Reddit Reddit reviews BRS 3000T Stove Ultralight Backpacking Stove Titanium Camping Stove

We found 60 Reddit comments about BRS 3000T Stove Ultralight Backpacking Stove Titanium Camping Stove. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Backpacking & Camping Stoves & Grills
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BRS 3000T Stove Ultralight Backpacking Stove Titanium Camping Stove
Powerful and efficient,generates 2700W; Boils water quickly, about 2 minutes 58 seconds to boil 1L water. Rated gas consumption is around 140g per hour.Stable, even flame; Smooth flame adjustment.Super easy. Just flip those pot support legs out and twist the stove on your canister. Tip: make sure the control valve is fully turned off before twisting the stove on.This stove is suitable for lightweight backpacking when weight and size are more important than some features.If you're looking for a functional, ultralight canister stove, this is your stove. BRS-3000T stove and 110g canister can be nested into 750ml Pot perfectly. Ideal for backpackers. (package list: 1*BRS-3000T Stove+1* Pouch+1*O-Ring)BRS 3000T stove is extremely lightweight. It only weighs 25g. and extremely compact
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60 Reddit comments about BRS 3000T Stove Ultralight Backpacking Stove Titanium Camping Stove:

u/r_syzygy · 12 pointsr/CampingGear

Jetboils boil water better than almost anything. If you're eating freeze-dried mountain house meals or something, you can't really beat it. Otherwise, they're just like any other canister stove.

If you want something simple/light/cheap, you could get something like:

This BRS Stove and

This Ti pot or a bigger one for more people/larger meals

and a canister

u/CJOttawa · 7 pointsr/Ultralight

Or don't?

https://www.reddit.com/r/Ultralight/comments/58nlkz/what_gear_or_technique_did_you_buy_or_try_only_to/d91tmmf/

TL;DR: with a BRS-3000T, 25-gram, canister-top stove and a light-weight pot for boiling water, alcohol doesn't save you much weight on short trips, and on longer, un-resupplied trips, LPG wins.

See also: https://www.reddit.com/r/Ultralight/comments/5akas5/nifty_but_possibly_dangerous_refill_transfer_fuel/

EDIT - never have to check for "fire bans" with LPG either - the stoves have a shut-off valve and are typically exempt.

u/trifonpapahronis · 7 pointsr/camping

I have also heard great things about the $18 stove on Amazon from BRS

u/[deleted] · 6 pointsr/Ultralight

BRS Ultrlight Stove

Been using this for 2 years. nothing competes on size/weight/price.

u/cwcoleman · 6 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I rarely have a campfire while backcountry backpacking. (I also live in the PNW)
Like you said - there are often full-time or seasonal restrictions on fires. Other times it just isn't worth the effort to start one.

I do LOVE fires when car camping. Especially in official campsites where there is wood for sale and a metal fire pit.

----
I use a canister stove for cooking when backpacking. It's quick and easy. They are pretty cheap and light too.

My setup:

u/LoadSM5 · 6 pointsr/CampingGear

I've used pocket rockets and alcohol stoves for a good while. Lately I've been using the BSR Ulralight stove http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U. Really cheap and light if you go the canister stove route.
Any stove you use will need to kept steady and level. As long as the canister isn't rocking you shouldn't have an issue.

u/nept_r · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

This really depends on your gear. The biggest weight savers are firstly bringing less (such as getting rid of extra clothes, knives, tablets etc) but then getting a lighter tent, sleeping bag, and pack. If you're good on those or can't lose weight there, next up could definitely be the cookset. A cheap light titanium pot and a light stove can make a big difference. Far down the list is tent stakes, imho. If you have cheap heavy stakes, sure swap them out. But there are bigger fish to fry if you're a novice.

u/MrClahn · 5 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

I've spent over 2 months with one had no complaints, and plan to take it on my thru starting next week (Ahh!). Just have to be more careful when you're cooking and watch out for winds/make a good windscreen for it. The biggest downside to them is you can't use them in a tent vestibule in the rain.

