Reddit Reddit reviews Etekcity Infrared Thermometer 774 (Not for Human) Temperature Gun Non-Contact Digital Laser Thermometer-58℉ to 716℉ (-50 to 380℃), Standard Size, Yellow & Black

We found 187 Reddit comments about Etekcity Infrared Thermometer 774 (Not for Human) Temperature Gun Non-Contact Digital Laser Thermometer-58℉ to 716℉ (-50 to 380℃), Standard Size, Yellow & Black. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Thermometers & Timers
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Kitchen & Dining
Home & Kitchen
Etekcity Infrared Thermometer 774 (Not for Human) Temperature Gun Non-Contact Digital Laser Thermometer-58℉ to 716℉ (-50 to 380℃), Standard Size, Yellow & Black
Better accuracy: The distance to spot ratio is 12: 1, meaning the laser grip 774 can accurately measure targets at greater distances compared to most other Thermometers; for best accuracy, the distance between the thermometer and object of measurement should approximately be 14. 17 inches (36cm)Target quicker: measure surface temperature ranging from -58℉ to 716℉/ -50℃ to 380℃, you can choose the unit from ℉/ ℃; response time: ≤500Ms; a built in laser gives you the precision to hone in on the exact space you want to measureAdded functions: the LCD screen is backlit, also has an auto-off function to extend the battery life, and features a low battery indicator so you never accidentally run out of juice (battery included). Storage Temperature: -20-50℃ (-4-122℉). Operating Temperature-0-50℃ (50-122℉)Versatile design: infrared technology makes this thermometer handy to measure the surface temperature of various objects especially temperatures above boiling points and below freezing points; use it when you are cooking and barbequing, performing auto maintenance, doing home repairs, and a host of other tasksNote: the thermometer can't measure the internal temperature of an object; temperature readings from this devices are inanimate objects, the measured temperature for humans or animals will not be correct; FDA, FCC, CE compliant; class 2 laser, optical power 0. 5-0. 9Mw
Check price on Amazon

187 Reddit comments about Etekcity Infrared Thermometer 774 (Not for Human) Temperature Gun Non-Contact Digital Laser Thermometer-58℉ to 716℉ (-50 to 380℃), Standard Size, Yellow & Black:

u/loganwachter · 102 pointsr/funny

They're cheap as hell here is the one I have

u/_ataraxia · 35 pointsr/snakes

i've been paged for my link dump, so here it is. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions. let me know if any of the links don't work.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/CG_Ops · 24 pointsr/bicycling

As a motorcycle racer, we pay a lot of attention to track temps b/c we get different tires depending on the heat. I have my IR surface temp thermometer for reading tire and track temperatures

Hot days can mean ridiculously hot surface temps... as in hot enough to blister your feed in a single step or two

u/arizona-lad · 19 pointsr/HomeImprovement

First of all, quit closing the doors. That right there is a big part of this problem. If you want nice cool air to flow into a room, you must also let it out. Blocking the air movement leads to stagnation and high humidity.

Second of all, you might want to try to balance the air flow.

Balancing the system only requires two inexpensive things, an anemometer and a non-contact thermometer.

First, open all the registers. Set the A/C about 5 degrees lower for this test, so that it stays running. Then walk around the house and record the air speed and temperature at each room's vent(s).

Now comes the balancing. Start closing the registers closest to the air handler (A/C fan). Is it in the basement or on the first floor? Restrict it way down. Maybe 25% of fully open. Don't worry, you can adjust it later.

Take a reading of the air flow. Now go to the next register in line. Greatly reduce it. Move on to the next....

As you do this, all the air is now being forced upstairs. The general rule of thumb is that you do not want to reduce the total air volume delivered by the A/C by more than 25% to 30%. More than that can make the fan work harder which means it could run hotter, which could shorten it's lifespan.

Your goal is to get maybe 60% of the airflow upstairs, and perhaps 40% downstairs. Some homes require 70% - 30% (depending on how it is built). Split levels can be a bit tricky, but I think you know what I am getting at.

Re-directing the air so more blows upstairs is not restricting it. A better term would call this a re-distribution of the available air.

Your goal with the anemometer and the thermometer is to get uniform air speed and temp across the entire upper levels. Just a reminder; all doors must be open, please.

u/SmolderingDesigns · 18 pointsr/snakes

Your friend is incredibly irresponsible and should seriously be talked to. You don't dump an animal on someone who 1) isn't expecting it and 2) doesn't even know how to take care of it.

Get rid of the sand, it's not an okay bedding. You want shredded aspen or coconut mulch for a milk snake. You can find either of these options at most pet stores. Make sure you don't get pine bedding meant for rodents. Give him at least several inches of bedding because milks do love to burrow.

You want to give the snake very small, tight places to hide. They like to be squished, it makes them feel secure. So the coconut hide is too big and open to function as a safe space for a baby milk snake. Look at the pet store for small caves and hide boxes that will just barely fit your snake. You'll need at least two, one for the warm side and one for the cool side.

For the heat, a heat lamp is great but only if used correctly. You'll need an infrared temperature gun to check what the surface temperature of the bedding below the lamp is. You can get one from Amazon, this one is great and cheap. You want the temperature of the bedding to be around 85°f directly below the lamp. You'll want to put one of the hiding spots close to the warmest spot so he can choose to warm up while being hidden. As for bulbs, the one you have is likely going to be too hot but it depends how big your tank is. It might be some trial and error with dimmer bulbs. Have the bulb on for ~14 hours a day, really whenever it's naturally daylight where you live.

Milk snakes are easy and room temperature is fine for the rest of the tank during the day. The light will be off for night and as long as your house stays warmer than around 70° it's okay for the snake to have a night time temperature drop.

You might need to add a humid hide if you notice trouble with shed getting stuck. This is as simple as a Tupperware container with a hole cut into it and filled with damp sphagnum moss. It's just to offer a more humid place for the snake to use.

Grab some silk plants and fill the tank. Snakes like to feel invisible so don't worry if the plants take up a lot of space, he'll love crawling through them.

Milksnakes should be fed once a week as babies and once every 10-14 days as adults. You'll want frozen mice the same thickness as the snake or a little smaller. Thaw it in cold water or in the fridge before meal time and then warm it up with warm water right before feeding. You'll need feeding tongs, snakes like to "accidentally" grab fingers when in feeding mode. Don't pick the snake up for at least 48 hours after feeding to allow him to digest in peace. Also, there is a myth that you should feed in a separate container to avoid cage aggression. This is false and outdated information, just feed him in his enclosure.

Snakes don't require handling and would be perfectly fine without any. But they will tolerate it to some extent. Generally, only handle once or twice a week for 5-10 minutes maximum.

Clean up poop/urates as you see them, clean and refill the water dish at least every few days. Eventually you'll want to replace all the bedding. Depending on the snake and size of the tank, this could be every 3 months or every 9 months, just judge when the bedding is getting smelly.

u/fleshexe · 16 pointsr/leopardgeckos

dried mealworms have no nutritional value. leopard geckos need live bugs.

here's an affordable thermometer. you really need one so you can make sure they're able to digest their food. https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00837ZGRY/

u/ThePienosaur · 14 pointsr/BeardedDragons

That's very cool! I should warn you though, caring for a baby beardie isn't easy or cheap. They need to eat at least twice a day, have salad made every morning, have poops cleaned every day, and have baths regularly, which is a lot to do and can be overwhelming. Their food is also pretty expensive because they can eat over 100 insects per day, it often comes to $20-40 a month. Plus the initial setup will cost a few hundred dollars. I say this not to scare you off (I always love when people get their first reptile) but to warn you. Reading it again it sounds more complicated than it actually is, but you should definitely be prepared to deal with those things.

For now make sure he/she is in a place where they can get to 75-80f. You can worry about high temps later, right now I don't want to risk overheating. Don't worry about feeding for now, they need specific temps to be able to digest, just give some water for now, maybe a place to hide. This should be fine for a few days while you gather the materials you need.

Read through the sidebar and ask questions if something is confusing.

The basic list of stuff you'll need is here:

Enclosure: minimum adult size is 36" x 18" x 18", but 4' x 2' x 2' is better. Can be an aquarium or a wood/pvc enclosure. You can get a 20g tank and upgrade, but there's no point in spending​ extra money, they don't get scared by big spaces.

Heat: a heat lamp is the best heat source for beardies, it doesn't have to be reptile branded. As long as it gives off bright white/yellow light and gets the temp to 100-110f it works, I have a 90w halogen flood light.

UVB: proper UVB light is essential. The best/only guaranteed good UVB lights are either Mercury vapor bulbs (heat and UVB combined) or fluorescent tubes. Compact bulbs can cause eye problems. Tubes are used much more often and are cheaper and better for beardies. You'll want either a reptisun 10.0 or Arcadia 12% tube, roughly 2/3 the length of the enclosure. They come in two sizes, t5 and t8, t5 is newer, stronger, and better. It gives you more options for where to place it and is lasts 12 months instead of 6 so it's cheaper. Basically, you want either a reptisun 10.0 t5 or Arcadia 12% t5.

UVB fixture: heat lamp fixtures are easy to find, but for uvb it's a bit tougher. This is what I use for my 22" t5: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00AKKUBDQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apap_as8FHHQMbU3iD

Timer for the lights

Substrate: tile is the best, imo. Paper towels and reptile carpet also work, just stay away from sand.

Basking spot: a large, flat object that absorbs heat well, a tile on a platform works well.

Hides: personally I've never seen my Beardie use a hide, but they're good to have.

Other decor: totally up to you, just make sure it's safe. Reptile hammocks are popular.

Dusting powder: you'll want calcium w/D3 and vitamins, calcium should be used more often.

Thermometer: analog thermometers are inaccurate, you want either a probe thermometer or a temp gun. This is what I have: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apap_L679M528XRDNl

Some housing for feeder insects to stay alive for a few weeks and to gut-load them.

Let me know if I forget anything or if you have any questions. Good luck!

u/Keifru · 13 pointsr/Sneks

Sounds like you were getting outdated or flat-out incorrect information and those 'experienced snake owners' are likewise misinformed. There are very few snakes that legitimately have evolved to thrive on sand-based substrate (irony being the Sand Boa is not one of them; they live in sandy soil which is very different composition than straight sand). The Ball Python is native to the svannah/jungles of Sub-Saharan Africa. Its dirt, soil, and burrows. Not a majority or even significant amount of sand.

Additionally, if I extrapolate correctly from this singular picture, your BP is also in a glass enclosure and has a log-style hide. The former makes keeping humidity in the 55~80% range a difficult exercise, and the latter, is a stressor as BPs do best with a hide that has a single-entrance or is cave-like; the more points of contact, the better, and a single entrance means they can feel safer.

I'm going to steal _ataraxia's ball python dump and toss it below:

i'm going to dump a bunch of links to get you on the right track. the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/vee_vee_vee · 11 pointsr/sanantonio
u/cheechak0 · 11 pointsr/olympia

If you want to try and find where they are coming in, or locate the nest by yourself, you can rent one of these from the Tumwater Home Depot for about $50 and look for hotspots:

https://www.homedepot.com/tool-truck-rental/Thermal-Camera/FLIR-i7/

This is a pdf example of how to use an IR camera to find wasps.

Or Amazon has cheap IR thermometers without cameras that you could do the same with.

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/

-----------

But, insects are specifically a landlord duty by Washington State law, so you should read up on that to know your rights, then find legal help at that last link:

https://www.atg.wa.gov/tenant-rights

https://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=59.18.060

https://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=59.18.070

https://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=59.18.090

https://www.atg.wa.gov/residential-landlord-tenant-resources

u/Tac50Company · 11 pointsr/snakes

>Not yet

NO NO NO NO FUCKING NO.

NEVER. REPEAT NEVER PUT A HEAT SOURCE IN WITH A SNAKE THAT IS UNREGULATED. It can burn or kill your snake. Go and order one, or go to a reptile store immediately and get one. Its literally one of the most important things in snake husbandry. And get a digital thermometer to keep track as well.

