Reddit Reddit reviews Inkbird ITC308 Freezer Thermostat Heating Cooling Plug Temperature Controller Outlet 110V 1200W Digital Temp Control for Greenhouse Heater Cooler Reptile Brewing Fermentation Kegerator Probe

We found 42 Reddit comments about Inkbird ITC308 Freezer Thermostat Heating Cooling Plug Temperature Controller Outlet 110V 1200W Digital Temp Control for Greenhouse Heater Cooler Reptile Brewing Fermentation Kegerator Probe. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Temperature Controllers
Temperature & Humidity Measurement
Test, Measure & Inspect
Industrial & Scientific
Inkbird ITC308 Freezer Thermostat Heating Cooling Plug Temperature Controller Outlet 110V 1200W Digital Temp Control for Greenhouse Heater Cooler Reptile Brewing Fermentation Kegerator Probe
Simple to use: plug it in, set the temp ranges, place the probe, plug in the heater/cooler into the marked outlet.Be able to connect with refrigeration and heating equipment at the same time.Easily calibrated.Can display in Centigrade or Fahrenheit.Whether you need temperature control for fermentation, greenhouse, kombucha control or to set up your temperature project system, the ITC-308 temperature controller is a great choice.
Check price on Amazon

42 Reddit comments about Inkbird ITC308 Freezer Thermostat Heating Cooling Plug Temperature Controller Outlet 110V 1200W Digital Temp Control for Greenhouse Heater Cooler Reptile Brewing Fermentation Kegerator Probe:

u/_ataraxia · 35 pointsr/snakes

i've been paged for my link dump, so here it is. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions. let me know if any of the links don't work.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Keifru · 13 pointsr/Sneks

Sounds like you were getting outdated or flat-out incorrect information and those 'experienced snake owners' are likewise misinformed. There are very few snakes that legitimately have evolved to thrive on sand-based substrate (irony being the Sand Boa is not one of them; they live in sandy soil which is very different composition than straight sand). The Ball Python is native to the svannah/jungles of Sub-Saharan Africa. Its dirt, soil, and burrows. Not a majority or even significant amount of sand.

Additionally, if I extrapolate correctly from this singular picture, your BP is also in a glass enclosure and has a log-style hide. The former makes keeping humidity in the 55~80% range a difficult exercise, and the latter, is a stressor as BPs do best with a hide that has a single-entrance or is cave-like; the more points of contact, the better, and a single entrance means they can feel safer.

I'm going to steal _ataraxia's ball python dump and toss it below:

i'm going to dump a bunch of links to get you on the right track. the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/ThePienosaur · 11 pointsr/ballpython

Red light isn't good, you'll want a heat mat (MAKE SURE you have a thermostat for it or it will get too hot) and possibly a ceramic heat emitter (also needs a thermostat) for air heat. What are the temps and humidity and how do you measure them? Glass tanks usually don't hold humidity well and often aren't good for bps. You need at least 2 good hides, one for each side. They should be snug and enclosed with only one opening, preferably identical, half logs don't work.

Someone should come by with a really good care sheet, read it, it has some great info. I know this might be a lot of information, but having a good setup is important and will save you headaches in the future.

Edit: I found the care sheet. Credit to u/_ataraxia.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/DSNT_GET_NOVLTY_ACNT · 10 pointsr/Homebrewing

Don't do the open refrigerator thing, you will waste a ton of electricity and won't actually be able to temperature control even close to enough to lager with any reasonable degree of certainty. If I had to guess, leaving a fridge with an open door for a month will probably waste far more than $16.

Instead of wasting that $16 in electricity, you can get one of these, which is perfect for a fermentation chamber made from a fridge. A small amount of wiring work is required, but it's relatively easy.

If you aren't willing to invest $16 and an hour figuring out how to wire it together, I would suggest just letting it ride without temperature control (or maybe a swamp cooler or similar). Most lager yeasts will be fine in the low-mid 60s.

Edit to note: it's not too late by any means to get that temp control part now. You could start it warm and chill down in the refrigerator when you have the part, possibly even complete fermentation warmish and then stick in the refrigerator on its highest setting for a few weeks. Or you could start it in the refrigerator on its highest setting and let it warm up a bit more when you have the part. Leaving the fridge open is probably the worst choice you could make out of all the options above.

Double edit: If you don't want to mess with wires, you could get one of these, but it's more expensive. It's basically the same thing as the cheaper one, but with plugs.

