Reddit Reddit reviews HeatMax Hot Hands 2 Handwarmer (40 Pairs)

We found 48 Reddit comments about HeatMax Hot Hands 2 Handwarmer (40 Pairs). Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Camping Hand Warmers
Camping Hand Warmers & Foot Warmers
Camping Safety & Survival Equipment
Camping & Hiking Equipment
Outdoor Recreation
Sports & Outdoors
HeatMax Hot Hands 2 Handwarmer (40 Pairs)
SAFE, NATURAL LONG-LASTING HEAT - Odorless, Disposable, Single-Use Item, Do Not Apply Directly to The Skin. TSA Approved. Made in the USA using domestic and imported materials. No shaking or kneading requiredTO ACTIVATE - Remove warmer from outer package, shake to activate. Warmer heats up in 15-30 minutes. If heat decreases, expose warmer to air and shake. After use, dispose with regular garbage. Ingredients will not harm the environment.MULTIPURPOSE WARMERS - Single use air-activated heat packs that provide everyday warmth and are ideal for keeping your body warm when the temperature gets cold. They’re available in several styles designed for your hands, feet, and body.WHEN TO USE: Tailgating at Events, Outdoor Sporting Events, Hunting & Fishing, Camping & Hiking, Working in The Yard, Jogging or Taking Your Pet for A Walk. Convenient, Compact, Portable.
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48 Reddit comments about HeatMax Hot Hands 2 Handwarmer (40 Pairs):

u/Bolinas99 · 21 pointsr/Seahawks

Was at Green Bay two seasons ago when we were last in the playoffs.

It's likely to get insanely cold there, so don't just layer up get hand warmers, foot warmers (you can buy both at any local Walmart in Minny), wear at least 4-5 layers with several being fleece, including thermal socks, long thermal underwear, and waterproof shoes. It was -30 and we barely survived it in GB; not sure if it'll be as bad in MN for you.

Doubt you'll have any problem beating them btw.

Wish I could buy the tix from you man; how much do you want for them?

u/OriginalSyn · 7 pointsr/Calgary

Just be aware when you're shopping, if you ask a Canadian for recommendations you're going to get stuff that is much lighter than you will probably want to get. Up to -10C many of us consider this light winter wear weather, but you will probably be wanting full on baselayer, gloves, boots and heavy jacket.

Calgary winters are fairly mild (averaging lows of -10 to -15C), but they come with wild swings due to our proximity to the mountains, you might go to work and it's -20C and when you leave its +10C so be prepared with layers as other have mentioned.

In the middle of Jan/Feb it's going to get real cold, often reaching -30C to -40C for a few days and a couple weeks below -20C. Be prepared for these days, if you have a vehicle make sure to plug it in (all vehicles sold in Canada have a block heater installed) if you take transit make sure to get some hand and feet warmers (like this). Wind chill is no joke it's not usually is listed as a "feels like" when looking at forecasts, if you're outside a lot pay attention to that number.

Also if you have a vehicle and street park at home or work make sure pay attention if you're in a snow route, they will ticket you if you're parked there during/after heavy snow fall.

u/0x18 · 7 pointsr/CampingGear

Snowboard clothing is overkill unless you plan on staying through a winter storm. Just remember: cotton kills and wool is your friend. If nothing else get yourself a pack of wool socks and some wool underwear and then wear your normal clothes over those. The coldest I've seen Yosemite get to (in the last ~7 years of visiting every winter) was about 30F in the day and ~0-10F at night (really easy to manage). A good wool hat also helps for staying warm at night.