I dont mean to sound mean but this is something that needs to be done NOW for the health of your snake.

What is the wattage of the bulb and how long do you leave it on ?

EDIT: get the following (or equivalent) immediately

thermostat

temp gun

thermometers. one for hot and cold sides

u/tb03102 · 10 pointsr/GifRecipes
u/segue1007 · 10 pointsr/eldertrees

Long time smoker, recent convert to concentrates here. My thoughts over the last few months:

You don't want to season a quartz nail, just heat it with a torch to clean it before you use it.

I like to always keep my banger clean. If you heat it up enough with a good-size torch, everything will burn off and it will look new again. No need to dunk in ice water or anything crazy, just torch it until it's crystal clear. Any residue will burn off and leave nothing but a fine layer of white ash. There is no reason to leave any icky buildup like a regular pipe, it will just taste bad later.

I initially bought a little butane creme-brulee torch. It sucks. Takes way too long to heat a banger. I grabbed my propane plumbing torch from the garage, and haven't looked back.

Unless you're dabbing one of those crazy-strong concentrates like distillate, you will have liquid residue left in the banger after you hit it. That's NOT the "good stuff", it's the other stuff that doesn't vaporize at THC- and terp-temps. Wipe it out with a q-tip after you take the hit, it saves you cleaning time later.

As far as getting it to the right temp, I had some trial and error. Too low, and it melts slowly and doesn't all vaporize. Too high, and it immediately turns black when you put it in the banger and tastes like crap. With metal nails, I can see getting it "red hot" and then timing the cool down, but with quartz is NEVER gets "red hot", at least with a brand-new banger. Quartz is insane... it just takes the heat with no complaints.

You could definitely learn your rig and torch as far as heating/timing, but I got tired of imprecision and bought one of these infrared thermometers. AWESOME PURCHASE, money well-spent. It only reads a high temp of 850 degrees or so, but you can monitor the cool-down, and as soon as it drops to 600F or so, you'll get a great dab. Plus, it has a built-in laser pointer! You can take a dab, and then lay on the couch and torment your cat! For only $17! But seriously, it makes for perfect dabs.

About the cleaning, I usually clean the banger right after the hit now (with the torch), after wiping with the q-tip. It's already half-hot, torching it makes it look brand-new, and who knows, maybe you'll be inspired to do another dab while it's still hot! (wash rinse repeat)

Have fun!

u/beefjeeef · 9 pointsr/snakes


First of all. It's very good you recognize that you need help in learning how to care for the snake.

Second, here is a big link dump created by another regular user u/_ataraxia all credit for this goes to her.

the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/CaptainUnderwear · 9 pointsr/funny

You should always use smile.amazon.com! Same price, same everything, except 0.5% of your purchase goes to the charity of your choice!

Here's your link using Amazon Smile

u/Braden0732 · 8 pointsr/interestingasfuck

Anyone who wants to try this at home it is very simple. It helps to have a temperature gauge like this one for $16 on Amazon.

Put any water based liquid in the freezer and get it to just below freezing. Depending on the liquid, the optimal temperature might vary to get the reaction to work.

If you don't mind wasting $3.00 on a 40oz of Highlife, those are my favorite. Get it down to about 30 Freedom Units, put it on the counter and open it. Watch the bottom and you can see the ice lattice forming all the way to the top. Super cool looking, but then you have frozen beer :-(

u/Cadder-12 · 8 pointsr/ballpython

Here's an info dump, courtesy of u/_ataraxia. It has pretty much everything you're asking about and more.

The first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. Read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.
Llet me know if any of the links don't work.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/velocity___ · 8 pointsr/snakes

You don't need to touch them, just buy a temp gun. I don't recommend touching them anyway, it gets dirty ape scent all over the prey items, and that probably won't be an issue with a Ball Python but once you start getting into species with very strong feed response it can become an issue with certain animals who start to associate human scent with rat scent.

u/Vaporhead · 8 pointsr/snakes

u/ataraxia has amazing information for ball pythons. You should definitely read it through. Glass tanks are not ideal for Bps, so this should help. Here is her normal dump of information I took from another post.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/hellobeffy · 7 pointsr/snakes

Home: For the heating pad, you need a thermostat, which will turn it on and off automatically around a specified heat range. Mine is set to 86 degrees with the probe placed between the heat mat and the bottom of the tank. This keeps the glass on top of the tank around 83-85, and the paper towel I have over the glass is around 81-83. You may need to have a different temperature setting, depending on your setup. You shouldn't turn the heat mat entirely off, unless you notice it is malfunctioning and overheating.


To make sure that your temperatures and humidity are decent, you will want a digital thermometer/hygrometer and a temperature gun. The cool side should be in the low-mid 70s and the warm side in the low-mid 80s. The humidity should be 30%-60%. If it isn't, you can make or buy a humid hide, block off some of the venting on the screen top with aluminum foil or acrylic panels, or switch substrates to something that can be misted. This last measure will likely not be necessary unless you live in a low-humidity area.


You should have two identical caves, one on the warm side over the heat mat and one on the cool side.


Diet: What you were told may be appropriate for an adult snake. If possible, weigh her and post pictures. Do a quick Google search on how much adult corns should be eating and how often. I only have a hatchling, and don't want to lead you astray with my lack of adult corn experience.


Handling: If you got her recently enough that you haven't fed her yet, you shouldn't be handling her yet. You should feed her at least once, preferably twice before handling her the first time, and wait 48 hours after feeding to handle her.


Depending on the snake, many can be held multiple times per week. Some are conservative and say only once a week for 15 minutes. Some people allow for more handling than this. But 3-4 times a week for 'extended periods' is almost definitely too much, and as she's new to you, you should be slowly working your way up to longer periods of handling. You also should never be handling her in the 48 hours after she eats.


Shedding: Their color will usually dull and their eyes will turn milky or blue. They might have some minor changes in behavior, like more resistance to handling or possibly even refusal to eat. Mine just shed, and hid for three days prior to that. Note that the shed should come off all in one piece -- if it doesn't, it may be a sign that your snake is dehydrated and doesn't have sufficient access to clean water or the humidity in the tank is too low.


Another quick note on water: You should be changing it at least twice a week, plus any time the snake soils it. I buy filtered spring water from the store, which doesn't have some of the chemicals in tap water that are fine for humans but not so good for snakes. It's kind of a pain in the butt, but it's only about $2 a month, so whatever.

u/monty33 · 7 pointsr/HomeImprovement

There are a bunch of tips here on sealing gaps to prevent infiltration. I used one of these to find out where the worst spots were that cold air was coming in. Just point and shoot! If you are trying to save some $$$ then targeting the worst areas should give you the best bang for the buck.

Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Laser Infrared Thermometer Temperature Gun -58℉~ 716℉ (-50℃ ~ 380℃), Yellow and Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_XkjXBb2ZTAQV1

u/rabidfurby · 7 pointsr/Seattle

You shut your whore mouth. That $13 laser thermometer is fucking awesome.

u/Forrest319 · 6 pointsr/AskCulinary

It's doing to depend out the range more than anything. Every range will be a bit different, and the burners on the same range will probably be different as well.

It only takes $16 to find out how hot your pan is getting

u/miezu78 · 6 pointsr/HomeImprovement
u/Bud2Budder · 5 pointsr/Dabs

I have https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00837ZGRY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1 but any cheap IR gun should work. Also for taking temps ignore the laser light and put the opening/sensor area right over the top of the banger for accurate readings.

u/WhoopsHamlet · 5 pointsr/Cooking

This is where those cheap infrared thermometers really come in handy. Just point it at the pan. Also great for grilling. https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00837ZGRY

u/CastIronKid · 5 pointsr/castiron

Even medium is probably hot enough if you let the skillet warm-up long enough. If you get a cheap infrared thermometer, you can start to figure out what temperature your stove dial settings equate to. I shoot for around 550 F fo searing steaks.

u/Sagan4life · 5 pointsr/AskCulinary

I assume you're talking about an IR thermometer? I got one because, like you said, it's a novelty and pretty cheap. I use it for things like taking surface temperatures of foods (melted chocolate, meat that I'm curing, etc.)

A lot of TV chefs (cough...Alton Brown) use them for things like taking surface readings of pan's temperatures. Unfortunately, many times an IR thermometer can't accurately measure temperatures in this situation. They rely on a property called emissivity. Emissivity had to do with how a material emits its energy as heat. Long story short, light/shiny objects have low emissivity which means that an IR thermometer will read a temperature lower than the actual temperature. So using the IR thermometer will work much better on dark, matte finished (some types of teflon or cast iron) cookware than stainless steel/aluminum/copper. So buyer beware...

If you're trying to wrap your head around the whole shiny vs. dull situation and why that matters. Think about it like this. A shiny object will reflect the ambient energy/radiation to a greater degree and not so much emit its own.

u/lVipples · 4 pointsr/Hedgehog

Hello! We have a C&C (similar to a hamster cage) cage and these are the products we use to keep it warm:

stand

thermometer/switch that will click on and off to keep the temperature from getting to high or low

Ceramic heat emitter

Porcelain clamp lamp

You should also pick up a temperature gun because the thermometer switch isn't that accurate. Also, because the switch isn't great you may find yourself needing to adjust it every so often, but that isn't too big of a deal.

Depending on the size of your cage you may need to double this set up (we do for our 8 sq ft cage).

I would imagine that an aquarium may get to hot/not provide enough ventilation, but can't say for sure because I've never used one. It may also not provide enough square footage, but not sure about that either.

Also, be sure to check out /u/VolcanoView 's page on hedgehog care to get more info about temperature.

You should try to get this issue resolved immediately as you do not want your hedgehog to try to hibernate. See the section on hibernation in the link above.

u/gunnarsvg · 4 pointsr/Cooking

An infrared thermometer, closely-followed by a Polder probe.

Take the guesswork out of cooking, and use these so that you aren't afraid to apply heat!

u/popsicle_of_meat · 4 pointsr/saab

That sounds like a faulty sensor to me. But I'm no expert, just know the basics and learn as I go. But shooting up immediately makes it sound like the sensor has a wire crossed and can't read the right base level. Thermocouples are very simple devices, but anything can fail.

Also, just as another line of investigation, do you have an OBD2 reader that works with a phone or computer to read the stats? It could be that the computer is seeing the real temp and the gauge might be shot.

Also, maybe an IR temp gun, like this? You could watch the heat rise in the radiator and if it starts getting dangerously high, then shut down. It could be the right temp, but the sensor or computer is borked.

u/snakejudy · 4 pointsr/reptiles

Instead of a second pad, pick up a thermostat. A temperature gun is useful to have as well. The thermostat will control the temperature of the mat, preventing burns and overheating, and a temperature gun will tell you the precise temperature of any spot in the enclosure.

Judging temperature by hand is as good as taking a wild guess. A mat at the right temp usually feels barely warm to the touch, but can also feel hot or cool depending on whether your skin is hot or cool.

u/drdelius · 4 pointsr/trashy

Digital Thermometers are basically instant, think of the hand-held ones like this (great to use as a high-powered laser pointer since it's powered by a 9volt, can keep your dog running at a dog park for hours).

The only real issue seems to be that they're using a type of thermometer that is supposed to be plunged into the product to check internal temperatures, and they are simply putting it next to the product. Not enough of an issue that you're likely to end up with food that was out of temperature, as long as it was fully heated and checked before being placed in the holding pan. Also an issue if they're plunging it in far enough to be touching the metal bottom of the holding pan. That's where you can easily have food that's out of temp and not caught, because the pan is always slightly hotter than the food inside.

u/heckingheckmate · 4 pointsr/BeardedDragons

looks pretty good to me, he may not be moving around because he’s cold, so just be sure you’re around 85 warm end with a basking spot of up to 120 (while they’re still young) and then cool end around 75 and drop the temperatures by ten degrees at night. i always recommend getting a thermometer gun as it tends to be more precise than a dial, and you can tell the temperature of several different locations without multiple dials, the stick on one you’re using is usually pretty inaccurate as it’s telling you the temperature of the glass. this is the thermometer gun i use and it works pretty well, it’s within 1-2°F of the actual temperature, there are certainly more expensive ones but i haven’t had any issue with this one. i always recommend having more hides, at least one on the warm end and one on the cool end, and while the extra food bowls look cool, it’s usually easier to have them out of the enclosure and put them in when you’re putting food in. congrats on your new pal, and i wish the two of you much fun

u/Ohthere530 · 4 pointsr/zerocarb

My hunch is that the pan is too cool. Try using an Infrared Thermometer Gun to measure the temperature of your frying pan. When the pan is too cool the meat tends to get grey and yucky instead nicely browned.

