Reddit Reddit reviews Dragonlance Chronicles: "Dragons of Autumn Twilight," "Dragons of Winter Night,""dragons of Spring (TSR Fantasy)

We found 5 Reddit comments about Dragonlance Chronicles: "Dragons of Autumn Twilight," "Dragons of Winter Night,""dragons of Spring (TSR Fantasy). Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Sword & Sorcery Fantasy
Fantasy
Science Fiction & Fantasy
Books
Dragonlance Chronicles:
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5 Reddit comments about Dragonlance Chronicles: "Dragons of Autumn Twilight," "Dragons of Winter Night,""dragons of Spring (TSR Fantasy):

u/dfunkt_jestr · 3 pointsr/Fantasy

Hmmmm

But if you are, here's a gist of the first trilogy. Amazon
and Thrift books

The first trilogy consists of:

u/Aetole · 3 pointsr/DMAcademy

Here is some good history on dragons in D&D; there have been a lot of iterations, although they have kept to the basic theme of chromatics, metallics, and gemstones (later).

In all fairness, 5E Monster Manual is pretty thin on material to build out dragons as more than stat blocks, but part of that is because the MM is mostly stat blocks, a bit of behavior. Earlier editions like 2E and 3E gave a bit more to work with, and the 1E Rules Cyclopedia had a fair amount as well. Dragons, to play them well, should get the full NPC personality treatment to flesh them out, and should be done before focusing on the stat blocks - they should have a reason to be there, rather than another big scary thing. They are (mostly) highly intelligent, have strong personalities and interests, and won't just mindlessly attack without a good reason.

There are some great suggestions in this thread on source books, but I also encourage you to look at D&D fiction books like Dragonlance and Forgotten Realms books to see how dragons' personalities are beyond the monster-stat block side. Also, look at non-D&D fiction to explore dragons - The Dragon and the George is unusual but fun, the Temeraire books by Naomi Novik are a very different take on dragons that is all about their interactions with humans. E. E. Knight's "Age of Fire" series is excellent in terms of giving a natural history and political exploration of dragons (but the editing in the last couple books is terrible, sadly).

In the end, you can make any monster/adversary interesting, but you have to be willing to do the work to develop them. I've been on a kobold kick lately to research what has been done and to come up with ways to give them actual personalities and a society. Dragons are much easier as there is so much material out there, and you have so much to work with.

Full disclosure: have been obsessed with dragons since He-Man's Granamyr and "Flight of Dragons" the animated movie. Watch those too.

u/Ornery_Celt · 2 pointsr/MaliciousCompliance

Yep, this one.


u/HighSorcerer · 2 pointsr/trees

If you're down for a swords and sorcery-style fantasy adventure, my favorite has always been the Dragonlance Chronicles. Another good one, for a grim/gritty medieval fantasy world is Orcs(btw, it's about orcs). That's the kind of reading I like to do, anyways. [3]

u/Waybide · 2 pointsr/DMAcademy

I’m old school, and I’m reading this as ‘what fantasy writings/books/novels can I read to be a better DM/GM’?

I would recommend the original Dragonlance trilogy by Margaret Weis and Tracy Hickman for insight in to storytelling and how to balance humor, darkness and the death of a character (PC).

Dragonlance Chronicles: "Dragons of Autumn Twilight," "Dragons of Winter Night,""dragons of Spring (TSR Fantasy) https://www.amazon.com/dp/0140115404/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_9KVtDb1EVFJXC

For combat storytelling, there is no one better than R.A. Salvatore IMO. The way he describes combat, it gave me great insight on how to turn combat in to part of the story through explanation of PC actions to the party. ‘You hit and deal X damage’ just doesn’t have the same appeal to me as ‘your character scores a grazing slash across the foul beast, some of its black blood oozes out in unnatural ways...’

The Legend of Drizzt Boxed Set, Books I-III (Set 1, Bks. 1-3) https://www.amazon.com/dp/0786947772/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_-PVtDb67EWJ0S

I hope this helps! Other suggestions about reading older editions of D&D is also excellent but may be confusing for a newer DM getting used to the rules.

Game on!