Best camping & hiking equipment according to redditors

We found 15,998 Reddit comments discussing the best camping & hiking equipment. We ranked the 7,031 resulting products by number of redditors who mentioned them. Here are the top 20.

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Subcategories:

Hiking backpacks & bags
Camping knives & tools
Camping safety & survival equipment
Trekking poles
Camping lights & lanterns
Camping personal care products
Sleeping bags & camp bedding
Hiking footwear & accessories
Camp kitchen equipment
Camping & hiking hydration & filtration products
Sports & Outdoors > Outdoor Recreation > Camping & Hiking > Clothing
Camping tents & shelters
Camping navigation & electronics

Top Reddit comments about Camping & Hiking Equipment:

u/uski · 78 pointsr/preppers

A few more ideas :

I would suggest having a battery-powered FM radio (and extra batteries if it's battery powered, or get one which charges via USB like the one I linked) to listen to the news and get vital information.

Also (if not too late), order a sawyer mini (best) or lifestraw (not as good). If you don't have access to clean water it can help you stay healthy (beware of chemical contamination which cannot be removed by these).

If you have the money, get a Garmin inReach satellite communicator (requires a (relatively cheap) subscription, down to $15ish a month). You can request SOS (much like 911), and send/receive SMS and e-mails, even without cell coverage. Excellent to keep in touch with relatives and in case of emergency. Can be used year-round when hiking, snow-mobile, skiing, ... Don't tell anyone you have this...

Download the offline map of your area on Google Maps on your phone beforehand. Can be priceless to navigate around and doesn't require internet access. Also get the Maps.Me app and download the map of your area too. Google Maps offline maps will expire and disappear from your phone after 30 days (I believe), Maps.Me maps will not.

If the cell service in your area is out of order, use your phone in airplane mode so that it doesn't continuously and desperately looks for a cell to connect to, which will drain the battery VERY quickly. Also use it on the lowest practical brightness setting to save battery power.

If not too late, get big USB power banks (>=10000mAh such as this one) and fully charge them beforehand. It's good as barter items and it can be nice to recharge your things when you have no access to a generator (on the go, or if you don't want to run the generator to avoid attracting attention). You can also get USB lights (this one for instance) and your powerbank doubles as a flashlight with a very long battery life.

Get a first aid kit, and not just one with bandaids... Get a CAT tourniquet, trauma dressing, Celox (preferred) or QuikClot bandage, triangular bandage, SAM splint, ... and know how to use them. Also get the basic medecines (stomach/diarrhea relief, basic painkillers, anti-allergy, and any prescription medecine if you require any). Remember 911 service may be unavailable for some time and you need to be able to take care of injuries. Tourniquets save lives, everyone should have one readily available.

​

I am a radio amateur and in these situations I like to have one or two portable radio for two-way communication but I realize it is not for everybody. Still, a pair of FRS/GMRS radio can be helpful. Please note that GMRS requires a (cheap) license in the USA. I would recommend this model which also allows to be used as a scanner and to program the NOAA weather frequencies (do it beforehand) and some local police/EMS/fire frequencies (if allowed in your juridiction).

Please DO NOT use a radio made for amateur radio use, where you can transmit on any frequency, such as the UV-5R; you may interfere with emergency communications, even if you can't hear them, miles away. Please stick to the FRS/GMRS frequencies. The radio above guarantees safe operation and still allows to be used as a scanner.

​

Take pictures of all your important documents (ID, properties, ...) and store them in a waterproof plastic bag. Try to keep at least your passport and driver license with you during the storm...

If you have a sump pump, try to arrange so that it can be battery powered and/or connected to your generator. If using battery power, get a battery charger and/or a generator connection, if the outage lasts and the battery runs down. Sometimes homes are not affected by the main storm but are flooded due to the lack of power around the storm and are still ruined, and that's totally preventable.

Also, beforehand, depending of the situation you might want to BLOCK your main sewage pipe. This way you might avoid sewage backflow into your home. There are normally valves already installed but in case of serious flooding (high backpressure) they sometimes are not up to the task.

​

Download a few offline movies on the Netflix app (if you have Netflix). I never lived though a hurricane but I assume after a few days/weeks, you might want some entertainment. You can also download e-books. Bonus if it's survival-related e-books.