If you just want a light/cheap stove aren't set on alcohol, there's the BRS 3000, sub 1oz canister stove http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/ohnovangogh · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

This is an option if you want to shave some weight replacing the pocket rocket.

u/OrganicRolledOats · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I haven't hiked the JMT so I can't comment on your clothing system but here are some general thoughts:

Ditch the headlamp for a sub 1oz USB rechargeable flashlight $30

Ditch the Leatherman for a Victorinox Swiss Army Classic $15

Ditch the paper maps and use Guthook's since you already have it. $Free

Ditch the Sea to Summit X-Cup and I wouldn't bother with the hot lips either $Free

Replace the trash compactor bag with a Fumigation bag $2.49

Ditch the compass $Free

Replace the stove with the BRS Stove $15

All this should save you about ~11 ounces for ~$63.

If you are worried about fitting in the superior 35 I would take a look at the MLD Prophet $195. This should be plenty of room and will save you an additional 18+ ounces.





u/travellingmonk · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Half a pound? I'm not UL and that's still way too heavy for backpacking.

I've got a Kovea Supalite Ti, just over 2oz. Works great, replaces my MSR Pocket Rocket.

I've also got a BRS 3000T which is about an ounce- it's a great tiny stove if you're just heating up water in a mug. Can't really cook anything on it though, if I want to actually cook food I'll bring along the Supalite.

u/chopyourown · 4 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Sterno is a terrible fuel for backpacking. I'd use a canister fuel stove. A cheap option is the BRS 3000 - link here.

An alternative would be to build your own alcohol stove, which is easy but slightly more finicky. Follow the rough directions [here] (http://andrewskurka.com/2011/how-to-make-a-fancy-feast-alcohol-stove/)

u/BlueJeans4LifeBro · 4 pointsr/camping

Biolite is like the heaviest, most complicated and expensive stove on the market and for all the reviews (search reddit for reviews) it is a very niche product. I could never see myself owning one. I think it's niche is if you're going to be sitting in 1 place for a long time, with no access to sunlight and needing to recharge your phone every 2 days.


What are your needs for a stove. What conditions will you be using it in? Very cold weather or just warmer weather?


Here is a very inexpensive and ultralight canister style stove to give you an idea of what is possible: https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/NotSure098475029 · 4 pointsr/camping

Here is what I think is the best stove for backpacking and it is $12.

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U


Add a fuel canister to that, a cheap pot, a mini bic lighter and a spoon and your kitchen is complete.


Rent the Big3 from REI (sleeping bag, tent, pack). Buy the Sawyer Mini water filter for $25 and use Smartwater bottles to store water. Take your existing clothes (no cotton) and use your existing shoes.

u/YourBrainOnJazz · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

This is lighter then the micro rocket and much cheaper then both the pocket rocket and micro rocket.

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

Others on the Ultralight subreddit have recommended this stove as well.

u/pto892 · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

The quality is all pretty similar. The real difference is in feature set and ability to control the flame-for example there's a world of difference in flame control between a Primus Omnilite and a MSR Whisperlite even though both are high quality products with a proven track record of reliability.

Some of the cheap canister stoves are also pretty good quality, since there just isn't too much engineering that's needed to make one. The BRS stove is a good example of such. These things are really just a screw on valve assembly and a burner, not much else is needed.

u/metarchaeon · 4 pointsr/Ultralight

Your stove is fairly heavy, you can save 9 oz with a BRS3000 (.9 oz) and a light aluminum or Ti pot. This is the cheapest way to lighten up if you want to stay with a cannister. A DIY ethanol stove is cheaper and lighter still.

Do you need such a heavy battery?

Are you bringing a phone?

u/defygravty · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

OK, here is a brain dump of whatever comes into my mind. Just hoping to spark your memory so don't get mad if I say a bunch of stuff you already know...

Put all the pieces into a lighterpack.com account and checkout r/Ultralight before you buy (head over there and burn down the sidebar reading list and the incomplete-wiki, it's worth it).

Is that Osprey really 70 L? That's huge. Probably weighs a ton, what are you bringing that fills up 70 L on a 3-5 day summer trip? A 50 L beer keg? Maybe you have some sweet luxury items that take up a lot of space in the pack, but I'd drop the volume on the pack to at least 50 L. If you can manage it, Try a Ultimate Direction Fastpack 30. But if you just can't get your volume that small, get what works. Weight is an issue too, in frameless packs the straps are uncomfortable over 30 lbs, sometimes less. But if you make some smart choices right now, you shouldn't bust 30 lbs. (It's also smart to get the rest of the gear first to get an idea of how much volume you'll need in your pack and if you'll need a frame.)

