Reddit Reddit reviews Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue

We found 100 Reddit comments about Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Camping & Hiking Water Filters
Camping & Hiking Hydration & Filtration Products
Camping & Hiking Equipment
Outdoor Recreation
Sports & Outdoors
Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue
Ideal for outdoor recreation, hiking, camping, scouting, domestic and International travel, and emergency preparednessHigh-performance 0.1 Micron absolute inline filter fits in the palm of your hand and weighs just 2 ounces; 100% of MINI units individually tested three times to performance standards by SawyerAttaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable water bottles, hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water sourceRemoves 99.99999% of all bacteria (salmonella, cholera, and E. coli); removes 99.9999% of all protozoa (such as giardia and cryptosporidium); also removes 100% of microplasticsFilter rated up to 100,000 gallons; Includes one Sawyer MINI filter, 16-ounce reusable squeeze pouch, 7-inch drinking straw, and cleaning plunger
Check price on Amazon

100 Reddit comments about Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue:

u/uski · 78 pointsr/preppers

A few more ideas :

I would suggest having a battery-powered FM radio (and extra batteries if it's battery powered, or get one which charges via USB like the one I linked) to listen to the news and get vital information.

Also (if not too late), order a sawyer mini (best) or lifestraw (not as good). If you don't have access to clean water it can help you stay healthy (beware of chemical contamination which cannot be removed by these).

If you have the money, get a Garmin inReach satellite communicator (requires a (relatively cheap) subscription, down to $15ish a month). You can request SOS (much like 911), and send/receive SMS and e-mails, even without cell coverage. Excellent to keep in touch with relatives and in case of emergency. Can be used year-round when hiking, snow-mobile, skiing, ... Don't tell anyone you have this...

Download the offline map of your area on Google Maps on your phone beforehand. Can be priceless to navigate around and doesn't require internet access. Also get the Maps.Me app and download the map of your area too. Google Maps offline maps will expire and disappear from your phone after 30 days (I believe), Maps.Me maps will not.

If the cell service in your area is out of order, use your phone in airplane mode so that it doesn't continuously and desperately looks for a cell to connect to, which will drain the battery VERY quickly. Also use it on the lowest practical brightness setting to save battery power.

If not too late, get big USB power banks (>=10000mAh such as this one) and fully charge them beforehand. It's good as barter items and it can be nice to recharge your things when you have no access to a generator (on the go, or if you don't want to run the generator to avoid attracting attention). You can also get USB lights (this one for instance) and your powerbank doubles as a flashlight with a very long battery life.

Get a first aid kit, and not just one with bandaids... Get a CAT tourniquet, trauma dressing, Celox (preferred) or QuikClot bandage, triangular bandage, SAM splint, ... and know how to use them. Also get the basic medecines (stomach/diarrhea relief, basic painkillers, anti-allergy, and any prescription medecine if you require any). Remember 911 service may be unavailable for some time and you need to be able to take care of injuries. Tourniquets save lives, everyone should have one readily available.

​

I am a radio amateur and in these situations I like to have one or two portable radio for two-way communication but I realize it is not for everybody. Still, a pair of FRS/GMRS radio can be helpful. Please note that GMRS requires a (cheap) license in the USA. I would recommend this model which also allows to be used as a scanner and to program the NOAA weather frequencies (do it beforehand) and some local police/EMS/fire frequencies (if allowed in your juridiction).

Please DO NOT use a radio made for amateur radio use, where you can transmit on any frequency, such as the UV-5R; you may interfere with emergency communications, even if you can't hear them, miles away. Please stick to the FRS/GMRS frequencies. The radio above guarantees safe operation and still allows to be used as a scanner.

​

Take pictures of all your important documents (ID, properties, ...) and store them in a waterproof plastic bag. Try to keep at least your passport and driver license with you during the storm...

If you have a sump pump, try to arrange so that it can be battery powered and/or connected to your generator. If using battery power, get a battery charger and/or a generator connection, if the outage lasts and the battery runs down. Sometimes homes are not affected by the main storm but are flooded due to the lack of power around the storm and are still ruined, and that's totally preventable.

Also, beforehand, depending of the situation you might want to BLOCK your main sewage pipe. This way you might avoid sewage backflow into your home. There are normally valves already installed but in case of serious flooding (high backpressure) they sometimes are not up to the task.

​

Download a few offline movies on the Netflix app (if you have Netflix). I never lived though a hurricane but I assume after a few days/weeks, you might want some entertainment. You can also download e-books. Bonus if it's survival-related e-books.

​

Hope this helps... good luck to those affected


PS: oooo, thank you stranger for the gold, I think I never had one before ! Happy prepping :)

u/timmy_the_large · 65 pointsr/preppers

Life straw is not a great product. Spend a little extra and get the Sawyer. It is a better, more useful product. It just doesn't have as cool of a name.

u/jason22internet · 34 pointsr/backpacking

Those are not designed to purify water.

You want these guys: http://www.amazon.com/Potable-Aqua-Water-Purification-Tablets/dp/B0009I3T3S/

Or these: http://www.amazon.com/McNett-Aquamira-Water-Treatment-Drops/dp/B00CHRFQPI

filter? check out the Sawyer Mini: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

if you're in a pinch, do a little homework with using ordinary bleach ... or prepare to boil

u/ETMoose1987 · 25 pointsr/preppers

Get a sawyer mini instead, about the same price and you don't have to bend down and stick your face in the water.

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_1FJXCbNV7FQ2S

u/chrono13 · 18 pointsr/CampingGear

Get the Sawyer mini instead for $19: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

Anyone looking at this should look at the Sawyer as a (better) alternative.

Lifestraw:

  • 264 gallons total filtration per straw.
  • Shelf Life: 5 years when stored at room temperature (package may say 3 years).
  • .2 micron filtration

    Sawyer filter:

  • 100,000 gallons (actually more, but this is the guarantee)
  • Shelf life: no limit on shelf life. Only temperature constraint is it should not be allowed to freeze.
  • .1 micron filtration

    Lifestraw is $20. Sawyer is $20. I own the Sawyer and the flow through it is easy. It comes with a squeeze bag, but also attaches to regular bottles. Fill an empty Pepsi/Coke/Water bottle with nasty water, screw on the Sawyer and you are good to go. It works with Platypus bags, and as an inline or end filter for any hydration bladder.


    If there is something special about the Lifestraw that I am missing, please let me know. I see tons of news, charaties buying them for 3rd world countries, and outdoor enthusiast recommending it. I do not see any advantage it has over a Sawyer filter.

    Edit: One comparison: http://prepforshtf.com/sawyer-mini-water-filter-vs-lifestraw/

    For me, the multiple ways of using the Sawyer have been the biggest benefit. I've used my Squeeze in a bucket gravity system, attached to bottles (ultralight backpacking) and with a straw (like a Lifestraw). I will often squeeze enough water to fill a Gatorade bottle or two before moving away from the water source. Now I have the mini and the flow rate is even better - best of any filter I've ever used, and it is still incredibly versatile.
u/[deleted] · 17 pointsr/Outdoors

/u/fetch04 is right. You are going to want to learn from youtube and practice before you show your son.


-Skills you will want to acquire:

u/edheler · 15 pointsr/preppers

Drop the Life Straw and use a Sawyer Mini.

u/Bobbafettlives1983 · 15 pointsr/preppers

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_MzGzDbKTT58GD

I have an in-line attachment for hydration pack.

There’s a little pump too.

Water Purifier Pump with Replaceable Carbon 0.01 Micron Water Filter, 4 Filter Stages, Portable Outdoor Emergency and Survival Gear - Camping, Hiking, Backpacking https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07NVCBWVV/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_MBGzDbY1W35D3

u/Teerlys · 12 pointsr/preppers

I wrote this up earlier today for someone who wanted to start getting prepped on ~$75/Month but also wanted to not have to cook the foods. I did include some long term storage as the first step anyway because it's so cheap and easy, but so far as consumables go, this is a good start for you.

--------------------------------------------

A lot of this is a shelf life and storage space issue. If you have plenty of room for storage, I'd start like this:

  • Month 1: This doesn't meet your doesn't-need-to-be-cooked guideline, but it's a really solid start to bulk up on available calories and requires minimal cash and effort, so it's going in anyway. Ignore it if it's not for you.

    Buy two 50lb bags of white rice from a place like Costco or Sam's Club. Find 3 food safe 5 gallon buckets with lids. Get Mylar Bags and O2 Absorbers. Then hit Youtube for instructions on what to do with them. If the Mylar bags bit will hold you back from doing this, then skip them and just clean the buckets then dump rice in them straight. Seal, date, set aside. That's 160,000 calories in month 1. Given normal pantry supplies that stretches things out quite a ways. Plan on rotating out at 7ish years if put straight into the bucket and 20 years if you use the Mylar. Realistically, with Mylar, white rice may be good for much longer than 20 years (most people say 30, but for the minimal investment I'd rotate earlier to be safe).