​

Hope this helps... good luck to those affected


PS: oooo, thank you stranger for the gold, I think I never had one before ! Happy prepping :)

u/timmy_the_large · 65 pointsr/preppers

Life straw is not a great product. Spend a little extra and get the Sawyer. It is a better, more useful product. It just doesn't have as cool of a name.

u/Tyler9400 · 60 pointsr/Bushcraft

Steel is steel mate. You can go with the expensive stuff, or with the cheap stuff - We're talking expensive at several hundred and cheap as under 20-50. I've seen 20 dollars knives made just as well as the 600 dollar knives, they just dont have the name brand. It's a chunk of steel, treated so it stands up to specific conditions and holds an edge better. It looks to be full tang - not sure what is up with the holes in the blade, or the design near the MT-5 logo. I found pictures online, looks like the steel comes out a bunch there? No idea what this design is or what purpose it could have - looks sketchy. And the holes in the blade...I mean I've seen the 5 dollar walmart knives with holes so you can create a makeshift spear but..Other then that, no idea why they are on this knife, and they cause more harm then good. You can use it for basic bushcrafting tasks but I'd be careful batoning, I've personally never heard of the brand - it could be name brand and be great, but it has some weird designs.

​

Really, steel is steel - all the fancy features cause more harm than good.

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-4-1-Inch-Military/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&sr=1-4

That is a 12 dollar knife, and you really won't ever need more, but there are better options. The 12 dollar knife has a thinner blade and isn't suitable to as heavy duty work, but is a great beater knife for doing anything.

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Survival-Starter-4-3-Inch/dp/B00BFI8TOA/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&sr=1-7

And their top of the line knives are

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Garberg-Carbon-Leather-Sheath/dp/B07B8SP4G9/ref=sr_1_10?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-10

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-M-12642-Stainless-Compatible-4-3-inch/dp/B01I1GITMA/ref=sr_1_12?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-12

There's a carbon version and stainless steel version. I'm gonna be honest...for the most part, they all do the same thing, but people want different things and fancier things - the garberg is the only full tang out of the bunch, but even their half tang knives are bulletproof, they hold up incredibly well and I've batoned with him countless times without issue. Mora, IMO makes the best knives - I have several other brands, and there are some I like better for ergonomics - but that's not the point, the point is any knife will work, steel is steel. Just find what you think looks and feels good, learn how to sharpen it and what you like, it depends on the what materials/types of trees you are working with, and what type of work you do. I prefer convex and Scandinavian grind (V Grind) knives, the Cudeman MT-5 looks to be a full flat grind - which I mean..AFIAK is mostly used in like chef knives and stuff, it's incredibly sharp but it's not durable, hitting hard objects is gonna cause knicks and it's gonna be brittle. This is all from experience, it's not like im an expert - but to be fair, I'd just keep trying different ones and see how you like it, but I wouldn't go spending crazy money, the $300 knives you see all the fancy bushcrafters use...these are what I call wall knives..They use them in the videos cause they look good but most people would just keep them at home and keep using their beater knives, because we are hard on our equipment and honestly, they work just as wall, all the fancy scalings and what not make them expensive, but they don't make them better.

TL;DR: Steel is steel. Get a cheap knife, in a better grind suited for the work your doing. All depends on what work you do, and what tress you have, soft woods, hard woods ETC.

​

Edit: Definately don't have to go with Mora, I've just always used them and they've done me well.

u/jason22internet · 34 pointsr/backpacking

Those are not designed to purify water.

You want these guys: http://www.amazon.com/Potable-Aqua-Water-Purification-Tablets/dp/B0009I3T3S/

Or these: http://www.amazon.com/McNett-Aquamira-Water-Treatment-Drops/dp/B00CHRFQPI

filter? check out the Sawyer Mini: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

if you're in a pinch, do a little homework with using ordinary bleach ... or prepare to boil

u/itravelandwheel · 28 pointsr/camping

I prefer these 7 gallon jugs. They're a LOT stronger than 5 gallon bottles and hold more. You can also stack things on top of them when packing your camping gear whereas the 5 gallons can break pretty easy if you put something on top.

I also use these jugs for fish tank water (RODI) and keep 6 full in my garage just in case we have a water issue. They're stacked 3 high in a cupboard.

u/ETMoose1987 · 25 pointsr/preppers

Get a sawyer mini instead, about the same price and you don't have to bend down and stick your face in the water.

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_1FJXCbNV7FQ2S

u/Bolinas99 · 21 pointsr/Seahawks

Was at Green Bay two seasons ago when we were last in the playoffs.