I'm jealous; I just moved from SLO to Oregon and won't be able to do my normal yearly winter Yosemite trip :( I'll miss wandering around in a kilt and tshirt when it's 30F and making everybody think I'm insane, but I can give some misc advice on Yosemite winter camping:

  • Bring snow chains appropriate for your car. Even if the road is clear up into the park it's not guaranteed to be de-iced the entire stretch into the valley, and for most of winter the park rangers will deny you entry if you say you don't have chains even if the road is clear. There's stores not far out of the park that sell them but they're far more expensive than your local car parts store.
  • Use the bear boxes for all food, deodorant, hair spray, tooth paste, and anything with a scent you could imagine a pet animal trying to consume against all logic because the bears, coyotes, and racoons will try and are much larger and smarter (and I have watched them all try).
  • Last time I was there sleeping in your vehicle was verboten. I'm not sure on the exact reason why, but I think it's because bears are known to break into (and ruin in the process) cars while looking for food. You're safer outside the car than in it.
  • Good sleeping bags are great but don't forget to put an insulating layer between yourself and the ground. Air mattresses are okay but suck for temperature control; one of those thin roll-out insulating pads are seemingly worthless but great for staying warm through the night.
  • For $25 you can get 40 chemical handwarmers -- activate two or three (or four if you're cold) at night and toss them into the bottom of your sleeping bag to stay warm at night. Wear a shirt with chest pockets and put another two there, then get a wool beanie and slip another one between it and your head (if there's a blizzard...)
  • Don't go to bed wearing wet (including sweat) clothes! It will cool through the night and wisk away your body heat. Before going to bed change into a fresh suit of dry clothing.
u/GIS-Rockstar · 6 pointsr/duluth

Duluth is an absolute mecca for outdoor winter sports. Gear up properly and you'll love your life in the 8 months of the Northland's winter!

If you're getting outside a lot in Eau Claire, you'll do fine in Duluth. If you plan on spending significantly more time outdoors in Duluth, then that's another story. Depending on where you live in town, you'll have different levels of need for snow tires; either way I'd strongly recommend them. PM me - I'm selling a set of snow tires in great condition over on the Online Rummage Sale for Duluth/Superior facebook group.

  • Thermal regulation is the name of the game. Not enough protection and you're cold. Once you're cold, you're done. Too many layers and you start to sweat. If you can't wick the sweat away or stop overheating, you're done

  • Cotton kills. You need 100% wool/poly/synthetic layers. Cotton absorbs moisture from your sweat, then freezes or just becomes a frigid sopping sponge against your skin

  • Layer selection is important. Something like a North Face Thermoball is great as a mid-layer under a parka for those insanely cold days. I have a SmartWool Marino wool base layer that was expensive but it was essential for keeping me warm and dry. Otherwise, synthetic long sleeve Under Armor kinds of shirts are perfect base layers.

  • Jeans are great at breaking wind and worked pretty well for me as a mid-layer. I usually just used synthetic long-johns to take care of wicking water from my skin. Roll both legs of the jeans up your shin to make room for boots and to keep the bottoms away from the snow or they will just get sopping wet. It's added warmth for your shins too. I'd finish off with a pair of snow pants that can go on and off easily

  • I used solid boots that were comfortable and insulated, with 1-2 pairs of various smartwool/puffy wool socks. Don't over-do it with socks. If your boot is too tight, it'll cut circulation to your toes and then you'll be cold. That's a delicate balance between "it's literally too damn cold out" and "I don't have circulation and I feel like it's too damn cold out."

  • A solid parka that goes below your butt is ideal. I got my North Face parka for around $300 and it was an excellent investment

  • Consider a shell that can break the wind. If you're hiking in Lester/Chester/Munger/etc. it won't be too windy; and if you're geared up properly those super cold temps are really a cake walk

  • Ice chains were important for my wife and myself. ICEtrekkers' Diamond Grip were my favorite. They really bite into glare ice where as coiled wire like basic Yak Trax were more slippery

  • I have a stack of the cheapest bandannas I could find in every color and pattern available. They're usually on sale for a buck each. The problem is that they're cotton, so my breath would condense on them quickly and they would freeze solid within 10-15 minutes, but the point is to keep the wind off of your mouth and cheeks. Even when frozen, they worked very well, and at 32° it was easily 30-50° warmer than the ambient air temps! I usually had 2-3 on me at all times for face protection and to wipe my nose/forehead (in case I started sweating) and I was very happy with them considering how cheap they were. Wash them once or twice before you use them to soften them up. I'd be interested in seeing other options for face covering.

