Reddit Reddit reviews Cascade Mountain Tech Trekking Poles - Carbon Fiber Strong Adjustable Hiking or Walking Sticks - Lightweight Quick Adjust Locks - 1 Set (2 Poles), Green

We found 39 Reddit comments about Cascade Mountain Tech Trekking Poles - Carbon Fiber Strong Adjustable Hiking or Walking Sticks - Lightweight Quick Adjust Locks - 1 Set (2 Poles), Green. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Trekking Poles
Camping & Hiking Equipment
Outdoor Recreation
Sports & Outdoors
Cascade Mountain Tech Trekking Poles - Carbon Fiber Strong Adjustable Hiking or Walking Sticks - Lightweight Quick Adjust Locks - 1 Set (2 Poles), Green
HIGH QUALITY STRONG VALUE – Poles are built with 100% carbon fiber. User friendly for beginners and strong enough for thru-hikers. Strong enough to withstand the pressure and the impact of any terrainLIGHT WEIGHT & COMPACT POLES – 7. 8 oz. Or less than a pound - our carbon fiber poles provide hikers, walkers, back packers, campers and many more The best option for a light weight strong pole.QUICK LOCK & EXTENDABLE- Need to adjust your pole height when trekking up a hill, or a downward slope? Our quick lock will support you during all your adventures, It is easy use and Reliable for holding the pole at the desired height ranging from 26”- 54”COMFORTABLE CORK GRIP - Cork grips provide exceptional comfort, lower the vibration as you step, and wicks away sweat. Our poles also include tungsten carbide tips and adjustable wrist straps. Bonus tip kit includes: snow basket, boots, small rubber feet.WE STAND BEHIND OUR BRAND- Let us know if we can help you with your trekking needs or replace any parts under. Our poles were designed to fit the needs of women, men, and kids hiking trips. Try our poles out for your next adventure!
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39 Reddit comments about Cascade Mountain Tech Trekking Poles - Carbon Fiber Strong Adjustable Hiking or Walking Sticks - Lightweight Quick Adjust Locks - 1 Set (2 Poles), Green:

u/psychedelicgulch · 16 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

Packs- Your pack is usually recommended to be one of the last things you pick up. That being said the Osprey Exos is a great pack and one of the staple packs you'll see. Wait until you get all of your gear and then go to REI or another outfitter and see how big of one you think you'll need.

Sleeping Bags- It generally won't get too cold so you can get away with a 30 or 40 degree bag. Right at the start of your trip it may be a little brisk so just have an extra fleece on hand. A lot of people like the Enlightened Equipment Revelation quilts. They're great and lightweight, but expensive and some side sleepers don't like them.

Tents- There's millions of options, Big Agnes, Six Moon Designs, HMD, and tons more I can think of. The Big Agnes Fly Creek UL 2 is popular and lightweight, its going for $265 online right now. If that's too expensive I'd say go for the Six Moon Designs Skyscape Scout for $125.

Trekking Poles- These aren't super important unless your tent requires them. Best ones I've seen for a decent price: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XM0YGW8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Cooking- You can go the alcohol stove route, I don't like it because you'll end up carrying more weight in alcohol than with a regular stove. The BRS 3000t is probably the lightest and cheapest stove you can find. For pots just a simple titanium pot will work.

Good luck on your hike!

u/minusfive · 9 pointsr/Ultralight

At that point you're probably paying the same or only saving a couple of bucks from a direct Amazon order, so probably not worth it.

https://smile.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Carbon-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

u/FeedMeCletus · 7 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I find the flick locks to be easier to use.

I bought these a while ago, and really like them for the price. Andrew Skurka recommends them as his value pick, if that matters to you

u/ThunderousApache · 6 pointsr/Ultralight

I assume you and /u/fire_0 mean this one? Because it's $45 right now, and Camelcamelcamel tells me it's only been $40.47 at its lowest.

There's another one that was $30 but it's a twist-lock model.

This is on the .com version, the Canadian version is just....ridiculous.

u/FroggattEdge · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I got the highly recommended Cascade Mountain Tech poles from Amazon here

u/cwcoleman · 5 pointsr/CampingGear

What price range are you looking for? Do your parents generally spend over $100 on your for gifts?

​

Here are some basic ideas:

  1. Headlamp: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077Z3LNX9
  2. Stove: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07L5S65HR
  3. Pot: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BVOME9Y
  4. First Aid Kit: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000G7WRBC
  5. Spoon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0045UA8G2
  6. Sleeping Pad: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BZ3C900/
  7. Water Filter: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005EHPVQW
  8. Water Bladder 1: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000AQYY38
  9. Water Bladder 2: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000J2KEGY
  10. Water Bladder 3: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07RC9BZ4G
  11. Trowel: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BFHT4P3
  12. Trekking Poles: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8
  13. Battery Pack: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0194WDVHI
  14. Socks: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074ZR5SJQ
  15. Buff: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BJ3N9MF

    You could also add basic stuff like batteries, lighters, power bars, trash bags, first aid supplies and other consumables.