  • Month 2:

    Grab a Water Bob (not right now though, hurricane season has prices high and stocks low for them). Also, a Sawyer Water Filter or two. That gives you an opportunity to grab an extra hundred gallons of water in your bathtub initially given enough warning, and some water purification options later on.

  • Month 3:

    Assuming you have storage capacity, start looking at #10 cans of food. Those are the cans that are around a foot tall and very wide. Look for things that you would eat and would be usuable in your daily lives, but also ones that would be calorie dense. For example, refried beans, nacho cheese, baked beans, white potatoes, chick peas, chili with beans, etc. Those are things you can use in recipes at home, but can pick them up and store them for a couple of years first. Getting them in the larger can is a better return on investment/dollar than buying smaller ones.

  • Month 4: This is probably more what you were looking for.

    If your pantry isn't topped up with the things your family normally eats, drop that money to get a little deeper on those things. Velveeta cheese, crackers, cans of soup, noodles, peanut butter/jelly, canned vegetables/fruit, pasta/sauce, salsa, dried/canned beans, seasonings, canned meat, canned chili, etc. Date them and make sure to work through the oldest first. Having the normal foods you eat in bulk will likely end up being what gets you through most things (like the current hurricane season, job loss, winter blizzard, etc). Spending on these things can be used to fill out whatever is left of your budget when it gets partially used up on other things. I'd also maybe consider having some flats of bottled water at home as well. I usually keep 4-7 Costco sized ones on hand for my SO and I.

  • Month 5:

    Start looking at longer term bulk water storage. I like 5 gallon stackable water cubes as they're easier to move and use and you buy them as you have a little extra cash here and there, but if you want to bump the budget up a bit for a month and your wife won't look at you like you're crazy, a 55 gallon barrel is a better price per gallon than the individual cubes. Sometimes there's just no replacing having your own clean water source ready to go. Barring all of that, if your family will use them just grab a bunch of flats of bottled water and rotate them. Stacked high they don't take up a ton of floor space.

  • Month 6 and Beyond:

    At this point you're pretty well set initially for both water and food. Keep the pantry stocked and rotating. Add on for long term stored water as you see fit and maybe invest in something like a Big Berkey if you really want to drop some money into it. At that point I'd probably begin considering longer term food storage. More rice, add in some dry beans (roughly 5 year shelf life in Mylar/Buckets), and if you're feeling really into it you can get unground wheat and that will last 30 years or better in Mylar/Buckets. You'll just need to have a hand crank grinder or two to use it.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I get wanting ready to eat foods, and that's pretty easy to do and a great place to start, but as one last recommendation... grab yourself a Propane Burner and a high pressure hose for it so that you can use regular propane tanks. You may be able to eat cold soup out of the can, but it's a lot more comforting when it's warm, and you can pretty easily have the ability to add more of your foods into your diet (like spaghetti or mac and cheese) when you can still have a burner to work with.
u/Almostcomatose · 11 pointsr/Ultralight
u/thegreatoutdoors44 · 10 pointsr/prepping

The Sawyer Mini is an great all around filter that can be purchased for $20. tablets aren't a bad idea either. Do not waste your money on a lifestraw though. the sawyers are good for like 10-100x the lifespan(in gallons of course)

u/pointblankjustice · 10 pointsr/bugout

There is a lot wrong with this list, so I'm just going to work down it one by one with my thoughts on the matter.

USB flameless lighter? Why? That is going to be unreliable, at best. Throw a few BIC lighters and some stormproof matches in there and be done with it. IF you want to be fancy, get something built to be rugged, that will stand up to use in the field:

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Floating-Lighter/dp/B00C85NBA6/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173178&sr=1-2&keywords=camping+lighter

Speaking of, I didn't see any sort of firestarting material. Warmth is going to be important, and you need as few steps as possible between you and fire. Get some quality firestarters. I am trying to keep all my links relevant from amazon.ca, so some of the brands I'm most familiar with aren't there. But these work well (though there are options from Wetfire and other brands that take up less space):

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Fire-Stix/dp/B00C6SHODK/ref=sr_1_20?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173338&sr=1-20&keywords=emergency+fire+starter

What is with the mall-ninja "tactical" hatchet? That is a lot of weight and not a lot of utility. You'd be better served with a reliable and lightweight folding saw, and a good full-tang fixed-blade knife. Something like a 7 inch Corona saw:

https://www.amazon.ca/Corona-Cutting-Tools-RS-7041/dp/B00004R9YN/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173467&sr=1-1&keywords=corona+folding+saw

If you insist on carrying a hatchet (and their function in a bugout situation is debatable, especially for the weight) get something quality like an Estwing:

https://www.amazon.ca/Estwing-E24A-14-Inch-Sportmans-Sheath/dp/B00BNQR4SG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173510&sr=1-1&keywords=estwing+hatchet

Nothing wrong with duct tape, but you'd do well to wrap just maybe 3-4 meters of it around a small core (like from doggy waste bags, or even just around itself).

The self-crank radio/flashlight/phone charger is shit. You also don't need four lights, especially if all of them are crap. Buy one good flashlight, and maybe one good headlamp.

A flashlight like a Nitecore P12 or something that runs on an 18650 and offers long runtime would be ideal. If you buy a diffuser cap for it, you can replace the lantern. Pick up some spare, high quality 18650 cells, as well. The P12 has SOS and beacon modes, which will run for days at a time, in addition to a nice throw and excellent brightness on Medium and High.

https://www.amazon.ca/Nitecore-Flashlight-Lumens-Meters-Distance/dp/B00PQE1D2E/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173859&sr=1-2&keywords=nitecore+P12

As for headlamps, those don't need to be super bright. You want something with enough brightness and floodiness to work around camp. But ideally you also want a red-light or low-light mode for night time, when you don't need to destroy your night vision just because you need to take a piss or something.

https://www.amazon.ca/TACTIKKA-CONSTANT-LIGHTING-HEADLAMP-DESERT/dp/B00GCGIGHK/ref=sr_1_14?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173989&sr=1-14&keywords=petzl+headlamp

The powerbank thing in the crank radio is crap, only 1000mah. Not enough to charge most modern smart phones even 25%. Figure that of that 1000mah, ~25% will be lost just due to inefficiency in the charging process. Get a 10,000mah or bigger high quality battery, with 2.1A ports, and be done with it:

https://www.amazon.ca/Anker-PowerCore-Portable-Ultra-Compact-High-speed-Charging-Technology/dp/B0194WDVHI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482173708&sr=8-1&keywords=anker+usb+power+bank

Combine the money you'd spend on the shitty folding knife and the shitty Gerber multitool, and buy a proper multi-tool. You don't need two folding knives.

The Leatherman Wingman is a good value, though I prefer a nicer quality one like the Charge TTi, but at four times the price it may not be worth it just for an S30V blade.

https://www.amazon.ca/Leatherman-2996-831426-Wingman-Multi-Tool/dp/B005DI0XM4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482174264&sr=8-1&keywords=leatherman+wave

Ditch the camp toilet paper, that stuff is like wiping your ass with cardboard. Get some biodegradable camp wipes from an outdoor store. You can now use these to clean your ass, and they also are useful for wiping your hands, or taking whore baths.

Same with the camp soap. Are you bugging out or camping for a week? Nothing you are going to do in a bugout situation is going to necessitate body soap. Toothbrush, floss, deodorant.

Ditch the giant first aid kit full of crap you don't need. Those things are heavy and 80 of the 85 pieces are just different sized bitch stickers. Build your own first aid kit tailored around the likely injuries you would face: sprains, cuts, burns. Maybe throw some Quik Clot Z-pack gauze or a tourniquet (CAT or similar) in there for larger trauma, if that is a concern to you. Limit the bitch stickers to 5-10. All gauze, tape, trauma pads, alcohol wipes, tincture of iodine, moleskin for blisters, tweezers, surgical shears, gloves, maybe burn cream. Small containers of medications you might need: aspirin, antihistamines like Diphenhydramine, anti-diarrheals, etc.

That survival paracord bracelet thing is garbage. You already have 100ft of paracord in your list (which you could probably cut down to 50ft). You don't need some shitty firestarter, whistle, and compass thing. Buy a real lensatic sighting compass. Not going to do you much good without a map and the ability to understand it, anyway.

https://www.amazon.ca/UST-Survival-Essentials-Lensatic-Compass/dp/B005X1YI3Q/ref=sr_1_5?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174799&sr=1-5&keywords=compass

You have both a cookset AND a mug/pot. This is extra redundant and not needed in a bugout situation. Stick to food you don't have to prepare. Caloric density is your friend. Jerky, EPIC bars, Clif bars, etc.

If you need to boil water, use a single-wall metal canteen (NOT a thermos). Remove the plastic lid, fill with water, set in your fire. Widemouth canteens like those by Klean Kanteen are multi-purpose (multipurpose is your friend). You can sterilize water, you can cook and eat food out of it (because of the large opening), and you can fill with hot water, wrap in a sock, and warm your sleep system.

https://www.amazon.ca/Klean-Kanteen-Stainless-Bottle-27-Ounce/dp/B0027W6WHE/ref=sr_1_sc_4?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174908&sr=1-4-spell&keywords=klean+kanteen+widemouth

You don't need a can opener if you have a good multitool.