  • Nothing beats a nice long wool knit scarf. Wrap it straight around your face and lay the tails flat against your chest or back for another insulating layer, or tie it in various ways for style and function around town

  • Sunglasses are a must to keep sleet and ice out of my eyes. Consider a set of very lightly tinted shades for evening/dark walking. There was nothing worse than hiking at night when it was sleeting. I've been told snowboarding goggles were lame, but ya know, Lake Superior is fierce before it freezes over. Ha. I would snowbaord all the time with amber tinted wrap-around shades that were snug to my head, and I'd hike with light Wayfarer-style frames

  • Finally, gloves are a real mystery to me. I'm not down with leather/animal skin, but it may be the only option to cut wind, and insulate the most efficiently. I usually used a thin woven wool base layer to wick sweat, a medium sized glove liner that usually comes with a decent set of gloves, and the thickest, heartiest, most beefy damn glove you can find. Pro tip: Make sure ALL gloves work with smartphones (capacitive touch). Never take a glove off to do something because you will never regain that heat without going inside

  • Just get a case of hand warmers. They're good in your gloves; next to your Achilles tendon in your boots; and against your camera or smartphone to keep those batteries running longer

    FIY: I spent 3 years in Duluth as a Floridian with no experience with real winter. Gear up properly and you'll be outside all winter long! It's expensive, but it's TOTALLY worth the investment. Otherwise you'll be cold and miserable; and that is one hella long-ass winter.
u/IPlayTheInBedGame · 5 pointsr/okeechobeemusicfest

Replying to my own comment with some purchasing recommendations:


2. Next level folding chair. The locking feature is sick, most comfortable camp chair I've owned.

My goto folding table. I've got a bigger 8 foot one if I'm camping with a big group but this small one is perfect for 1-4 people.

3. Highly recommend this charger. Will charge a typical iPhone like 5 times and has QC 3.0 built in (quick charge, which is a nice feature at a festival). Currently on sale for $40 if you clip the coupon, I've seen it as low as $30, they'll probably go on sale for black Friday and Christmas too.

5. Bring a box of these babies and if it gets cold, you've suddenly made like 40 friends.

6. Something like this is a good choice for makeup. In case you have to go back to camp and freshen up, the light is a nice touch.

u/dmoney247 · 4 pointsr/aves

Buy some hot hands they work miracles. I remember someone last year gave me one for my wife and I definitely made the cold bearable and they're pretty cheap for big pack maybe you can pass them out like I will be doing!!
HotHands Hand Warmers 40 Pair Value Pack https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_vq2hAb1GVX2GY

u/Neeko6ix · 3 pointsr/Overwatch

They're heat packs. Commonly used by skiers and snowboarders on very cold days. I got a real kick out of seeing them used in OWL. Voila

u/davidguydude · 3 pointsr/bengals

It will be cold as fuck, bundle up good and bring some of those hand warmers

he will likely catch a bit of harassment, but it shouldn't be all that bad.

parking will fill up early. it will be a lot of traffic, but imo its worse at the end of the game when leaving.

i dont know exactly where 333 is, but imo, this stadium has some of the best views from the upper levels compared to the old stadium especially.

who dey!

u/[deleted] · 3 pointsr/AskReddit

I just remembered the shelters in my area always ask for donations of hot hands so that would be a good addition to care packs.

u/akaganyaku · 2 pointsr/aves

Something not much people do, but handwarmers really help and give me a sense of warmth in the cold!

u/ShockaJesus · 2 pointsr/cannabis

You're in luck!

tight underwear or the boxer briefs that run down your legs 6-8 inches preventing anything from falling out. buy an extra pack of hand warmers read the instructions on how to get them to warm reliably. Either preheat the urineluck in a microwave with the cap off in ten second increments (two should be max needed) or set it in a ziplock bag in a cup under hot water for five minutes to raise it up to temp. I let mine stay above temp and then drop it down to the right temp just outside the test clinic (two heaters will do this well) remove one heat pad and head in. Before I drop it in their cup I make sure its below 100 (some can measure initial too hotness) but above 90. Having it not be warm enough is the big risk.