I like to heat the pan up to 450-550 F. Then you get a nice brown sear.

You might also try cast iron. Two reasons. The first is that it holds a lot of heat so it stays hot even when you pop the cool steak on it. Second is that you can safely heat up cast iron to higher temps than many non-stick pans will handle.

u/Fonzibearr · 4 pointsr/BeardedDragons

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_3dXhzbX2XTSD8

15 bucks on amazon and will give you instant temperature readings unlike a dial or probe thermometer

u/kjmorley · 4 pointsr/microgrowery

If you want to make MCT oil, here's the method I use for extraction:

  • Decarb 60 gm of bud at 250 °F for 45 minutes
  • Chop lightly in blender
  • Add to crockpot and cover with 600 ml MCT oil + 1 tbsp lecithin
  • Heat at about 160 °F for 2 - 3 hours with occasional stirring. Check the temp periodically so it doesn't over heat.
  • Let cool, filter and transfer to 1 oz dropper bottles

    You should have enough to fill 16 - 20 bottles. Depending on the strain, the oil should contain 15 - 20 mg/ml THC.

    Some items you may need:

    Turkey Bag for decarb

    MCT Oil

    Lecithin

    Digital Thermometer

    Honey Strainer to remove the particulate

    Large syringe for transferring oil

    Dropper Bottles
u/Herherpsnderps · 4 pointsr/leopardgeckos

Those are rookie numbers. Personally wouldn’t listen to his advice, he’s fuven you a bit of bad advice. Which i will apologize that those are total junk, if you can return it. What would probably be the best thing for you guys and similar pricing is a temp gun, you can use them for all the reptiles and get the temperatures anywhere in the tank. Those only poorly measure the air temperature, but your using a heat pad which doesn’t heat ambient, but surface temps. Here’s a really good one. You’d both be able to use it. You just point and shoot, it has a little red laser to show where it’s reading the temp from. Also a care guide that can go into more detail on some of this stuff than I can in a comment section.

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1_sspa?keywords=temp+gun&qid=1563412077&s=gateway&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

Also no reason to get so upset because people are giving you solid advice to care for your animal. Bit of hostility towards us on this.

u/PaleAleGiraffe · 4 pointsr/funny

I have this one, but you can get away with this one for $16

u/Rtreesaccount420 · 3 pointsr/EatCheapAndHealthy

http://amzn.com/B00837ZGRY As is a IR thermometer.. Got one just for the kitchen.. since were bringing up things that are damn handy in a kitchen.

u/SpiderW3bb · 3 pointsr/ballpython
u/Jeff1801 · 3 pointsr/Homebrewing

I use a laser thermometer instead (~$15). More accurate, and many more uses. Strike water temp, see how close wort is to boil, toy for your cat to chase, wort chilling monitor, finding a fermenting area, stop it cat I'm trying to make beer, checking fermenting temp.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00837ZGRY/

u/ZMan941 · 3 pointsr/snakes

I picked one up in preparation for my first snake. Be prepared to try and temperature sense all the things.

u/_ataraxia recommended this one to me and it seems to be a nice unit. If nothing else, it will come in handy for some of my other hobbies too. I've yet to try a ice bath test with it like I did the two digital thermometers I also purchased, but that is planned for tonight when I get home.

 

Also, just as an aside, the laser is just there to help guide you. it doesn't actually do any sensing.

u/ShareYourSkittles · 3 pointsr/candlemaking

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00837ZGRY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1520056166&sr=8-1-spons&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=infrared+thermometer&psc=1


Open lid, give the pot o’ wax a quick stir, zap it with this. Instant and accurate af.

*Bonus red dot laser fun if you have a cat.

u/Crunchewy · 3 pointsr/leopardgeckos

Heat mat is the way to go for sure, but you MUST also get a thermostat for it. Otherwise it will be too hot. Set the thermostat to keep it at 90°. The heat mat goes under the tank, definitely not in it. The heat mat has a sticky surface and you stick it to the bottom of the tank. There’s very little risk of fire. Ours is on a wood table and has been for years.

Here’s a pretty good thermostat that we use:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000NZZG3S

Make sure the temperature sensor is against the floor of your substrate (I recommend paper towels for the substrate. Cheap and easy) so it reads more accurately. To be extra safe get a laser thermometer to read the temp on the surface of the tank. This one is good and inexpensive:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00837ZGRY

Use it to verify that the surface temperature is about 90°

u/thesidneygunman · 3 pointsr/snakes

the only thing I can think of is give her a week or two to settle in before trying to feed her (goes for handling as well), and you might want to pick up some more hides. Shes still a small snake so the more clutter you have in the tank the more secure she'll feel (paper towel tubes buried in the bedding is one of mines favorite). Oh and you might want to pick one of these up: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00837ZGRY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 (just to do surface spot checks, and if you get other snakes that are a bit more picky this would be pretty handy to have)

u/Felzlek · 3 pointsr/snakes

Yep. I should mention that it only displays one temperature at a time, but a quick button press will switch back and forth between temperature at the unit and temperature at the probe.

You should also grab a temp gun for spot checking temps directly above the UTH.

u/LyricalLinds · 3 pointsr/BeardedDragons
u/bmmoore2021 · 3 pointsr/BallPythons

Are you just setting the rat in front of him? Because it can often help if you make it do the rat dance (take a pair of tongs and wiggle it in front of your snake) and then once he strikes, keep pulling on the rat after the snake as struck, so he thinks the rat is trying to get away and will constrict it. Also are you sure you're getting the rat all the way up to temp? It should be about 90 degrees. You can use something like this to be sure: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00837ZGRY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/xexyzNES · 3 pointsr/rccars

I've been happy with this one. It also has a lit screen option.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B00837ZGRY/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/dave_890 · 3 pointsr/fixit

> chill the entire fitting then heat the outside with a torch

Reverse that process. Heat the entire fitting first, then use a freeze spray to drop the temp of the cartridge.

Use a small torch flame on the fitting, mostly on the threaded area around the cartridge; conduction of heat will heat the rest of the fitting to a lesser degree. Have a fire extinguisher handy, of course. Buy or borrow a non-contact IR thermometer to monitor the temp. Walmart has a similar thermometer if you don't want to wait for delivery by Amazon.

Once it's around 250F, use a freeze spray to rapidly cool the cartridge, while applying a bit of torque with a wrench on the cartridge (you might need an assistant to do this safely).

Walmart has a freeze spray that's almost identical, but without the penetrating lubricants. I'd use the non-lubricant spray, as the lubricants hitting a 250F fitting might cause issues or a possible fire.

u/rollapoid · 3 pointsr/ballpython

Reposting the famous u/ _ataraxia info:

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/megahurtz83 · 3 pointsr/sousvide

It would probably vary a bit depending on your specific model of stove. The only way to know for sure would be to use something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1451863683&sr=8-2&keywords=temperature+gun

u/loverslanders · 3 pointsr/fountainpens

It is certainly worth waiting for the right tools. It is actually quite rare that the section on this pen was shellaced as Sheaffer did not do that at the factory. 95% of all Sheaffers I have had come loose with a good water bath. If you are going to keep doing restorations, it is certainly worth acquiring a temp gun to keep your pens safe during heating. I have one similar (same brand as) this one and it works great.

u/sickhippie · 3 pointsr/askportland

> the coldest month last year cost me close to $400.

> I've also gone around sealing up cracks in the year I've lived here

If you don't have one of these yet, I highly recommend it. Super cheap and you can pinpoint exactly where the hot/cold spots are. You'll probably find quite a bit around the windows and floorboards, but if you've got single-pane windows that aren't covered there's likely a massive amount passing right through.

u/unkilbeeg · 3 pointsr/castiron

The last time I looked, the infrared thermometer was about $15. And it's one of the handiest things you can have, even if you don't use cast iron.

u/Peronalodis · 3 pointsr/ballpython

I have been recommended a temp gun as a just-in-case for areas that become too hot or too cool, but it doesn't sound like you'll need any other heat emitters, if there are no issues like that. Edit: I think she hasn't gone into the log because hides that only have one opening do their job better/are generally better/half-log hides suck as hides. I wouldn't remove it, but maybe put another box in for maximum hide-age.

About the tank: aquariums have been known to be the escape artist's dream, and difficult to keep the humidity right with. (You didn't mention what the humidity was at! Has it been manageable?) If you don't have proper clamps to keep the top down (no rocks or weights), you should definitely invest in some. I don't actually know where you could get those, because I never looked into getting an aquarium for my ball, but I'm sure someone here could tell you if you asked. And If you do, prepare to be blown away with alternative enclosure options. Aquariums aren't generally ideal. (As a side note, do you have decorations for the tank aside from the log? At that size, it may need lots of clutter to help your snake feel comfortable. I've been assured sanitized rocks and branches could work.)

Ataraxia's comment might help you figure out the enclosure situation, if you're interested in changing it. (Assuming you haven't seen it before.)

u/EverybodyScram · 3 pointsr/Cooking

I would aim for something like 350F myself, 400F strikes me a quite hot for fish. FWIW I just use a dutch oven and check the temp with one of these infrared thermometers.

Also, are you dredging the fish in flour before the eggwash? If not you'll have a hard time getting the batter to stick.

edit: just so we're clear, the order would be flour -> eggwash -> batter

u/akwakeboarder · 3 pointsr/seriouseats

I cannot agree and recommend an IR thermometer enough. I believe I purchased this one from Etekcity on Amazon and it works like a charm.

u/Peaches491 · 3 pointsr/3Dprinting

Have you measure the temperature of your hotend with some external measurement source? I picked up a cheap IR thermometer from Amazon while I was building my Mendel90, and it had been super useful in the "should I touch that yet" department.

It could be that your thermistor is improperly installed, causing your hotend to not be as hot as you think it is.

Here's my el-cheapo IR thermometer:
Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Laser Infrared Thermometer -58℉~ 716℉ (-50℃~380℃), Yellow and Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_GjrTyb6KAX0F6

u/Barnhardt1 · 3 pointsr/BeardedDragons

A branch is fine if he likes to use it. Once he's full grown you'll probably need to make him some sort of platform to lay on since they get up to two feet long. For the basking area, it's the actual surface temperature of whatever he's laying on that you want to check. We use an inexpensive infrared thermometer from Amazon. We have this one and it's only $15.99

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1538690046&sr=8-3&keywords=infrared+temperature+gun

The air temperature only needs to be in the 80's, and you want to put the basking area at one end of the tank. That way the basking area is the hottest and the opposite end is cooler, so he can move around and find the spot where he's happiest with the temperature. You want to put the UVB light in the middle so it shines on him no matter what part of the tank he's in.

One way to tell if you have the temperature in the basking area right is if he sits under the light with his mouth open. That means he's at the temperature he's happy with, and since he can't sweat he's using his mouth to cool down just enough to maintain his temperature. If you Google "bearded dragon gaping" there are lots of pictures of them doing it.

​

u/grantalfthegray · 3 pointsr/castiron

Get yourself a laser temp gun (https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY)

I find it handy to know what temperature the pan is before I add food. so I can tell it's warm enough, or possibly too hot.

u/ceris13 · 3 pointsr/Homebrewing

This has served me so well.

Works on strike water if you stir the water while heating, and it works to check in on fermentation temps. I've been using mine for about 2 years and its still on the first battery. Only downside is not getting a super accurate mash temp, but if you grab the temps on your grain and strike water, your mash should be fine.