Lifestraws suck ass. They only work as a straw, and I am going to guess you don't want to get your water by drinking out of puddles exclusively. Get a Sawyer Squeeze mini filter. This can be used in-line with a hydration bladder, can be used like a Lifestraw, or can be used to filter an fill your water storage containers/bladder:

https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175065&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

One seriously lacking area for you is your sleep system. A tarp and a space blanket are not going to keep you functionally warm. You might survive a night, but you won't be useful the next day.

At the BARE minimum, you should get a good, reflective, breathable bivvy sack, like this one from SOL, AND a sleeping pad. A bivvy will reflect heat back onto you, helping with heat lost through convection, but no sleeping bag will help with heat lost through conduction (you touching the cold ground). That is why a sleeping pad is mandatory. I have used the Escape bivvy and the Klymit pad linked here together, and both kept me comfortably warm to about 50 degrees F. Below that, I've had to augment with base layers or jackets, and that still sucked. If you are hoping to sleep in below freezing temperatures, you'll need a properly sorted ultralight sleeping bag.

https://www.amazon.ca/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Escape-Bivvy/dp/B00EVGD0FQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175280&sr=1-1&keywords=SOL+escape

https://www.amazon.ca/Klymit-06SVGR01C-Camping-Mattress-Green-Grey/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175199&sr=1-1&keywords=sleep+pad

Other recommendations of mine would be to take survival, medical and foraging guides and put them on a smartphone, along with a GPS mapping software and pre-downloaded offline topographical maps at 1:24k resolution of your main bugout areas and 1:100k resolution elsewhere. Something like Gaia GPS for iOS or Backcountry Navigator Pro for Android:

u/atetuna · 7 pointsr/Survival

$19.99 with shipping on Woot for 1,000 liters of filtering capacity or $19.06 with shipping on Amazon, which is strange because Woot is owned by Amazon.

Or you can get a Sawyer Mini for $19.97 with shipping for 100,000 gallons (378,541 liters) of filtering capacity, while filtering at 0.1 microns instead of 0.2 microns for the Lifestraw. It comes with a straw so you can use it the same way as the Lifestraw, plus has the greater flexibility of being able to be used with a hydration bladder or set up as a gravity filter systems, and also comes with a small water pouch.

u/resamay · 7 pointsr/shutupandtakemymoney

What do you think of the http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1406720934&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini It has a 0.1 Micron Filter. I believe that still won't remove Viruses in water though. And do you know what are the chances of North American Streams, or Lakes etc containing viruses in the water?

u/InvalidUserAccount · 7 pointsr/preppers

Why would you not just buy the Sawyer Mini for $18.97 on Amazon?

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_qhWfub0018FS9

u/cwcoleman · 5 pointsr/CampingGear

Please OP - don't ever buy a Lifestraw for backpacking. They are worse in every way compared to a Sawyer filter.

https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP103-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/

u/ib4student · 5 pointsr/EDC



| Lifestraw | Sawyer Mini
---|---|----
Membrane | 0.2 microns | 0.1 microns (2x better)
Capacity | 264 gallons | 100,000 gallons (378.8x better)
Bacteria | 6 LOG | 7 LOG (10x better)
Bacteria% | 99.9999% | 99.99999% (10x better)
Protozoa | 3 LOG | 6 LOG (1000x better)
Protozoa% | 99.9% | 99.9999% (1000x better)
Price | $19.89 | $19.41 or 4 for $67.51 ($16.88 each)

The mini is also smaller and comes with a 32 oz squeezable water pouch, 7" tube, syringe for cleaning (if it clogs)

>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable bottles (28 mm thread), hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source

http://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

u/Sinjhin · 5 pointsr/Charlotte

Or just grab a couple sawyer filters for $20 a pop. Still good to have some backup bottled water I suppose and fill up the tub, but with a sawyer I can literally just go drink out of a puddle if I need to.

​

https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1536624885&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=sawyer+mini&psc=1

u/SomeTwelveYearOld · 5 pointsr/raleigh

As a back up, you can buy one of these pretty cheap:

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_8tgBDbGGF66B7

u/Zooshooter · 5 pointsr/camping

Do not get a Lifestraw! Get a Sawyer mini filter instead. They're back-flushable (you can unclog them if they get clogged) and they're guaranteed for more gallons of water than a Lifestraw. The mini filter will also screw on to a lot of plastic drink bottles, like the 12-20oz bottles you can get from vending machines.

u/YogiIan · 5 pointsr/camping

You can buy a Sawyer Mini SP128 for not much more and get .1 micron filtration. Clean sip doesn't even list its filter specs on its website, most likely because it doesn't compare to more reputable manufacturers. Just because it's "the world's smallest", doesn't necessarily make it a smart purchase.

u/Whispertron · 5 pointsr/de

Nimm eine erweiterte Erste Hilfe Ausrüstung mit und sorg' dafür, daß deine Reisebegleiter davon wissen und im Notfall dafür sorgen, daß die verwendet wird. Diese Seite hat eine gute Liste von dem, was man einpacken sollte. Besonders die Einmal-Spritzen, Kanülen und Disinfektionsmittel sind notwendig. Bei der Abreise kannst du alles nicht verwendete an jemanden Spenden, der dort wohnt.

Medikamente gegen Durchfall und Verstopfung kann ich auch empfehlen. Wasserfilter wie diesen oder diesen, und zusätzlich noch Wasserreinigungstabletten, sollten auch nicht fehlen.

DR Kongo hat die zweit-höchste Malaria Infektionsrate der Welt, also sollte Malariaprofylaxe und Insektenabwehr hoch in deiner Prioritätsliste sein. Kleidung sollte wenn's geht leicht sein aber die Arme und Beine bedecken. Das hilft sowohl beim Sonnenschutz als auch gegen Insekten. Es gibt mit Permithrin imprägnierte Kleidung die sehr empfohlen ist. Ansonsten gutes Insektenabwehrspray mitnehmen und ausgiebig verwenden.

u/Graybealz · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Here is a great little stove. It's a Chinese whisperlight, but I've been using it quite a bit over the past 2 years and have no complaints whatsoever. Also super cheap, which gives you more money to play with.

The Sawyer mini squeeze is also a great item to have. You should have $20-25 left after these two items.

Here's a decent magnesium fire starter for cheap as well.

With these items, all essential/survival items, you should have about $15-20 to play with. Maybe some socks?

u/Prosapiens · 4 pointsr/EDC

Gorruck 34L GR2 Coyote Tan - a good bag, heavy, uncomfortable, probably give it to my grandchildren in like 50 years

Flip Flops - generic things

Bigblue 28W solar charger - very good, can charge my battery up during the day if i leave it in the sun which I've never really done honestly

Jakemy hardware tools - seamed useful? i've never needed this

Army glove shells - i thought i used these a lot and were indistructable but now that i think of it, i don't use them that often and are probably pretty cheaply made.

Sharpie, pen, all weather notebook - probably should switch over to a fisher space pen...

Straws - these are probably already broken.

Whistle - really really really loud

Fire-striker, matches, lighter - i'm not sure i have enough ways to start a fire

Fresnel lens - ok, now i have enough

LED flashlight - i used to go running in the middle of the night with this flashlight, its tiny

LED flashlight - this isn't the one i have but looks kinda similar? i don't remember where i got mine

Earbuds - generic cheap earbuds

Leatherman Surge - given to me by my wife for passing the bar. thanks wife!

First Aide kit - i put mine together from stuff i've stolen from friends houses whenever i go over and use the bathroom

playing cards - these look very similar to the ones i have, they are plastic so they won't get rained on

glasses/ sunglasses - i have really bad vision

personal hygiene kit - aahhhh dry shaving

Sawyer Mini / syringe, collapsible canteen (dirty), heavy duty straw - i've never used this

collapsible canteen (clean) - i've never used this either

sewing kit - i've used this a lot

ID tags - i guess if i get blown up they'll know my blood type?

garbage bag - for when my pockets are full

elastic bands - i use these when packing to keep rolled socks and things from falling apart

Salt - i have nooooo idea why i have this

cooking grate - i'm not going to hold meat over a fire with a stick like some sort of caveman

heavy duty ziplock bag - in case my mapcase breaks and other reasons

rip-patch - leftover from when i needed a pack because i bought a crummy cheap inflatable sleeping pad.

Army Fleece Beanie - i always keep this at the top of my pack

4 Bungie Cords - not the one i use but similar. to make a field-expedient shelter

Trowel - for disposal of biological wastes

Lensatic compass - because GPS should only be a backup

Pocketboy 130 folding saw - i have a bigger one for yardwork, this small one is really great

Tent stakes - for tent staking

Ravpower 26800 Battery - use this all the time can fast chage my stuff

Battery Battery holder, cables, wall charger - all fits togehter like glove!