Bonus fun fact edit: Refrigerators make the room warmer in general, but peaving the refrigerator door open will make it even warmer. You would be effectively making a really really ridiculously inefficient space heater.

u/beefjeeef · 9 pointsr/snakes


First of all. It's very good you recognize that you need help in learning how to care for the snake.

Second, here is a big link dump created by another regular user u/_ataraxia all credit for this goes to her.

the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Cadder-12 · 8 pointsr/ballpython

Here's an info dump, courtesy of u/_ataraxia. It has pretty much everything you're asking about and more.

The first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. Read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.
Llet me know if any of the links don't work.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Vaporhead · 8 pointsr/snakes

u/ataraxia has amazing information for ball pythons. You should definitely read it through. Glass tanks are not ideal for Bps, so this should help. Here is her normal dump of information I took from another post.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/xbox666 · 6 pointsr/CannabisExtracts

you need a digital temp controller ( here ), a 1000watt horse trough heater ( here ) and a submersible pump ( here ).

u/rb-2008 · 4 pointsr/Homebrewing

It may be difficult to sanitize all the edges if there are any on the fish tank heater. There a lot of crud floating in a fermenting beer.

If you can spare about 50$ get an inkbird temp controller and a cheap heating pad (I use this one) set it on low or medium. I secure it to the outside and forget about it.

u/updog357 · 4 pointsr/cigars

Depending on how much a new controller costs, another option would be to use an ETC to control when the fridge turns on and off. Once configured, the fridge would turn on and off as needed. However if the controller on the fridge completely fails at some point in the future, this setup might no longer work.

Edit: Wrong acronym. ETC not ETR

u/hawk121 · 3 pointsr/Appliances

Many homebrewers just buy a conventional chest freezer, then use an external temperature controller like this Inkbird:

https://smile.amazon.com/Inkbird-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM

The freezer plugs into the controller, you put the temp probe inside the freezer space (make sure it's in air, not touching the sides/bottom of the freezer), and set to the desired temp. I personally use them and they work well. I have 2 freezers, one is a constant 35 f year round, and the other one I adjust to specific temperatures all the way up to the 60s and 70s for fermenting beer. Keep in mind using a 3rd party controller might void the freezer's warranty, even though most all have compressor cycle protection built in now.

u/rollapoid · 3 pointsr/ballpython

Reposting the famous u/ _ataraxia info:

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/iwilljustforget · 3 pointsr/Homebrewing

Depending on how "presentable" you want it to be build the fermentation chamber it out of a chest freezer. You can throw a tablecloth over it w/o affecting the freezer functioning as long as you leave the motor uncovered.

This is similar to the setup I have. It’s big enough for 10 gallons of beer in two 5 gallon carboys. You could always right size the freezer for what you want.

u/ddurand2051 · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Hey folks, back again with another question.

I just took advantage of labor day sales and got my first equipment kit, linked below.

https://www.homebrewsupply.com/advanced-homebrew-beer-kit.html

I bought some extract recipe kits from northern Brewer. Stepson root beer, beerie and off the topper to be exact.

I have a small basement freezer already and plan to buy this item to control fermentation.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B015E2UFGM/ref=s9_simh_gw_d0_g60_i2?pf_rd_p=1c5f02ae-183e-4906-990b-5a293310a66c&pf_rd_s=blackjack-personal-1&pf_rd_t=Gateway&pf_rd_i=mobile&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=Y4SZRWAJQ2ND3A86RR3W

Is there anything hardware wise that I'm missing to get my first batch ready ? Any recommendations?

Thanks in advance.

u/agent_of_entropy · 2 pointsr/malelivingspace
u/Mitten_Punch · 2 pointsr/microgrowery

Cool. Very helpful.

The LED/HPS price gap is worth it, in the United States, where I can get HLG Quantum Boards or parts from Digikey without paying VAT/import tax. The LED panels on EBay are not worth buying. But if you can get current, best-gen LED, then yes, it's worthwhile. They cost ~40% less to run and cool, and you don't have to change bulbs like you do with HID lighting. Even if they cost 2x or 3x up front, you'll make that back in a year.

On to your setup: Things look good.

  • Secret Jardin is more expensive (again, in my market) then it should be. There isn't a lot of difference between a $60 1mx1m tent and a $120 1m SJ tent. Spend that money elsewhere.