    ​

    Other items are harder to pick without know more details...

  • Tent - do you want to sleep in that hammock, or want a tent too?
  • Sleeping bag - 30F or 40F bag may be goo enough for Texas 3-seasons?
  • Backpack - want to keep the one you have, or upgrade?
  • Footwear - boots or trail runners?
  • Shirts / Pants - sizes and styles you prefer?
  • Jackets - need waterproof? puffy warm? other?
u/admckillip · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I was reluctant to try trekking poles because I thought I didn't need them and I had been hiking for years. To try out poles I snagged some Cascade Mountain Tech and I now really like them. Life savers for elevation and spiderwebs, haha.

For a cheap, but decent pair to try you could grab [these] (https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Trekking-Climbing/dp/B01055BZDA/ref=pd_sbs_468_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01055BZDA&pd_rd_r=AHB8XKJMJ4XVHCWDZ7TE&pd_rd_w=QLBlN&pd_rd_wg=UGPPr&psc=1&refRID=AHB8XKJMJ4XVHCWDZ7TE) ($20) and see if you like them. Cascade Mountaion Tech are generally considered the best cheap trekking poles, and you can upgrade if you do? I went middle of the road on those up above, and they're good enough to not upgrade, but saving 5-7 oz on mine with better poles would have been nice weight savings on something you pick up and put down constantly (way more than 5-7 oz in your pack). SO, my thought is, if you're not sure. By super cheap, and if you like trekking poles, buy nice and light YMMV.

I had the HV UL2 and ended up returning it. It was pretty darn nice, but I wanted something that was lighter, felt a bit more durable, and more flexible in terms of options for pitching so I grabbed the [Tarptent Saddle] (https://www.tarptent.com/saddle2.html). When I'm using the inner, on the saddle I feel ZERO need for a footprint, but I did with the Copper Spur, though you could always just repair... I also like that if there are no bugs I can pitch just the Saddle Outer Tarp with a ground sheet and total weight would be about 20 Oz. Either tent are pretty good options though.

EDIT: Added context.

u/packtips · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Try to get a pair with flip locks, instead of twist locks. Twist is the old tech, doesn't work well, and you'll wish you had flip if you put them side by side.

These cost more than the ones you link to, but are worth the price (still reasonable considering.) Have cork grips (better in sweaty hands), carbon fiber (lighter in weight but stronger than aluminum), flip locks (way easier to adjust and more trustworthy).

u/thisisGLADOS · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

you can still get those on amazon for $43 I have them and they are pretty nice

u/mdzealot · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00XM0YGW8 if you're in Canada.

Or, check Costco for them. They're cheap, light, durable enough. If you really like poles, look to upgrade in the future. But give those a go first imo

u/alaskaj1 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Cascade mountain tech poles. The aluminum ones are $23.

They also have carbon fiber ones for $45 but they go on sale occasionally, I got them for $28 a while back.

These poles can often be found in store at costco I believe.

I have used these poles on both light hikes and multi day backpacking trips and they have held up well. Overall they seem to be the go to pole for an inexpensive option on here.

u/ddickson83 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

These are pretty popular over at /r/ultralight

u/purebishop · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Incorrect. The twist lock version is $39.99. The quick lock version, which is what Costco has, is $44.99.

Green Graphics with Cork Handle https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_s8K4ybRHS6MNX

u/MotherofAllNoobs · 3 pointsr/GearTrade

These are pretty well recommended for their price if no one else offers a trade.

u/yardboz · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

That's what I have and what I was going to suggest. I'm not convinced that I need to spend $100 on hiking poles.
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=twister_B00YHMJ6BQ?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

u/bcgulfhike · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

I second the Fizans! I've had a pair since '09 and they've been everywhere with me with never a problem. They look pretty battered but they work as new!

