Reddit Reddit reviews Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (3rd Edition) (Big Nerd Ranch Guides)

We found 21 Reddit comments about Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (3rd Edition) (Big Nerd Ranch Guides). Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (3rd Edition) (Big Nerd Ranch Guides)
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21 Reddit comments about Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (3rd Edition) (Big Nerd Ranch Guides):

u/D3FEATER · 699 pointsr/IAmA

The exact four books I read are:

Learning Obj-C

Learning Java

iOS Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide

Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide

However, I would now recommend learning Swift instead of Obj-C. At the time when I was looking into iOS books, good books on Swift were few and far between.

u/Earhacker · 5 pointsr/glasgow

JavaScript is weird, right enough, but it's the language of the web. If your idea involves a website, even a mobile web site, then JavaScript is the only way to go.

If your only target is Android devices, then you want Java. Java and JavaScript sound related, but they have nothing to do with each other. Java is a bit of a beast, and not the easiest thing to teach yourself, but it's the backbone of Android. It's also a hugely employable skill in Glasgow, with all the banks and financial services building their systems in Java or C# (Microsoft's own very similar version of Java).

CodeClan just opened in Glasgow in January. It's a 16-week course in software development, including modules in Java, Android and JavaScript, and the main purpose is not just to teach these things but to put people into jobs doing these things. It's not cheap and it's a full-time commitment, but it can be covered with a careers development loan and your job prospects on leaving are awesome. Full disclosure: I work here. Our next course starts in September.

If that's not for you, freeCodeCamp is a worldwide network of self-teaching coder newbies, and they have a Glasgow chapter that meets fairly regularly.

Apart from that, you're on your own. There are plenty of sources for learning JavaScript solo, but the best I've seen is JavaScript30. It doesn't start from scratch, so follow the Learn JavaScript track of Codecademy for the basics.

For Java, yeah there are freebie courses out there but they're mostly shite. I would recommend the books Head First Java followed by the Big Nerd Ranch Guide for Android.

u/rylexr · 5 pointsr/androiddev

First, welcome to the indie community! I'd recommend to start designing a small PoC. Grab some sheets of paper and start drawing your app's different views and interactions. The purpose of this is to clarify your ideas. At the beginning, that's all you need. Once you have something you think is "usable", then, just then, move to coding - it'll save you a lot of time. Just as a reference, I spent 7 months designing Memorigi 1.0 (no coding, just drawings).

​

How much programming you need? Well, there's no "right amount" IMO. If you want to go Java path, I recommend this book Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (https://www.amazon.com/Android-Programming-Ranch-Guide-Guides/dp/0134706056/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1551068980&sr=8-2). If however, you take Kotlin path this is my recommendation Kotlin in Action (https://www.amazon.com/Kotlin-Action-Dmitry-Jemerov/dp/1617293296).

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One last advice, start small, then grow from there. Don't try to have your app fully complete in one pass. It's a recipe for discouragement and disaster. DM me if at some point you feel stuck and I'll do my best to help you.

​

Cheers!

u/t0s · 3 pointsr/androiddev

A very good book and up to date since it was published earlier this year is :Big nerd ranch

u/BirthdayBuffalo · 3 pointsr/androidapps

If you're starting completely from scratch (no programming knowledge at all), then learn Java. Intro to Java Programming is a pretty good and in depth book. Chapters 1-13 should be good enough to get started with Java programming.

If you want something faster or just need a refresher, than the Java tutorials from TutorialsPoint could work.

Other wise, if you already know Java, the BNR Android Programming book is a really good book for Android programming. It covers a lot of topics; the basics all the way to the more advanced, real world applications.

The Android Developers site is incredibly useful as well. The training and API guide sections do a good job at explaining more specific things and some sections include code snippets.

The biggest hurdle for me when I started was just setting everything up. Installing Java and Android studio was a pain because all the hiccups. It's more stable and straight forward to install now though. I'm pretty sure the intro chapter in the BNR book covers installation as well.

u/Double_A_92 · 3 pointsr/learnprogramming

Buy an Android book and read that in class instead of following his bullsht.