Plus the laser is super fun.

u/canis-latrans · 3 pointsr/leopardgeckos

The analog dial/stick-on ones are notoriously unreliable. Tbh I'm not even sure why they still make them, but go with something digital for sure.

Hygrometer wise I have used and seen several people recommend [these] (https://www.amazon.com/AcuRite-Humidity-Thermometer-Hygrometer-Indicator/dp/B0013BKDO8/ref=mp_s_a_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1540538560&sr=8-5&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=Hygrometer&dpPl=1&dpID=516gPXAOs5L&ref=plSrch). You can also find them at most hardware stores in the garden section.
A [temperature gun] (https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1540538681&sr=8-3&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=temperature+gun&dpPl=1&dpID=41UpFdeJusL&ref=plSrch) is super cool and useful to have- it will measure the surface temperature of whatever you point it at, which is really nice especially for monitoring things like basking spots. They do make reptile-specific temp guns as well, but the hardware kind are significantly less expensive and function the same.

u/shrike1978 · 3 pointsr/snakes

Under tank heating does not raise the temperature of the air in the enclosure, and they should be on the bottom, not the side. They are strictly for raising the temperature of surfaces. Your thermostat probe (not thermometer, that's different...stats control sources, thermometers only measure them) should be either between the heat mat and the bottom, or taped to the bottom of the heat mat with foil tape. Thermostats are an absolute requirement for every heat source. Use an IR temp gun to measure the surface temp of the enclosure floor and set your thermostat appropriately (should be around 88-92 for a ball python). Put a thin layer of substrate over the heat mat (you can and should make it thicker everywhere else).

However, if your air temp is only 70, you need to raise that up quite a bit. Minimum air temp should be 76-80. For this, you're going to need to either raise the room temperature or use an overhead heat source. I'm thinking from your description that you have a glass tank. The appropriate device to raise temperature in a glass tank is a ceramic heat emitter. This must also be on a thermostat. You can use it in conjunction with a heat pad to just raise ambient temperature, but you can also use it by itself to both make a hotspot and raise ambient temps. You'll probably have to insulate the tank to get a good gradient.

Go read the stickies at /r/ballpython. There's a lot of info there on how to set up different enclosures. Glass is really bad for ball python keeping. It can work, but you're going to need to do some modifications to make get it right. PVC is a much better cage material for ball pythons.

u/FLUMPYflumperton · 3 pointsr/sousvide

+1 for IR thermometer, avocado oil, and ~500°F surface.

I'd also add that you need to get as much surface area contact with the meat and skillet as possible, so any way to get even pressure pushing down on the meat. I put the meat in, then a sheet of aluminum foil, then my clean smaller cast iron pan (for weight/distribution) on top, then my hand pushing it all down (in an oven mitt). You can use a plate as well, and I've heard of people putting dumbbells on top instead of pushing down. Just something to consider.

u/AckieFriend · 3 pointsr/MonitorLizards

Who told you that this was appropriate? Listen to u/arcticrobot. His advice is spot on! Insect only diet and hot basking surface! 140 degrees F! Use this to measure it: https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_3?crid=1C2DMUP0STUE&keywords=ir+temperature+gun&qid=1569642081&sprefix=ir+temp%2Caps%2C264&sr=8-3 It's cheap and it works. Get it now.

Do not feed it any more rodents!

u/Prorogue · 3 pointsr/snakes

I haven't used this specific combination before, but here's some things I know about the components:

  • That thermostat is an "on/off" thermostat, not a proportional heating thermostat. If it were proportional heating, that would mean that setting your target temperature high would increase the heat delivered. However, the Jumpstart thermostat doesn't work that way; it delivers 100% voltage as long as the probe reads below the target temperature, and 0% as long as it reads above the target temperature. In either case, you shouldn't set your target temperature to higher than the temperature you actually want to reach. Do you really want to reach 108 degrees at your probe?

  • What is the wattage of your heat tape? It might not be enough. Also, make sure that your heat tape is firmly adhered to the enclosure surface and that there is space for air underneath the heat tape. It won't work well if both sides of the heat tape are touching something.

  • Go get a digital infrared thermometer and measure the temperature at other spots in your enclosure. Maybe the temperatures are all decent, even though the temperature at your probe isn't what you expect.
u/KidLando · 3 pointsr/reptiles

I'd get rid of the lamp, bright light can hurt their eyes. The under tank heater should be enough for heat, and whatever the lighting in the room is should be enough for light.

You'll need a thermometer that measures ground heat, digital thermometers with probes are best. You can also use a temp gun.

You're also gonna need more hides for him to make him feel more secure, at least one on the cool side and one on the hot.

Check out /r/leopardgeckos too, they have tons of helpful information and a lot of cute gecko pictures.

u/say_oh_shin · 3 pointsr/AskCulinary

Oven thermometer is a must, but IR guns are also a fun and cheap investment.

u/mindlessASSHOLE · 3 pointsr/CannabisExtracts

I bought one of them Laser Thermometers. Can't wait to use it for the perfect temps. Also great to have on hand if you cook.

u/openpandorasbox · 3 pointsr/bluetongueskinks

Definitely keep a heat source on one side of the tank all night. Make sure the hot side is maybe around 80 at night and the cold side at 70. As for the matt burning him, you should purchase a light dimmer.

Lutron Credenza C.L Plug-In Lamp Dimmer for dimmable LED, Halogen and Incandescent Bulbs, TTCL-100H-WH-C, White https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00FRD2GHA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_6Qm4AbD5SB2F5

This is what I bought, it works for a heating pad so you can keep it warm. I noticed it was way too hot for my skink. You should also buy a thermal digital thermometer (alongside digital thermometer on each side of the tank and a hydro meter) to check surface temperatures.

Etekcity Infrared Thermometer Digital Temperature Gun Non-contact Food Laser Thermometer for Kitchen Cooking BBQ and Bath Water, -58℉~716℉ (-50℃~380℃), Yellow and Black https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_8Sm4AbFESMM21

This is what I use. I usually make sure the glass where the matt is is never over 90 degrees and his basking spot is never over 105 degrees.

As for the substrate it’s really up to you, I use aspen too, I’ve tried other substrates and he just doesn’t seem to enjoy them cause he can’t burrow. I change my substrate once a month and spot clean daily. If you keep it clean it shouldn’t be a problem.

Source: Northern bluey owner for only a year. My information is only from my own research.

u/PeaceLoveLindzy · 2 pointsr/BeardedDragons

Because he's still new the stress marks are probably from relocation stress and you constantly messing with things. Give him like 2 weeks before you start handling him a bunch so he can settle in. You can start baths at that time too.

Ditch the heat mat. Beardies don't register belly heat and can burn themselves as they don't know to move off of it. Go with the heat bulb that puts it at the proper temp and a tube UVB. Grab an infrared temp gun like This as it will give you the most accurate readings. What wattage heat bulbs do you have?

They can be pretty sensitive to what's going on around them and honestly the loud washing machine with the vibrations might freak him out.

Also he may just be glass surfing because he can see himself better with the different light. Sometimes they just glass surf to surf. I've never heard of it being correlated with heat, unless it's because he has more energy due to being warmer.

u/MannyDantyla · 2 pointsr/CherokeeXJ

First you gotta determine if it's really overheating or if your gauge is faulty.

When the temp gauge is reading red, is the coolant boiling? You would be able to see it boiling into the overflow bottle, and when its real bad it would be puking out the radiator cap.

Get one of those IR thermometer guns and check the upper and lower radiator hoses. If the upper hose is over 245 F then its overheating or very close to it. If the lower hose isn't reading significantly lower than the upper hose then you probably need a new/better radiator.

If it looks like its not actually overheating when your gauge says it is, then its either a faulty gauge or sensor. Get an OBDII scan tool, I use this one, to check the temp that the ECU is seeing. If its reading too high while your IR thermometer is showing a normal reading then it's probably a bad temp sensor. Else it's a bad gauge.

Too much air in the system can cause the sensor to give a false reading, as others have mentioned, so bleed any air bubbles out first.

Unless you live in AZ, it usually takes more than a few minutes of normal driving to even get up to normal operating temp. But if you have a head gasket leak and the engine is pushing hot gases in the coolant then it will get crazy hot real fast. Check for air bubbles in the coolant with the engine running, coolant in the oil, oil in the coolant, white smoke in the exhaust, etc. You can still have a HG leak though without those symptoms so if you really want to be sure, check for combusion gases in the coolant by taking it to a shop. They'll stick their emissions wand in the radiator opening and know right away and charge you $20. Yes Autozone and others loan out kits that test the same thing, but I don't like those personally.

Lets say you've tested everything you can, you're actually overheating, and you still can't figure out why. Does your heater work? If not your water pump might be bad or the heater core clogged (indicates your radiator could also be clogged). If it does then what happens when you run the heat at full blast? Does the temp drop? If so then your cooling system just can't keep up with the demand. Maybe the fan clutch is bad, the lower radiator hose is collapsing, etc.

u/SNAFU01 · 2 pointsr/Aquariums

I use the Python and am super happy with it. I don't have any experience with the Aqueon unfortunately so can't comment on it.

I know you're not looking for reasons to spend more money, but I will say there are a couple things for the Python that make a huge difference. First, I feel like the hook attachment is almost required. It makes it so much easier to use the system without getting water everywhere. My only other initial problem was that water would often come rushing out of the hook so fast that it would dislodge plants, however I saw a great tip in a YouTube video that this filter tube (70/110 size) fits perfectly onto the end of the hook and is great for diffusing the water. The conbination of these two products makes the Python a pretty perfect system in my opinion.

In regards to matching water temp, I use an infrared thermometer to match the water coming out of the facet before adding it to the tank. Has worked flawlessly as far as I can tell.

Also just to comment on the other posters, I haven't personally experienced any trouble just adding Prime directly to the tank and then immediately filling it up. Haven't had any issue with flow strength either and I'm on the third floor of my building with the tube stretching the full 25' length to reach my tank room.

u/DonSconn · 2 pointsr/Dabs
u/iBeenie · 2 pointsr/CannabisExtracts

Well I'm not the person you replied to, but I bought a cheap infrared thermometer and it has trouble getting a steady reading (especially on metal). Sometimes the temp fluctuates rapidly by hundreds of degrees when I'm holding it still on the same surface. This is the one I bought on Amazon It has great ratings, so maybe mine is just a fluke. Never bothered to comment or write to the seller or anything (it was so cheap, I just didn't bother).

u/Cannibal_Island · 2 pointsr/snakes

These can actually be off significantly (+/- 5 F) depending on the surface they measure, as well as how much you pay for them. A lot of people like them because they're convenient, but the really cheap ones can be misleading, especially if you try to measure a surface that has different emissivity than what the temp gun is set to. This is a cheap one but accurate about +/-2 F. It will only be accurate on surfaces like glass and plastic, but won't work on metal surfaces at all.

u/Gamberick · 2 pointsr/ElectricalEngineering

It's blown three times so far. The first fuse lasted about 1 year of near 24/7 use and the second and third lasted one or two days each.

There is a chance that the first fuse was a 10A. There was a spare fuse compartment on the power inlet and I just took the spare one that was included in there. It's possible that the original was a 10A and the backup was a 5A, once the second fuse blew I replaced it with another 5A fuse which also blew.

I did replace the foam on the sensor, should be ok there.

We have a thermometer (this one) what are you thinking?

Thanks!

u/salemprophet · 2 pointsr/snakes

I have a Mexican Black Kingsnake in a 40 gal (36x16x18). I bought a zoomed 8x12 UTH for it. (I bought this one since it was labelled for 40 gal.)

I have a UTH and a CHE. I use the UTH for a hotspot and use the CHE for ambient temp (my room is usually at like 68-70F). If your room is usually like 72F to 75F normally, I don't think you need a CHE. I use the jump start thermostats and they work fine for my needs. I plan on getting the herpstat one when I upgrade my tank when my boi is an adult.

