Reddit Reddit reviews The Peter Norton Programmer's Guide to the IBM PC

We found 3 Reddit comments about The Peter Norton Programmer's Guide to the IBM PC. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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3 Reddit comments about The Peter Norton Programmer's Guide to the IBM PC:

u/brandnew87 · 7 pointsr/MrRobotARG

Here's something I just tried. It's real dumb and I really doubt it's anything, but I'll document it here anyway.

I took out everything except the lines with the books:

102 "Pink Shirt Book"
66 "Ugly Red Book"
1 "Blue Book"
15 "Green Book"
19 "Tan Book"

Four of these books can be found in the "rainbow" list, the fifth one is referenced in the movie hackers, and that movie is where the "ugly" in ugly red book comes from as well. The Pink Shirt Book is The Peter Norton Programmer's Guide to the IBM PC.

So I added the ISBN(for the pink shirt book) or the document ID (for the rainbow books) to each line:

102 "Pink Shirt Book" 0914845462
66 "Ugly Red Book" NCSC-TG-011
1 "Blue Book" NCSC-TG-019
15 "Green Book" CSC-STD-002-85
19 "Tan Book" NCSC-TG-001

Then put all the numbers in one string ("1020914845462660111019150028519001"), and tried decoding it as base64, converting from hex, etc and got nothing. But when I removed the leading zero from the ISBN ("102914845462660111019150028519001"), it decodes from base 64 to

M׏8玶5]5^to94

Which to me, kind of looks like a chess move. Maybe an opening move, as M8 is a starting pawn position. The Chinese characters apparently mean "language and culture" according to google translate.

That's all I've got.

u/zeidrich · 3 pointsr/gamedev

One of my first graphics programming forays was making a raycast engine like wolfenstein that used an array of text to create a map that I hard coded into the basic file.

Same thing, used assembly for the graphics routines, mode 13h. This was before the Internet was really a thing. I used a copy of https://www.amazon.ca/Peter-Norton-Programmers-Guide-IBM/dp/0914845462 that I got from the library if I recall.

It wasn't a "game", but you could move around, and it had collision detection. No texturing, and it was not performant enough to really play.