Army Poncho - wear it, make a tent out of it etc

Microfiber towel - not the one i use but similar. i mainly use this for when the kids accidentally fall in a lake like they tend to do for some reason

Down Jacket - cheap chinese knockoff... i feel bad for not buying american

Wet weather top - not sure this is worth the space/weight

Wet Weather bottom - not sure if this is worth the weight/space

Silkweights - PJs! and warmth

Jungle Blanket - this is a lot better than the army's woobie. lighter and warmer

Gransfors Bruks Wildlife Hatchet - again, gift from wife. she wanted me to chop things and be more manly, generally. now i come home with parts of wildlife for her to cook

Map of New England - or, how i stopped worrying and love dismounted land navigation

PT belt - keeps me safe in all situations

Compression straps - i don't like lashing things to the outside but i guess i can if i wanted to

Fork and Spoon - stole these from the kitchen. i'll probably be replacing this soon with something titanium.

​

EDIT: i just priced it out: $1,585.08 total

u/Mexicanpizza1 · 4 pointsr/preppers
u/so_there_i_was · 4 pointsr/Bushcraft

Sawyer mini is the way to go for water filtering.

u/gizram84 · 3 pointsr/preppers

I remember reading that the Sawyer Filter is a much better product than the LifeStraw.

LifeStraw claims it can filter 1,000 liters. The Sawyer claims 100,000 gallons. Also the Sawyer filters protozoa much better (99.9999% vs 99.9%)

u/MrMaxPowers247 · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I thought you might like this a Mini Water Filter. Happy tax day

u/Ksrugi · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I grew up in Louisiana and always had these at the ready in case another Katrina came by. Barebones and lightweight in case you need to get up and move.


Multitool - Something that's sturdy, offers plenty of options, but also is lightweight. If I got washed out, this would be one of the top things I'd want coming with me.

First Aid Kit - You just never know. Water can hide a lot of nasty stuff like sharp metal edges, broken glass, etc. The kit I've linked to also comes with a multitool.
Water Filtration System - Dehydration will get you before anything else. Southern heat combined with physical exertion takes a lot out of anyone and tiny filtration systems like this will take care of you without adding bulk.

Meal Replacement Bars - You'll ideally want a few days emergency food. I recommend meal replacement bars that are high in protein and fiber and no less than 500 calories. They'll provide decent nutrition and should make you feel satiated for at least 2-4 hours. I don't have a recommendation on this one because there are so many brands and flavors.
Hand Crank Lantern - A reliable source of light that you can crank on your own. Generally, I avoid using generators and the like. I'm paranoid about electricity after flooding occurs.

Whistle - Great for alerting people without tearing up your vocal chords. It's also very, very, very good to have in case animals that shouldn't come by are nearby.
Dust Mask - If your city floods, there's going to be a lot of crud that comes up from the sewers and a lot of things accumulating inside buildings. Save your lungs and your noses.
Portable Battery - I love this age of technology we're in. Charge this a few days before the storm hits and you'll be able to keep your phone charged for days if the power goes out.
Insect Repellant - The ample amount of still water after a hurricane is prime bug nesting. A little repellant goes a long way.
Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick Offerman - Or any book really to help pass the time. This is a fantastic read though. :)

u/HeyRememberThatTime · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Direct link to the single blue filter that's $18.69 w/ Prime shipping: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/?psc=1

Woot's still a better deal if you're ordering more than one, like OP said, since you only pay the extra $5 once.

u/archbox · 3 pointsr/preppers

Filters better and filters more:



| Lifestraw | Sawyer Mini
---|---|----
Membrane | 0.2 microns | 0.1 microns (2x better)
Capacity | 264 gallons | 100,000 gallons (378.8x better)
Bacteria | 6 LOG | 7 LOG (10x better)
Bacteria% | 99.9999% | 99.99999% (10x better)
Protozoa | 3 LOG | 6 LOG (1000x better)
Protozoa% | 99.9% | 99.9999% (1000x better)
Price | $19.20 | $19.97 or 4 for $67.51 ($16.88 each)

The mini is also smaller and comes with a 32 oz squeezable water pouch, 7" tube, syringe for cleaning (if it clogs)

>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable bottles (28 mm thread), hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source

http://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

u/hi_in_fiber · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

You're welcome!

>Is there a good compass or gps you would reccomend?

I'm afraid I'm not a good authority on GPS. I use a DeLorme InReach which is a two-way communicator with GPS ability if tethered to a phone. It's overkill for someone starting out, I wouldn't recommend it unless you've got piles of money burning a hole in your pocket.

As for compasses, I carry a cheap Brunton baseplate compass. Similar to this Silva, but I don't go off trail or crosscountry. More importantly is that you know how to use one. Watch some youtube videos first, figure out if you need a compass that has sights, or if you live in a higher/lower latitude and need something to match your magnetic zone.

Hold off on the GPS and learn how to use a compass and map first. Then if you think it's necessary (or more convenient) step up to a GPS. Remember that maps and compasses don't need batteries.

>How much water is enough water?

General rule is 1 gallon/day, but it varies from person to person, terrain, temperature, etc. If you're in an area with decent water sources, get yourself a Sawyer Mini.

>When deciding where to go in back country do most people just choose a thing and then travel there and back and around or are there trails that people take and camp along?

Choosing a thing and traveling there is called "cross-country hiking" which means hiking off-trail and making your own path. This is allowed in some places and frowned upon at others, depends on how fragile/protected the terrain is. If you're going cross-country, you better be proficient at orienteering.

I'd wager the majority of people hike on trails and camp along the way at established camp sites.

u/AngeloPappas · 3 pointsr/preppers

For anyone thinking this is a good buy, please check out the Sawyer Mini. It may cost more, but the Lifestraw filters up to 1,000L. The Sawyer does 360,000L and also filters out more than the Lifestraw. The Sawyer also works with fittings and attachments for hydration bags meaning you can set it up to work as a gravity filter in addition to using it as a straw.

It's better than the the Lifestraw in every single way. I have used both and have no affiliation with either company.

u/WhiskeyandKittens · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I'm going deep in to the woods. We are going to stay in awesome hammocks and we will be wrapped in fleece sleeping bags. We will also bring a water filtration system so we can drink from the spring rather than lugging water with us. After all, lugging a cooler or four full of beer and whiskey will be enough of a task for us.

I'm so excited that the weather is getting better that I have super duper camping on my mind. :)

u/dasponge · 3 pointsr/hiking

Are you dead set on a Geigerrig filter? They seem awfully expensive for something that will only last 50-100 gallons.

I'd get a sawyer mini - http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

u/holganaut · 3 pointsr/camping

Uhh.. Since nobody else is helping, I will give it my best shot. On a normal day, the average reccomended amount of water per person will be 64 oz., or .5 gallons. This is a rough estimate for an average person. If you are larger, pack more. If you are smaller, pack less. Depending on the heat, you may end up sweating alot of the water out.

I would reccomend no less than .75 Gallons per person per day.

As far as containers go, something like this would probably be best. I think that stores like walmart have a similar option....

To purify lake water you have several options. There are a multitude of water filters that backpackers use to make drinking water safe. /r/ backpacking raves about this one in particular for its low price, easy use, and low weight. It should filter out bacteria and other nasty things in water.

Alternatively, water purification tablets can be bought to do the same thing. These will not filter out sediment though. They only kill bacteria.

Since this is car camping and the weight/size of gear is not as big of a concern, simply overpacking on water will do no harm. Just keep track of how much you drink as a gauge for next time!

u/innoutberger · 3 pointsr/Flagstaff

Forgot to mention above, I do have a water filter, and was planning on filtering on-the-go as I was camping. Does that change anything?

u/arrbos · 3 pointsr/vancouver

Get a Sawyer filter over the lifestraw. https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/


You don't have to suck water through, and it's rated for way more water.

u/parametrek · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Replace the $70 Katadyn filter with a $20 Sawyer filter.

Replace the $60 Petzl with a $20 Wowtac A2.

> I am also looking for a set of hiking poles.

The $30 Monoprice CF poles are considered the best/lightest for the money. You really don't want heavy poles.

> Do I need any other cookware?

Are you planning to actually cook or are you eating trail mix the entire time?

u/phirebug · 3 pointsr/camping

As others have mentioned, it will depend on what kind of camping he likes to do and what he already owns, but here are some of my favorite pieces of gear I've picked up over the years:
This little guy is a pretty good rechargeable lantern/flashlight with magnets so you can stick it to stuff and a usb output so you can charge other things with it.

I've had one of these for YEARS and I just lost it the other day. There was $200 worth of gear in the pannier that fell off my bike and I'm more pissed about that cup than the rest of the gear combined. It looks like they made it a little taller, which I do not like, but he may. There are several other brands that make something similar in both steel or titanium. It's not just a cup though...it will slip perfectly over the bottom of a nalgene, you can cook directly on a stove or fire with it, and you can pair it with the smaller jetboil coffee press or the guts of a standard bodum press and turn it into a french press. It's the exact same diameter.
A Sawyer can be an AMAZING if you're going to be anywhere long enough to pack water in. The squeeze bag it comes with sucks, but it has standard bottle threads, so you can screw it into a 2-liter bottle with the bottom cut off and it turns it into a gravity filter. Just pour more river/lake water into the 2 liter every minute or so and it will keep pouring clean water into your bottles. Also, you notice the weird skinny part in the middle? It's exactly the width of duct tape. You can wrap several yards of it around there.
EDIT: forgot some words

u/ThirstyOne · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

High-Vis version of this kit.

