Reddit Reddit reviews Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal

We found 48 Reddit comments about Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal
Shimano pedaling dynamics - spd performs whether you're on or off the bike; makes pedaling more efficient with a wide variety of shoe and pedal styles; and the recess cleat makes walking more comfortableInnovative - by eliminating toe-clips and integrating the pedal and outsole into a single; unified power transfer system; shimano changed the industryIncredible performance - spd not only boosting power to the pedal; but also the rider's control over increasingly adventurous styles of ridingBetter control - you can pedal with greater efficiency; stability and comfort with the spd systemSuperior mud-shedding design - an open binding design allows mud and debris to be flushed out when the rider steps in
Check price on Amazon

48 Reddit comments about Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal:

u/rxmxsh · 16 pointsr/bicycling

I went this route from day 1 of my commuter purchase. I love them: http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO

I reduced the tension nearly all the way, and it's super easy to clip in and out. You will fall. Know that right now. You'll forget and you will fall.

The nice thing is having the platform pedal on one side so you can wear street shoes when you so desire.

u/Zenigata · 6 pointsr/bikecommuting

>http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-M545-Downhill-Clipless-Pedal/dp/B000XNXUUG

I wouldn't recommend those for riding any distance in normal shoes as the clip mechanism is by necessity proud of the platform.

My brother used to have M545s on his hybrid but got rid of them for that reason he's much happier with the M324 pedals he switched to instead. Getting the wrong side some of the time when you set off is preferable to having no right side. The new [A530 looks even better](http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1397424911&sr=1-2&keywords=shimano+hybrid+pedals
) with a really nice big platform on the clip free side.

Personally I'd go for Time Allroad Grippers because I like the float atac pedals give you.

u/tehallie · 5 pointsr/RagenChastain

> She doesn't even use clipless pedals.

She does, based on pictures of her bike. She runs double-sided: flats on one side, Shimano SPD on the other. I run the same on my bike, but that's because it's not a dedicated racing bike.

u/Devoured · 5 pointsr/bicycletouring

Ive been using these to great success: Shimano A530 Yet another half and half solution.

u/PsylentStorm · 5 pointsr/bicycling

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the Shimano A530 Pedals. They're dual-purpose pedals meant for road bikes, with SPD pedals on one side, and a platform on the other. The catch is, obviously, that they're not dual side, so you may have to flip the pedal over to use the correct side of the pedal.

I just started going clipless, with these pedals as my first clipless pedals, and I have nothing but good things to say about them. The only catch is that I've been only cycling clipless for a week, so I have limited to experience to base my review on.

u/pokemeng · 4 pointsr/bicycling

your price is just about right for shoes + pedals. Most new bikes dont come with a pedal so unless you know otherwise about the bike you are getting you will probably need to purchase a pedal and if you are purchasing pedals you might as well purchase shoes :] right? if you give a cyclist a bike, hell want pedals, if you give him pedals, hell want shoes... :P Also im a big fan of just splurging on what you can and enjoying the full package. This is all dependent though on your budget.

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO

this is the pedal i ride on my commuter. its a good dual duty pedal and the platform feels solid. Its a bit bulky so i dont ride it on my nice bike but if your planning on clipping in only sometimes i would suggest this one. If you are planning on riding clipped a majority then i would suggest a pedal without the platform.

Here are the differences in clips. (i think they are called the cleat but i am going to continue calling them the clips)

road clip

road clip shoes notice these have 3 holes where you screw the clip into the shoe in a triangular pattern.

spd clip

spd clip on shoe

notice the spd clip is smaller and recessed. This makes the shoe feel more like a normal shoe and you dont notice the clip as much

road v spd, road on left

road v spd clips and pedals

As a late disclaimer, I have never used road clips but this is the information i gathered in the process of purchasing. Road clipped shoes also usually have a stiffer sole, i believe.

As far as your question goes. I cant imagine long rides anymore without being clipped into the bike. You feel and are more attached to your machine. Your pedaling will most likely be more fluid, you can pull the pedals on the upstroke, your feet wont pop off the pedals on hard shifts letting you pedal through the shifts (something i couldnt do so well without clipless), and you have to learn to trust your bike because your stuck in it :]

That said, I did ride without clipless shoes for quite a while and didnt have any problems but if you asked me to go back now i wouldnt do it. I think if you cant swing a set of shoes and pedals right now, you wouldnt die because of it, but i would suggest investing in them if you are looking to be more serious about riding.

