Reddit Reddit reviews The Basics of Information Security: Understanding the Fundamentals of Infosec in Theory and Practice

We found 6 Reddit comments about The Basics of Information Security: Understanding the Fundamentals of Infosec in Theory and Practice. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

Information Theory
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The Basics of Information Security: Understanding the Fundamentals of Infosec in Theory and Practice
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6 Reddit comments about The Basics of Information Security: Understanding the Fundamentals of Infosec in Theory and Practice:

u/TheFakeITAdmin · 2 pointsr/sysadmin

Don't get me wrong- BackTrack, Kali, Pentoo, etc. are all amazing tools but to recommend this to someone coming from a helpdesk role might be a bit much to grasp.
Learning how to work with the distros and the wide range of tools is great but you have to learn about the theories behind analyzing protecting the infrastructure and software.

OP, you might start with some books (these have helped me a lot in my career in security)-

CompTIA Security+ Study Guide (not a bad book and the cert is easy, provides the basics of IT security)

The Basics of Information Security: Understanding the Fundamentals of InfoSec in Theory and Practice (an easy read)

Gray Hat Hacking The Ethical Hackers Handbook (is an intro to the security world and a lot of info, more in-depth)

IT Security is an awesome field and like most IT is has many separate areas within it to learn.
Check out the links below for more info on training (there are others available these are just ones I've used and SANS has a lot of additional resoures)-

SANS Institute

InfoSec Institute

u/OSUTechie · 2 pointsr/ITCareerQuestions

Yes, most Gov jobs require at least Sec+.

Depending on how much you did as an LEO you may look into computer forensics. Network Security etc. You may also want to beef up knowledge of networking as well. So either the Net+ and/or CCNE cert.

Books are always a good place to start. I don't know about this one but have read a few other books by this publisher that have been pretty good.

Ones I have read/skimmed:

u/hitmanactual121 · 1 pointr/HowToHack

I realize this is an old post, but I figured I would add my two cents in:

If you have no Linux Knowledge, I would recommend these two books:
http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Unix-Linux-John-Muster/dp/0072226951

http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Linux-Manual-Student-Edition/dp/0072226943/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_y

I would also recommend getting a book on windows server:
http://www.amazon.com/Mastering-Microsoft-Windows-Server-2008/dp/0470532866

After going over those you should have a fundamental understanding of Unix/Linux

Then I would recommend this if you need to brush up on your basic networking knowlege:

http://www.amazon.com/CompTIA-Network-Deluxe-Recommended-Courseware/dp/111813754X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1369292584&sr=1-1&keywords=network+%2B+delux+guide

Some security theory wouldn't hurt: I'd recommend these in no particular order:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Basics-Information-Security-Understanding/dp/1597496537/ref=pd_rhf_se_s_cp_7_FHWA

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1597496154/ref=s9_simh_se_p14_d0_i6?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=auto-no-results-center-1&pf_rd_r=6289C56ED33B4C108B60&pf_rd_t=301&pf_rd_p=1263465782&pf_rd_i=itia2300

And now we actually start getting into penetration testing:

http://www.amazon.com/Metasploit-The-Penetration-Testers-Guide/dp/159327288X/ref=pd_rhf_se_s_cp_3_FHWA

http://www.amazon.com/The-Basics-Digital-Forensics-Getting/dp/1597496618/ref=pd_rhf_se_s_cp_6_FHWA

http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Penetration-Testing-Highly-Secured-Environments/dp/1849517746/ref=pd_rhf_se_s_cp_8_FHWA

http://www.amazon.com/Nmap-Network-Scanning-Official-Discovery/dp/0979958717/ref=pd_rhf_se_s_cp_10_FHWA



Full disclosure: I have used all these books in my studies. I am not affiliated in any way with these authors, this also isn't something you can just "master" in 24 hours; you may however learn a few cool tricks early. My advice would be to keep at it, not only read these books, but setup Virtual environments to test these concepts in.

Those books I listed should give you a fundamental understanding of: Linux, Windows server, Networking, Information security theory, computer forensics, and basic penetration testing.

I would also recommend you take up a scripting language, Python is pretty simple to learn if you haven't already, and insanely powerful in the right hands.

Oh, one thing I forgot. NEVER EVER EVER run Kali linux as your primary distribution, setup a duel-boot and use something like Debian as your "casual" computer, and then souly use Kali or backtrack as your "Network security distro"

Ninja edited by myself


u/MotorbikeMacomber · 1 pointr/nova

Meneed - what do you want to do in Cybersecurity? What is your current work experience? What high-level things are you good at? What's your personality like?

There are MANY different roles and career paths in "Cybersecurity". I'd suggest talking to people in the field, find out what they actually do, and figure out what sort of work you gravitate toward the most. Some disciplines are highly technical - others are less so. Figure out where you want to go before you start.

I recommend picking up a copy of this book - I've shared this with interns and some past IT colleagues who were looking to get into infosec. Easily digestible, broad but not deep, gives you a good intro and frame of reference for stepping into deeper water.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/1597496537/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_ep_dp_Fq9kybAWZ5HMN

u/[deleted] · 1 pointr/nova

> Meneed - what do you want to do in Cybersecurity? What is your current work experience? What high-level things are you good at? What's your personality like?



Pen testing. My work experience is not IT/security related. Depends on what you mean by high level? I'm good at the job I had in the military (again, not IT/security related but it isn't infantry or anything like that). I like to learn and participate. This is why I was looking for something resident.

> There are MANY different roles and career paths in "Cybersecurity". I'd suggest talking to people in the field, find out what they actually do, and figure out what sort of work you gravitate toward the most. Some disciplines are highly technical - others are less so. Figure out where you want to go before you start.
> I recommend picking up a copy of this book - I've shared this with interns and some past IT colleagues who were looking to get into infosec. Easily digestible, broad but not deep, gives you a good intro and frame of reference for stepping into deeper water.
> https://www.amazon.com/dp/1597496537/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_ep_dp_Fq9kybAWZ5HMN

Will look into it

u/ashtondrakestorm · 1 pointr/battlestations

The Cube: HERE
The Bottom Book: [HERE] (http://www.amazon.com/The-Basics-Information-Security-Understanding/dp/1597496537/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1406954470&sr=8-3&keywords=introduction+to+information+security)

Those are just decorative books and refresher books. I work as an information security consultant. I have a ton of books at home and pdfs on my computer. :)