I'm not a fan of the Knife+Ferrocerium rod combos. The Mora Survival one specifically is more expensive than the counterparts purchased separately. I prefer purpose built strikers because trying to exercise mechanical force using something other than the business end of something sharp and pointy sounds like a recipe for injury. Plus, if you lose your knife you're fucked because now you don't have a striker.

Get some:

u/og_boyscout · 2 pointsr/preppers

The life straw and aquamira are both good choices. However I found that the life straw was overly bulky and large for the job it completes. Also I had two of the aquamira carbon elements break on me. My suggestion is to go with the sawyer mini - http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1417445721&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX200_QL40

Or the sawyer squeeze- http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B005EHPVQW/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1417445858&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SY200_QL40

(Sorry I don't know how to condense these links.)

If you look at their weight vs. Filtering capacity it's almost unbelievable. They weigh just ounces and it's something like 100,000 gallons for the mini and 1,000,000 gallons for the squeeze. Plus walmart sells these so they are never to far away. Best $20 I ever spent!

u/cdougyfresh · 2 pointsr/financialindependence

I have a straw filter in my bug out bag, but for home I keep this one around.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I also have some water purification tablets.

I honestly haven't tried any of the freeze dried food yet, need to do that! Canned food rotation is good, but we don't really eat much canned food regularly, so doesn't work too great for us. We try to eat as much fresh / local produce & meats as possible.

u/II12yanII · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

For a water purifier I would go with the sawyer water filter. You can filter water into any bottle you want or use it like a straw. http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1457621423&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=sawyer

u/AnotherProject · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Good inexpensive water filter http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2?pc_redir=1395985123&robot_redir=1

For a first aid kit just build your own; a few band aids, bandage, neosporin, ibprofin, anti diarrhea

u/thelastboyscout007 · 2 pointsr/preppers

Becker BK22 - This knife is a freakin beast. I've batoned 4in thick hardwood logs with this badboy with no problems and it still held its edge. And at 1/4 thick you could pry open a car door with it if needed.


Sawer Mini Water Filter


Mountain House Meals - Lightweight long storage and taste great.

Laplander Folding Saw

u/FindYourFemaCamp · 2 pointsr/camping

Iodine is blegh. Takes a while to purify the water and leaves a taste.

instead get a
sawyer mini from amazon for 20 bucks.

Removes 99.99999% of all bacteria, up to 100,000 gallons.

u/fidelitypdx · 2 pointsr/Portland

I also like the Sawyer, it's ~$22.00 on Amazon. It's not the fastest filter, but it works pretty well.

u/Brettc286 · 2 pointsr/camping

Do you want to cook with filtered water? If so, these systems are not great. I really like this Sawyer filter, it's very versatile.

u/eyesontheskydotcom · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I'm newer to this, but have done a bunch of research and searched for deals, plus gone on several trips now, so I'll just throw out some options on a few things that have worked for me. Just my $0.02; take it for what it's worth.

Knife: I've have several Mora's. They get tons of recommendations. Plus they're small, light and capable. I've used them to split wood. The one with the firestarter in it is nice.

Water bottles: I use store-bought bottled-water ones. My Sawyer Mini water filter screws right onto them. Granted, that's not a useful option to put hot water in your Nalgene to warm your feet in your sleeping bag, so for cold weather that may not be a good option for you.

Light: Use a headlamp. Much lighter-weight and allows for hands-free.

Clothing: No cotton as others have said. Search for deals on Sierra Trading Post. Sign up for their emails. They'll send you 2-4 every day, but I've gotten a lot of nice stuff for low cost going that route. I put stuff in my cart I think I want, and STP will send you deals regularly. I click through the flyers and then look at the prices in my cart. When the stuff in my cart is a price I like, I buy the stuff then.

u/xxxm310ion · 2 pointsr/bugout

So I want to think you’re going for “grey man” due to your backpack, but carrying around an AK might make you stand out a bit. You could try storing your rifle in one of those bags that come with folding chairs. It would help a little at least.

You have a lot of heavy stuff like people have already said. That backpack won’t hold up to much weight over distance. You shouldn’t ever cheap out on the one thing that holds all of your gear. I understand backpacks can get quite expensive, but it really is a must.

You should pack more cordage. That can be used for a million things.

Get you a smaller bottle of water and a water filter. (Sawyer Mini )

I’m sure everyone is talking about weight, so I won’t say much about that other than cans, pots, and pans are heavy.

I’d like to see what changes you make, so feel free to post again once you have updated it a bit! Good luck! Welcome to the club!

u/zed_brah · 2 pointsr/sydney

Awesome, I'd like to see it in action. I am looking at getting a Sawyer Mini for my trip.

u/MrMagicpants · 2 pointsr/Design

Every few weeks a post emerges somewhere on Reddit talking about this amazing innovation called the LifeStraw, and inevitably someone chimes in saying the Sawyer Mini is objectively better for the same amount of money.

This time, I'll be that guy.

http://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1417660764&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

u/SilverSeven · 2 pointsr/ottawa

Just an FYI, I spend a LOT of time in the woods and put a lot of research into which leatherman to buy. Im so very happy I let a guy at Le Baron talk me into buying the Victorinox SwissTool RS. Its locking mechanism is way better IMO, the selection of tools is a little better, its got a much higher quality feel...all around just a way better product.

Does he spend time in the backcountry? Id highly recommend a Sawyer Mini. Pretty much the best filter you can buy. Can throw it right in line on a camel pack too. Super cool.

u/desktop_version_bot · 2 pointsr/preppers
u/thomas533 · 2 pointsr/preppers

First I see no rain protection. Even if you are wearing some, you should have a rain cover for your pack. A multitool is going to be far more useful than a big hunting knife. A Sawyer Mini Water Filter is far more versatile than a Lifestraw. Nothing beets Beef jerky and GORP for on the go food that is high in calories. The magnesium bar is great and all, but a mini Bic lighter is easy to use and almost as reliable. Carry both.

I would highly recommend looking at some gear lists over at /r/Ultralight. These are people who obsess over coming up with gear lists that they can spend weeks in the woods with but weigh next to nothing. Take their lists and add in a few items for those extra scenarios that worry you the most, and you'll have a good item list.

u/mjern · 2 pointsr/trailrunning

I carry a Sawyer Mini Filter. Haven't had to use it, though.

u/cast_away_wilson · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Sawyer Mini water filter. 1 for $15.46, 2 for $29.47
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=twister_B06XVV54DF

u/docb30tn · 2 pointsr/preppers

Get moved in and unpacked first. The main problem with apartment prepping is Space. Depending on how many are living there that could further complicate things. You can buy risers for your bed and put it on that making extra room under there.
Water is the most important item so that's another issue. I would suggest buying this Sawyer Mini Filtration system for each adult member. http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=pd_bia_nav_i_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=0GHK87VC1FWNP65Q9HM8
Since you haven't started according to your post then there a lot of research that should be done. Do you have any skill that you are really good at, that would be good for prepping and survival? If so, then start practicing. Stockpiling a lot of items it's going to help if you're not trained and try to have 'everything' you think will help.
You might have to leave your apartment one day and what about your stuff? Whatever you leave behind will be for looters to pick up. Bugging In is always an option. Research 72 hour BoBs and Build Your Own. Do not buy an already stocked kit. Most if not all are overpriced, not big enough, nor made of good material.
If you have owned storage then that is a bonus. I wouldn't work on filling that up right away. Information......is more valuable and can't be stolen. Have a backup for your plan(s); as well as a backup for the backup i.e. contingency plans.
Most imortant: Don't brag or tell just anyone you are doing this. When SHTF they will be coming to your place for stuff.
Skills: First Aid, CPR, and AED from the Red Cross. Weapon of choice, but silent bladed weapons are best, IMO. Foraging. Plant Identification. Hunting and kill prep. Fire starting. Water filtration and a host of other things you'll want to learn and be proficient in well before anything happens. Problem is disasters aren't planned.

u/jhulbe · 2 pointsr/BWCA

I've rarely had people stop in at my campsite, we usually hang a clothes line out front so they know the site is taken.

We've swung by on our boats if we saw people at a site we wanted and asked when they planned on leaving.


For water, i usually go with big groups. Boiling would be a paint.

We bring two of these: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-5-Gallon-Collapsible-Water-Carrier/dp/B000088O9Y/

picked up a hose to filter it through: https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

Then I just take the dirty 5 gallon bucket down to the water, fill it up, and then hang it from a tree and drain it into a clean water tote. The clean tote is used for filling nalgenes and such. Then if you just need a little water to brush your teeth grab it from the dirty bucket hose.