It's likely to get insanely cold there, so don't just layer up get hand warmers, foot warmers (you can buy both at any local Walmart in Minny), wear at least 4-5 layers with several being fleece, including thermal socks, long thermal underwear, and waterproof shoes. It was -30 and we barely survived it in GB; not sure if it'll be as bad in MN for you.

Doubt you'll have any problem beating them btw.

Wish I could buy the tix from you man; how much do you want for them?

u/chrono13 · 18 pointsr/CampingGear

Get the Sawyer mini instead for $19: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

Anyone looking at this should look at the Sawyer as a (better) alternative.

Lifestraw:

  • 264 gallons total filtration per straw.
  • Shelf Life: 5 years when stored at room temperature (package may say 3 years).
  • .2 micron filtration

    Sawyer filter:

  • 100,000 gallons (actually more, but this is the guarantee)
  • Shelf life: no limit on shelf life. Only temperature constraint is it should not be allowed to freeze.
  • .1 micron filtration

    Lifestraw is $20. Sawyer is $20. I own the Sawyer and the flow through it is easy. It comes with a squeeze bag, but also attaches to regular bottles. Fill an empty Pepsi/Coke/Water bottle with nasty water, screw on the Sawyer and you are good to go. It works with Platypus bags, and as an inline or end filter for any hydration bladder.


    If there is something special about the Lifestraw that I am missing, please let me know. I see tons of news, charaties buying them for 3rd world countries, and outdoor enthusiast recommending it. I do not see any advantage it has over a Sawyer filter.

    Edit: One comparison: http://prepforshtf.com/sawyer-mini-water-filter-vs-lifestraw/

    For me, the multiple ways of using the Sawyer have been the biggest benefit. I've used my Squeeze in a bucket gravity system, attached to bottles (ultralight backpacking) and with a straw (like a Lifestraw). I will often squeeze enough water to fill a Gatorade bottle or two before moving away from the water source. Now I have the mini and the flow rate is even better - best of any filter I've ever used, and it is still incredibly versatile.
u/superpopcone · 17 pointsr/berkeley

Seeing as both wildfires and power outages are going hand in hand, I want to repost an FAQ I wrote from last year for wildfire safety, updated with some power outage info. I'll be updating and simplifying this as time allows - hopefully it's comprehensive.

EDIT: Exceeded word count, I extended it into the comment responses. Check Table of Contents for whatever info you care about.

------

TL;DR SUMMARY:

Wildfires - Enhance awareness by checking fires and AQI, and buy/wear a valved N95-rated respirator (NOT a regular surgical mask). Most importantly, ensure a proper fit/seal if you don't want short or long term respiratory problems/failure.



Power Outages - Stay informed. Prepare 2 weeks worth of water and cash. Move things to fridge/freezer for up to 48 hours of storage.



Evacuations - Sonoma County is currently being evacuated as the Kincade Wildfire razes homes to the ground. Cal Maritime Academy was evacuated yesterday (10-27) due to the Vallejo ("Glen Cove") Fire. You decide if you want to prepare for evacuation - details below if so.

------

Table of Contents


  1. General Info - Power Outages and Wildfires
  2. Wildfire Safety - Respirator Masks
  3. Power Outages - Preparedness
  4. Evacuations - Go Bag

    ------

    1. GENERAL INFO - Power Outages and Wildfires


    What's going on with power outages?

    PG&E is implementing PSPS, "Public Safety Power Shutoffs", during times of high fire risk (dry, high winds), in an attempt to prevent wildfires.

    ​

    How do I stay up to date about power outage information? Am I affected?

    Official City of Berkeley webpage about PG&E outages.

    PG&E Outage subpage.

    PG&E outage map - use to check if you're out of power.

    PG&E's Twitter may be a better information source if high traffic causes other websites to go down.

    Other alternative sources available here.

    -----

    What's on fire right now?

    Official California wildfire maps here. A colored highlighted section will appear when a fire perimeter for a significant fire is created. Incidents not covered by CalFire (the state fire department) are listed as "Not a CAL FIRE Incident", in which you can click on it to find out which local city fire department will have more information. Status updates and evacuation orders are listed under each fire's specific page.

    ​

    Tell me about the Air Quality Index (AQI)?

    Official EPA AQI website here. The AQI is a metric used to measure air quality and certain pollutants, such as PM2.5 and ozone.