The UTH probe should be sandwiched inbetween the adhesive pad and the bottom of the glass tank, all of it outside of the tank. You can try to use silicone caulk or hot glue to adhere it to the glass inside the tank but burrowing species like kingsnakes can dislodge them and through off the thermostat. Do NOT use tape inside the enclosure at all for any reason. Also, if your tank doesn't have little legs on it, make sure you use the silicon stickies on your tank at the corners so it's lifted up a bit. The air flow will help stop your UTH from burning your table/floor.

I put the CHE prob in the middle-ish of the tank suction cupped on the glass right above the substrate. I want the ambient temp to be about 75F. I set it up on top of the screen on the hotspot side, this way both the CHE and the UTH doesnt need to be set super high to heat up the substrate. The hotspot is 84-86F depending on how deep the substrate is. I let my cool side go down to 72F. At night cool side hits 68F.

I use aspen substrate. As long as the bag says its 100% aspen then is fine for snakes as well.

I use something similar to the number 2 thermometer/hydrometer to measure the ambient temp in the middle and cool sides. I just leave those two inside the tank. For my hotspot I use a laser thermometer like this to measure the surface temp. I also will periodically sweep the laser gun over the middle and cool side to kinda spot check that my thermometers are working.

For deep cleaning I use bleach and for spot cleaning I use cholohexidine and vinegar. (I make my own solutions with the ratios recommended in this video )

I don't have or use the emergency heat pads yet, so no recommendations there.

If you're getting a baby please also budget for clutter. They like having fake leaves when going from one hide to the other. And my MBK really loves climbing! Corns especially are semi-arboreal so they need it more.

Good luck!

u/Alcoholic_Love · 2 pointsr/ballpython

My new Jungle carpet python is like that. She won't eat anywhere but in her cage right now, thankfully she isn't aggressive by any means just really curious. It's usually stress or security related when they won't eat outside their habitat from what I have read. All my others never cared where they were fed. I'd try to get a meal into your snake however you can until he adjusts completely, then keep trying it in a tub until he takes. Sometimes it can take weeks. Knowing it's age will give you an idea how long they can go without food. Switching to frozen can sometimes be a pain though, and some snakes will just never take to it. Just make sure the temps, and humidity are good so you can rule that factor out. Sometimes they won't eat if it's not ideal. Also make sure there are at least two hides that the snake fits in comfortably, but not too big. One on the hot side, one on the cold side.

This is the temp gun I use for all my reptiles by the way. It works great, and is quick and easy to read/use.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00837ZGRY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1406867683&sr=8-1

u/itlopijjj · 2 pointsr/reptiles

I use this one http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00837ZGRY/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1462332524&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=temp+gun&dpPl=1&dpID=41nDmmWRKKL&ref=plSrch so they aren't expensive and they could save you money in the long run depending on how many animals you are keeping. You don't need a thermometer for each individual enclosure which is nice.

u/VilimirDrahkme · 2 pointsr/BeardedDragons

how old is your uvb bulb? They should be replaced every 6 months or so... also consider a thermometer gun - you can get them from amazon or at a local hardware store usually.

EDIT: I have this

u/Luna_Parvulus · 2 pointsr/Sneks

Hi! A little late to the party, but something else to keep in mind that I did not see mentioned is that you will definitely want a thermostat (not just a thermometer) to regulate the heat from your heat pad and/or Ceramic Heating Element. You will probably want one for each heat element, although CHEs can be controlled with dimmer switches as well I believe.

A thermostat lets you regulate the output of a heat pad or CHE. This is important because without regulation, it is possible for either of them to overheat beyond typical heating abilities. This could lead to extreme temperatures in your tank that could burn the snake or even cause neurological damage if it's hot enough.

I'm taking my list of suggestions from other users who post around snek subreddits as I am not yet a snek owner myself :(.

Cheap options are Jump Start thermostats, although they do not have safety features that will shut down the heating element if the thermostat fails. Another option that's in the same price range but a bit safer is an Inkbird thermostat. If you wanna splurge and get a very high quality thermostat for your little buddy, you can go for a Spyder Robotics thermostat.

Also, not necessarily required but useful and fun: an Infrared Thermometer

u/VenomXTs · 2 pointsr/Nest

Pick up a temp gun similar to this then walk to your vents and see what temp is coming out of your vents. If its not matching your thermostat or colder then you may have a issue with the condenser. Had a similar issue last year but if you have cold air out and its just really hot outside your unit may just be struggling with the heat and the size of your house.

u/SGRainz · 2 pointsr/reptiles

So I don’t know exactly how much I’ve spent on my beardie since he was given to me with almost everything I needed to care for him, but I can give you the basics.

First off, for the flooring you can use paper towels to start, or contact cabinet paper that can be found at a dollar tree. I don’t think tile is that expensive, but if you’re unable to get some at the moment those work just fine. I also suggest covering the back and sides of the tank so the beardie doesn’t see its reflection and get stressed

You’ll need at least one hide on the cooler side, which can be made from something as simple as a small cardboard box with a hole cut in it or some bricks that are arranged into a cave-like hide

A basking area can be made from bricks purchased at Lowe’s or Home Depot, or if you choose to use any driftwood/rocks you find just make sure you clean them properly

Calcium powder is also extremely important to help your beardie not develop MBD. I’m part of a Facebook bearded dragon group that suggests this brand sprinkled over greens/bugs three times a week: https://www.chewy.com/repashy-superfoods-calcium-plus/dp/166276 I poke some holes in the paper lid with a toothpick to create a shaker-type deal so I’m not wasting any calcium

I think one of the most expensive parts is the UVB light since they can get pretty pricey, and since they need to be changed every six months. Here’s an 18”, along with a fixture that could be used, but obviously with a longer tank you’ll need a longer size: https://www.chewy.com/zoo-med-t8-reptisun-100-uvb/dp/126590 https://www.amazon.com/GE-Fluorescent-Included-Workbench-16466/dp/B000HJ75PW again, I usually stay away from reptile brands for things such as fixtures because the cheaper version works better and lasts longer. The T8 bulb needs to be hooked into the tank, which I use zip ties to the lid but Velcro to the side also works, as long as it’s 12” away from the basking area

Heat lamp with dimmer: https://www.chewy.com/flukers-clamp-lamp-dimmer-85-in/dp/129140

Pack of 90w flood lights (make sure they’re halogen, not LED): https://www.homedepot.com/p/Philips-90-Watt-PAR38-Halogen-Indoor-Outdoor-Flood-Light-Bulb-2-Pack-466268/205541724

Digital temp gun: https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY

Light timer for both lights: https://www.amazon.com/Century-Heavy-Digital-Programmable-Timer/dp/B00MVF16JG

Vet bills and fecal tests can be pricey as well, depending on where you live. My last vet appointment with mine, which did include a test for parasites, cost around $300

While I don’t know how much I’ve spent on my beardie, I can safely estimate it’s $700+, give or take a bit. One of the most expensive is buying the greens and bugs for him. I’m growing a garden to feed him but since it’s not ready yet, I have to constantly buy him collards, turnip and mustard greens, along with various fruits and veggies which can go bad very quickly. I’m in the process of looking into buying his superworms online where you can get a better deal, but at the moment I’m paying 100 for $10 at my local exotic pet shop, which he goes through quickly.

I don’t know how old you are, but if you say you’re not old enough to properly take care of a reptile I would wait a few years or so until you get another. Bearded dragons, while more of a beginner reptile than others, still require a lot of time and effort to make sure they stay healthy. I would recommend doing a lot research throughout the next few months (look at multiple sources, don’t just listen to people at a pet store because often they don’t know what they’re talking about), and if possible, perhaps slowly start gathering the needed supplies in order to properly care for one

I hope I covered everything since reddit refreshed and deleted my first response before I finished, but if you have any more questions you can always message me (:

u/zacattack62 · 2 pointsr/MDEnts
u/Rebel_816 · 2 pointsr/leopardgeckos

It takes a while for them to warm up, but remember 90 isnt very different from our own body heat, so it wont really feel hot or anything. Make sure its making good contact with the floor of your tank.

Get an infared temp gun, they are really cheap and make checking temps super easy and its very important to know your temperatures. About $15 on amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=lp_393284011_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1503297617&sr=1-1

u/golfpinotnut · 2 pointsr/Cooking

You need an infrared thermometer gun thingey like this

u/SrGoyim · 2 pointsr/snakes

These are terrible. For snakes, you want to ditch the coloured bulbs & go for ceramic emitters (http://www.amazon.com/BYB-Ceramic-Infrared-Emitter-Brooder/dp/B00HFNZ59Q) in a porcelain clamp lamp such as http://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Deluxe-Porcelain-8-5-Inch/dp/B0002AQCXM/ attached to a stand such as http://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Reptile-Stand-Economy/dp/B000HG76B8 (highly recommended as ceramic emitters are a large fire hazard, reaching over 700f) . Exo terra terraniums such as http://www.amazon.com/Exo-Terra-Short-Terrarium-12-Inch/dp/B008N9LYJ6 are great for beginner snakes which don't have unusually high humidity requirements (mesh tops found on glass tanks let out lots of humidity compared to e.g. plastic tubs with air holes melted via soldering iron). While the ceramic emitter will raise the ambient temperature, your snake will also want a very warm spot to go to for belly heat to aid digestion, so a heat mat such as http://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-ReptiTherm®-Heater-Medium/dp/B0002AQCL4/ attached to a thermostat such as http://www.amazon.com/MTPRTC-ETL-Certified-Thermostat-Germination-Reptiles/dp/B000NZZG3S/ is highly recommended. The thermostat is not optional as heat mat's reach over 105f which can be fatal. As for supplementary light in e.g. winter, snakes have no special requirements as compared to other reptiles for uva/uvb, so any desk lamp or room lighting would suffice. As for decoration, snakes don't care. Hides can be made out of cereal boxes, butter containers etc, substrate can be newspapers, shredded tissue paper (not shredded paper as it causes cuts), or you can research more professional substrate for your specific snake (beware the earthy substrate which can cause impactation/death if ingested, also wood chips can harbour mites - simple paper is often better!). As for monitoring humidity/temperature within the tank, the analogue ones suck. I would recommend a digital one such as http://www.amazon.com/Avianweb-Digital-Thermo-Hygrometer-Black/dp/B00U2S6JSC/ - even if 10% out as per reviews, they are better than analogues which are 20-30%+ out and get more inaccurate over time. Finally, not required, but useful is an ir gun such as http://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ so that you can get a sense of the surface temperatures around the tank that your snake is crawling across, and to ensure your hot hide is within parameters and not lethally exceeding 105f.

u/AwkwardMunchkin · 2 pointsr/ballpython

u/_ataraxia has a lot of good information. I've stolen their list of links and information for you to go through, but all the credit for this belongs to them. (Also I don't know how to embed links into the comments since I'm a reddit noob so please excuse the messiness)

the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations in case you need to get any supplies yourself.

http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding

spyder robotics (http://www.spyderrobotics.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=1) makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. https://www.amazon.com/MTPRTC-ETL-Certified-Thermostat-Germination-Reptiles/dp/B000NZZG3S/ is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat.

heat tape (http://www.reptilebasics.com/heat-tape) or ultratherm heat pads (http://www.reptilebasics.com/ultratherm-heat-pads) are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options.

a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer (https://www.amazon.com/AcuRite-00891A3-Outdoor-Thermometer-Humidity/dp/B001BO8CUE/) allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].

an infrared thermometer (https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/) allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.

these hide boxes (http://www.reptilebasics.com/hide-boxes) are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

edit: Just fixed some formatting to make it easier to read.

u/rexstuff1 · 2 pointsr/sousvide

Two things of note:

  1. If you can taste it, your oil might be off, and going rancid. How old is it?

  2. Get yourself one of these: https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_3 and never have to guess again. They're also a great deal of fun.
u/arcticrobot · 2 pointsr/MonitorLizards

Yeah, that guy is wrong. You are not getting proper surface measurement with cooking thermometer. You need this:

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/

u/jeffreyww · 2 pointsr/eatsandwiches

This is a very good recipe. Dip a few onions to get the feel for how thick the batter needs to be, better to start a tad thick and add milk a little at a time until you think it looks right. I fried these in canola oil at 350 or so. These things are great for monitoring oil temps.

u/grewapair · 2 pointsr/aww

The cop is holding a thermometer in his other hand. I think you have to give the cop the benefit of the doubt that he knew what he was doing.

u/Starstoolborts · 2 pointsr/barstoolsports

gotcha, try and grab you one of these https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY. it's an extra expense but it definitely makes all the difference in the world knowing what temp you are dabbing at so it's at optimal temp. are you just heating the nail and then ripping with no time in-between? I don't have much experience with nectar collectors but chances are you are dabbing it too hot. if you really want the best experience get an electric nail for cheap that you can get for like $80 that has a digital read-out of the temp you are dabbing at. sweet spot is anywhere between 500-650.

u/ActionMakShin · 2 pointsr/questionablecontent

Apparently Robocop got the Amazon deal of the day

u/Genghis_Tron187 · 2 pointsr/pcmasterrace

First, I would not use Prime95. There is a specific version that can be used with newer Intel processors, but either way, Prime95 puts an unrealistic load on the CPU. Try AIDA64 for a better baseline.