I hope this helps your decision and doesnt make things even more confusing :P

heres my setup for reference.

shoes $100

pedals $70

if your not sure how to use them. You slide the front of the clip in and then start pedaling and push the back of the clip in and it will click in. To get out you twist your ankle away from the bike and the clip will pop out. After i get my pedals i always loosen the spring on the pedal to the loosest setting, then tighten to preference. Looser settings will allow you to still twist your foot side to side while clipped in. Also i think spd clips will give you more side to side play than a road clip.

EDIT: i changes the road clip picture, it was a bit confusing before

u/lavacahacemu · 4 pointsr/cycling

You don't really say where you are and what type of riding you'll be doing but here's my $0.02 on what I've done and would recommend to others.


Clipless Pedals + Shoes --> These are the newer version to what I use on my roadie, but if you want the versatility of the dual clipless or the single+flat on the other side, you can do that. Or you can go with full-road-cleated pedals, of course. For the shoes, try some out at a store, the internet hasn't replaced this step.

Saddle bag -- I err.. duct taped a tube to my seatpost and carry the rest of my crap in my jersey pockets.

Water bottle -- If you ride in extreme weather, consider an insulated bottle, it's sooo nice to fill with iced water and have cool water to dring on 100F+ days

Pump -- I have one that came with a bracket to bolt under the water cages, maybe look for one like it (can't remember the brand of mine)

??? (I have no idea what else I will need) -- you'll need/want:

  • a multitool to adjust or fix anything that can come up. I have the park multitool and I don't really recommend it as there's probably better tools out there for road bike use, just make sure that it has a chain tool included.
  • Tire levers, if they aren't included somehow in the multitool. I always carry one extra so I can have 3 leverage points if I get a flat.
  • With a new bike you might need bottle cages.
  • Get some chain lube if you don't have any.
  • Depending on chain brand, a power link or quick link
  • For patch kits, the park one is pretty much OK but do stay away from the self-adhering ones, they're garbage!
u/jeremiahs_bullfrog · 3 pointsr/bikecommuting

Is this the one you're talking about, or do you mean the A530 or the M324? It looks to me like the M530 is dual sided clipless, but there's only one picture in Amazon, so I can't be sure.

I'm considering getting clipless pedals, but I also like riding to the grocery store or park and it doesn't make sense to change shoes.

u/benben555 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I have a set of Shimano PD-A530 on my Salsa Vaya that I use daily for commuting (platform) and longer rides on the weekend (SPD).

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376967521&sr=8-1&keywords=shimano+pd-a530

I really like them, they have not failed me after 2000 miles and are a solid feeling pedal. Even though they do not have the more 'spikey' surface on the platform side I have yet to have my feet slide off even in the wet. It may be a smidge out of your price range, but honestly it was for me as well, but I do not regret it one bit!

The big thing to keep in mind with dual pedals is will you be able to easily flip them to the side you need. With the A530s the SPD side is always on top in it's equilibrium position which means I don't have to look down to find the side I want. I just reach for the pedal with my foot and either clip in, or flip the back of it forward to get to the platform side.

Personally I think the design of the pedals you are looking at would make it really hard to determine which side of the pedal you are on. But, just like everything if you get used to it I'm sure it will work great. It all comes down to personal preference I guess!

u/seattlebikeman · 3 pointsr/bikecommuting

SPDs are incredibly easy to unclip and you can do it using right or left rotation without even thinking about it. You can also just slam your foot onto the pedal and click in immediately.

I used to ride on SPD-SLs and while I think they are slightly better for long rides, I ditched them entirely and only use SPDs now. Not only can I walk around normally, but they are basically just as good and now I don't have to even think about clipping/unclipping.

I commute about 30 miles daily in dense urban to suburban areas, so while downtown in the big city I'm stopping/starting constantly. Can't imagine not having clipless, especially for hopping curbs/potholes/road debris. Just so much more control and besides, every time I've crashed I've popped out of them automatically.

Give it a try, dude. You don't need to wait for a new bike, just get a set of pedals/cleats for $50. You can even get dual SPD/platform pedals if you want maximum flexibility (I had a set but got rid of them because I never used the platforms).

u/mfryan · 3 pointsr/bicycling

i have some hybrid pedals. they are shimano spd and are flat on one side. my daily commute is about 1 mile, so it is really not worth putting the bike shoes on, but when i ride for pleasure i like to go 10-20 miles. then it is worth it.