    Unofficial AQI site - PurpleAir. Not government official, but there are significantly more sensors that are higher resolution and generally more accurate.

    You should wear a respirator for an AQI of about 150 or above.

    ​

    What is PM2.5?

    PM2.5 refers to fine dust particles less than 2.5 microns/micrometers in diameter - these are the particles that come from heavy pollution (see: China) and wildfires (see: California). In short, they damage your respiratory systems like no tomorrow (depending on concentration and duration of exposure) for both short term (asthma, heart attacks) and long term (respiratory disease risk increase). Source. Source 2.

    These particles are microscopic and cannot be seen, which means the best way you should check if you need to protect from it is to check an official AQI source, NOT simply check if it's smog/smokey outside. (FYI context - the average virus is 0.3 microns in size.)

    -----

    What are other major risks to be aware of?

    ​

    Water

    Running water may suddenly stop. Water utilities are vulnerable to both power outages and wildfires - lack of power to run pump equipment, and water redistribution to firefighting efforts will cause water outages.

    EBMUD (East Bay Municipality Utility District) website.

    ​

    Prepare - Have 1 gallon of water per person, per day, for 2 weeks of self reliance. If you don't have that much storage, fill as many bottles as you can. Then buy water storage containers such as Aquatainers (cheap, larger capacity) or jerry-can style water containers (more durable, better leak-proof, and smaller capacity + handle design = easier to lift and move to your car. Water is HEAVY.).

    ​

    Cash

    Credit card readers and ATMs may not work, and stores will begin to only accept cash. In addition to power outages, network outages will disable the verification process credit cards - so even if you have power, credit card readers will not work.

    ​

    Prepare - Have a backup reserve of physical cash on hand for at LEAST 2 weeks worth of expenses. Smaller bills are better.

    ​

    Internet

    Wi-Fi and power outages are not directly correlated to each other.

    If there is internet coming to your building, but your building has no power, you can still use your Wi-Fi network if you can run your modem/router on backup power somehow.

    If the ISP network center, which sends the internet to your building, is experiencing power outage issues, then you will have Wi-Fi outages, even if your building has power.

    -----

    Source for most of the respirator info - very long but thorough.

    -----

    If there's more info to add or correct, feel free to comment and I'll edit this. Hope this helps everyone - stay safe out there.

u/[deleted] · 17 pointsr/Outdoors

/u/fetch04 is right. You are going to want to learn from youtube and practice before you show your son.


-Skills you will want to acquire:

u/psychedelicgulch · 16 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

Packs- Your pack is usually recommended to be one of the last things you pick up. That being said the Osprey Exos is a great pack and one of the staple packs you'll see. Wait until you get all of your gear and then go to REI or another outfitter and see how big of one you think you'll need.

Sleeping Bags- It generally won't get too cold so you can get away with a 30 or 40 degree bag. Right at the start of your trip it may be a little brisk so just have an extra fleece on hand. A lot of people like the Enlightened Equipment Revelation quilts. They're great and lightweight, but expensive and some side sleepers don't like them.

Tents- There's millions of options, Big Agnes, Six Moon Designs, HMD, and tons more I can think of. The Big Agnes Fly Creek UL 2 is popular and lightweight, its going for $265 online right now. If that's too expensive I'd say go for the Six Moon Designs Skyscape Scout for $125.

Trekking Poles- These aren't super important unless your tent requires them. Best ones I've seen for a decent price: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XM0YGW8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Cooking- You can go the alcohol stove route, I don't like it because you'll end up carrying more weight in alcohol than with a regular stove. The BRS 3000t is probably the lightest and cheapest stove you can find. For pots just a simple titanium pot will work.

Good luck on your hike!

u/roseflower81 · 15 pointsr/UlcerativeColitis

Many states have passed the Restroom Access Act (Ally's Law) for people with specific medical conditions to have access to bathroom. You can also request for a card here.

In any case, I too have a similar set up, but in my car in case of an emergency in the middle of a drive. It's a bucket but with a toilet seat that you can get on Amazon

u/poidogs · 15 pointsr/preppers

What is your plan for going to the bathroom if there is no running water/toilets/privacy? At the least get a bucket toilet so that you have some place to put it all.