As for the hoses, I have an infrared thermometer gun but after running under full load for about 10-15min I could physically tell a significant difference just by touching the hoses. I suppose it boils down to (heh) if there is a problem with the rad, how much of a problem it is.

One final note that the H80i GT is a single rad and you should probably expect higher temps on it to begin with. I unfortunately have no idea what temps you should expect.

u/HateToShave · 2 pointsr/watercooling

> How would I get a good reading on the water temperature?

As some what stated by others, a G1/4 or inline temp sensor hooked up to a temp sensor header on your motherboard so that you can read out the parameter in Windows (with HWInfo64 or the motherboard manufacturer's own monitoring software). Another way is to use stand alone setups like Aqua Computer's Aquaero. Yet another is to do the very cheap way and use an infrared thermometer gun (held close to various spots) to get base line and overclocked readings while paying close attention to the rooms current ambient temps. This last method is not very accurate, but could get you by until you can move to or afford something more accurate.

> I always thought the cpu temp was the measurement

You still do this, yes, but the water temp is key for cooling both a CPU and a GPU at the same time to prevent high water temps that could damage a pump (like your listed 50c rated D5 pump). We, collectively, say that a water temp reading is best to base ones fan and pump speed (if doable) curve on because if you set your fan speeds based on your CPU temp, only, then the fans are going to be both prone to fluctuation considerably more (case by case) than if that lower, more consistent water temp is used and limited to only working with your CPU as opposed to both the CPU and GPU in the same loop, automatically (sorry for the long sentence):

So if a loop, with fans at 750 RPM is providing 225 watts of cooling for both a CPU and GPU in the same loop then only the CPU is getting the higher 375+ watts of cooling made available from your loop because the fans, tied only to the CPU temp, are now at 1500 RPM under a heavy, hot CPU load, for example. But if you were gaming with a 8600k that was sitting at 25% load and only about 40-55c then the fans probably won't be moving a whole lot away from that 750 RPM and ~225 watts of cooling. Meanwhile in that same game your overclocked 1080Ti is dumping out tons of heat, say 250+ watts alone, into the loop water with fans stuck at a low RPM not moving air, and thus heat, away from the radiators. This can lead to that 50c of water temp scenario that whatever D5 pump you were looking at can come into play.

​

u/Gayrub · 2 pointsr/sousvide
u/EchoBrain22 · 2 pointsr/BeardedDragons

I second this, they are junk.

Go with an IR thermometer like this

The one linked isn't bad but I prefer one with a wired probe instead of the extra sensor. You can put the probe right on the basking spot. Like this one

u/laisseladouleur · 2 pointsr/BeardedDragons

Okay, Do you know the temps of the hot and cool side of your enclosure? 20 gallons is small. Could be too hot in there. do not trust the velcro stick on analog thermometers. You need to get a temp gun or digital thermometer to be accurate. Let me know when you know what kind of bulbs you're using and how far away they are from each other and the basking spot. :)

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1542315725&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=temp+gun&psc=1

​

this is the one I use and it's super affordable and reliable.

u/neuromonkey · 2 pointsr/SCREENPRINTING

They mean an infrared, non-contact thermometer. The laser dot is just for sighting where it's taking the reading.

u/skittlekitteh · 2 pointsr/snakes

Here's u/ataraxia's classic link dump I found on a other post. Although the informstion is written for bps (most common snake people have trouble with it seems- mostly due to the humedity) but the suggestions could definitely help you for the humedity aspect needed for your boa.


You should definitely read it through.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/drawkin · 2 pointsr/reptiles

For starters, yes, please go to an exotic vet who's familiar with beardies.

Can you take a photo of your enclosure? What's his basking temperature like? Do you have a temperature gun? How close is the bulb to his head? What sort of bulbs are you using? And What do you have for substrate?

u/super_smasher · 2 pointsr/steak

This infrared thermometer is one of my favorite kitchen tools.

Knowing the temperature of the cooking surface helped me "calibrate" my sense of how my pans behave on the stovetop.

u/ohmygobblesnot · 2 pointsr/ballpython

Get digital temp amd humidity gauges. The analog ones are known to be highly inaccurate which could lead to you not knowing of a problem inside your bps enclosure. Ill list some more accurate temp/humidity gauges i use for all my animals/know work far better than analog gauges.

(These two links are for direct spots) https://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Digital-Thermometer-Humidity/dp/B06XY3X7P9/ref=sxin_2_ac_m_rm?ac_md=0-0-ZGlnaXRhbCByZXB0aWxlIHRoZXJtb21ldGVy-ac_d_rm&keywords=digital+reptile+thermometer&pd_rd_i=B06XY3X7P9&pd_rd_r=f1b30844-5547-49df-95ff-ba0aac3561f2&pd_rd_w=Uchs0&pd_rd_wg=guzkL&pf_rd_p=d1a6ea92-24ed-409e-8e33-97dc5a8de815&pf_rd_r=TGRYA2JMNKC4SK449XXH&qid=1569166473&s=gateway&sprefix=digitalreptile++thermometer

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B07RBPV8Q4/ref=sspa_mw_detail_0?ie=UTF8&psc=1

(I use this one to make sure my heatmat regulartor thing is accurate) https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sxin_2_osp129-ac57b3ab_cov?ascsubtag=ac57b3ab-bed4-443b-8488-8e105122ba5b&creativeASIN=B00837ZGRY&cv_ct_id=amzn1.osp.ac57b3ab-bed4-443b-8488-8e105122ba5b&cv_ct_pg=search&cv_ct_wn=osp-search&keywords=digital+thermometer&linkCode=oas&pd_rd_i=B00837ZGRY&pd_rd_r=89005af9-9dd9-4e80-a240-605a60d3d510&pd_rd_w=t3SHd&pd_rd_wg=c1tkV&pf_rd_p=33b90d57-4392-4d9b-9557-da4c9de25645&pf_rd_r=AZDN5TXKRQHMD5KGXTCN&qid=1569166451&s=gateway&sprefix=digital+&tag=thedrive09-20

(This one is for the middle or get two for each side as this one has worked the best to see the overall temp/humidity in the enclosures for my bp and crested) geckohttps://www.amazon.com/dp/B01H1R0K68/?coliid=I2O5Q9VJY092E6&colid=2MBRCC0QH2E8J&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

Edit: also whats your overal humidity in the room you're keeping the tank cause the cypress might be soaking up in moosture in the air which is causing your enclosure to be so high. I do still suggest you change to digital but it still might be helpful to know if your bedroom is the problem.

u/wpm · 2 pointsr/carbonsteel

Get yourself one of these bad boys. You'll never figure out weird and random scales like burner settings, you need to know the actual temp of the pan.

u/SugarandSass · 2 pointsr/candlemaking

Use the CandleScience wick guide while you're building your cart and that'll give you a good idea of which ones to start testing!

I use this cheap infrared thermometer I swiped from the garage tools. Hold it at the recommended distance and it works great!

Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Laser Infrared Thermometer Temperature Gun -58℉~ 716℉ (-50℃ ~ 380℃), Yellow and Black https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_jTVADbGSJVHB9

u/crulwhich · 2 pointsr/food

Here's my method for preparing scrambled eggs in case anyone cares:

  1. Start to preheat your pan on medium heat
  2. Get a plate ready
  3. Bread in the toaster. Don't push the lever yet
  4. Crack your eggs into a container and break the yolks, don't stir it too much
  5. Your pan is probably hot by now. Remove it from the heat and let it cool to 500 degrees (Do yourself a favor and buy this bad boy)
  6. Add butter and let the pan cool to 450 or slightly higher
  7. Add your eggs and return to heat
  8. Stir constantly using a silicone spatula or spoonula
  9. Move the pan on and off the heat every 15-20 seconds while stirring until the egg whites are almost set
  10. Scoop the eggs onto your plate. Oh look the toast is done.
  11. Let the eggs cook on the plate for a minute.

    This technique yields incredibly moist, soft, fluffy scrambled eggs every time.
u/dee-emm-tee · 2 pointsr/DMT

My advice is to invest in a good IR thermometer. ETEKCITY branded ones are affordable and they do the job really well. You can get one that reads up to 380℃ for $16 from Amazon.

I personally don't know the correct temperature for dabbing DMT as I only use full convection vaporisation, but having the IR thermometer will allow you to learn the best temperature and apply it consistently to get the same result every time.

u/_darth_bacon_ · 2 pointsr/BBQ
u/The_Photon_Fantom · 2 pointsr/microgrowery

No worrries man! I'm just skeptic as fuck. You got nothing to apologize for, that link does have data in it, dude says he gets more potency with UV lights, even put them on one side and not the other and got more potent buds from the side with UV.

I would very much like to know if/by how much the total yield changed with UV and without. To put it as a question: what effect does UV light have on THC production vs it's effect on plant growth?

Once I established that I would like to run the same test but substitue UV with blue, then 6000k white, then green, then 3500k white, 3000k white, then red, then IR. Then I could compare the effects of adding different wavelengths and see if one seems to make more THC but not effect yield, or maybe one tends to make the plant yield more but THC remains the same.

And don't beat yourself up too much for just not knowing. I get schooled all the time on stuff that I think I know about and I'm completely wrong. Case and point: a couple weeks ago I got in an argument with Growmau5 (is he on Reddit? /u/Growmau5) about LED efficiency. I thought there couldn't be that much of a difference between manufactures because an LED is an LED, right? Wrong. I set up an expirement with a Cree CXB3590 run at 30w and an array of Epistar LEDs at 30w and got 52k lux at 6" from the Cree vs 30k lux from the Epistar LEDs. However, 30w of Epistar LED's is $8, while a CXB3590 is ~$50, plus I like the spread of the Epistar LEDs and you can always just put them closer if you want more light on your plants.


....anyways, for to measure VPD you need an IR thermometer and a temp and humidity monitor

Honestly I know what my VPD is, but I haven't really found what the optimal VPD is for weed. Poeple talk about it a lot but I've never seen someone say "8.0 is the best VPD for cannabis"

u/MelodramaticMe · 2 pointsr/BeardedDragons

Oh good, I'm glad she is more comfortable. :)

As far as thermometers, I have this one and have been happy with it.

u/liberummentis · 2 pointsr/enail

I've never had a problem with this temp gun. If you can afford a Liger, you can afford this.

u/RingoQuasarr · 1 pointr/Showerthoughts

I just use this. Works pretty well.

u/theanatomyofpainting · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

I use this since it let's you test the Temps of the various surfaces your beardie lays on.

u/AthiestLibNinja · 1 pointr/gadgets
u/vbaspcppguy · 1 pointr/bettafish

The brown of the edges on his fins is already significantly reduced. This makes me happy.