Research quilt vs sleeping bag. Quilts are big these days unless you are a crazy sleeper. Enlightened Equipment is the shiz. I've bought 4 quilts and made 3 DIY and EE are the best I've tried. EE also sells a synthetic quilt called the prodigy which I use in the summers or as a layer in the winters. I hear that Katabatic quilts are truly the best if the price tag doesn't scare you away. And a super cheap, but quality option though on aliexpress, it's buy at your own risk. Worked for me last time, doesn't mean it will next time.

Massdrop is selling a skinny UL static V (and the insulated verion) right now for cheap. (I own the insulated option and bought it from massdrop.) But there's a lighter not-as-skinny pad called a Thermorest Neoair Xlite. Also the sea to shining sea ultralight pad gets high marks. So look at those, see what other pads are popping on r/ultralight, the balance the weight and costs to your preference. (Assuming you know about r-values and what your needs will be in Maine/Vermont. I'm guessing spring is a little cold so maybe r=~4 in the early spring or high altitude?)

Nemo tents are great. If you're only camping spring/summer I'd get a much lighter weight tarp tent. Like 3 lbs or less including stakes/cords (and footprint if your tent has a bathtub floor).

11-14 oz MSR Whisperlite is awesome. Stoves are pretty personal, it's best to go with one you trust. MSR is probably the right choice for you. I use a tiny 2oz stove and a homemade windscreen. My stove is finicky and too small if you're cooking for 2 or more. However, there's a whole mess of stoves between the 2oz and 14 oz which might still cover you and save you a few ounces or half a pound. Like the Kovea Spider which I also have, and use in the cold (gas liquefies and fuel can must be inverted, so I need a freestanding stove with a tube). I'm personally biased against the jetboil because of how much space it takes in my pack, but I own 2. They are fast, good for groups. Again the MSR is NOT a bad choice.

You also need a cook pot. Titanium is a waste of money, find a cheap Aluminum one for the same results. Like the olicamp ones, or if you want a real lid, you'll have to spend more (the metal lids cost way more for some odd reason).

Water filtration. Everybody ravs over the Sawyer Squeeze and I guess I'm out of the loop having never tried it. Fretting about making sure my filter doesn't freeze seems like a source of anxiety. I'll try it eventually though. I like the hand pump water filters. I rock an MSR hyperflow. And if I'm in a big group, I'll break out my Katadyn 6L Gravity Filter.

Get a down jacket from costco or sams for 20$, if you're camping in it, you'll wear it out so no use spending a ton there. (Down packs small and won't take up nearly any pack space)

Get a headlamp, I prefer blackdiamond or Fenix. For BD this image sums it up very nicely. For fenix there's a variety but I am currently using the HL55 (900 lumens). Again look at the weights, but also look at the battery requirements and the longevity/efficiency. Find what you like.

Ok my brain is dumped. Hopefully I hit on something worth your time. If I were you, I'd go as cheap as possible, then put the savings into funding your travel for hiking or buying a kayak. Random, I know, but having blown tons of money on gear I feel like there's quality for a good price if you look for it. And using the extra money to break into a new hobby opens the door to a potentially mind altering experience. Especially a related hobby like kayaking, fishing, snowshoeing, rock climbing, diving (though this one is lots of money), or whatever's clever.

u/jcb272 · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Stove: BSR Ultralight stove

Spoon: Toaks Ti Long handle

Pot: Toaks Ti 750ml

Fire: Bic Mini

Seasoning: Tabasco in 30ml plastic dripper bottle

Water bottle: Smart Water 1L (x2)

Purification: Boil (winter) Sawyer Squeeze (other 3 seasons)

Meals: Mountain House, Packit Gourmet, SPAM singles, trail mix

I eat right out of the bag for the dehydrated meals

u/alaskaj1 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

The brs 3000 also gets a lot of mentions for inexpensive backpacking stoves.