If you plan on doing some clean up, get face masks/respirators and protective eyewear appropriate for that. If you are wearing work gloves, put latex/nitrile gloves under that. There are gloves that are a bit longer than the usual wrist length. Any cut/wound becomes an opportunity for infection. Make sure you have enough first aid supplies to both thoroughly clean and bandage any cut/wound.

Have good "hand awareness" -that is be mindful of not touching your face. All the gloves and ppe in the world won't do any good if you rub your gloved hand over your eyes/nose/mouth and directly administer cooties to yourself. That is another reason for some sort of mask/eyewear -so that you don't rub gunk in places you don't want gunk.

Be careful! Stay safe! I hope your house is ok.
edit: formatting fail

u/Bobbafettlives1983 · 15 pointsr/preppers

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_MzGzDbKTT58GD

I have an in-line attachment for hydration pack.

There’s a little pump too.

Water Purifier Pump with Replaceable Carbon 0.01 Micron Water Filter, 4 Filter Stages, Portable Outdoor Emergency and Survival Gear - Camping, Hiking, Backpacking https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07NVCBWVV/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_MBGzDbY1W35D3

u/edheler · 15 pointsr/preppers

Drop the Life Straw and use a Sawyer Mini.

u/Pwntastic1 · 14 pointsr/malefashionadvice

Buy these

Trust me

u/captainkurt1 · 14 pointsr/camping
u/zNNS · 13 pointsr/ElectricForest

There are showers there. I think they cost $10 and they're usually not the warmest.

I don't think I've ever taken a shower at fest (gross I know). What a lot of people do is buy solar showers and use those. Yeah, they're not quite as thorough but they do the trick.

I'm basically married at this point so I have nobody to impress.

u/toucher_of_sheepv8 · 13 pointsr/knives

Honestly? You're going to want to just go to a knife forum- this is a good example of one, or BladeForums.com is another- and just immerse yourself in it. Read posts, ask questions, salivate over knives, etc.

Here's a guide on knife grinds and the differences between them. Here's another.

Some good, popular companies for folding knives are Spyderco, Benchmade, Kershaw, and Cold Steel. All of these also make fixed blades, but only Cold Steel has anywhere near as many fixed blade designs available as they have folders.

Some popular companies for fixed blade knives are Ka-Bar, Morakniv, Ontario Knife Company, ESEE knives, BlackJack Knives and Fallkniven.

Any knives by any of those companies will likely be good, solid knives for whatever their intended purpose is- which brings us to another point, the intended purpose of a knife.

Different knives are obviously intended for different things, and a good knife for bushcraft might make an incredibly shitty one for cooking, with the While the Becker BK2 might happily slash apart a log or firewood, it's so fucking thick that it'll take a lot more work to push it through food, for example. Alternatively, while the Benchmade 530 is a great EDC knife that will happily cut food or cardboard all day, if you try its super-thing blade against wood or rope you'll be in for a bad time and might even need a new knife. Basically, there isn't really any knife that's "good" for everything. There are knives that are BAD for everything, but that's a different story entirely.

If you have any questions about anything I said, feel free to ask. Like I said- that's a good way to learn about knives.

u/Landoperk · 13 pointsr/backpacking

Sawyer Mini water filter. $20 Arguably the best lightweight backpacking filter available.
Also, the Leatherman Squirt is on my backpacking wishlist this year.

u/Amator · 12 pointsr/preppers

Maybe.

I'd set up somewhere in a National Forest in my general area (NC/SC/TN) with plenty of water sources, some fish and game, and an escape route if wildfires get too close.

I have enough Boy Scouts and armchair bushcraft experience to work with an axe and cordage to put together a decent enough shelter--it probably wouldn't take more than a month--and I'd try to setup a decent camp latrine away from water sources.

In addition to my BOB gear*, I'd spend some of the money on a used wheelbarrow, shovel, axe, splitting wedge, $50 worth of cheap cordage/bungee cords/carabiners/tarps/duct tape from Harbor Freight, $10 worth of BIC lighters (can still be used as firestarters once the fuel is gone to supplement the fire gear in my BOB), a gallon of bleach (santize the latrine, backup water purification), a decent cheap WalMart fishing rod/tackle (plus the license). Let's estimate $200 for all that.

Can I scrounge? I'd get a dozen or so free 5-gallon buckets from food service operations and several Arizona tea jugs out of recycling bins. I'd hit up the bulk Goodwill office to grab extra clothes/blankets/bandanas/towel for $.80/lb. I could probably even score a decent pot/pan and plate/flatware/coffee mug to go with the minimal cooking gear in my BOB, maybe even a grate from an old rusted grill. If you're going to be there a year, it's probably worth the couple of bucks.