My girlfriend has the Cascade Mountain Tech carbon poles and they are OK. Although they are not exactly heavy, they seem so after using the Fizans! They are also not as well made and I'll be surprised if they last 10 years without replacing the flick locks (Andrew Skurka has an article on his blog about this issue and how to fix it)

u/meg_c · 2 pointsr/hammockcamping

If you go for trekking poles, I can recommend this set: Cascade Mountain Tech Carbon Fiber Quick Lock Trekking Poles. They're great, especially for the price :) I've got a set with the foam handles, and they're still going strong after a couple of years :)

u/CobaltyDan · 2 pointsr/myog

Why not just get a set of Cascade Mountain Tech poles and have a decent set of inexpensive poles?

u/NotSoUltralight · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

Cascade Tech Carbon Trekking Poles

Check these out. Have em and love em. Great budget option. Recently switched out the tips for some BD tips and couldn’t be happier!

u/kyuss80 · 2 pointsr/Ultralight
u/kylorhall · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

They may not be at Costco though, they really come and go. This is my recommendation as well, but I had to buy mine off Amazon (link). They did well when weighed ~250lbs and a far heavier pack than I have now; they lock really well and did great with a lot of elevation. Saved my butt on one trip and I definitely used them thoroughly.

u/younevermo41 · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

probably the same exact product with different branding and they get great reviews https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8?th=1

u/_OldBay · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I'm going to post a link to my gear that I have. Everything in the picture is about $800 total

https://www.reddit.com/r/CampingGear/comments/arck5m/2019_gear/

Definitely shop around for sales. The Gregory backpack in my post, I was able to find it for $130 online and then they had a first time 20% discount that I applied, ended up getting it for $106 after S&H. That was with Campmor.com.

You definitely don't need to spend a lot on a water filter system. Most people here and in r/ultralight will swear by the Sawyer Squeeze. It's about $30, not really going to find it cheaper elsewhere unfortunately, trust me I tried. Tablets would probably work just fine to be honest, especially in the Smokey's. I did an Outward Bound 14 day backpacking trip in Pisgah which is next door to it and we only used iodine.

My sleeping bag in my post, normal MSRP was $340. I got it for $170 at an REI garage sale in Dacemeber. Saved a lot of money there.

For a sleeping pad, really depends on if you're a side sleeper or not. If you sleep on your side, you do not want to get a closed cell foam pad, which is that one's you mentioned earlier about people using them down to their butts. Personally I have the REI Flash insulated and it's comfortable and not too expensive. Another popular pad here and on r/ultralight is the Klymit Static-V insulated which is about $90.

For trekking poles, personally I would absolutely invest in a pair. Especially in the Smokey's, the terrain isn't always forgiving when you're carrying a larger backpack and they'll help with any stream crossings. The one's I have are these. Very cheap, but very durable. Definitely no need to buy $100+ poles.

Definitely keep shopping around though if you find something you like.

u/peeholestinger · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

I bought some of these for my first set of poles. Andrew Skurka has a pretty good write up and for $45 I figured it would be worth giving them a shot. So far they have been great. Right at about 16oz for the pair.

u/KenBalbari · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

For shelter, you really have a choice, tent, tarp and hammock, or tarp and net tent. If you want to hang around camp, you might want a bigger tent. If you plan to do hiking, many people only use the shelter to sleep in, and go with something small and lightweight, like a small solo tent, or even bivy.

I would point you towards some lightweight hiking gear here. That gives you the option to hike off to primative sites, carrying your shelter and supplies on your back. You don't necessarily need to go to the ultralight extremes that serious distance hikers go though.

You could start with a tent like this or this. If you wanted to get more serious into distance hiking, you would maybe spend more on something even lighter in weight (like maybe 2 lbs).

In Florida, I like the combination of a bug bivy (like this ) and a good tarp (like this). Though you would need poles as well. Hikers tend to use their trekking poles (like these). You would also need paracord (550 cord works well) to pitch a tarp.

For a stove, I mean something like this. Those are inexpensive and work fine.

For clothes, you can probably use mostly things you already own. Avoid cotton and linen. Synthetics like nylon and polyester will dry much more easily and do a better job in the heat and humidity in FL. And if you are going to go out there now, in hunting season, make sure you have some things that are bright orange. The hunters can be more dangerous than the bears.

As for bears, you don't really need any special container. Just learn to hang a stuff sack with any food or toiletries which have any scent. Using an odor barrier bag as a liner isn't a bad idea though. They'll generally leave you alone unless they smell what they think is food (and their sense of smell is very strong).

For shoes, again existing walking shoes are probably fine for now. Especially if you stick to sites off existing hiking trails to start.

For now, I'd start with a less primative site in a campground in someplace like Ocala. You can explore from there (there are sites near to trails), and have an idea next time you go out where you might want to try more primative camping. For now, focus on developing skills like how to use a compass, how to pitch a tent or tart, learning usefull knots for pitching tarps or hangning bear bags, etc.

It probably is a good idea to have a sleeping pad right off. A RidgeRest Classic might do the job for about $20. You can spend more on an inflatable pad if you think you will be more comfortable.

u/echoawesome · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

These are the costco ones, a bit cheaper and well regarded.

u/Zero25O · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Thanks for the link. I was about to pull the trigger on the Cascade Mountain poles on Amazon that have solid reviews, these look like they may be better and cheaper.