I will say this though, it is nice to have a quality backpacking stove like the pocket rocket 2. I have both the etekcity and the pocket rocket. The pocket rocket feels sturdier and has bigger arms. Here is a photo of the same pot on the PR and etekcity. Those little arms on the etekcity just kind of flop back and forth too. I dont have any experience with the brs 3000 though

u/7861279527412aN · 3 pointsr/Ultralight
u/bacon_boy_away · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

So is propane the best for weight right now besides alcohol? I love my white gas! Is this the stove you have for solo? https://www.amazon.ca/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

I'm leaving for my solo wct in two days, Tuesday May 7!

u/lpmarshall · 3 pointsr/JMT
  • For around $50 you could get a Toaks 700ml pot ($40, 2.3 oz) and a BRS stove ($15, 1oz) and drop about 1lb.

  • For around $200 you could get a 20 degree HG Econ Burrow quilt and save 2.5lb (wide for ground sleeper).

  • Your big 3 are heavy in general but as you stated you aren't really to invest heavily in that.

  • I'd personally drop the solar panel and kindle and save another pound.

  • I'd add bug spray if you do not have it. And I assume you are probably taking a phone.

  • There are a few others areas like clothing that could be lighter, but if took the above suggestions you could drop 4.5 lbs for about $250
u/GarlandOutdoors · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

I know you wanted the rubberized handles, but that limits your options significantly. I'd say apply the rubber yourself with a tool handle dip.
BRS Stove - $16
Snow Peak Trek 900 - $45
Rustoleum Grip Dip $17.50

That leaves a solid $10. You can have them pick you up a canister or two!
I've been using both the BRS Stove and Snow Peak Trek 900 and they both work great. Now, if you have a windy situation, you may need to build a windscreen or get a MSR Pocket Rocket.

​

u/prototofu · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Honestly, if weight is priority, I would just grab a BRS stove. Test it a couple of times, and if there are issues, buy another.


I'm not keen on the waste of doing this, but I've got one and it has been working perfectly over the course of half a year or so. Just keep in mind that it won't perform as well in wind relative to your candidates. But boy is it tiny.

u/iskosalminen · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

As a tip, just don't bring alcohol stove on the PCT. Fire bans are everywhere and you don't want to be that guy who sets the trail on fire.

Get the BRS-3000t and ~650ml titanium pot, like Toaks 650ml pot or Evernew Ultralight Deep pot.

More than likely you'll go stoveless at some point.

u/ben_gardner · 3 pointsr/camping

I have a bunch of them - MSR pocket rocket, Kovea Titanium stove, 2 cheap ones off Amazon. Only difference is the name brand ones feel more solid. If I could buy and try another, it would be the BRS stove, http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U


I also use the Kovea LPG adaptor so I can use propane cans with these stoves when car camping: http://www.amazon.com/Kovea-LPG-Adaptor-Small-Silver/dp/B00CFPISZW


Get one without an igniter, as they all go bad sooner or later. Just bring a lighter to light the gas.

u/sargon2 · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

You could consider the BRS-3000T stove instead of the MicroRocket -- it's cheaper and lighter.

For the pot consider the SnowPeak Trek 700 -- I have one and it fits a canister well.

u/voodoodollbaby · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

You look pretty solid, honestly.

How much night hiking do you do? Are you sure you need the headlamp? You could probably get away with something like this. It's the one I use, weighs like 9g

Also, how attached are you to your jetboil? Have you tried the BSR? Only weighs 25g, uses the same fuel. Your pot should fit as well.

u/CedarWolf · 2 pointsr/Shoestring

Hey, you can also make quite a bit of your own gear if you're feeling up to the challenge. Check out /r/myog for more information about that.

Fancy, fold up cook kits can run you $20 to $70 or more, plus fuel, but you can also make your own cook kits real easily from soda cans, cat food cans, and grease pots. You can get one from Walmart for $7, and an aluminum pot handle from any outdoors store for a couple of bucks. Here's a basic one for $4, but you can find them for $2, too. You can also use a folded bit of aluminum foil as a wind break around your stove.

The best part about those is not only are they light and cheap to replace, but your can stove and your aluminum handle should fit neatly inside your grease pot. Depending on how tall you made your windbreak, you might be able to fit it inside your pot, too. If not, it's just aluminum foil; it'll fold up.

It really depends on what your budget and your conditions are. You can grab a cheap, fairly light tent for $50 or $60. (If you want to go crazy cheap, there are $20 tents that you can set up between two trees or support with trekking poles.)

I wouldn't suggest depending on a cheap tent for the long term, but use them as something you can test out, beat up, and not be too heartbroken over. They're just the basics.

