Reddit Reddit reviews Noodler's Black Waterproof Fountain Pen Ink - Bulletproof,3 ounce

We found 24 Reddit comments about Noodler's Black Waterproof Fountain Pen Ink - Bulletproof,3 ounce. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Noodler's Black Waterproof Fountain Pen Ink - Bulletproof,3 ounce
100% made in the USA from cap to glass to inkArchival qualityMedium 3oz. Bottle
Check price on Amazon

24 Reddit comments about Noodler's Black Waterproof Fountain Pen Ink - Bulletproof,3 ounce:

u/clearingpuppy · 24 pointsr/JUSTNOMIL

Make it Noodler's bulletproof.

Once this touches fabric it is never. Ever. Coming out. Not even with bleach. If you want something ruined forever, this will more than do the trick.

u/ARbldr · 9 pointsr/fountainpens

Some quick questions, do you write really small now?

Most of the engineers I know do write small, which is why I ask. /u/the_illest does this joke you see here every time this question is asked, but it is a good recommendation to start. I personally recommend the Pilot Metropolitan over the Lamy Safari, I think it is a nicer pen to use, and the I believe the nib is better. If you write fine, you might be better off going to Goulet and getting the new model in fine, than buying the medium nib on Amazon. If you write really small, I really like the Metropolitan with the nib from the Pilot penmanship swapped onto it. The link here is more than I spent on the penmanship, if you search you can find them cheaper (I think on Amazon sometimes, I got two for that price). The Japanese EF nib is closer to a western UEF nib (the medium on the Metro is very close to an EF on the Safari). The line is very thin, and comfortable if you are used to writing small with a mechanical pencil.

With this, pick up a bottle of Noodler's black , and you will be set.

Now, to deviate a little from the standard answers. If you want something a little different, the Nemosine Singularity is an good intro pen that has gotten a lot of good feedback.

For a cheaper alternative, but usually only in a medium nib, the Jinhao x750 or x450 are big pens that make a statement (Amazon has sellers that ship these from China, Goulet pens carries them for $10 in stock).

There are a few others on Amazon that people like in the starting range, Parker, Scheaffer, etc that some like, but generally, the popular ones are the Metropolitan and Safari.

u/_Panda · 8 pointsr/fountainpens

My suggestion is to buy a Pilot Metropolitan, which comes with both a cartridge and a converter so you can try both out. I would also suggest getting a bottle of a basic, workhorse ink. Something like Noodler's Black would be a good option, a nice saturated black that is waterproof and behaves pretty well on cheap paper.

u/browniebiznatch · 6 pointsr/fountainpens

Pilot Metropolitan <F> nib and Noodler's Black. Use a CON-40 or CON-50 converter for the ink as the included converter is more for cleaning than anything

u/YoungRichKid · 6 pointsr/mechanicalheadpens

Keyboard: WASD 61 Keys with custom cap colors (built on their site)

Headphones: Sennheiser HD 598 SR with open backs.

Pen: Baoer 388 with a medium nib

I want to buy a nicer pen but for right now this one (with Noodler's black ink) works perfectly. I use numbers a lot at work, so I plan on making a separate number pad soon, and I also am probably going to purchase a trackball to place between the keyboard and number pad. The headphones I bought on Prime Day for half their normal price (at the time).

u/drzowie · 5 pointsr/InkPorn

If you're using a fountain pen, go with Noodler's Bulletproof Black. Amazon UK has it for under 20 quid, and it's both free-flowing and permanent.

If you're using a dip pen, basic black ink is less expensive. IIRC, I've used Senshi (their top item) and it worked OK. I grew up using Speedball Super Black India Ink, which is listed on that page for under £9. Most of those are for dip pens only, and not suitable for fountain pens.

u/Halgy · 5 pointsr/moleskine

Get Noodlers ink. The stuff is awesome and doesn't bleed through moleskine paper.

u/CriticalityIncident · 3 pointsr/fountainpens

Noodler's Black is fairly well known for being bleed resistant:
https://www.amazon.com/Noodlers-Black-Waterproof-Fountain-Pen/dp/B000MVZ2E6

For bleed through I've found that higher quality paper helps more than different inks. I like these A5 Clairefontaines:
https://www.gouletpens.com/clairefontaine-1951-clothbound-notebook-black-lined/p/C195246

u/kur1j · 3 pointsr/fountainpens

Any of the inks that are considered "bulletproof" from Noodler's (Noodler's black, 54th Mass. etc.) will not smear (unless they haven't dried). Once a bulletproof black is on some cellulose material (e.g. paper, fibers) it is there for good.

http://www.amazon.com/Noodlers-Black-Waterproof-Fountain-Pen/dp/B000MVZ2E6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1427578163&sr=8-1&keywords=noodler%27s+black

u/MrMooMooDandy · 3 pointsr/Austin

Online, the ink I use is on Amazon so I just get it there in recent years.

u/ImmovableMover · 3 pointsr/pens

> Care to tell me the advantages? I'm open to new things, I might change my mind if the pros outweigh the cons.