Last time i checked this book was nice, if you are really interested: https://www.amazon.com/Android-Programming-Ranch-Guide-Guides/dp/0134706056

u/ImEasilyConfused · 3 pointsr/IAmA

From OP:

>The exact four books I read are:

>Learning Obj-C

>Learning Java

>iOS Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide

>Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide

>However, I would now recommend learning Swift instead of Obj-C. At the time when I was looking into iOS books, good books on Swift were few and far between.

From u/AlCapwn351 in regards to other sources to learn from:

>www.codeacademy.com is a great site for beginners (and it's free). It's very interactive. W3schools is good for learning stuff like JavaScript and HTML among other things.

>When you get stuck www.stackoverflow.com will be a lifesaver. Other than that, YouTube videos help and so do books. Oh and don't be afraid to google the shit out of anything and everything. I feel like an early programmers job is 90% google 10% coding.

>Edit:

>It's also good to look at other peoples code on GitHub so you can see how things work.

u/futureisathreat · 2 pointsr/cs50

My ultimate goal at the moment is to move into a digital nomad type role doing mobile development, preferably for Android.

So, my invisioned path from here is to buy or download some books on Android development and start learning. I've located what seems like a good source (of sources) for learning about Java/Android here, (taken from here)though I don't know because I haven't the links yet.

What is a good (and free) Java / Android Development courses online? Anyone have an opinion on Google's?

Does this path seem good? Should I be considering Java and Android Development the same thing? Thank you!

u/dogewatch · 2 pointsr/androiddev

You will need one or more, or some combination of these. Don't like the plethora of choices give you analysis paralysis, just pick one and stick with it for a while.

Videos/courses

  1. Android basics by Udacity -> graduate to Android Nanodegree
  2. Lynda Android path. You can access lydna for free with a library card.

    Course

  3. Recently updated (9/18) Android code labs + slides by Google

    Books

  4. Commons ware online book
  5. Professional Android
  6. Big Nerd Ranch
u/kishbi · 2 pointsr/androiddev

>ed? Well, there's no "right amount" IMO. If you want to go Java path, I recommend this book Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (
>
>https://www.amazon.com/Android-Programming-Ranch-Guide-Guides/dp/0134706056/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1551068980&sr=8-2
>
>). I

I'm glad that I read this comment.

u/tbramlett · 2 pointsr/learnprogramming

Android uses Java, which is an extremely versatile modern programming language. So it’s not at all a bad first language to learn. It’s also high-level enough to where it doesn’t use pointers which confuses some beginners.

I would check this book out: Android Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (3rd Edition) (Big Nerd Ranch Guides) https://www.amazon.com/dp/0134706056/

u/be54002 · 2 pointsr/androiddev

I knew more than enough Java to understand everything in the Big Nerd Ranch book, which is how I started learning Android. I probably couldn't just code anything I could think up (still can't), but having a good Java foundation makes it so much easier to understand all the Android docs and guides.

u/Natehhggh · 2 pointsr/cscareerquestions

I haven't gotten far into app development, It's been on my todo list for a while. But I've been planning on going through this youtube playlist (might be a bit old by now, not sure if there is anything more recent thats better) and I recently got the Big Nerd Ranch book for android development.  

Are you going to continue with your major in Computer Science at UNR, I've recently transferred there from Truckee Meadows Community College, and I feel like the courses required for it should be a good enough understanding to pick up app development easily.
 

edit: changed big nerd ranch link to 3rd edition

u/mxkep · 1 pointr/cscareerquestions

Android Programming from Big Nerd Ranch. Here's the link on Amazon.

u/MrFancyPant · 1 pointr/androiddev

I'm wondering how much Java would I need to know to start developing apps. I learned it during college as part of my program, but outside of that I haven't used it at all. I have a decent amount of understanding of the fundamental of programming (object oriented, polymorphism, etc). Would this be enough or should I consider getting some resource such as this book to brush up on it.

Also any thoughts on this book to learn android dev?

u/Velix007 · 1 pointr/computerscience