Woot.com often has sales on camping gear, including backpacks, light blankets, sleeping bags, and hammocks. Decent backpacking hammocks usually run about $15 to $25 online, don't stress about getting one that's really expensive and has a lot of features. They're pretty much all parachute hammocks. Worry about investing in the expensive stuff later.

My advice, though? Don't stress about your gear at first. Get some cheap starter gear, read about it, test it, make a plan. Drop on by /r/trailmeals and find some simple recipes that you like. Find a nice state park nearby and look at their maps. Find a camp site and see what's there: Do you have trees available for hammocks? Is there a fire pit already set up? Do you have wood available for fuel? (You probably won't need much more than your cook pot and utensils if your campsite has a firepit with a grill, for example.)

Make your plan and execute it. Let people know where you're going, and what you're up to. Invite a friend if you can. Put your comfy shoes on, toss your crap in a backpack, go out for a weekend, and test your gear. Get some experience with your new stuff, see what works for you and what doesn't. Learn where you want to focus if you want to shed weight, and check your reviews. Go to places like REI: they'll often let you see or set up any tent you're interested in, in advance, so you can check out how easy or how difficult it might be on the trail, in the dark. That last part's important. You can have the fanciest tent in the world, but it doesn't mean a hill of beans if you can't set it up in the dark. (Because at some point, you will be setting up your tent in the dark, in the rain, in some sort of adverse conditions. It happens. Be prepared.)

Practice with your gear, learn your gear. Learn your limits and your preferences.
Knowledge is easy to acquire, useful to have, and doesn't weigh anything, so pack a lot of it.

You're gonna want to get that experience on your cheap stuff, so you can learn and make mistakes without ruining some high-end piece of kit that's really gonna cost you. Get your experience in and add the expensive, fancier stuff as you go. I like to focus on pack, shelter, and shoes. They're going to be your main sources of weight and your big comfort items. Bad shoes and ill-fitting packs hurt. Insufficient shelters suck. Upgrading those early on, or starting with some mid-tier gear if you can afford it, is handy.

And if you decide that maybe this isn't for you, that's okay, too. You can back out without having dropped several thousand dollars on all the latest gear. It's easy to spend hundreds on fancy gear. Try to avoid falling into that trap.

It's probably ultralight heresy, but I often bring a cheap paperback book with me. Sure, it's sort of heavy for a luxury item that I don't need, and if it falls in a creek then my book is destroyed; I get that. However, for me, you can't beat hanging out in a comfy hammock under the trees with a good book. That serenity is why I go hiking and backpacking in the first place.

I also tell myself that if things ever go incredibly sour, a cheap book or a trail journal is also a good source of tinder and toilet paper. Not that I would do such things, but if I was ever stranded somewhere and I had to, the option is there. Similarly, you can signal other hikers or other people in your party if you have a trail journal - just pull out a page and leave a note for them.

Oh, and it's also wise to bring a couple of trash bags along with you. Get the big, kitchen sized ones.

They're great for:

| | | |
|:--:|:--:|:--:|
| holding trash | separating wet clothes | good laundry bags |
| dirty shoe mat | tent hole repair | emergency ponchos |
| emergency pack covers | food bag | extra warmth |

------

Oh, and remember the simple principles:

Pack it in, pack it out. - Any gear (or people) you bring, you're responsible for getting it (or them) back out.

Leave no trace. - You have a responsibility to leave your campsite as you found it, or better than you found it. Any trash you bring, you pack it right back out with you. If someone before you has been an asshole and has left a bunch of trash all over the campsite, try to clean it up, even if you can't pack it all out.

Hike your own hike. - This means that you can have all the excellent advice in the world, but how you do your hike is up to you. No one else can tell you how to live your life, and if you want to carry a little extra weight for a luxury item, or if you prefer a bit of kit that isn't quite in vogue this season, or if you can't afford the high-end, cuben fiber this or that, don't stress about it. You're out there to enjoy yourself, focus on that.