If you get screwed like that a last ditch effort is to rub your thumb on your jeans until its real hot and then touch the temp strip till it hits 96 or so (risky)

Fuck Ronald Regan he was a B movie president and his workplace drug laws are a joke. A MAJORITY or near majority of people here in WA actually smoke pot regularly and fake it like this or in a similar fashion.

u/dgxshiny · 2 pointsr/discgolf

I always make sure to pop 4 hand warmers in my pockets.

cheap on amazon - http://www.amazon.com/HeatMax-Hot-Hands-Handwarmer-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/kingofpluto · 2 pointsr/AskReddit

Doesn't matter - get some of these - they are cheap and they last for 10 hours. I have a pair in my socks right now.


http://www.amazon.com/HeatMax-Hot-Hands-Handwarmer-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/Offthepoint · 2 pointsr/Advice
u/jrwreno · 2 pointsr/preppers

Write yourself a reminder of how to start a fire with the items within your car:

How to start a fire with your car battery

You know, in case you do not have a cigarette lighter working in your car.


It is REALLY. IMPORTANT. To stay dry. Get a slicker for each member of your family, as well as sturdy, water proof foot gear. If you can get a combo snow coat/water proof whatchmacallit, that is perfect. I personally take all items, and vacuum seal them in ziplock Space bags (including first aid, flashlights, flares, everything, to ensure they are protected from moisture before being placed into the duffle bag)

Handwarmers. A buttload of handwarmers. The can last up to 10 hours!


first aid kits, -40 degree sleeping bags, solar rechargeable/hand cranking latterns/flashlights, a simple manual on field survival (scavenging for food, simple traps, signaling for help, a small sum of money in case you need to purchase gas/towing/food, flares, freeze dried, high calorie foods (nuts work amazing))

Water. I am a bit miffed at the person that said he does not store water, but carries a water filter. ALWAYS. CARRY. WATER. A 24 pack of water bottles in the trunk with the tire is good, or a few liter bottles with some air space for expansion. Having a water filter does nothing if you do not have a source for water, or the means to melt snow/ice. Get a water filter as something supplementary. Pack a cheap multi tool and a good knife as well.

A fire starter (flint) and some simple kindling(a sandwich baggie of cotton balls) added tip--coat your cotton balls partially in vaseline, it will increase the flammability of the cotton, and help repel water.


Something I also include, is a pair of foot long 2x4 pieces. I name them the 'clackers'. Smacking 2x4's together is akin to a gun shot, and will get the attention of someone if you do the typical SOS morse code pattern. They also scare away wildlife. Although I always travel armed.

A typical portable jump starting battery
You can often find these little systems with ports which can charge your phone.

A tarp or tent in case your car is compromised and cannot provide adequate shelter

Maps, both local and national (in case you travel) and a compass.

A simple dig out kit for getting your car free (shovel, kitty litter, or a tin can and candle trick, ropes, tire chains, etc)

u/SkinII · 2 pointsr/cycling

They're expensive but I absolutely love my Lake winter boots. Got them used on eBay about 5 years ago for $180 in excellent condition. For gloves I use Pearl Izumi lobster gloves.

I've always had cold hands and feet and sometimes even the above isn't enough. When it's really cold I put Hot Hand hand warmers in my gloves, against the palm/base of fingers, and in my boots on top of my toes. They are very toasty.

Tip: The Hot Hands last quite a while and are still useable after a ride. They heat up with air contact so when I finish my ride I put the Hot Hands in a plastic bag and squeeze out as much air as possible. They can't stay in the bag forever but will stay in limbo for a few days. I've used one pair on three different rides. Another trick is that they get hotter the more you shake the package so the first time I only shake it a bit. That way I can be sure they'll be good for another ride.

u/ThePinkPanther2 · 2 pointsr/AskWomen

I don't think it is necessary to give a gift card for a lowkey care package, but if you know they are struggling financially or they have a favorite grocery store or clothing shop then it sounds like a great idea. You can utilize things like Groupon, Amazon home services for cleaning and home repairs, BlueApron or equivalent food prep boxes. I have heard that many people like those type of subscription boxes.