Sure can! Here's why I use a fountain pen for most of my daily writing:

  • Fountain pens require much less pressure with which to write. A few years ago, I started using rollerballs for this very reason. Most ballpoints require you to press down so god damn hard. This strains the hand. Good luck writing for a long period of time with a ballpoint. That shit sucks. I started using fountain pens just a few months ago because I found that they required even less pressure than liquid ink rollerballs and gels.
  • If you pick the right fountain pen, it's going to be a pleasurable, buttery experience. I'm not kidding. The nib of a fountain pen glides across the paper. Nowadays, I look forward to when I have to write something down. It's not a chore anymore, and for me, it gives me just another slight motivation to do schoolwork (college student). Hey, nothing hurts, right?
  • A single fountain pen can last you a lifetime, and even more. I find that there's something admirable and even romantic about carrying a single writing instrument that you can refill again and again. You get to know the nuances of the pen; you get attached it the pen. I think that's freaking cool in our current "use and dipose" culture of shitty Bics. Don't get me wrong. I'm not anti-tech or anything. I just find it super cool to always have on me my trusty fountain pen that's been with me through a lot! It's neat. I recently bought a vintage pen from the 1950s. It still works like a charm!
  • Speaking of refilling, the ink choices of fountain pens are a big plus! There are literally thousands of ink choices of all shades and colors. One of my favorite aspects of writing with certain inks is that it shades! It makes it look so pretty on paper. Check it out: http://wonderpens.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/img_2772.jpg https://colewardell.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/autumn-inks.jpg
    Fountain pens can be refilled through disposable cartridges or through filling mechanisms that take up ink from a bottle (cartridge-converter, piston filler, etc.)
  • And speaking of shading inks, the nib options for fountain pens are awesome too! EF, F, M, B, BB, etc. And even flex! Flex nibs are nibs that allow you to get some line variation depending on the pressure you apply. http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b325/azavalia/flex1.jpg That's sexy, lol. Oh yeah, and even italic, stub, oblique nibs, and a bunch more.
  • Fountain pens are usually much manufactured with a much high quality than most other types of pens. It's the niche it fills. It has to be higher quality because it's meant to last hopefully forever. Besides the high quality, they look really cool, with the nib and big barrel and whatnot. Here's one of my favorite pens: http://img-2013.tapatalk.com/d/13/03/31/thumbnail/3e8e7yga.jpg

    So yeah, that's why I use fountain pens. My first fountain pen still works perfectly. It was a Lamy Safari EF: http://www.jetpens.com/Lamy-Safari-Fountain-Pen-Extra-Fine-Nib-Charcoal-Black-Body/pd/1937

    My first bottle of ink was Noodler's Black: http://www.amazon.com/Noodlers-Black-Waterproof-Fountain-Pen/dp/B000MVZ2E6

    And to refill the Safari, I had to buy a converter: http://www.jetpens.com/Lamy-Fountain-Pen-Z-24-Converter/pd/1941

    And that's it. After 6 months, I still have the pen (although I've bought a bunch more :D), the converter, and the same bottle of ink is still going strong. I call that a good investment. If only I hadn't gotten addicted and bought a bunch more fountain pens and inks. But, it's a cool hobby that I enjoy. Check out some videos on Youtube and let me know if you want writing samples or anything!

    So, tl;dr Fountain pens are cool. Get one.

    > I love them. The smaller the better. I like the precision they provide. I usually don't buy anything more than 0.5, as a matter of fact, I didn't even know there was 0.38, I'll definitely look into that.

    Along with your Safari that you should definitely get, you could toss on a Mach III and the Pentel Energel that I linked. ;) Orders of $25 from Jetpens have free shipping. :D

    > I've been looking for the Pilot Precise since I read this testimonial on LifeHacker but I just can't find it in Canada. I might have to order it online. Never looked for pens in Walmart though, I'll definitely have to give that a shot.

    Yeah, if you enjoy needlepoint pens, you should definitely start off with the Pilot Precise V5. That was my first good pen that started my pen addiction 4 years ago.

    Wow, I'm too obsessed with pens, lol.

u/Thjoth · 3 pointsr/guns

My Lamy Safari is getting quite worn out. I've had it for years and it's been riding around in my pocket the entire time. Switching back to writing in cursive with that pen made it so that I can actually somewhat keep up with notes without developing horrifying writer's cramp.

A large portion of the black coating is gone off of the wire clip, it no longer retains in the cap like it should, and I've had to replace the nib where it got loose in my pocket and got crushed. Still love the thing, though. In the end, it's wound up saving me money, because the $40 I spent on the pen, a bottle of ink, plunger insert, and replacement nib is all I've spent on writing implements in the last 3 years or so, whereas before, I was going through multiple G2 gel pens a month.

I have no idea why that caused me to go off onto such a tangent. I guess I'm just attached to that pen. I use Noodler's Bulletproof Black Ink in mine, by the way.