  • For a ~3'x3' space, the 400w HID is the appropriate light. Get a dimmable ballast, so you can run a Metal Halide bulb during veg at 200w or 300w, then use your HPS at 400w for flower. If money is a worry, for now, buy cheap bulbs. Down the road you may want to buy nicer HPS bulbs (Eye Hortilux is the best, in my experience). But, for now, cheap is fine. Take a look at CoolTube kits. I'm only seeing this one, there must be more. Buying the bundle should save some money.

  • If possible, run a duct-fan (Winflex) just for your light. So, outside of tent -> ducting -> CoolTube + light -> ducting -> outside of tent. The air cooling the bulb should be separate from the air in your tent. And that fan runs whenever the light it on.

  • You want an inline (Can Fan) as your exhaust. And you want a programmable thermostat. . .although maybe not this one, if you are on 220v power. The idea is, only have the exhaust fan turn on when it needs to. In my situation, that is a 76F degree goal. When the tent hits 80, it kicks on and runs until it's below 76 again. This helps your carbon filter last longer, and also lets humidity/warmth build up as it needs to.

  • Pot sizes: I have a 1m/1m tent. I've run 6 x 3gallon pots. And 1 x 10gallon. So, it depends on how many plants you are growing. But aim for 15 gallons on soil total.
u/martineister · 2 pointsr/Hydroponics

Design and design considerations:

  • Outside Design photo - rooster crowing
  • Outside Design angle view
  • Inside reservoir view
  • Inside close up view
  • Inside full view

  • I anticipated issues with heat and so I placed my reservoir inside the shed on the concrete floor for a heat sink effect
  • reservoir holds ~30 gallons of water filled from my well
  • pump pumps up to ~ 11 feet high in shed (~12-13 feet outside). Pump was rated for 220 GPH at 10 feet, 0 at 13 feet. I figure I'm getting 150-200 GPH at ~11 feet.
  • I used old hoses, hose repair ends (male and female) with hose clamps to attach, run up and through the shed wall, use a 'Y' splitter and run into the top of each system.
  • 4" diameter 10' long sewer pipe (cheaper than PVC), elbows and extensions to extend the distance between the elbows. I was concerned about them being too close and over shadowing each other and so there is ~22" gap at the narrow end, and ~28-30" at the far end
  • target drop was 4" for the 10' run.
  • at the bottom, I used sewer pipe to PVR converter and joined together with a bottom drain coming out (1 1/2").
  • this returns through the shed wall with a ~1" drop over 2 feet to re-enter the reservoir at ~2 ' height above concrete
  • I used these net cups
  • I'm using Inkbird Pre-Wired Dual Stage Digital Temperature Controller Outlet Thermostat 110V, 1100W Heating and Cooling.

    Heating/Cooling:

  • The Inkbird dual stage controller is set to 71F. If the temp goes below that then the heating plug kicks on to active this 800w heater
  • As seen below in my temp graph, when the temp outside goes high enough, the water temp goes above my target max of 75 F. I need to come up with a cooling solution. Updates to come.
  • 5/23 update: Decided to get an active cooler Hydrofarm
    Active Aqua Chiller, 1/4 HP
    - Note in the temp graph below the blunting of the green curve as the red (ambient temp) went high. I have the dual stage temp controller set to kick on the cooling plug at 68, and this starts the second water pump that pumps through the cooler. The cooler is set for 69 currently so when the temp reaches 70, cooling kicks in. I am continuing to fiddle with this setting.

    Nutrients:

  • I ordered General Hydroponics Maxigro, Maxibloom, Each 2.2 lbs. - and I started at 1/3 concentration of recommendation of the Maxigro.

    Plant photos:
    Plants received dry bare root with no green growth from starkbros.

  • 5/15 2 week old plant - notice the new white growth
  • 5/23 growth and increase in root mass A lot of the brown is old roots from before the planting, white roots with a bit of browning is visible.


    Temp graph:

    This is with the La Crosse wifi temp probe (https://www.amazon.com/Crosse-Technology-926-25106-Wgb-Wireless-Monitor/dp/B06ZYJ5L5B/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8) so I can check remotely. Red line is ambient temp, green line is water temp.