My pedal setup.

pedals

shoes

u/jjarmoc · 3 pointsr/cycling

For first clipless pedals, I like the Shimano PD-A530s. They’re SPD so you can walk in the shoes easily, and have clipless on one side with flats on the other so you can ride in sneakers occasionally.

I have them on my hybrid so I can go with whatever shoes I’m wearing for commutes, rides with the kiddo, etc. I still have the option to go clipless on that bike if I want using the same shoes as my road bike and its PD-M520L pedals.

Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_7S41Ab03R9VC1

For shoes I have Shimano SH-CT71 which I like just fine.

Shimano 2015 Men's Recreational Cycling Shoes - SH-CT71L (Black - 41) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LWGSQ7A/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_DW41AbV539CR4

This kind of setup is about $100, so it’s within your budget. I’m not sure what more you’d get for the extra money really..

u/viniciusah · 3 pointsr/whichbike

SHIMANO PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal

Almost 2 years ago, and not much wear and tear (except for some falls while learning to clip in and out LOL)

u/P-Tricky · 3 pointsr/whichbike

Sounds to me like you'll be after either a cyclocross/gravel grinder bike or a commuter. Both styles have clearance for wide 700c tires and (usually) mount points for racks and fenders, which are invaluable commuting accessories. The cyclocross/gravel bikes have drop (road style) bars, while the commuters have flat (mountain style) bars. Both are equally at home on pavement or gravel roads, but will struggle with true mountain biking.

Here are a bunch of new commuter bikes for ~$500:

u/mrandyclark · 2 pointsr/pelotoncycle

The R530s are on sale for $39.99 on Performance:
http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product2_10052_10551_1108401_-1

Pretty sure these are the pedals I have on my Peloton, $29.99 on Performance:
http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product2_10052_10551_1167364_-1

And these are the pedals I have on my cross/town bike. They have a platform on the flip side, $42.45:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001MZ2AGO/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The clip for the SPD style cleats is smaller - much smaller and harder to clip into than the LOOK style. But once you get used to it, they are really easy. Overall, I'm glad I made the switch.

u/PM_ME_YOUR_LADY_BITS · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring

Cool shoes! As far as pedals go, I'd get a combo pedal with one clipless side and one flat side. That way, if you decide to use normal shoes it still works. Or if your legs/feet start hurting after hours of keeping them in the exact same position on a clipless, you simply flip the pedal and enjoy some freedom of movement on the flat side.

I have one pair of these pedals on a MTB, and I don't really like them. They weigh the same on each side, so they never flip to one side by themselves. When you start pedaling you never know which side will be up.

I'd much rather get something like this, because they will always orient themselves with the right side up. I don't have experience with those pedals in particular, but I've got some almost identical ones made by Exustar and I like them a lot (couldn't find them on amazon though).

u/gwarster · 2 pointsr/bikecommuting

Use what I got they give you the best of both worlds.. You can either click-in or use platforms.

u/dubbl_bubbl · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Last year I got my first "real" bike and decided to take the plunge and get some clipless pedals, after about 2k miles I will never look back. A friend in the cycling industry recommended Shimano SPD pedals, they are cheap and easy to exit, (road specific pedals and shoes tend to be more expensive) and also tend to have a recessed cleat. I have Shimano shoes they are comfortable, and relatively inexpensive (as far as bike shoes go) you might be able to find some better deals on nashbar or other sites like that though.

I am about to order some Shimano PD-A520 which is more of a touring pedal, it has a bigger platform which will reduce hotspots on long rides (which wasn't a problem until recently, probably due to shoe wear.) You may also want to check out these which give you the choice to use clipless shoes or just regular shoes.

*sp

u/kaceFile · 2 pointsr/bicycling

> The ideal scenario is to have a big club where you can find a group that goes at the pace you want, but in most places your options will be limited. Perhaps start by practicing your group riding skills with a slow group, then go with a fast group and accept that you might get dropped.
The average guy on a Saturday or Sunday morning doesn't care about the gender makeup of the group but does want to get a good workout. They won't mind if they have to wait for you for a few minutes after designated sprints, but if you can't keep up at a normal cruising pace then it's better to wave goodbye.

Oh, totally! I completely understand that. There are some bike shops that have group rides of various levels, but that's about it. Not too many clubs (other than casual ones) around here that I've been able to scope out. But, maybe I'll check out the casual ones to learn some etiquette-- that sounds like a good idea!