I dug through some photos and found a picture of my setup in the background.

http://imgur.com/a/jjFD2


as for the wind... Paddle slow, tie your gear into your canoe. We use Gear Ties by nite ize to secure most things.

I've paddled in some sketchy stuff.

u/brainbacteria · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Lifestraw is good, but for the same amount of money you can get a Sawyer mini filter. http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1412635189&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini
It seems to be the go-to backpacking filter, has 100,000 gallon guarantee on it, and a smaller micron filter at .01. I agree with 12pieces though, a filter is a good way to go.

u/BarbarianNerd · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

If you want to get by cheap, pare the list down to essentials.
You need water, food, good shoes/boots, and shelter and to keep it light. Everything else is periphery.

The cheapest and lightest way to carry water is to use an empty quart milk jug or two with a rope on it. It's not as good as a camel back style bladder, but it's more reliable in my experience for fractions of pennies on the dollar.

I recommend a Lifestraw or a Sawyer filter for water purification. They cost about 20 bucks and they're really effective. Not necessarily essential for short trips, but it does a lot for peace of mind and you never know when bad stuff will happen. They don't filter out heavy metals or dissolved materials (ie anything <.1 microns).

REI has a really good info primer on sleeping bags

I wouldn't worry about poles for overnight stuff at all. That's for like weeks of constant hiking or alpine stuff. They can be useful and are helpful, but they can be passed by most of the time.

I get by with a rubberized army poncho and a blanket instead of a tent and bag. It's good enough to keep the rain off and a bit of body heat in, but it's not ideal and it's time consuming. I got it at a yard sale for two bucks. But for one night, it's good enough. A rain fly or tent foot print, or plain tarp is also effective. There are some pretty legit one person backpacking tents out there for about 70-100 bucks, I'll probably get one next. Not sure which brands are good though.

For food, I'd do the mountain house meals and hoist my garbage high and away from camp after wards, preferably in an air tight bag of some kind when you haul it out.

Normally I prefer to do something like pilot bread, PB, dried fruit, a big bag of spinach for the first day or two, green beans, nuts, and maybe some quality sausages and cucumbers, but the convenience of the MRE style foods is often appealing. army steel canteen cups are good for boiling stuff in, but the canteens are kinda useless.

A lighter, some matches, and wet fire packets are great.

Get a mid grade belt knife, like a buck or a k-bar or similar. It's a whole nother can of worms to discuss however. Just be careful as some buck knives are made in china, the ones made in idaho are always marked american made on the packaging.

Silva makes a good compass, a good topographic map, a small 10ths scale ruler (or any cheap one) are a good idea. Know your pace count and hwo to use these tools effectively. Compasses are pretty useful in foul weather or unfamiliar places, but navigational things aren't really essential.

I'd get some biodegradable toilet paper and read this.

That's about all I can think of right now, there's probably more to say and think about. Good luck! Park jobs are a ton of fun! Wish I was going with.

u/Cool_Bastard · 2 pointsr/preppers

I skimmed through your list, but am short on time. Some of my stuff overlaps with yours, but I'm a firm believer in redundancy. Shit gets lost or you loan it out or it gets up and walks away and then you have none. You'll notice it happens to us even when we're NOT in a natural disaster emergency situation.

I'm assuming your bug out bag is for more than 3 days. I hate the 3 day scenario.

I did CTRL-F. What I did not find was:

  • tourniquet - I suggest two
  • The blue tarps are big and bulky. One would be great on the ground under a tent, but I'd suggest a large poncho or thin nylon sheet with grommets for a "roof" under trees to keep the rain out, or snow. Maybe something fireproof?
  • knife - specifically survival knife & pocket knife. Yeah, I saw your multi-tool...it's not a survival knife.
  • Is your TP in a ziplock baggie? Is it separated into separate sections so it won't get lost. I suggest two rolls, just in case.
  • Duct tape.
  • 100' parachute cord - I saw you had 30', Personally, I like to have a lot more. You'll need a knife to cut and a lighter to burn the ends
  • Lighters - You have one unopened set of Bic lighters, so if you lose it, you lose all of them. Maybe consider opening it and putting the in different locations so when you lose two, you still have three backup.
  • Backup flashlight & extra Batteries - I suggest rechargeables and a solar rechargeable pack. I like to standardize all my electronics with the same type, like AA.
  • Pen/paper - Yeah I saw you have it, but are they waterproof? I got some off Amazon (pads were in a pack of 5) where the paper pads were waterproof and tear proof. Pen was sposed to be waterproof as well.
  • Boots - with appropriate socks (3 pair)
  • Water purifier that's a little more robust than laying down in a creek bed and drinking through a straw. Maybe this one or this one along with your life straw. Do you have a collapsable container to hold water in? So you won't always have to go to the creek bed?
  • Solar shower? You don't know how long your disaster might be and a shower does wonders for the body & mind.
  • Towel, wash cloths. You always need to wash and dry your mess kit along with yourself and tools.
  • Soap for washing mess kit and for yourself. Shampoo or bar shampoo, extra ziplock bags, larger nylon bags (like shopping bags) to carry shit that you come across, like firewood or other cans of food or rocks.
  • Something for self defense or to chase wild dogs/coyotes away or even predators. Even if it's a high power sling shot with steel ball bearings, or a high power, full auto CO2 BB gun, anything to tell an aggressor that you're not just a sitting duck. Personally, I would NOT want to be hit with a full auto BB gun or even a steel ball from a sling shot. Don't make yourself an easy target, hence your knife.
  • A back up boot knife. Always have two. One they can see, and one that's hidden.
u/ForrestSmith151 · 2 pointsr/hiking

First Aid Kit - you might not need it ever, but you should always have it. All kits are different but there are fundamental items that should be carried, you can check out the NOLS Kits
and either buy one or for less, make your own that is custom to your needs and desires.

Tools - First, carry a knife that can cut decent size branches, again, you might not need it but its good to have. Second, I recommend getting a water filter such as a Sawyer mini or Katadyn Be Free as they are both lightweight and will probably decrease your pack weight if you hike near water. Third, Fire can be helpful in many situations but must be used carefully and with respect. If you live somewhere that allows it, a wood burning camp stove will be worth some warmth and also allow you to cook if you bring along a mess set. I personally use an MSR Pocket Rocket. As a day hiker, you might not use a stove often but it's not bad to have if you do longer hikes or are far from civilization so if that's the case, look into tablet stoves. generally, you should have a lighter or two just in case. You may also consider carrying a survival blanket just in case (as goes for most these objects).

The Front Pouch - So the idea behind having this pouch is to have things that you want quick access too on the trail, the most important of which is your map. Navigation is important when hiking so if you're not familiar with an area buy a map and bring a compass. I personally don't use a compass but I've learned how to navigate without one, however you should always have a map. You may also need to have a permit for some hiking areas and it's nice to have within reach, usually with your map. you may also like to have TP and a camp trowel in there so that it is not hard to find at the wrong moment. along with that, a trash bag of any kind should be carried. Finally, carry snacks in there so that you don't have to dig around to find them.

Summary - This is all advice from a Backpacker so there will be many things you don't need on every hike but could save your life if you get caught in a bad situation, many of the objects I recommend are the same. If I'm close to home or not going out too far on a day hike, I usually carry a Knife, Be Free Filter, Lighter/Stove (depending on mileage) an extra coat, and extra food, but each hike and hiker are different. You will eventually find a system that works well for you, but it's always good to carry things that make life on the trail easier and can get you through a night in the wild. With thought on my comment, you should also check out the Ten Essentials as they will almost always be worth their weight.

If you have any other questions feel free to ask!

u/makinbacon42 · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Firstly for the sleeping bag what temperatures are you looking at needing it for? also have you considered the possibility of a quilt?

How much water depends on the availability of it where you're hiking, but generally 2-4L as a start is usually good. For purification I bring a Sawyer Mini with a 2L bag and aquamira as a backup.

I prefer baby wipes as they can be used for other things but make sure you get biodegradable ones as well

My stove is a MSR Pocket Rocket but as a cheaper option [this] (http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1411302345&sr=1-2&keywords=msr+pocket+rocket) stove works well too. You also have the option of small alcohol stoves and other liquid fueled types.

u/gunshyjohnny · 2 pointsr/socalhiking

I have the katadyn Vario and i've used the MSR Sweetwater EX. They are both good. My favorite now is the cheap ($20) Sawyer squeeze filter. I use it with a Platypus bag as a gravity filter. The Vario and MSR weigh too much and there is much more maintenance. The sawyer squeeze is very popular. You don't need the Platypus bag, you can use the sawyer squeeze by itself.

sawyer squeeze

platypus big zip

u/standardalias · 2 pointsr/camping

how do you define pure water?

don't water bottles become reusable bottles after yo drink them down?

why cant my tap water be filtered?

question 8, what type of water filter? the ones from question 7 where i had to decide which of two styles i like?

i use one of these. make something better and cheaper and i'll use that. http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_2?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1412024242&sr=1-2&keywords=water+filter

u/Bizzaroworld725 · 2 pointsr/bugout

this site has some good bags for the cheap.
Your priorities sound like they should be shelter, water,food.
Pick a bug out location. Go out into the woods you mentioned and maybe set up a campsite for the weekend. Maybe go back to the same site next weekend and practice some bushcraft skills and make your site better, practice building fire, hunting, things you'll be doing in a SHTF situation.
You'll need a means to treat water. I think I'm gonna be ordering a sawyer mini in the near future after reading some good reviews. But boiling water should be fine as long as it hasn't been tainted by chemicals.
Food kind of depends on how long you plan on bugging out for.