  • 5/15 temp graph
  • 5/23 temp graph with heater and cooling effect


    Water changes:

  • 5/20 - pumped out old water, filled and allowed to heat to ~58 degrees before being impatient and starting the pump. Ambient temp was low 60s.


u/FamilyHeirloomTomato · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Do you have temperature control figured out? I did it DIY with an STC-1000, but I'd suggest going with the Inkbird for $35.

https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM/

u/brycebgood · 2 pointsr/Hunting

Craigslist freezer - we chose upright for vertical space. Chest freezer might work - but you would have to figure out how to hang in it.

Temperature controller - there are lots of options. This one is the Johnson 419. You plug it into the wall then plug the freezer into the female lead. It cycles the freezer on and off at the set temperature. There are cheaper options - but I had this one laying around. I'll link some suggestions below.

The fan is a computer fan with speed switch. I wired it to an old 12v wall wort I had laying around in the parts bin.

Meat hooks are just stainless hooks - again from amazon.



Temp controllers:
Johnson - https://www.amazon.com/Johnson-Controls-Digital-Thermostat-Control/dp/B00368D6JA/ref=pd_sim_328_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=SG7X9CB5Z0VYY8RM7EVB

If you're comfortable with electricity:
https://www.amazon.com/Lerway-All-Purpose-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat/dp/B00BMLCGF8/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1481133568&sr=8-2&keywords=temperature+control

Best deal:
https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1481133568&sr=8-1&keywords=temperature+control



Meat hooks:
https://www.amazon.com/Meat-Hooks-Inch-Pack-Pieces/dp/B0195CE08Q/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1481133886&sr=8-3&keywords=meat+hooks



Fan:
https://www.amazon.com/Antec-TriCool-DBB-Cooling-3-Speed/dp/B00066ISES/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1481133824&sr=8-5&keywords=speed+fan+computer

u/knsaber · 2 pointsr/Reef

I use an existing fan and this temperature controller to turn the fan on when the water is above 78F. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_8ZHNAbEYSH8NX

u/ganesht · 2 pointsr/diabetes

I had to replace my fridge's dial thermostat with a digital one; it looks a bit hacked together but was able to control the temperatures much better

this is similar to the one i used:

https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Temperature-Controller-Fahrenheit-Thermostat/dp/B0152LYY0I


but if your fridge gets can stay below your target temp you could set the fridge to max and use something like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM

u/skittlekitteh · 2 pointsr/snakes

Here's u/ataraxia's classic link dump I found on a other post. Although the informstion is written for bps (most common snake people have trouble with it seems- mostly due to the humedity) but the suggestions could definitely help you for the humedity aspect needed for your boa.


You should definitely read it through.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Ksp-or-GTFO · 2 pointsr/DIY

So here we go,

First off a Danby 4.4 Cu Ft fridge, something like this. I got this off of some one on craigslist for a $100. I tried to talk them down but some one had informed them that the fridge was valuable to home brewers.

The tap tower was purchased on amazon.

The line connections were also purchased there, since the ones that came on the tower were incorrect for the five gallon kegs.

The temperature controller was also purchased on amazon. Really amazon was my go to.

Here is the CO2 tank I anticipate buying. I haven't really picked out a regulator yet.

u/noncongruent · 2 pointsr/DIY

One won't be near enough, though that depends on its size. As far as heat transfer, yeah, wort doesn't pump well at all, and if anything, keeping it circulation as opposed to still would probably give the little yeasties some indigestion. I can imagine a complex system of tubing, heat sinks, pumps, and heat exchange fluid, but that's probably beyond most people's motivations and abilities. I think that you can make essentially an insulated box that's cooled by the Peltiers, essentially a refrigerator, and use a glass carboy for better thermal transfer to the fluid.

For example:

https://www.mpja.com/Peltier-Cooling-Assembly-12VDC/productinfo/15312+PM

This module uses 6A at 12VDC to move just 170 Btu of heat. Fermentation is exothermic, so let's do some math. According to this:

https://byo.com/article/fermentation-temperature-control-tips-from-the-pros/

It's possible for the fermentation process to raise the temperature 20°F in 6 hours. A common batch size is 5 gallons. A BTU is the amount of heat necessarily to raise one pound of water one degree F. A gallon is 8 lbs, so to raise 5 gallons, which is 40 lbs, of wort 20°F takes 40x20=800 BTU, and to do it in 6 hours takes 800/6= 133.3 BTUh.