>Consider getting started on clipless soon, since clipping in and out quickly is a key group riding skill. Other than that, all you really need is the equipment to repair a puncture (bring a spare tube, not just glue and patches) and the right clothes, including gloves and glasses.

Rodger that! I'll probably get clipless in a month or so. Do you have an opinion on THESE? I want to have the option of using my bike to commute-- so I don't want to commit solely to clipless.

>Sounds like you're on the right track. See if you can bump up to 3 days per week training as this will really help. And if you're only doing short workouts make them count. Towards the end of winter you should be doing some tough interval sessions.
When you have an opportunity to race in the spring, just dive in. Crits are great fun if you can keep your cool when people are riding very close to you. Don't worry about poor results at the beginning.
Women's racing often has small fields or mixed fields, so a lot of races break up. Just keep hammering away.
And if you get a chance, have a go at individual time trialling. It's either the most boring form of racing or the truest, depending on your philosophy on life.

Yeah! I think they have open studio time, so I'm hoping to get in a 3rd training session during the week by myself (I just don't have the cash at the moment to pay for the 3x/week program ;( And biking outside isn't an option here in the winter-- though if the weather holds up like how its been: We might skip winter entirely!)

Re: Racing-- Oh I plan to! The first one is in April, so I'm planning on doing one per weekend (if possible), before the BIG tour comes in June. Provided I finish all of the races I participate in, I think I'd be able to compete in those as a Cat 4!

u/reidburial · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I'd recommend the Shimano A530 pedals, they're pretty great imo and got plenty of good reviews, you got SPD on one side and platform on the other when you don't feel like using your cycling shoes.

u/FlagBattery · 2 pointsr/FixedGearBicycle

no, those are MTB pedals, not road pedals. see my list in this thread for some compatible shoes. these are good pedals if you intend on sometimes riding with shoes that don't have cleats in them. Since they are flat on one side and clipless on the other side. And the flat side is wide enough to be comfortable and keep your feet secure as well.

u/leadnpotatoes · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Maybe something like these so you don't have to swap the pedals.

u/Ogroat · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Here are a couple to get you started.

If you want to ride the same bike clipless and then with street shoes, something like that is the way to go.

u/rfrick · 2 pointsr/cycling

I've got Shimano M324 on my Giant Defy Disc. Running them with Gito Treble II 2014's. They aren't the most racey, but whatever. I can clip in when I want and ride around the hood in some tenni's. I dig them. You may want to check out Shimano A530. I've heard the A530's can be slick.

u/merinith · 1 pointr/bicycling

On my "rainy day" road bike, I have Shimano's A530 pedals ( amazon link ). They are platform on one side and SPD cleats on the other. While I usually ride clipped in 99% of the time, I find the platform side occasionally useful when I want to wear normal walking/running shoes while riding (usually because of whatever I plan on doing when I get where I'm going).

The main downside (for some) is that I've only ever seen dual pedals with SPD cleats (not SPD-SL, which a lot of roadies use). I prefer this style anyways because of the amount of float that they provide, and solve a lot of the other issues that people usually complain of (hot spots, stiffness) by having carbon-soled cycling shoes.

u/VoldemortRocks · 1 pointr/pelotoncycle

Agreed, its a good idea for folks who already have a shoe with different cleats. I already had SPD compatible shoes and didn't want to spend the extra $ on the Peloton shoes. Did something similar but with Shimano pedals:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001MZ2AGO/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Allows my 15 y.o. daughter who does not have cycling shoes to take advanced beginner rides and a couple of friends who have been curious have also been able to try out the bike.

u/BatmanTheHorse · 1 pointr/chibike

I have a silver 59cm Windsor Wellington 3, bought this summer, less than 100 miles on it, with new Shimano A530 pedals (SPD on one side, platform on the other)

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/windsor/wellington3-xv.htm
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001MZ2AGO

It was inspected by Bike Lane in Logan Square after assembly, everything's in good shape.

I just prefer my old bike and I still ride it exclusively, so this one is just taking up space. Make me an offer if you're interested. Thanks!

u/chaloobin · 1 pointr/FixedGearBicycle

I got these, what do you think?

u/peejie · 1 pointr/MTB

I bought these.
My buddy bought these

They're dual platform/cleats. I enjoy them GREATLY and frequently switch during a ride. Granted, I don't race, but on a typical ride, I'll clip in for uphill/downhill and switch to platforms for anything technical. I have about 20 hours using these now and this was my first time using cleats. There absolutely is a learning curve but the trade-off is exceptional power and control.