I don't know much about trapping, but a handful of connibears and steel wire snares aren't too expensive and I'll be there a while so it might be worthwhile to spend $25 on those and a cheap bottle of musk. While I'm at it, let's get a couple of spring-loaded rat traps while we're at Harbor Freight to nail to trees and try get some tree-rats for dinner. At this point, I'm probably going to have to get a hunting license so let's upgrade to the annual premium fishing + hunting license for $50 as it has more privileges.

Let's add some speed-fishing hooks for $11 as well, assuming they're legal in the area.

Oh, I'd better total up what we have so far - $200 for misc tools, $75 for licenses/trapping stuff, and let's drop $25 on a basic cheap slingbow, $5 for an extra band, and $25 for a few cheap arrows from Walmart. Let's guesstimate we're at $300 at this point on tools and food procurement.

I don't plan on catching a lot of meals this way, but I need something to do with the time and if I can catch one critter a month it'll be great for the fresh food to supplement the beans and rice. Another guy in this thread did a cost analysis for a year's supply of rice/beans/oil for $227.88. Let's add a few iodized salt containers and cheap multivitamins from Dollar Tree and then go hit the salvage grocery store for cheap spices/teas. Say $250 for my food supply.

That leaves around $450 left. At this point, I feel like I have some of the basics covered and can start spending money/effort on a few things to make that year go by easier. I love coffee, but it's an expensive habit on a tight budget. Since I'll have an abundance of time, I'll get my coffee fix by buying green unroasted coffee beans - the cheapest bulk bag of green beans from Sweet Maria's is $5.50/lb but is $87.70 for a 20 lb sack and they have a 15% coupon code so let's estimate $90 shipped for 20 lbs. That gives me just under an ounce a day so it's a splurge but I'm willing to spend $100 to get the beans and a $10 french press from Ikea and I'm pretty sure it won't take me too long to find a couple of river rocks that would work as an impromptu mortar/pestle.

I also like to smoke a pipe maybe once a day which is maybe an ounce a week. I already have a spare pipe and tobacco in my EDC bag so this would go with me, but I'll make do with the cheap drugstore pipe tobacco marketed for RYO cigs at $14/lb shipped. We'll grab 3 of those 1 lb packs for $42 to keep me in my daily smoke.

I have a handcrank radio in my BOB and I could kinda cheat and say I already have that folding solar charger I plan on buying someday, but let's not and I'll cough up the $38 for this one. I'll have my battery bank and flashlight that's in my BOB plus my iPhone in my pocket and my Kindle I keep in my EDC backpack. The plan will be that I'll find a nice sunny spot to permanently mount the charger and I can go plug in the battery bank each day to keep my phone topped off. That way I have a radio for news and I can load a lot of music/audiobooks/ebooks/games to help keep me sane. I'm also going to buy an extra pair of earbuds from DollarTree as well as a few bars of Ivory soap a $9 Solar Shower from Amazon. Gotta stay clean and having a shower is a huge morale boost.

Speaking of books, I'm probably going to hit the library on my way out of town and check out a few survival/homesteading books. I'll have plenty of money to pay the late fines after I win the boatload of money from my uncle.

At this point, I've spent:

$350 on Tools/Food Procurement
$250 for boring basic calories food supply
$100 on coffee (important)
$50 in tobacco (likewise important)
$50 for electronics

So $700 total. Do the rules state I have stay in the woods, or can I walk into town from time to time? If so, I'll keep the rest of the money for a weekly walk into town to spend my $3.85 allowance and visit the library. If I can't, I'm going to probably spend the rest on a cheap used rifle and as many rounds as I can buy. I'll have my 9mm Glock and a few clips of ammo from my BOB, but that's no fun to hunt with. I'd also try to figure out a way to get a cheap guitar from somewhere if possible - I could probably figure out a song or two in a year.

Let's say the above plan is approved, and I'm going to the woods for a year. Hoo-rah! That's a lot of sacks of beans and rice - I'm glad I bought a used wheelbarrow! Once I get to a campsite I like, I'll start divying out enough rice/beans/salt into empty 5-gallon bucks and dig a pit to bury them in--probably two or three to make sure it's not all in one place if I didn't bury it deep enough and a bear smells it. The next order of business would be setting up a semi-permanent lean-to glamping shelter, cooking pit, latrine, a sand filter for pre-filtering water before adding into my Sawyer and storing it away in the Arizona tea containers.