The main physical problem with Peltiers is that the hot and cold side heat sinks have to be close together, and that makes it difficult to use them in an insulated box because insulation requires thickness to be effective. You'll need fans, both internal and external, to move air past the heat sinks, and in the inside, to keep it circulating. Putting the modules in the lid would probably be the most effective solution as hot air rises and that brings that air to the modules via convection.

The more I think about this, the more difficult and expensive it looks, honestly. If you're lagering, I think you'd actually be better off money and power wise using a small refrigerator. Actually, maybe a small chest-style freezer with an external thermostat controller to turn it into a refrigerator might be a more practical approach. In fact, here's a decent one on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Thermostat-Temperature-Controller-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=Inkbird+ITC308&qid=1568383520&s=industrial&sr=1-4

That being said, it sounds like an interesting series of experiments to try!

u/Beardedfury1980 · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Inkbird temp controller - Inkbird Pre-Wired Dual Stage Digital Temperature Controller Outlet Thermostat 110V, 1100W Heating and Cooling for Fermentation Kegerator Heating Mat ect https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_60kEAbEGD0X7D

Chest freezer

Heat lamp

To Make yourself a ferm chamber

Stirplate and bar for making starters

A journal to document of/fg recipe and tasting notes



u/onedisection · 2 pointsr/HomeImprovement

Inkbird Pre-Wired Dual Stage Digital Temperature Controller Outlet Thermostat 110V, 1000W Heating and Cooling for Fermentation Kegerator ect https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_pVplxbKZFRS0H


I used this for a similar application. It works well and is intuitive.

u/Sasseron · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

Just take any 5 gallon recipe and divide by 5 ( 5.5 # wheat malt = 1.1 #. As for temp control just Google son of a fermentation chiller. And Temperature Controller paired with a heater.

Now your recipes, Google the recipe you want ( IPA, Pilsner) or ask r/Homebrewing.

u/chemistree · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

You could definitely go cheaper if your boss-man is worried about price: intertap faucets

kegco couplers

The intertaps are pretty new to the scene so IDK how well they perform. I think their design is pretty close to Perlick. Perlicks have been around forever and they are really solid.

I don't know if the freezer you end up buying will have a setting above freezing, or if it will have precise enough control for an optimal kegerator. You might plan on buying one of these temp controllers if the freezer isn't capable of holding ~38F +/- 1F.

u/IwasShelterButNoMore · 1 pointr/cheesemaking

Wine fridge is one way
I have a fridge with a temperature control plug( Inkbird Pre-Wired Dual Stage Digital Temperature Controller Outlet Thermostat 110V, 1100W Heating and Cooling for Fermentation Kegerator Heating Mat ect https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM?ref=yo_pop_ma_swf)
With a thing of water.

I am one day going to buy a humidity sensor

u/nevinem · 1 pointr/CraftBeer

Beer fridge https://imgur.com/a/QenV5

The link is a post of my old setup and current setup.

My first setup was a result of me checking Craigslist constantly to find wine fridges. Found 2 and used those for a while.

The new setup was achieved when I went to a local furniture auction and won it for $300.

I would either look for good deals on commercial wine fridges or buy a garage fridge and something like this to control the temp:

Inkbird Pre-Wired Dual Stage Digital Temperature Controller Outlet Thermostat 110V, 1100W Heating and Cooling for Fermentation Kegerator Heating Mat ect https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_OKCNzbB8YSKW1

u/mosborne32 · 1 pointr/daddit

Kegerators use a thermometer tied in with a freezer to automatically kick it on and off depending on temperature. If you tie it in to the space heater, that may help regulate the space.

​

https://www.amazon.com/Inkbird-Temperature-Controller-Thermostat-Fermentation/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1489001949&sr=8-1&keywords=inkbird+kegerator+thermostat&linkCode=ll1&tag=kegerators-20&linkId=1861f6ca14056781d504e4797547f086&data1=999999

​

Just an example.

u/chino_brews · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

This related model might be better for beer-making: Amazon link to ITC-308.

The ITC-310T is a more fully-featured model that allows you to pre-program a fermentation schedule.

u/Mr_Stinkfinger · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

Outside of basic equipment like pots, fermenters and chillers, the 2 most impactful things that will make his beer better are the following:

  1. The ability to control the temperature of his fermenting beer. So, if you can get a cheapo chest freezer to put in the basement (if you have a basement) and a cheap temp contoller (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B015E2UFGM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1). You can find a new chest freezer for around $150 or even less if you search craigslist.