These are just a few quick ideas to help get the brain storm going and just to kinda throwing them out there. Pick up a few survival books, maybe hook up with someone that knows wild edibles in your area.

u/launch201 · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I don't know too much about that backpack, so I can't comment, but you should be able to pickup a pack in that price range if you're just getting started.

water

A lifestraw will work, but essencially you need to go source to mouth, so if you need water for anything but drinking (i.e. for cooking) I don't know if the lifestraw will be best. Sure you can suck in, spit out, but there is a better solution: the sawyer mini is about the same price point: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890779&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

meals

and that brings me to water for cooking. MREs are heavy, and while you won't be hiking far carrying that weight even for a short distance might not be the most fun (especially if you are saving money on your pack) - there a many commercially available freeze dried meals which are very light and you simply add boiling water to. Mountain house is the most common - http://www.amazon.com/MOUNTAIN-HOUSE-Beef-Stroganoff-4-80oz/dp/B0002YRNJK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890892&sr=8-1&keywords=mountain+house

besides mountain house there is backpackers pantry (better IMO):
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=backpackers%20pantry&sprefix=backpacke%2Caps

and finally if you want to try some of the best I recommend packit gourmet:
http://www.packitgourmet.com/CookInBagMeals.html

clothes

wool is good because it keeps it's insulation warmth when wet. wool can be expensive though. If the weather is going to be good I'd recommend a couple quick drying shirts (which are pretty affordable)
http://www.amazon.com/Russell-Athletic-Sleeve-Dri-Power-3X-Large/dp/B00719Y8HO/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891200&sr=8-3&keywords=quick+dry+shirt

and be prepared to own the worlds best pair of underwear - buy two pair wear one, wash one in a river:
http://www.amazon.com/ExOfficio-Give-N-Go-Boxer-Brief-Medium/dp/B001M0MN02/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891283&sr=8-1&keywords=exofficio+boxer+briefs

tools

this is probably one of the first things that gets "over packed" what to you anticipate needing a tool for? On the hand saw if you will be collecting fire wood there is a very nice lightweight handsaw that is perfect for backpacking, the Sven Saw:
http://www.amazon.com/SVEN-SAW-Sven-Saw-21/dp/B002J900EQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891413&sr=8-1&keywords=sven+saw

cookware

on cookware it all depends on what you'll be cooking. on a budget I'd recommend this cup:
http://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-Glacier-Stainless-Bottle/dp/B001LF3IB6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891523&sr=8-1&keywords=GSI+cup

and this stove:
http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891563&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove

with that you'll be able to boil water for your freeze dried meals, make ramen, and you can also make hot drinks like tea.

u/memento22mori · 2 pointsr/todayilearned

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=2CXXD1Y7Z7KMA&coliid=I3S0PSH4ATHBEB&psc=1

This isn't an Amazon affiliate link or anything, I used to work for them and I never figured that out, this is the best portable filter money can buy and it's $21. It removes almost all of the bacteria and protozoa from water- though it doesn't removes viruses or pharmaceuticals.

>High performance filter fits in the palm of your hand, weighs 2 ounces and filters up to 100,000 gallons (30 times more than comparable filters)
>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable water bottles, hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source
>Removes 7 log (99.99999%) of all bacteria and 6 log (99.9999%) of all protozoa (Each filter is certified for absolute microns; that means there is no pore size larger than 0.1 in size. This makes it nearly impossible for harmful bacteria, protozoa, or cysts like E. coli, Giardia, Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella typhi (which cause Cholera and Typhoid) to pass through the Sawyer Mini filter.)

u/jcrot · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Water Filter
http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1395805266&sr=8-3&keywords=sawyer+squeeze

this would be an easy, cheap upgrade and would save some ounces.

70.4 ounces for the half dome? REI Specs it at 92. I have the same tent, but am looking at upgrading to the quarter dome 1 person. When someone else is with, I can split up the weight for the half dome.

As some one else recommended, lose one of your knifes. For how much they're used, I don't find multi tools worth while and just carry a small folding blade.

u/aminalbackwards · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I stole the whole setup design from a friend, just a bladder and a filter.

https://www.amazon.com/Geigerrig-G2-070-0Z-p4-Hydration/dp/B00870DGDS

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2?psc=1

The pump adds air to a separate compartment to pressurize the water reservoir and lets you fill cups/pots with water straight from the mouthpiece, without it you would have to carry the extra Sawyer squeeze bag. Only thing I would change is using a bigger sawyer filter, this one flows pretty slow (maybe buy the geigerrig filter instead). The geigerrig is a really awesome piece of equipment though; super easy to fill and really durable.

u/Shibbyman24 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

My wishlist for this year:


  • ZPacks 900 Fill Down - Lightest warmest 900 fill down sleeping bag on the market and for a reasonable price! Sadly I can't afford it for my 6 month bicycle tour that I'm going on this year :'( I'm stuck lugging around a 4lb synthetic sleeping bag that takes up about 25L of volume - If I had the ZPack sleeping bag I wouldn't need a front rack and two front panniers which would save me considerable weight as well.

  • Ortlieb Folding Bowl 5L - This folding bowl serves multiple purposes and can be used for doing laundry, washing dishes, washing smelly feet, and can even be used reverse side for food prep.

  • Sawyer Mini Water Filtration System - Most versatile compact water filtration system (I don't really need this one yet but it will come in handy for future trips outside of North America)

  • Keen Commuter 3 - Hiking/Biking sandal with SPD cleats (Apparently Keen Commuter 4 is coming out this year so I will wait and see how much that one has improved)

  • Icebreaker Anatomica Boxers - I would have bought these for only $18CAD but they don't have any in my size :'( I can't justify spending $30+ on a pair of boxers on my budget

  • Therm-a-rest Evolite Plus - I have a feeling this is going to be on par if not better than the NeroAir XLite because apparently it doesn't crinkle nearly as much! If I didn't already buy a Trail Pro this year then I would be purchasing the Evolite Plus


    Future trips wishlist:


  • MSR Dromedary Water Bladder 4L

  • dhb Merino Zip Neck Base Layer 200


    Stuff I bought this year:


  • Hennessy Hammock Expedition Asym Zip - Can't wait to try this out, it only weighs 2.4lbs, takes up little space since no tent poles, and it can be used virtually anywhere

  • Thermarest Trail Pro Sleeping Pad - I don't why it's marked "Irregular"? There's nothing wrong with it, no blemishes or anything

  • Eureka Cimarron 15 Degree Sleeping Bag - This sleeping bag is stupidly heavy, but cheap and very warm

  • Marmot Zeus Down Vest - 700 Fill Power - Lightweight warm high quality down vest that I got for stupidly cheap (Originally $200CAD got it on sale for $76CAD 61% off!)

  • Icebreaker Tech Lite National Park Shirt - 100% merino wool T-shirt for only $40CAD, nothing to complain about there

    I actually have a Green MSR Hubba Hubba with Gear Shed that I bought last year and only used for a handful of days last Summer - no wear N tear at all. I'm going to be selling it soon for a steal at $420CAD on Amazon.ca (would cost you $620CAD+ to buy new) if you are interested feel free to let me know. Here is what it looks like http://i.imgur.com/hSjfpZb.jpg except the gear shed vestibule expands more than that http://i.imgur.com/ePVtarF.jpg
u/brighamthediggler · 1 pointr/LifeProTips

Sawyer water filter

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=abs_add_sc_?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Have one in my kit and it has been extremely useful.

u/vibeee · 1 pointr/coloradohikers

Thank you so much. Thank you taking your time to explain it to me.

I have this Sawyer. I think we might have drank some water from one of the lakes in Titans but we survived that without getting sick. We also mostly boiled it as it was really cold outside(October).

I'm definitely going to get the tablets for treating. It sounds it's good to have them in your pack.

Lastly, which USGS maps do you use? I just went to their website and I am kinda lost. I have been buying the National Geographic maps where ever I go. Are those good enough? Would they show mining sites?

Thanks again. I really appreciate you typing all of this. It's super helpful.

u/Brute1100 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2?pc_redir=1405213547&robot_redir=1

Yes it is. One of the cheapest and also one of the highest filtration ratings on the market. The regular has like a 4 oz field weight. The mini is like 2-3 oz.

u/defeldus · 1 pointr/drumcorps

Related note for anyone that hates dealing with nasty tap water, I use one of these for hiking but you could easily take it on tour (it's the size of your palm) and always have safe and clean tasting water for $20.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00FA2RLX2&linkCode=as2&tag=cleve05e-20&linkId=63MQIKRUTLVEUC52

u/langzaiguy · 1 pointr/camping

Water purity concerns are for bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and chemicals/contaminants. In the past, I've used a Steripen with good results. It protects against the first three dangers. I recently bought one of these but haven't tried it yet:

http://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=oh_details_o07_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It only protects against bacteria and protozoa. If you're going to the Boundary Waters, I think that would be your primary concern. When I did my portaging trip there, we drank untreated water from the middle of lakes. Probably a baaad idea, but my point is that the water quality is generally pretty good there.

u/Gffcom · 1 pointr/Documentaries

Man, it must feel great to be that self righteous!