Enjoy, whatever you decide on!

u/DIM1 · 1 pointr/bmxracing

They do make pedals with an actual platform on one side and clip on the other designed for dual use. [Example] (http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO)

u/itbai · 1 pointr/bicycling

Funny enough... the pedals I have on there are SPD pedals that came on the bike I previously purchased. They're similar to THESE, which I found on Amazon.

The pedals I will be putting on soon though, are THESE, of which I am a massive fan. They've got SPD clips on one side and a platform on the other side, which means I can clip in when I am using cycling shoes, but can also just hop on with sneaker or any flat soled shoe that I could be wearing. Great for commuting if you don't have room in your bag to switch shoes!

u/scrooched_moose · 1 pointr/CyclingMSP

Have you seen the Shimano A530 Pedals? They're reversible, with SPD on one side and platform the other.

u/sebnukem · 1 pointr/bikecommuting
  • spare inner tube
  • patch kit
  • light rain jacket
  • bike gloves
  • SPD pedals and shoes (hybrids are the best)
  • helmet mounted mirror
  • puncture resistant tires
u/questions_fo_days · 1 pointr/bicycling

Just my experience but I went with Bontrager Solstice shoes and absolutely love them. I have a wider foot and they have rubber on the bottom so not terrible to walk a short distance in.


For pedals I went with Shimano A530 pedals. A solid pedal that can be ridden as a flat as well. Not the lightest pedal but very practical for me.


Total cost $130.00. Might be an option for you.

u/_Curious-Guy_ · 1 pointr/bikewrench

> You could rig up toe clips which work with sandals.

No, I am so not a toe clip guy. Been there, done that. I have an MTB flat pedal on there now. I do a lot of off and on road, so I like the wideness of the pedal and super comfortable on them. In many ways, don't want to lose it, but I ride enough and knowledgeable enough to know that the constant shifting around is causing me to get my knees out of position. I put a lot of miles in and know enough now. And I have been locked in before with a Shimano PD-A530 before, although it has been a few years, and realized then that my mechanics were just much smoother and natural when locked in from what I remember.

> If you walk around your home with SPD shoes on you will destroy your floors.

Oh I know that...I was talking more about why then what I was hoping to do. I just want a SPD shoe that I can be in when I am out and about all day riding or when I start to tour, I will be in them majority of the time. When I walk around camp or whatever, I can use flip flops, regular sandals, or light second pair of shoes of whatever I decide to eventually carry season dependent.

u/mochabear1231 · 1 pointr/bicycling

Yeah, any other non-road bike pedal will be more than enough. I have these on my Felt, and they're not true road or mountain bike pedals, more like commuter-esque/urban riding pedals. A lot of people like the Shimano SPD pedals because they are really great value for the price point. These ones are the most common and are very versatile.

Unless you're pro-cyclist level, there really isn't a huge gain (at least imo, ymmv) between the two. Comes down to preference really. I have noticed in a few bike shops that road shoes/cleats tend to run a little bit more as well, but I also wasn't really looking into those, so obviously there's going to be variation.

Yup, I wear those to bike and 4-5/7 days of the week at work. Really not complaints at all - very sturdy shoe, good design, and the vibram soles work great in any wet/non-ideal conditions.

It sucks to say, but you are definitely going to eat shit at least once while getting used to clipless pedals. Just a part of the initiation into biking culture!

u/Mindflux · 1 pointr/bicycling

I was eyeing some Shimano Dual Platform pedals myself. One side is for riding with your 'normal' shoes and the other side supports SPD cleats.

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331911376&sr=8-1


Then instead of some insane moonboots I was going to do something like:

http://www.zappos.com/keen-commuter-ii-black-keen-yellow~1
or
http://www.keenfootwear.com/us/en/product/ss12/shoes/men/pedal/springwater%20ii
or
http://www.zappos.com/chrome-kursk-pro-black

I figure this way if I want a leisurely ride with the family.. I can do that. Or if I want to clip in I can do that too.

u/gabbagoo · 1 pointr/bicycling

Oh man, besides the pedals I'm not sure these are upgrades as much as they are 'add-ons' but hey I'm done working so I'll pretend by being on Reddit:

Got this light from my LBS with my bike, love that it was bright as shit and rechargeable...I emailed the company about some the band and different sizes since we have the interrupter lever, they were awesome and sent me some to try out

This tail Light because it was also rechargeable and crazy bright...people behind me have rolled up and asked what kind of light it is...me likey

These panniers because the good reviews, minimal looks, and the waterproof aspect..I use these guys along with a random rack from REI everyday....love it..I also got this backpack thingymajig that makes the pannier a backpack

Got these pedals because they allowed me to rock normal shoes when I'm not wearing these, I like that I can tool around with just normal shoes on without worrying about foot placement.