I use a IR thermometer with a laser and he actually chased the laser, as best he could anyway. Then I went and stuck my face up close to check out his fins and he ran off to hide under the filter output again.

u/birdsbirdsbirdsbirds · 1 pointr/ballpython

Hmm, that's a good question! Ideally you want to be measuring both the hot and cold side simultaneously and independently of the thermostat. In your case, I would probably put it right in the middle (against the back wall) so it's getting an average of the entire tank. BUT, I've also heard people say to put it only on the hot side so you know the max temps your snake could experience.

One thing you might consider investing in as a "Christmas Present" to your snake is a cheap infrared thermometer. It makes it super easy to measure temps every place in your tank. Then use the digital thermo/hygro as a general all-the-time indicator.

PS. Glad to hear your thermostat is helping you get on-track for maximal husbandry!!

u/Neuman98 · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

You deff want the high output uvb bulbs they don't put out heat but uv light which they need to metabolize calcium. Since beardies spend lots of time in the sun, those lights are super important and you shouldn't go without one. As for the temps you can get a temp gun for like $15 on Amazon, https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00837ZGRY/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1494544122&sr=8-3&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=thermometer+gun&dpPl=1&dpID=41cHjF4O4QL&ref=plSrch

u/StevenFielding · 1 pointr/gpdwin

Run one yourself. If you've got a spare SATA slot on your tower (and a spare SATA cable), all you need is this to plug it in and this to measure its temps

u/geekasaur14 · 1 pointr/reptiles

Unfortunately a thermometer still won't give you surface temperature, no matter how close it is. So the surface temp is likely hotter than what you just said. A temp gun is necessary if you want to be sure of your basking temps, and they're especially important for reptiles like uros. This one is cheap and effective. I have multiple.

u/Tallguy_23 · 1 pointr/reptiles
u/sslowswimmer · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

http://amzn.to/2jeOTow Non-contact Digital Laser Infrared Thermometer - to show my wife how hot she actually is.

u/Zandar007 · 1 pointr/gpumining

they are so cheap now and they work great. Technology!

*This is a non affiliated , non shill link. just for an idea of wat to pay - $15

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1525795544&sr=8-3&keywords=laser+thermometer

u/pussy_admiral · 1 pointr/HomeImprovement

Get one of these to check if you have heat gain through your home's envelope:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_i_uKncBbWC1NGZP

u/jynnsomething · 1 pointr/Lizards

https://www.amazon.com/MTPRTC-Controller-Thermostat-Germination-Reptiles/dp/B000NZZG3S. Here is a cheap thermostat that will do all you really need by turning off when it hits a certain temperature and turning back on when the temp gets to a different temperature. In the future you should also keep it outside of the cage, as well as the thermostat probe. Trust someone who has learned the hard way what happens when you don't, so you don't hurt your animal, or worse, kill it or even start a fire.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00837ZGRY/ref=mp_s_a_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1527664094&sr=8-9-spons&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=it+thermometer+gun&psc=1
Here is a cheap IR thermometer that is perfectly effective so you can actually properly monitor surface temperatures. Also, if the thermometers you currently have aren't digital, you're not even measuring temperature accurately now. Dials (i.e. Analog thermometers) are totally useless.

Now by the downvotes I'm getting, I'm assuming you're mostly ignoring me. Cool. So when your reptile inevitably gets burned, don't bother posting here or in the reptile sub or wherever asking what to do, because the advice will be the same: just immediately take him to your nearest reptile vet (I'd make sure you know where that is.)

I wish the best for your poor lizard and hope you aren't failing in other aspects of his care.

If you had made this post in r/reptiles, you would have gotten the heat tape thermostat talk too. Don't believe me? Go post there and wait for other people to tell you the same thing.




u/VenusAndSaturn · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

I'd recommend a digital temperature gauge with a probe or a temp gun. The temp gun would most likely be best. Downside is temp guns are a bit expensive sometimes but their worth it in the long run.

https://www.amazon.com/ANGGO-Non-contact-Temperature-Thermometer-Precisely/dp/B01FYVEJMY/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1527639624&sr=1-2-spons&keywords=temp+gun&psc=1

This is the temp gun I use but it seems to be currently out of stock.

However this one should be fine.

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_3?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1527639624&sr=1-3&keywords=temp+gun

As far as UVB goes I'd get this bulb and fixture for both of the beardies. It will probably be a bit bigger than their current tanks but it'll save money when you have to upgrade each of them to 75 gallons at the very least as that is the minimum for full grown beardies. Although 4x2x2 is preferred. Do note 20 gallons only last a beardie until 6 months of age and then they must be moved to their final enclosure or a 40, 50 or 55 gallon. If you go with the grow out tanks then those will last another 6 months before you need the final enclosure since preferably you want them moved into the final enclosure at 12 months.

https://www.amazon.com/Reptile-T5HO-Standard-Fixture-Reflector/dp/B01B209YQC/ref=sr_1_5?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1523586973&sr=1-5&keywords=t5+ho+fixture

\^ 34" T5 HO Fixture

https://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-26062-Reptisun-Fluorescent/dp/B00AQU8HKO/ref=pd_bxgy_199_img_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B00AQU8HKO&pd_rd_r=ZNH52XHETCP3Y7K5FGA2&pd_rd_w=GIi1G&pd_rd_wg=oAEwd&psc=1&refRID=ZNH52XHETCP3Y7K5FGA2&dpID=31QDwNV8eSL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=detail

\^ 34" T5 HO 10.0

u/Sendmailtome · 1 pointr/AskElectronics

If it is a temp problem we use a temp gauge like this. you will see the component heat up quick.

u/Zerowantuthri · 1 pointr/sousvide

I am unsure why his pan is not getting hot enough. Induction or not, low power or not, his stove top should be able to hit 400-500F easily which should be fine for searing.

As other mentioned drying the steak is #1 in importance.

I would also pick a higher temp oil like Avocado Oil or, if that seems too weird or hard to find then peanut oil. Avocado oil has the highest smoke point but peanut/sunflower/palm/refined corn oil is fine (although beware of peanut allergies if you have guests and use peanut oil).

After you dry the steak brush it with the oil. Not a lot. Just a light sheen (some fat from the steak will cook out adding more grease to the pan so not a lot of oil is needed).

When it comes to the pan definitely use cast iron. My guess is you are not letting it heat up enough. Cast iron has poor heat conductivity (compared to other metals). For searing this is actually a good feature. That said it takes the pan longer to heat up so leave it on the burner for a minimum of five minutes on full blast before cooking. Maybe longer...you'll need to experiment a bit (I have seen recommendations of up to 10 minutes but that seems a bit long but then I have not tested it so I cannot say for certain...if your stove top is low power it may well take 10 minutes).

Only once your pan is ripping hot should you add the steak. If you really want to be sure of your pan's temperature buy an infrared thermometer. They cost less than $20 if you really want to know what's going on. Just point it at the pan and it tells you the surface temp.

Again, wait till the pan heats up. It is easy to think with a burner going full tilt a metal pan heats up in moments. It doesn't. Give it some time. Especially with a cast iron pan. (Note: It can get too hot as well...a bit of practice helps figure out the sweet spot.)

u/thankwoo · 1 pointr/microgrowery

Hmm I thought these were $200+! This one on Amazon is $18 and has 4.5 stars. Thanks for the tip.

u/Drewski_drew_10 · 1 pointr/leopardgeckos
u/LazyGrower · 1 pointr/microgrowery

I was typing up my list of shit for my second grow. Lets see if I got my Reddit Formatting Correct. :)

The Details

Seeds

u/Armonster20 · 1 pointr/Trackdays

With warmers you'll probably be fine (i.e. no cold tire crashes), but considering the temperature and your pace, the SC2's probably won't give you any benefit over Q3s.

You could get one of those little laser temperature readers and test your tire temp right off the track. If you can't break 100 F, put the Q3's back on.

u/lateefx · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

Awesome. Those starter kits are a shame - you've done a good job keeping up with the lights though. Here's my recommendation and this is from learning from experienced bearded dragon keepers.

  • Ditch the dual light set up ASAP. Your beardie won't be getting the right amount of UVB it needs to thrive. Preference is something that will cover 2/3 of the tank like this: -- I can't emphasize enough how important appropriate UVB light absorption is for your beardie's growth, digestion, etc.

  • Don't get a temperature gauge, get a gun like this so you can test temps at specific spots, surface temperature is what we're after.

    Finally - you must check out the links in the sidebar, starting with the "Comprehensive Care Guide" -- everything I've said in this message is in that comprehensive guide.
u/VZZld_SONlWOP · 1 pointr/analog

I'm putting together a kit to develop black and white film at home.
Can I use one of these infrared thermometer guns instead of a glass thermometer? I eventually want to develop color film as well.

u/farijuana · 1 pointr/Hedgehog

im assuming the cage is directly on the floor? i would recommend getting a laser thermometer (theyre actually pretty cheap on amazon) so you can see how cold the floor of the cage really is. If you can, buy or build something that will raise the cage off the floor, which will allow the warmer room air to circulate under the cage. If you can bump up the room temperature too, that would be best. Once a hedgie has attempted to hibernate, they are more likely to again in the future. 74 is only one degree higher than the minimum recommended temperature of 73 so a higher temp (75-78) would definitely be safer.

u/Wirerat · 1 pointr/overclocking
u/TukusD · 1 pointr/picobrew

In 24 hours, the keg should be at room temperature. I also use an infrared thermometer gun to show temp instead of an actual thermometer inside the wort to help keep everything sanitary. My gun is similar to this one on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=temp+gun&qid=1570210888&sr=8-3

u/Sieberella · 1 pointr/Wishlist

If stuff is coming out burnt tasting it could be because the oil is getting too hot. Get yourself one of these -it's a life saver

u/the_koob · 1 pointr/chicago

My heat is currently shut off. I'm able to maintain a comfortable 68 by utilizing the heat from my neighbors to the sides and below me.

EDIT: some helpful advice

Pick up one of these and scan around any exterior facing areas of your home (from inside) to check for cold spots. Add insulation or caulking or tape up your windows.

Or pick up a thermal imaging camera - FLiR just released a new one that works on iPhone/ Android

u/Back2nature11 · 1 pointr/CannabisExtracts
u/Alec9Grows · 1 pointr/microgrowery

I agree with this statement to an extent. I don't use the vpd chart as a do or don't guide by any means, but I would be concerned if I were seriously far off from what it recommends. As for checking the temp of your leaves...

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY

... it's not hard at all to figure out the temperature of literally anything you can point at.

u/chirsmitch · 1 pointr/Cooking

There's one on sale for prime day for $14. Don't know if that works outside the US though.

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY

u/snorkelbagel · 1 pointr/overclocking

http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php/758722-Anyone-with-Gigabyte-970a-ud3p-boards

TL:DR false software readings. Your board doesn't actually have VRM temp sensors.

Use an IR thermometer. I use this one. It's cheap and fairly accurate.

Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Laser Infrared Thermometer Temperature Gun -58℉~ 716℉ (-50℃ ~ 380℃), Yellow and Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_y5NwzbYNJ1N88

u/krails · 1 pointr/KitchenConfidential

Infrared thermometer, $16:

Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Laser Infrared Thermometer Temperature Gun -58℉~ 716℉ (-50℃ ~ 380℃), Yellow and Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY

u/2_old_for_this_shit · 1 pointr/grilling

Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Infrared Thermometer, Yellow/Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awd_ZaF7wbKGBY4AV

u/MetalMaiden420 · 1 pointr/hamsters

Hooking up a thermostat to a heating pad is as easy as plugging it in, then plugging the thermostat into the wall. Heat Pad into Thermostat into Wall Outlet.

Here's a cheap thermostat that a lot of people get

I personally use these for a heat pad but ZooMed ones work too (found in most petsmarts and petco's)

Also if you go this route, I HIGHLY reccomend getting a laser thermometer to make SURE the pad isnt getting too hot. One I have is found here.

u/Fake_account27 · 1 pointr/HomeImprovement

Do you have a temp gun like this.