EDIT: Why not get that USP in .45 ACP, by the way? I think I would have gone with .45 instead. I already have half a dozen handguns in 9mm, though, so maybe it's just saturation on my part.

u/terransdestroy · 2 pointsr/fountainpens

i got these two with a metro

hope i got the right stuff lol


u/Zediac · 2 pointsr/fountainpens

Noodler's Ink black. Item number 19001. I use the pen at work so I have to keep things simple and professional. I'd prefer a nice dark blue, but, eh. It's for my paperwork.

I like your handwriting. Mine is still sloppy but I'm working on it.

If cleaning doesn't work then I'll try the soap trick. Thanks.

u/Rybos · 2 pointsr/EDC

How about a nice pen? Have you ever used a fountain pen?

This pen is great. I have one with a silver trim. I've had many a fountain pen, and this is still my favorite, even more so than pens that cost me twice as much. Feels good, looks good, made very well, writes well. Just don't drop it. It will break. That's the only downside for me. However, I've broken mine 3 times, and epoxied it back together and polished it up each time.

When you start using a FP, paper becomes important too. Cheap paper and some fancy notebook brands (i.e moleskine) are horrible for fountain pens. Ink will bleed and spider on the page. I'd suggest looking at this brand of paper. They're cheap(er than moleskine), look good, and take fountain pen ink super well.

You'll need some ink too. I'd suggest starting with something from Noodler's ink lke this. Some FP inks are waterproof, some are not. Bulletproof, iron gall, or pigmented inks are usually water proof.

I know that probably puts you closer to $100, but imo, it's worth it if that's something that interests you.

u/GalactusIntolerant · 2 pointsr/fountainpens

Noodlers Bulletproof black has a pretty big following. I use it myself and it perfectly fits my ink needs. They also sell other inks that people seem to enjoy, but I personally have no experience with them.

u/Jesse_berger · 2 pointsr/fountainpens

The paper makes the experience and for the time being this will treat you nicely. You can get a 5 pack for three dollars at most Target.

If you can justify the price Rhodia and Clairefontaine makes excellent paper.

Ink:This is a well behaved ink that will work great on any paper.

Waterman is a nice ink sold on Amazon, I have inspired blue and it's excellent and a lot of fun.

The folks here will suggest all different kinds of ink, enjoy your new pen and try not to get addicted like me!

u/Oncotic · 2 pointsr/fountainpens

My experience with inks is pretty limited, I hope others will help me out with suggestions. I use Private Reserve DC Supershow Blue, which is a full, darkish blue. My uncle recommended it to me because it is easy to clean and it is easy to restart pens that have dried up using a drop of water. HOWEVER, it has no water resistance whatsoever, so if you expect your notes to come in contact with water (aka rain), they will smear badly. Inks like a Noodler's Bulletproof Black are great if you want your notes to last a long time. However, I haven't used a bulletproof ink before, but I know they smell.

u/Ardakilic · 1 pointr/fountainpens

Sorry, I should've been more specific. When I wrote Noodler's, I meant Noodlers Black, this one.

> if you find an ink too wet, you can add a tiny bit of water to make it drier. This works by diluting the amount of surfectants/other things that help the ink flow.

Well that's new for me. Thanks, that's awesome to know this! I'd think quite the opposite because all this wetness/dryness logic (such as add water = wetter).

u/TofuTakahashi · 1 pointr/BuyItForLife

Oil based inks? No, it wouldn't flow as nicely and it wouldn't flow as nicely in the pen. However, there are some safe pigment inks that are "waterproof." I want to put a disclaimer here though, you should not use any ink not intended for fountain pens, ever. Specifically India ink. It's too heavily pigmented and will destroy the pen's feed (that's the piece that rests behind the nib and connects to the ink reserve).

There are a few notable waterproof inks out there, most of them are labeled as "taper proof" or "safety ink" intended for office use. After all, there still are a fair share of professionals who use fountain pens but need to have taper proof signatures (same goes for personal use and signing documents). Noodle's bullet proof ink is quite good, and inexpensive for a waterproof and tamper proof ink. Platinum also makes one as well. There are others out there, but they escape my mind. Only downside to the waterproof inks is they are not quite as "wet" as other inks., and they lack the verity of colours

u/SabioHombre · 1 pointr/fountainpens

I just bought Noodler's black and it's exactly what you want. The only small thing is that it's not a pure, darkness of space black.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000MVZ2E6/ref=nav_timeline_asin?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/Skepticalj · 1 pointr/fountainpens

I haven't tried many inks, but the one I'm using now is Noodler's Bulletproof Black, and it's just excellent. In a Lamy Safari EF, it's my go-to pen for everyday use.

u/Ruff_Dog · 1 pointr/fountainpens

I just got a JinHao pen and it looks amazing. The reason I say looks is because I don't have ink for it. I've checked the sidebar and the sub wiki and such, but I had a question for y'all. What's your favorite non-blue and non-black ink? If I was going to go black I'd get this and blue would be this. But I want something.. different.

I'd like to stay around or under $20.