And riding through town with the oblivious drivers/tourists around downtown I'm picking this horn, we'll see how it goes..and maybe a gopro......

u/brit527 · 1 pointr/ladycyclists

GPS or the pedals?

I use these for pedals on both my road bike and hybrid. Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001MZ2AGO?ref=yo_pop_ma_swf I found shoes at a local bike shop for $100. I definitely say to try them on before buying.

As for the GPS— I bought a used Garmin Edge 500 for $50 from someone in my bike club. Prior, I used Strava on my phone but it was a real battery killer.

u/gnarmonica · 1 pointr/bicycling

I'm a little late on your post, but as someone who only recently got serious about cycling and even more recently went clipless, I'll share some thoughts:

> more speed/acceleration

As others have said, there isn't a substantial speed increase. However, in my opinion, it does become easier to get up to speed if you pop out of the saddle and floor it. It also makes climbing feel far easier to me. The biggest advantage is the added stability in your feet. After 5-10 miles, I don't even feel the pedals so much anymore and it becomes a fluid process.

> But does this tire you out faster?

Not really, but if I'm being honest, "pulling" uses a set of muscles you may not be used to using, so your legs may get unexpectedly sore for the first couple of rides if you do that. Once you're past that (which was quick for me) there are no real downsides.

> Are they hard to get out of in a pinch?

This depends. There are different types of cleats/clips, and you can vary the tension on each, making them easier or harder to get out of. I've been using mine for about 6 months and have always been able to clip out in time, even once when a car cut me off and I had to get out in a split second.

> Are good/light ones terribly expensive?

Prices vary widely, but you can easily get a solid set of pedals for $50 or so. I have these pedals here, since I ride recreationally and also use my bike to commute in to work. Notice there are clips on one side and a flat platform on the other. They aren't the lightest, but they aren't super heavy, and the versatility is great.

u/the_gnarts · 1 pointr/bikecommuting

> Uhh, those are definitely meant for cleats to be installed. The 2 screws are standard SPD compatible.

Yes I know, but they work good even without.

> How tiny are your platforms that they can fit into that space?

On the commuter I have these: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001MZ2AGO/

u/ItsToka · 1 pointr/corgi

Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_8rgrxbJKR823W these.

u/edgebaristax · 1 pointr/FixedGearBicycle

I am thinking about getting the same SPD Pedals that I have on my other Masi. There are amazing because they offer a few riding options.

u/OneLegAtATime · 1 pointr/bicycling

these pedals or these pedals have clips on one side, platforms on the other. I ride 20 miles a day on them commuting, and have done it both with and without clips. I can't think of anything better for my current commuting scenario.

u/roy649 · 1 pointr/bicycletouring

Yup. I've got the Shimano A530 but there's a few others that are variations on that theme.

Sometimes, even if I'm wearing my cycling shoes, I'll use the platform side. If I'm navigating some tight urban space, for example, and know I'll be going slow and stopping often. Or, even on the road, sometimes I'll unclip and flip them over just to give my feet a change.

I find being clipped in most useful climbing long hills. Pulling up on the backstroke gets other leg muscles into the game. Sometimes that's the difference between cresting the hill and having to take a break.

I used to wear toe clips with straps. This sort of thing. I find the SPDs to be easier to get out of quickly. What I haven't tried is the new style strapless toe-clips. I should probably give those a try.

u/Self_Destruct_Button · -2 pointsr/bicycling

There's no such thing as a clipless shoe that's comfortable to walk around in; they all feel like ice skates or ski boots due to the rigid and hard soles. The best case scenario is something like Chrome makes with the rubber outsoles and recessed SPD cleats, but it's still got a rigid sole thicker than a steel toe workboot.

My advice is to turn the Fred knob back. You can do plenty of "serious" riding or whatever on normal pedals, and Clipless shoes are a pain in the dick to walk around in for less than minimal benefit at the entry level.

If you really insist, try a multi-function pedal like this.