Link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00XM0YGW8/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1&th=1


Anyone have any recommendations between these 2?

u/GenuineMtnMan · 1 pointr/Ultralight

UL trek poles my mother in law gave me for my birthday about 6 years back have been a lifesaver on day hikes and multi night treks alike. They're sold through Costco or on Amazon. Cascade Mountain Tech Carbon Fiber Quick Lock Trekking Poles. They're $35 right now. Thank me later.

u/wesinator · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Try these cascade mountain tech poles. I have them and love them. I've put them through a couple hundred miles and accidentally stepped on them a couple times and seem to be doing great. Pretty light weight (about 8 oz per pole). I love the long cork/ foarm handles and straps. My only beef is that the tip covers fell off somewhere when hiking. But I've heard people bought them for as low as 28 dollars at costco in the northwest. When I find them at costco I'm going to get 4 or 5 pairs and give em out to friends they are so good.

u/Cdfisch97 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

These are what I use and a good budget option. Basically you want something with cork handles to absorb sweat and a locking mechanism similar to these.

u/rastalostya · 1 pointr/Ultralight

According to the comparison chart on this Amazon page a single pole is 7.8oz.

u/talahrama · 1 pointr/Ultralight

YMMV regarding finding them in store. I got them on Amazon awhile ago for roughly ten bucks cheaper. Here is the link.

u/dinhertime_9 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Tent: Tarptent Notch - $314, 1P, 28oz (w/ stakes), trekking pole supported

Pack: If you order the HMG Windrider from backcountry.com (which currently has a 20% off coupon), you can easily return if it doesn't fit; the return label is only like $7. FWIW I have the HMG Southwest and it's my favorite piece of gear.

Warm Jacket: I'm sure someone can explain better, but a fleece is better for active warmth; it breathes and allows sweat/moisture to pass through. A down jacket is better for static warmth; it blocks wind and has a greater warmth to weight ratio. REI Magma 850 Down Hoodie is only $109 right now and a good entry/budget option from what I've read. The North Face TKA 100 Glacier Quarter-Zip Pullover is a good fleece option ($55 retail).

Trekking Poles: Cascade Mountain Tech, there are a few options but the cork handle with quick lock mechanism is the most popular I think: https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Collapsible-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1542382742&sr=8-3&keywords=cascade+mountain+tech+carbon+fiber+quick+lock+trekking+poles

u/SuicidalCheezIt · 1 pointr/Ultralight

The same trekking poles are sold on Amazon for $45 if you can't find any in stores. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

u/format120 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Looks like 70$ on Amazon. Are they still the most budget friendly at that price?

u/patrickeg · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

I'll remember that for next time. I've already packed it all away, but I might drag it out and take some pics. My foot is pretty banged up so it'll be a minute. But Ill give you a short list :)

Pack: Osprey Exos 58

Sleeping Bag: Teton Sports Tracker

Tent: ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1

Tarp: Ultimate Survival Hex tarp

Mess kit: Mess kit and Mug

Water Filtration: Sawyer Mini

Tools/Defense: Note: Normally I would only take one knife, but I wasn't sure which I would prefer as they're two quite different blades. Ka-Bar Becker BK2, Condor Bushlore, and Bear Spray

Stove: MSR PocketRocket

First Aid: I had the Adventure Medical Kits Day Tripper, and then added to that with Celox and an Israeli Bandage

Trekking Poles: Cascade Mountain Tech CF with Cork Grips

In addition I had a few little things in a small kit; Ferro rod, duct tape, trail blazes, chemical water purifiers in case my Sawyer failed, bug spray, a small thing of sunscreen (which I didn't end up needing as it was overcast), deodorant, TP, etc.

u/BecauseSometimesY · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

These Cascade Tech carbon fiber poles are pretty great, lightweight at 1lb for the set, and recommended at their pretty low price. Currently $43 on Amazon; however, Costco frequently has them for $30.

Also, I highly recommend this Tillak UL camp chair. It’s more durable than cheaper options on Amazon, and slightly lighter, at about 1.5lbs. Even better is the Helnox Chair Zero, but it’s a little pricier. I have both. The Tillak is a little more comfortable, the Helinox packs smaller and lighter.

u/franks28 · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

My personal recommendation, especially if you are in only OKAY shape, take them (two of them) even if you were going with 0 pounds of gear. They are worth it on your knees alone, and can help your pace. You dont have to spend much. But if i had to recommend one set it would be these.https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Carbon-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1485792994&sr=1-1&keywords=mountain+tech+trekking+poles+cork