Be prepared. - This is the Boy Scout motto. Things will happen that you're not going to expect. Don't go overboard and don't get too crazy about it, but have a plan and know how to execute it. Learn the area you'll be at and know what sorts of conditions to expect. If you get hurt, know who you can call. If you're in a state or national park, those phone numbers are always on the freebie trail maps they provide - grab one at the ranger station or the trail head and keep it with you or keep a photo of it on your phone. Are you going to need extra batteries? Is your phone going to have service? If you can, sign up for a first aid course or a trail-specific first aid course. That's information you'll want to know if you ever need it.

u/dfsw · 2 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

This ultralight canister stove has been making the rounds lately, I've been pretty impressed with it. http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/zerostyle · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

A few items that look heavy:

  • compressible pillow @ 9oz is super heavy, but if it's the only thing that will help you sleep that's ok (-6oz for inflatable)
  • could use a BRS stove that's lighter, but the pocket rocket is fine (-2oz)
  • could go to a smaller power bank (6700mAh around 4oz) to save 2oz or so

    Also, as I reiterate to everyone, lyme disease is VERY rampant in the northeast. Don't by shy about packing more DEET or picaridin. Soak all of your clothes in permethrin before the trip, particularly socks.
u/SupportingKansasCity · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Out of convenience, I usually use an artisan instant coffee like Voila.

If I really want actual coffee grounds, I’ll bring the grounds in a plastic bag and use a tea strainer. It works well. Just get water near boil, drop in tea strainer with grounds, lightly stir. This is the exact one I use: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075K57B73/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_UUA6BbJCMDBJN

As for a stove, I use this ridiculously light and cheap Chinese stove. Quantity is not great but it’s dirt cheap and I’ve never had one show up not functional. Some will leak gas for an instant when you screw the stove on (more than you’d expect), some don’t. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_2VA6BbGGSBA02

u/izlib · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

I've had good luck with Toaks products. You can hold the handle without it being too hot, even with boiling water. This should fill your requirements:

https://www.toaksoutdoor.com/collections/pot95/products/pot-550-l

For a stove I use this popular item:

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U

Super light, heats water up just fine.

u/WahFuDrumSong · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Ever heard of the BRS 3000T?

u/forrey · 2 pointsr/Israel

In that case, I'd recommend going as light-weight as you can. A set like the one in the photo will be fine for car camping, but too heavy for backpacking, especially multi-day. Here's what I take when backpacking:

Toaks titanium 700ml pot

BRS ultralight gas stove

Toaks titanium folding spork

And a 4 or 8oz gas canister like this one, depending on how long I'll be going for. Don't get the gas canisters online though, get them at a camping or outdoors store, they'll be cheaper.

Honestly, that's all I need for solo backpacking. If you're backpacking with other people, you would maybe need a bigger pot (like 800 or 900ml), but I prefer to use the smaller one and make batches of food if need be. If I'm going car camping, I can bring more stuff as needed (cups, mugs, bowls, etc).

You don't need to get the exact items I have, but basically just ask for a simple, ideally ultralight gas canister stove, cooking pot (ideally titanium, not stainless steel), and a lightweight spork.

I also don't think you need tupperware unless you're car camping. When I backpack, I bring primarily dried foods that require not much cooking (asian style noodles, oatmeal, couscous, etc), and augment with some packaged tuna or chicken (in a bag, not a can) and spices. You can browse through /r/trailmeals for inspiration on cooking while camping.

u/gooberlx · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Last year I picked up this stove. Light as all getout and works well.

I also purchased zelph's fancee feast stove, but have yet to try it out at high elevation. This guy swears by his custom one though.

u/BecauseSometimesY · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Olicamp mug/pot $12, 4oz weight, 20oz capacity

BRS 3000T Burner $15, 25g. It really is an amazing little micro stove.

Jetboil Flash LID This lid fits the Olicamp mug/pot perfectly! $6, plus shipping. About 1oz

A 100g canister fits perfectly inside, plus the BRS and a bic. The jetboil lid fits securely and keeps everything together.

Ditch the canteen.. carry your water in 1L and/or 750ml smartwater/lifewater bottles. Seriously. It’s durable, and weighs significantly less.

u/GrandmaBogus · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Titanium mug and a mini gas burner? Then buy your own butane in Reykjavik.

The smallest 100g canister will be good for 15-20 cups of smoking hot coffee.

u/echodeltabravo · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

Someone here in r/ultralight said the BRS 3000 simmers well. I have one but have not tried it. However, for $16 it might be worth buying and trying out yourself.

u/makinbacon42 · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Cooking over a stove is much easier than on a fire, you have a lot more control over what and how hot you can cook, saying that I'm often known to bring steaks on the first night of a trip and cook them on the fire.