  2. Pitching the proper amount of yeast. You can get him a 2 L flask (https://www.amazon.com/PYREX-Narrow-Mouth-Erlenmeyer-Flasks/dp/B004XR5W5E/ref=sr_1_cc_1?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1488125537&sr=1-1-catcorr&keywords=2+l+flask+erlenmeyer) and a stir plate.... I think these are cool (http://craftstirplates.com). He'd need a stir bar too.

u/SignedJannis · 1 pointr/ballpython

Thankyou so much for the help. Yes I care about animals and she just doesn't look that happy. The new owner is a great person, but doesn't possess either the financial means nor "technical desire" to take care of the somewhat precise environmental needs.


Yes tank is glass, with a "wire frame" top. I am handy with carpentry, so am thinking of making a decent wooden lid for the cabinet, with air vents routed in to it.


So for a glass tank, should I go for a UTH and a ceramic lamp for ambient temperature? Would I need two thermostats? e.g would two of these suffice: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM/

u/YourSistersTwizler · 1 pointr/ReefTank

I hooked mine up to a cheap thermostat, and used a VERY cheap digital thermometer along with my TDS meter (not this exact one) to hone in.
Now I don't worry about my heater failing in the ON position, because if the tank gets too hot, it shuts off. I set my desired at 77 with a 1 degree in either direction swing before either my heater kicks on or a clip-fan pointed at my water surface does. I went from 81-84 (yikes!) swings to 76.5-77.5 degree stability.

u/vortex1324 · 1 pointr/Aquariums

I just use an stc 1000 temp controller with my heaters. I have used the cheap chinese heaters, eheim ,and most in between. I use the internal temp setting on the heater as a failsafe should my temp controller fail. Though the relays in the stc are n/o so they should fail off, not on. In any case I feel confident using any crap heater lying around since the temp controller is running the show, not some crappy bending metal thermostat trapped in the same tube as the heating element. The stc 1000 is like 15 bucks on amazon. They also make a similar version that is already wired up, though it costs a little more.

Pre wired https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_RpJxxbCN93ZZE

Stc-1000 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BMLCGF8/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_vrJxxb8CMPCKW

I use 2 250 watt eheim currently in my dual 40b setup. That way if one fails my corals stay nice and warm while I replace it. I fear no overheating! Also I keep my house like 65 during winter. So I need some serious wattage. To keep my uncovered tank at 80f

u/IrishHomebrewer · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

What /bodobeers said. I just bought an igloo 5.1 cuft chest freezer just for fermentation. (My bigger chest freezer is being turned into a keezer.) Got a slightly dinged one from Home Depot for ~$130, new ones are~$160-200 depending on brand. You can go with a 3cuft chest freezer (about same price, less space width wise than 5.1), but you will have to make a collar for it to fit carboy+airlock due to the hump. you can get the plugin Inkbird controller for around ~$30-40 for a cheaper temp controller with doesn't require wiring. If you want to be more precise with the Inkbird though, you will also need a heating element. If you don't mind it being off by 5 or degrees then you are ok with cold side only. I have one of the more expensive Johnson Controllers that are pretty precise with just cold side for my fermenter, and an Inkbird for my bigger keezer build for I'm not as concerned about exact temperature with the keezer.

Pre-wired Inkbird


Johnson Controller for reference

u/BigBudZombie · 1 pointr/homeautomation

Ive used this before.

u/sebb_x · 1 pointr/cheesemaking

I used this green one for my sous vide before,it works great. You can try one out.

u/hsiavanessa · 1 pointr/DIY

plug-and-play temperature controller, I think it's better.http://www.amazon.com/dp/B015E2UFGM

u/oppositeofcatchhome · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

The temperature to use when you're using a calculator is the highest temperature the beer reached at any point during fermentation. So I would use 73.2 in your case.

I've heard that the stick-on thermometers are great. You might also want to look into some more temperature control options. You can go as simple as putting the fermenter into a tub of water, adding frozen water bottles as needed to maintain a cooler temperature, or as far as buying an extra fridge or freezer with a temperature controller. In my case, this time of year, my basement is reliably in the upper 50s/low 60s, so I just use one of these heat wraps plugged into an Inkbird temperature controller with the probe taped to the side of the carboy with a flattened koozie on top of it to insulate it from the ambient air temperature.