I ask because I have a similar setup, but my crawl space does not really get that warm so the floor is always a little cold. In my case the floor is always a few degrees colder then the house, and I have to wear socks.

u/wwb_99 · 1 pointr/AskCulinary

Protip: I keep a laser temperature gun (https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/) in the kitchen precisely to know how hot my pans are. Also makes a great laser pointer for pet entertainment and it is handy to figure out where the drafts are coming from.

Anything an inch or more thick tends to get reverse seared or sous vided in my kitchen, really just much better methods if you've got the time and the tools.

u/SynclinalJob · 1 pointr/MechanicAdvice

If you want to be 100% sure nothing is sticking then you should buy this https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_b300Cb53YHKM6

You just point it all all the rotors after driving and see if there’s an abnormally different temp between all 4. This gun also has many other uses as well.

I would start with confirming that there is no issues with calipers sticking first and then continue on. Sticking calipers can cause a lot of heat to be introduced to the breaking system and can cause issues throughout.

Look on YouTube and watch some videos on proper brake bleeding and do your whole system completely (starting from the furthest caliper caliper and moving closer, also confirm the correct fluid from your manual DOT3 or DOT4 usually)

Message me if you need more help

Edit: this is a 96 corolla which probably means rear drum brakes, which may need adjustments. Check into that

u/Naaarrfff · 1 pointr/ender3

Thermometer or thermal camera

Something like this

u/Herpaderp7jis9of · 1 pointr/Sneks

This kinda behavior might be a bit unusual but every snek is different. I would check to make sure your ambient temps are around 80F and you have a hot spot using pad under the environment which heats to around 90F.

My ball python did a lot of searching before we got the temps right. I use 2 jump start thermostats now and she just chills 99.9% of the time.

Get this ... its $15 and so worth it for any reptile (also kinda handy in the kitchen if you cook)

u/AutoModerator · 1 pointr/ballpython


I am a bot programmed to automatically provide the following content by /u/_Ataraxia when summoned. Link to the most recent version of this content here

The first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions. Let /u/_Ataraxia know if any of the links don't work.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

Ball Python Care Guides

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems

    Set-up Recommendations

  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. some popular brands include animal plastics [most recommended], boaphile plastics [i personally have these and like them], reptile basics, and vision cages, though you'll find many more with a quick google search. many people will use a tub at first and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter[CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as pro products [most recommended] or reptile basics.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    Copypasta version 7/24/2018 (c) /u/_Ataraxia

    I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.
u/birdman3131 · 1 pointr/askanelectrician

Some home depots rent them. I have one builtin to my phone and it comes in quite handy at times.

If not something like this will work. you just have to pan slowly across rather than being able to see everything at once.
https://www.amazon.com//dp/B00837ZGRY/

u/pragmaticapprentice · 1 pointr/HomeImprovement

This is a bit of a drop in the bucket, but one thing I haven't seen yet is that even if an electronic is turned off, it's still pulling a small amount of electricity. What I've done with a few areas of my house is plug everything into a surge protector (this should be done anyways for expensive electronics) and unplug them completely when you're not going to use them for hours at a time. My PC setup is unplugged for about 18 hours of the day then.


Another option is to see if there are "peak" times your electric company charges more since everyone is using the electricity. Try and avoid doing laundry / dishes around these times.


Move to LED bulbs. They're roughly $2.00 / bulb at this point.

When I added insulation to my attic, my utility company reimbursed 75% of the cost of the material. I found out about this from a free energy audit along with other initiatives that they would reimburse.

You could also try spotting your own leaks with: https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_1?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1487044338&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=laser+thermometer&psc=1

u/rocklawbster · 1 pointr/homeowners
u/nijjerfajjot · 1 pointr/leopardgeckos
u/AsH83 · 1 pointr/watercooling

For that OC maybe it is worth it. you can get a infrared temp for less than $20
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY

u/5uNmk · 1 pointr/DMT

I use a 2L erlenmyer flask for 100g extractions. I use a 1L for the acid bath.

Some other tools you might consider:

u/BourbonBBNandQ · 1 pointr/smoking

Basically you remove the all of the insides of the smoker (heat shields and grates) and then set the pizza base directly over the fire box - top it with the stone and then the dome. Fire up your smoker and let your stone get up to ~800 degrees. I use a temp gun to get my actual stone temp ( Temp Gun Link ) but normally it's set smoker to 300 degrees for about 20 mins. Fresh pizzas cook in about 2 to 3 minutes at that temp. Good find on CL. Enjoy !!

u/jakabo27 · 1 pointr/FixMyPrint

It looks wayyyyy too hot based on that picture. Get a temperature sensor gun thing and measure the actual temperature at the nozzle - I wonder if the temperature control is broken and it's actually heating up as much as possible. I guess you could also try doing like 150° or something else that should barely melt the plastic and see if that changes it.

u/BossHassTheSauceBoss · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

Yes, I like to use a laser thermometer as they are usually very accurate and let me check all around the tank. I have this one https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_-aKiDbR2WT5H2

u/radams713 · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

Mhm! I use this one from Amazon. It's cheap and works great.

u/Junkmans1 · 1 pointr/Appliances

> I might try and borrow and IR camera to see how hot the bottom of the stove is getting.

You can get one of these fairly inexpensive IR thermometer guns to check that out. They work surprisingly well and are handy to have around. https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY

u/Aerie06 · 1 pointr/leopardgeckos

I have that under tank heater in my Amazon cart, along with <a href="Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Infrared Thermometer, Yellow/Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_Otgsxb4YYJ4SV"> this temp gun</a>.

I don't know their sexes yet, I haven't even got a pic of them yet bc I didn't want to stress them out more.

u/Untimely_TARDIS · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

From what I understand you want to feed however much she can eat for 10 minutes. When I fed mine crickets I had a spare 10 gallon tank that I kept them in so I would just stick her in the cricket tank to eat to her hearts delight and then put her back once she stopped eating. Worked out way better than chasing down cricket that she didn't eat. You don't want to leave the bugs in overnight because they will nibble on your beardie while she is asleep.


I recently bought this temp gun to keep track of her basking area. I was pretty sure that the temp was right because she opens her mouth when she basks but the gun gives me more comfort to know the exact temp. http://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY

I also bought a separate stand and light fixture to set up in my bedroom so she can run around in my room. There aren't any places she could get stuck in my room and after running around a bit she always comes back to the basking spot in my room.

You don't have to buy the reptile bulbs for a heat lamp, you just want the uvb which you will have with the zilla light. The heat light I use now I bought from Wal-Mart and it heats the tank better than the mercury vapor bulb I had before. They have them at Walmart and probably any feed stores because they are often used to keep chicks warm. http://www.walmart.com/ip/GE-250W-Heat-Lamp-Red/16911779

Also you can get an inexpensive light fixture from either home depot or lowes. Clamp Lamp

Also if she is a girl you want to make sure you dust her food with calcium powder. The reptile specific ones are pretty expensive so I bought this at amazon a few years ago and I still have a ton of it.

If you want to keep your crickets hydrated instead of buying those cricket water crystals just buy Non-toxic ones My first bag I bought in 2013 and didnt need to buy a new bag until 2015 and that is because I am raising my own Dubias now.

u/mpennington · 1 pointr/DIY

Funny meeting you here! I do occasionally wander outside of /r/excel . I have used this infrared thermometer to check for cold spots in my house with great success. Doors and windows are the obvious leak areas, but I have noticed while working on some of the plumbing in my house that areas between walls where there are plumbing fixtures tend to have no insulation , as to allow room to work on the pipes. I also had drafts coming in from the base of my house where I have plumbing and gas lines running. I shoved insulation and or foam anywhere where I noticed meaningfully temp differences and resolved most of my issues. Messy work, though. Congrats on the second, kids are a blast.

u/[deleted] · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

Like the others said, the UVB bulb is extremely important. The Zilla ones aren't considered to be very good. The Repti-sun 10.0 tube light (this kind) is what you should get, assuming you're in the US. Here is a page that explains what lights you need and how to set them up in the cage.

Turning off the light in the middle of the day is not good for him. You can get an infrared thermometer to find the temperature and then adjust your lights to get the correct temps (110F in the basking spot for a juvenile, 105F for an adult). For the heat, you can just use a regular light bulb, just don't get the ones with a weird color coating - get a clear or bright white bulb.

The cage temperature can drop to 65F at night and it will be fine.

If you get a timer power strip, your life will be much easier. :)

Check out the link to the right titled Nutrition Content to find what foods are good for your lizard. The romaine isn't giving him what he needs.

I'd like to emphasize the importance of the UVB - it is a life or death sort of thing. Once you get one, it needs replaced every 6 months. Make sure you get the long tube, not a coil bulb.

Good luck!

u/TheFirstAndrew · 1 pointr/homeowners

If you don't want to rent the FLIR, yes, just buy one of these. It'll get the job done. Honestly though, so will your bare hand. If it's making that big of difference, it'll be obvious.

u/oursland · 1 pointr/Sneks

Only way to know is to measure.

Get a cheap IR thermometer and observe the temperatures on the hot and cool sides to make sure they're in appropriate ranges.

u/EPIC-8970 · 1 pointr/hognosesnakes

Of course, take good care of husbandry, once you do you’ll feel more at peace lol. Take it from me, I was in a panic because my thermostat was coming late and it was getting too hot below the substrate. Feels good now to have a thermostat handling things for me.

Here’s the links to what I have, good luck:

www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_WxkzDb9TYPQ3Z

www.amazon.com/dp/B000NZZG3S/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_lxkzDb47R94N0

u/Crackpotelf · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

Usually on the back of the bulb/lamp boxes there will be a little graphic of distance vs heat, so for the basking bulb, find a structure that they can climb onto that is at the height, usually in the 100 to 110 region. For the UVB, i would make sure that a good portion of the tank gets good lighting, especially the basking spot as thats where they spend alot of their lazy boi hours. I used a cheap laser thermometer to check my temps for the first week or so and he seems to be doing ok. Good luck!

Thermometer: Etekcity Lasergrip 774 Non-contact Digital Laser Infrared Thermometer Temperature Gun -58℉~ 716℉ (-50℃ ~ 380℃), Yellow and Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_qcGjDb6TY1ZVQ

u/moonstarfc · 1 pointr/ballpython

Inkbird thermostat, I figured it would be good enough to use temporarily. I have my other snake on a Herpstat 2 and I intend to use it for the BP too, once she's done with quarantine.

I use this temp gun to check the temps under the hide, at least once a day.

u/GreatThiefPhantom · 1 pointr/gpumining

You mean something like this?

u/redneckrockuhtree · 1 pointr/BeardedDragons

Buy an inexpensive flourescent fixture - Something along the lines of this and mount it inside the tank, under the screen, using 3M Command Hooks. That'll be the fixture for your UV bulb. You want it under the screen because A) distance affects UV strength and B) the screen will block a lot of UV.

You also need a basking bulb and fixture. Get a fixture like this with a ceramic socket. You want the ceramic as basking lights get hot and plastic sockets will fail. You'll want a basking light to go in there, as well.

Depending on how warm your house stays at night, you may need a second fixture like the above with a ceramic heat emitter in it. During the winter, we have to use a CHE to keep Vermillion's tank warm enough, but we don't need it during the summer.

I would suggest a timer. That way, your new buddy has a regular daylight schedule. Put the UV and basking light on the same timer.

The basking light should be placed over something that allows your beardie to get moderately close to the bulb for warmth. A temp gun is handy for checking the temperature in the basking spot to make sure it's warm enough.

u/chuck1011212 · 0 pointsr/homelab

Buy a laser temp gun. They are neat and cheap and can be used around the house for temps and the laser is good to play with animals.

https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY?keywords=laser+temperature+probe&qid=1537721058&sr=8-9&ref=sr_1_9

u/javi404 · 0 pointsr/PlantedTank

Get one of these, great for tanks and a million other uses like checking the temp of a hot cast iron pan or a BBQ grill grate.


https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1501386909&sr=8-3&keywords=digital+gun+thermometer

I don't have that exact make and model but plenty of those laser temp guns to choose from. Great to have around the house and for checking tank temps if you need to.