My personal favorite care package goodies are shared below. I would wrap a pretty scarf around a small bundle of goodies. And to make it all pretty, I would pin artificial flowers and a thoughtful card to the front.

HotHands Hand Warmers

[Nature's Approach Aromatherapy Neck Wrap Herbal Pack, Celestial Indigo] (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0027VH7GK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VuuYBbQY3GTYH)

Handcrafted Goat's Milk and Olive Oil Soap Bar with Attached Natural Organic Sea Sponge - Sweet Strawberry Scent

Tervis Sunflowers Tumbler

Power Thought Cards

But in terms of "adulting" you could give them Groupon vouchers for cooking classes or yoga/meditation. But if they are strapped for cash, I would definitely include a gift card to their local grocery store.

u/stevegcook · 2 pointsr/hockeyplayers

These! Boot-specific versions exist and they stick onto your socks, but the hand ones work just as well and are easier to find. Plus they're usually bigger. Quality varies brand to brand.

u/not_a_throw_awya · 2 pointsr/GlobalOffensive
u/KjoeLjan · 2 pointsr/leagueoflegends

> Like can they go on facebook in picks and bans or draw in paint?

I think I've seen some players play OSU! as a warm-up once or twice, but I'm not sure if it was during LCS. I assume they have limited access to internet and the computer's software though.

> Also what is that squishy thing in their hands all the time?

They use it to keep their hands warm. As /u/CFThirty mentions, they are called "HotHands".

> And are those face cameras always on? or just when broadcasting?

It's another assumption I make, but I think they're always on. The LCS producer will probably tell what images are showed on stream.

> Can they hear the crowd or announcers?

Sometimes, because it is very hard to cancel out all sounds. The huge black things on their ears are meant to keep out the noise though.

> Is it illegal to remove their headsets?

Yep, unless the game is on pause and the referee needs to ask the player something. In that case communication is just easier by removing the headset ;-)

More information about all the LCS rules can be found here.

u/soproductive · 2 pointsr/videos

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_D-TtDbHKSV25B

If you live somewhere where this is a risk, why not stock these in your car? Probably a safer alternative to a space heater that you could sleep soundly with.

u/justnotthatcool · 1 pointr/Construction

I do construction in Michigan and feel like I need extra warmth for my hands. I use the nitrile or rubber coated gloves that are insolated for winter. Then wear a knit or cotton glove inside the insolated one. On really cold days i add the small hand warmers in between the glove layers in my palm. I can hammer, carry stuff and never be bothered by the handwarmers. I use one set of both kinds of gloves in the morning and then put on a dry set after lunch. I use these hand warmers.... http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0007ZF4OA/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1418862991&sr=8-1&dpPl=1&dpID=51%2Bk8z12gRL&ref=plSrch&pi=AC_SY200_QL40

u/ArtieLange · 1 pointr/snowmobiling

Last winter was ridiculously cold so I tried to find the best gloves this year. I came to the conclusion that you need at least 2 pairs (maybe three) for the varying conditions.

For the super cold days I settled on Black Diamond Soloist finger gloves. I also bought a case Hot Hands for when the conditions change on the trail.

u/oldlinuxguy · 1 pointr/Survival

http://www.amazon.ca/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-40-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

They are single-use chemical heating pads. You activate them by shaking them and they get very nice and warm. Handy to keep around.

u/camopdude · 1 pointr/AskReddit
u/slapplebags · 1 pointr/hab

[foam box, apply duct tape to hold shut] (https://www.grainger.com/product/12F276?gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OYmFsxWbQPsZ6q6G2LcJL5M4zB0FDx7diAlZz8JqX1lQ9P6GeFZPjBoCnbAQAvD_BwE&cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&ef_id=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OYmFsxWbQPsZ6q6G2LcJL5M4zB0FDx7diAlZz8JqX1lQ9P6GeFZPjBoCnbAQAvD_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!50916733197!!!g!82129239837!)

just a thing to hold your electronics in to keep them insulated from the cold during flight, and cushioned for the impact of landing.