Assuming you're talking about hiking trips, if you're after something thats cheap and will do the trick there's this $9 stove on Amazon there's also the BRS3000T which IMO is a better stove.

Cookware is going to depend on what you're wanting to cook

Currently my setup is the BRS-3000T, TOAKS Ti Light 650mL titanium pot, Sea to Summit Long Spoon and a little foil windshield. I also have a Jetboil Minimo, MSR Whisperlite International too, but for just starting out I wouldn't go with either of those.

u/gedster314 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

I have the BSR one off Amazon. I actually got mine from BuyGeek flash sale for $9.99, free shipping. Took 2 weeks to get here from a China. It's been a pretty good stove for me.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00NNMF70U/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1522032785&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=bsr+stove&dpPl=1&dpID=318GiUmpQkL&ref=plSrch

u/mobile_monster_ · 1 pointr/PacificCrestTrail
u/ewolin · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

The three stoves below have worked great for me.

My current favorite is the BRS top-of-canister stove:
https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U. Extremely light, seems sturdy enough.

For a more substantial remote canister stove I use the FireMaple FMS 117t: https://www.amazon.com/FMS-117T-Titanium-Outdoor-Camping-Equipment/dp/B00UX07EQU.

I also use alcohol stoves, Trail Designs Caldera Cone: https://www.traildesigns.com/products/caldera-cone-system

I have many other stoves, I turn them on once in a while for nostalgia sake or use them car/kayak camping. I used a Svea for decades (fantastic stove, but too heavy now), also my MSR Expedition stove for winter. I use my Optimus 111B when I need a blowtorch to heat really large pots (e.g. boiling a dozen ears of corn). I could go on and on...

u/Vapour78 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Stove-Ignition/dp/B00ENDROMW/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1454174592&sr=8-4&keywords=Cannister+stove

Super cheap and works pretty well.

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1454175219&sr=8-1&keywords=Brs-25

I picked up a brs-25 earlier this week (when it was shipping from the US instead of China) and it's a cool 0.9 oz stove that runs $10-$18 if you can find it in stock (or are willing to wait for shipping from china.)

Massdrop has nice deals on klymit insulated static v lite pads every month or so. Usually around $55 shipped and 19 oz with a decent r rating.

u/gnosticpostulant · 1 pointr/camping

I'm an ultralighter and have been keeping an eye on this...

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

Lightest in the world (less than 1oz) titanium stove, and only ~$16. Reviews on it sound pretty decent.

u/DavidHikinginAlaska · 1 pointr/CampingGear

But it's become so popular on Amazon and eBay that now there are sellers with "BRS-3000T" in the description or title selling an entirely different small stove that weighs twice as much and, in one type I tried, conducted so much heat to the stem that the valve geometry changed and stopped the gas flow until it cooled of.


Here's one on Amazon that has (at least has a photo of) a real BRS-3000T:https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=asc_df_B00NNMF70U/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=198072135009&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16301542988954434560&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033901&hvtargid=pla-317875287747&psc=1#customerReviews and the price looks right (currently $17-$19, it was $13 several years ago).


Here's a listing on Amazon for a "BRS-3000T" that isn't. That brass stem is both a warning sign and part of the problem (it conducts too much heat downward). You'd think "How can you go wrong for $6?", but you can. A stove that shuts off after 2-3 minutes is not only super annoying but also potentially VERY dangerous because once it's cooled off, it will vent unburned gas through the stove head: https://www.ebay.com/i/273601044072?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=273601044072&targetid=595076215808&device=c&mktype=pla&googleloc=9033901&poi=&campaignid=6470636535&mkgroupid=77538519077&rlsatarget=pla-595076215808&abcId=1140476&merchantid=118868785&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1uaEj8um5QIVj_hkCh2nCwTLEAQYAyABEgI_rvD_BwE

u/98PercentChimp · 1 pointr/CampingGear

If you want lightweight and small, you can't beat the BRS 3000T. It's also cheap, too. You can also get it on Aliexpress for a few bucks cheaper if you don't mind waiting longer to get it.

u/benlucky13 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

but less than half the price for us cheap bastards. and has it's own source of ignition

u/farbrortumm · 1 pointr/PacificCrestTrail

You might want to check out the BRS-3000t as well:

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/bennettpena · 1 pointr/trailmeals

I use these:

GSI Outdoors Halulite Boiler Cooking Pot, 1.1-Liter https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GP1GSAO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_gGI0CbV08N5W5

BRS Outdoor Camping Gas Cooking Stove Portable Ultralight Burner 25g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_HFI0Cb57SJ66E

Total weight: 135g or 4.76oz; Total cost: $47

You can get stuff that weighs less but I’m cheap.

u/keananmusic · 1 pointr/Ultralight

The REI Magma 850 Down Jacket is on sale for 50% off right now (13.75 oz) I got the same one without the hood when it was available and have loved it so far. This is nerdy as hell but you could get this dope glow in the dark multi purpose swiss army knife and save some weight. Get the BRS Stove and save a couple ounces. You could probably get by with the Anker 13000. Don't know what your sit pad is but the GG 1/8" Foam Pad is super light. I emailed GG and they said the pads would be available soon

u/Meowmeowmeouch · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Ubens BRS Ultralight Camping Gas Stove Outdoor Burner Cooking Stove 25g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_43EPybPPWPHMC

I bought this and it's fine. Used a handful of times.

u/_BALL-DONT-LIE_ · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Backpacking is what I love above all else, happy to help.

Finding a local Facebook Group or forum is definitely great advice, they're usually the best resources for learning about places to go/conditions to expect/anything specific to your area, plus find some people to tag along with. Starting out with day hikes is also totally the right thing to do, it will help give you a feel for moving through the woods. You could also combine this with car camping to familiarize yourself with your gear and with cooking/sleeping/etc. outside with a little less commitment than a backpacking trip.

I'd recommend /r/Ultralight over BackpackingLight, which is not particularly active and of much poorer quality than it was a few years ago, IMO. /r/Ultralight is quite welcoming/helpful and pretty active these days. I don't always agree with him, but Andrew Skurka is a well known hiker/adventurer who is also a great resource (both his website and his book). I think he is more approachable for beginners than a lot of others.

I disagree with /u/ImAtleastTwelve, at least to a certain degree, on cost. It certainly is not a cheap hobby by any means (especially considering even in great outdoors cities you're still almost certainly going to need to drive decent distances), but having a fairly light setup with solid gear doesn't have to be exorbitantly expensive—at least relative to say, fashion or photography. I could write endlessly about all kinds of gear, but just taking the example of stoves. You can get a little stove that screws onto a gas cansiter and weighs about an ounce for under 20 bucks. Startup costs can be high because there is quite a bit of gear you need, but it doesn't have to be too crazy. Also, it's a popular activity—lots of used gear (I rarely buy anything new) and people to borrow from out there.

And like he said, it's totally possible to do any number of amazing trips with whatever gear you can scrape together. The gear is a means to an end with backpacking, and all you need is enough to survive somewhat comfortably before you're ready to go outside and enjoy yourself. Everything after that is either making it more comfortable or extending your limits.

u/maxillo · 1 pointr/trailmeals

And remember you can just bring the bits you need. I like mine better for the weight actually, and have 2 different kits:


https://www.reddit.com/r/CampingGear/comments/2h32ru/picked_these_up_at_the_store_for_1495_and_1995/

I reeally like them and when i go by myself i just take the small one, and when 3 people I take them all and 2 stoves. I have an older pocket Rocket clone but got this little baby a few months ago for $10 or 11 bucks:

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

I just try to be cheap thrifty so I do tend to look for sales and "clones". My buddy just bought the whole kit he needed for JMT and is in over 3 grand. My kit is pretty good and I am in for maybe $500-600.

I can always go back and buy the super expensive gram saving thing if I find I want to loose more weight from my pack down the road. But i figure at this point a diet will do more for trail weight than fancy gear.

u/oreocereus · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Way too heavy. My cooker is something like this (it might even be the same thing) https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U

It weights 45g. You don't need a case for it either, I just put it inside my pot and make sure there are some socks or a buff around it so it doesn't stab a hole in my pack/other stuff.

u/rambotoad · 1 pointr/CampingGear

This used to be my go-to stove until I discovered the BRS3000T. Weighs less than an ounce and functions quite well for an ultralight $17 stove.

BRS Outdoor Camping Gas Cooking Stove Portable Ultralight Burner 25g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_E-FJAbMW831GN