To bad it won’t last. This will give you 100,000 potable gallons for 20 bucks.

https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1527296707&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=sawyer+squeeze+mini&psc=1

u/Flagrant_Geek · 1 pointr/CampingGear

The closest thing I used to a life straw is the "Soldier water filter". An ultra small membrane type filter built inside a real tiny hand pump.

While it worked incredibly well as a filter, as a pumping device it sucked. Took circa 30 minutes of minutia pumping while crouched by a water source to suck up a single liter of water.

To me those straw, look more like a last resort type of water filter for similar reasons. They probably work well as a filter but are rather tedious to use. They have a truly limited use scenario.

Also because of it's method of use you are likely not to be fully hydrated as you will likely not drink as much as actually needed for long hikes in hot weather, as it's designed to be only used at the water source. Water sources can be rather far apart. Good sucking skills are also required.

I have images in my head of sucking that straw until I turn blue with my face suspended a few inches above the lake or river bank attempting to suck water then sliding and falling into the water while simply attempting to have a drink.

I don't know about you but it seems likely to produce some rather comical photo opportunities for other hikers while simply attempting to get a drink.

I personally used the Katadyn 6L base camp water filter (The revised Version #2) and found it an amazing high speed device that allowed me to filter enough water to fill my 3L bladder and cook dinner and breakfast as well as provide water for other hikers with me. This each and every night at base camp. This in a mater of minutes. it filters really fast. An entire days supply only takes minutes.

Aside this I would perhaps consider the Sawyer squeeze filter, which is somewhat similar but designed for smaller quantities of water. You don't have to suck until you turn blue.

Simply fill bag and squeeze, Around a liter per squeeze bags and is about the size of a life straw while stored in your bag. This is the real economical yet highly functional solution. Small, compact. The only draw back is you have to do this multiple times a day. Other than that it's the perfect kit.

Katadyn and a few others make better hand pump type water filter that are more usable than what I had. However they are truly cost prohibitive and I personally cant see why pay this much makes sense for me.

In the end for me it's a gravity filter, less work, fast, more quantity per water pull from lakes and rivers and fast easy filtering. It is a real blessing to have ease of use, when tired and having to setup camp and prep food etc. I cant say a single bad thing about that filter, yet.

Albeit I have read some rather bad reviews on the same filter I use, but so far it's not my experience with them. Not a single issue ever...

u/RenegadeBurrito · 1 pointr/onebag
u/JoeIsHereBSU · 1 pointr/preppers

Sawyer Mini is much better IMO. For BOBs I would suggest a gravity fed system like Sawyer SP160.

u/xBIGxTITIESx · 1 pointr/kzoo
u/TheEyeofEOS · 1 pointr/camping

There's a cheaper model that works just as well, but doesn't have a screw adapter on both ends so the clean water you just gotta kinda point and shoot when filling bottles.

https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=br_lf_m_j5pekp3jae389p3_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&th=1&psc=1

u/NATOMarksman · 1 pointr/zombies

The [Sawyer Mini water filter] (http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/) is smaller, can be screwed onto standard disposable plastic water bottles, and is capable of filtering far more water since you can reuse it. If you pick up a [stainless steel water bottle] (http://www.amazon.com/Klean-Kanteen-40oz-Classic-Loop/dp/B0093IRPSA/), you can boil water in it as well.

You should always have a backup when it's a survival situation; [Israeli water purification tablets] (http://www.amazon.com/Taharmayim-Israeli-Water-Purification-Tablets/dp/B0077TB65U/) will both look legit and be legit if she actually needs to use them.

There are always more items you might add to a first aid kit, but [this one is pretty well rounded] (http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Weekender-Kit/dp/B000G7YIL4/). If you want a cheaper base kit (i.e if you want to add your own items), [this other kit] (http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Tripper-First/dp/B0033B4I9C/) will also do the job.

Battery-free lights can be good, but AA batteries are common enough that a [good tactical light that takes AAs] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006O4CELO) might be a more convenient option.

If she has a tablet (if tablet, go for the 12W) or E-reader (7W), [solar power might be an option] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F3LPODY). With [rechargeable AA batteries] (http://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-BK-3MCCA8BA-Pre-Charged-Rechargeable-Batteries/dp/B00JHKSN5I) and a [USB recharger] (http://www.amazon.com/SunJack-Battery-Charger-Ni-Mh-Batteries/dp/B00PZ6V99U/), the flashlight and any other AA device (like a [small, separate radio] (http://www.amazon.com/Sony-ICF-S10MK2-Pocket-Radio-Silver/dp/B00020S7XK)) could work indefinitely, as well as any regular USB-charged device.

[ResQme] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000IE0F12/) may not be strictly zombie-related, but if you buckled up as per Rule #4, you may want a way to quickly exit your vehicle if your seatbelt jams and the windows and door won't open normally.

There are a lot of compasses out there, but [this one] (http://www.amazon.com/Suunto-SS012063013-A-10-Compass/dp/B000FEXZGW) is simple, reliable, and won't break easily. It's also designed to be laid over maps without getting in the way of reading them.

[Pocket chainsaw] (http://www.amazon.com/Chainmate-CM-24SSP-24-Inch-Survival-Pocket/dp/B0026OOS60). Won't be useful against zombies, but if you ever needed to cut a tree or thick branches and don't want to carry an axe...

...You can also carry a [hatchet] (http://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-78506935-X7-Hatchet-14-Inch/dp/B0002YTO7E/) instead. This one has a short blade, which will cut into their heads and not get stuck like others. It'll also do a fine job cutting smaller branches.

For non-zombie/woodwork related tasks, the [Victorinox Forester] (http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-Army-Grip-Series/dp/B003EH82TC/) has your bases covered.

You should also include World War Z (the book, and the movie if you'd prefer), I Am Legend (both the book and the film), and the Walking Dead series (TV, comics, and both seasons of the Telltale game series on Steam).

u/rukiddingdood · 1 pointr/LosAngeles

Might I suggest people check out this or a similar water filter for such emergencies. Could really be a lifesaver.

u/alphasixtwo · 1 pointr/Survival

Starter knife look at the Buck Nighthawk(you dont need the tops version.) Amazing knife well priced and near indestructible. The choice of steel also makes it fairly easy to sharpen.

The one thing Sukram 85 is missing is a water filter. All you need though is a cheap basic one like the life straw or the sawyer mini.
.

I saw go with the sawyer. The price is similar but it will last way longer and can be used in line with a water bladder.

Don't use a plastic water bottle. Try and find one with made with steel(not aluminum) then you can boil water in it too in case you don't have your filter on you or the filter broke.

u/VGooseV · 1 pointr/backpacking

+1 on the sawyer mini. It works like a champ.

u/keepsharp · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Try the Sawyer Mini! Its half the weight, and $21 on amazon.

u/matthewrozon · 1 pointr/backpacking

You do not have to spend a lot. Here are some suggestions that I choose to use even though I could spend the money on more expensive gear.

Pack: Rent until you decide you want to do this a lot and have already bought the rest of your gear

Tent: rent it for this trip if you don't already have one. If you do, it's best to split it up, poles and fly for you and tent for him or vice versa

Sleeping bags, bring them if you have them or rent

Stove: http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396264963&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove Works just as well as the 50$ one.

Water filter: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396265006&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini+water+filter cheap, durable, no moving parts to worry about and it's super light

Pot: A lot of people use this, but it might be a bit small for you depending on what kind of food you're going to cook but this works well for freezer bag meals http://www.amazon.com/Stanco-Non-Stick-Grease-Strainer-Black/dp/B000MVTIOQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396265044&sr=8-1&keywords=grease+can

Long Johns and other clothing: Walmart usually has decent options. Make sure that they are synthetic. You may find that you already have a few things if you look through your clothes at home. Depending how thick they are your snowboarding socks might make good hiking socks or if you have long underwear for snowboarding they would be useful camping.

What are you doing for shoes? Do not waste money on boots if you don't already have them. 90% of trails can be done in good running shoes and 95% of trails can be done in light hiking shoes.

Misc hints: For water bottles just re-use old gatorade bottles, those nalgenes are super heavy. Think about getting two hiking poles instead of just walking stick but this is a preference thing. Avoid cotton at all costs and have fun!

u/ldt003 · 1 pointr/assholedesign

DUDE! These caps are the best! Get yourself a sawyer mini like this. They fit those caps perfectly! I think it’s the reason smartwater is dominating the premium water market. Because backpackers keep buying them up.