[piezo electric buzzer, attach to arduino to give an audible alarm to help track down your payload after landing] (https://www.adafruit.com/product/1536?gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OVsUCcFPwRh9nBWLsDKDr9_VNEnteEJxQoZ5P8Z_j0ddqz6boPAyfRoCeLkQAvD_BwE)

not required but can be helpful when hunting down your payload

[hand warmer] (https://smile.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-Odorless-Activated/dp/B0007ZF4OA?sa-no-redirect=1)

also optional, i've never used them, generally used to keep your batteries warmer as warm batteries perform better than cold.

[GPS Antenna] (https://store.uputronics.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=72&search=gps)

gotta get GPS signals somehow, i highly suggest the MAX M8Qs from Ublox

[AA battery packs, i suggest using the energizer ultimate lithium batteries] (https://www.digikey.com/products/en/battery-products/battery-holders-clips-contacts/86?k=battery+holder&k=&pkeyword=battery+holder&sv=0&pv91=355996&sf=0&FV=-8%7C86%2C32%7C306832%2C1989%7C0&quantity=&ColumnSort=0&page=1&pageSize=25)

you'll likely use a 4-6 pack that has the batteries connected in serial to supply the 5v the arduino needs

[trackuino shield and guide] (http://hab.education/pages/trackuino.html)

this tells you where your payload is via sites like aprs.fi

[cheap external temperature sensor] (https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/maxim-integrated/DS18B20/DS18B20-ND/956983)

the trackuino code already has provisions for this temp sensor so it requires very little modification to the code to use.

[antenna, no coat hangar required] (https://www.byonics.com/antennas)

Any antenna thats made to operate on 144.390 mhz (assuming you are in the US, other countries you'll have to check your band plan) will work. I make mine from 2 19" pieces of 20 gauge wire.

u/glombus · 1 pointr/chibike
  • These giro winterproof shoe covers have been lifesavers when I want to wear normal shoes/non-boots. I just wear them with my gym shoes and platform pedals and they work fine. They're not waterproof, but they're water-resistant enough and warm. I've found they're good enough that my shoes keep totally dry in snowfall. Just don't try except them to stave off heavy rain
  • champion base layers from Target keep my legs just warm enough. I don't even wear the thermals, but I'm sure they'd be great
  • Topside's helmet light is bi-directional (front and back) and really bright with steady and blinking modes. I find it's handy to have a light this high up when visibility is tough in winter
  • Showerpass waterproof socks are fantastic if you think your shoes are going to get soaked. I've had days where my shoes are drenched from the rain but these keep my feet dry. The only downside is they get a bit clammy if your shoes are soaked

    I typically adjust my helmet so I can just put my hoodie or a normal winter hat under it, which keeps me pretty warm on my ears and head. Barring that, a balaclava is nice too

    I have yet to find gloves that are good enough to keep my hands from freezing so I often take the time at lights to rub my hands together. I really want to try out Bar Mitts or similar "pogies". I keep Hot Hands in my backpack in case of emergencies

    I've found that cheap light waterproof non-breathable jackets can be helpful because they're thin and really trap heat. Most rain shells are breathable so they don't suffocate you in warmer weather, but I've found that the crappy non-breathable ones are great for winter for that same reason. I can go with just a sweatshirt and one of those and I'm usually sweating by the end in freezing temps. The only problem is I have to keep moving. It's useless if my body's not doing work to keep the heat building up, which is problematic if you may get stuck somewhere remote.

    I want some clear glasses as well, for windy/snowy days when the precipitation stings my eyes. I think something like these would probably do the trick. REI sells, Tifosi, a brand of bike glasses, but I think these would be overkill for me
u/TabbyFoxHollow · 1 pointr/AmItheAsshole

https://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-Odorless-Activated/dp/B0007ZF4OA

http://nymag.com/strategist/amp/article/best-hand-warmers.html

Prepare to have your life changed. I use them on the slopes, look into gear people use for the snow, there’s all types of heat gear.

u/TubesBestNoob · 1 pointr/learnprogramming
u/alohaepicure · 1 pointr/dji

I went to Iceland this past February and took my Mavic Pro. Some tips I have for you are:

  • Keep your batteries warm! The color temperature can really kill your battery life, or prevent the drone from turning on if the batteries are too cold. I put some of these hand warmers (https://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-Odorless-Activated/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=sr_1_3?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1536981832&sr=1-3&keywords=hand+warmers) into a sock and placed them next to my batteries in my backpack. They did wonders to keep things just warm enough to maintain charge, but didn't make me worried at all that the heat would damage the batteries or anything else in the bag.
  • Be careful of the wind! The wind in Iceland can be super unpredictable, especially as you move over steep drops or cliffs. I saw someone lose their Phantom when they flew it up over a ledge (we were standing below a cliff). My best guess is the wind gust above the cliff was much stronger and took the drone in the opposite direction from where we were standing. He tried to throw it into sport mode (I think) and fly it back, but the wind was too strong up over the cliffside.
  • Be prepared to bring your drone back from flight at a moments notice. Again, the weather is unpredictable and can change in minutes. I arrived at a landmark and it was bright/sunny with barely a cloud in sight. I took the drone up and no joke, ten minutes later it was full on snowing with sleet and the entire sky above me was overcast. Just be aware and be ready to bring the drone back when things change. In Iceland they say if you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes. This is 100% true of my experience in the winter.
  • Be respectful to others. Icelanders are SUCH nice people. If there's a no drone sign I'd really encourage you to respectfully keep the drone in your bag and just enjoy the amazing scenery.
u/eloreb · 1 pointr/femalefashionadvice

I wore these when I was in Iceland in March 2016 (so. freaking. cold.) and they were great! I can't stand having my hands cold, so I bought some wool liners for the gloves and Hot Hands to stash in my jacket pockets too. Have fun in Iceland; it's an amazing place!

u/ImmovableMover · 1 pointr/medicalschool

I have the same problem. I started using hand warmers, slipping them into my boots and pockets, and it's been great.

Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-40-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/cecikierk · 1 pointr/translator
u/jeifurie · 1 pointr/teslamotors

I bought a pack of handwarmers off amazon (~$25 for 40 pairs, but you can cut in half so its actually 80) and will keep them in the trunk. Hasn't gotten cold enough in Boston to need to use yet though. But, I think they would get warm enough to unfreeze the handles & trim areas w/o damaging anything.

u/MacabreChaos · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I'm a college student, so I totally understand buying cheap stuff. Here are some of my personal finds.

I bought these cute rain boots for myself about a year ago, and they've held up well! They come in a lot of patterns; I have the argyle plaid just because I like plaid, but the polka dots are cute too. :)

I have this scarf in red. It's super warm and comes in multiple colors. :)

I'm pretty attached to my phone, so I have these gloves. I love the knitted pattern, and it's a must for me to still be able to do stuff on my phone while I have gloves on.

I have some heated purple slippers (battery operated) from Sears, and they're really nice since my floor is wood. I have my eye on these adorable slippers though because they're just so cute. I love food with cute faces on them. :D They're kinda pricy though.

Also, Hot Hands are a savior. I would buy them from Walmart or Target; it's cheaper, and you can get however many you want. These kept my hands warm when I was outside in freezing temperatures from midnight to 10 am!

u/guinnevere · 1 pointr/infertility

PS- I love these for thick injections. Wrap 'em in a washcloth and apply. Also, w the PIO, letting it run under hot sink water can thin it out a bit before injecting.

http://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-40-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/jstricks87 · 1 pointr/AirForce

What about when I toss one of these to you?

u/pomod · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Stock up on these

u/Darkone06 · 0 pointsr/pics

I would also throw in some hand warmers in cold climates.

I'm in Austin so it's not as cold but the few cold nights we get can really Suck since you don't have any exposure to come weather.

That's why when I know it's going to be cold at night. I bring a few extra hand warmers to pass around the bus stops that I know homeless people frequent.

For $20 you can get a nice box of 40.

HotHands Hand Warmers (40 pairs) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_L.4myb4QDPH1A

u/Skruby · 0 pointsr/GlobalOffensive

You can get them on Amazon, you can probably get some for cheaper, these are the just the first ones I saw. Sometimes they might have them at your local sports store (usually in the winter)