I'd spend my days playing around with the hunting/trapping/fishing gear, reading, playing guitar badly, and writing in my journal. Once a week or so, I'd shower, put on my best shirt, and hike to town for a visit to the library and to buy a beer or some other treat. If could access Wi-Fi it'd be great to set up a blog--I could take pictures and write on my phone and upload to a free WordPress site whenever I'm in town. I'm pretty sure I could get a book deal out of this as well.

u/sea_of_clouds · 12 pointsr/hulaween

I've tried those, but have had...less-than desirable results. Apparently I lack the sort of coordination needed to use one without peeing all over myself. 😆

So I did the next best thing and created my very own Whiz Palace! It's essentially a large bucket with a toilet seat on top; I secure a small trash bag inside and fill with cedar shavings (like you'd put in a small pet cage), to mitigate any noise or smell. The toilet is then placed inside a pop-up shower tent and voila! I also include toilet paper and other accouterments. I change the bag and cedar daily. It's not pretty, but it beats the heck out of stumbling to a porta-potty at 5am.

u/jrshaul · 12 pointsr/povertyfinance

Oh gawd.

  1. Find a way to create a flat floor - fold down the rear seats and shove some plywood in there if need be. Uneven surfaces are murder on your back.
  2. Any enclosed space will start to smell funny due to humidity buildup. A car in motion circulates air constantly; a car at rest will fog up fast. Rolling down a window a bit (and maybe covering it with a bit of mesh) is advised.
  3. Febreeze your car. You can't smell it. Everyone else can. (Emptying about half a bottle into your car, idling it with the heat cranked up until it gets stupid hot inside, then driving a mile with the windows open to purge it is recommended.
  4. If you can, get a tiny under desk space heater (mine is about 200w) on a long extension cord. You can keep the car surprisingly warm without the windows fogging.
  5. Once it hits freezing, all bets are off. Exposure is like the worst flu you've ever had.
  6. Wal-mart is generally very hospitable to people living in their cars - and it's clearly marked if they're not. Califorina, Colorado, and Tucson are the major exceptions.
  7. A cooler full of ice is a must-have. A good cooler can go quite a long time on a few bucks of ice.
  8. An Iwatani butane burner and a frying pan will let you cook quite a lot at a rest stop - just put it on a picnic table; they're designed for indoor tabletop use. This one is great value.
  9. If you make it to south-central Wisconsin, I'll buy you brunch.
u/cwcoleman · 12 pointsr/backpacking

You say tent and sleeping pads but have this tagged as Travel. I'm confused...

Why is REI not somewhere you want to shop? They sell quality gear and have educated salespeople.

---

Your question is really wide open... Could you provide more details to help us help you?

  1. Where is your planned trip? When?
  2. What low temps do you plan to sleep in?
  3. Will you be solo or with a group? 1-person shelter or more?
  4. What is your budget?
  5. Do you value cost, weight, or quality most? Pick 2.
  6. What is your experience? Ever been on a day hike? Car camped?
  7. What gear do you need other than tent and sleeping pad?

    You don't have to be super specific with answers, but anything helps. Just trying to get an idea of your needs, because the options for backpacking gear are huge.

    ----

    The goal is to keep your weight/bulk down. The #1 way to do this is by skipping gear that's unnecessary. While that's hard for someone new, since you don't know what is necessary vs. unnecessary, try hard to skip 'just-in-case' or too many 'luxury' items.

    If your full pack weight is under 30 pounds you are doing well, over 50 and you should rethink your approach.

    Most new backpackers will require a backpack in the 65 liter range. Fit is important to comfort, so if you could go into a local shop and try on a variety of options - do it.

    ----

    I wrote this semi-recently, check it out:

u/Teerlys · 12 pointsr/preppers

I wrote this up earlier today for someone who wanted to start getting prepped on ~$75/Month but also wanted to not have to cook the foods. I did include some long term storage as the first step anyway because it's so cheap and easy, but so far as consumables go, this is a good start for you.

--------------------------------------------

A lot of this is a shelf life and storage space issue. If you have plenty of room for storage, I'd start like this:

  • Month 1: This doesn't meet your doesn't-need-to-be-cooked guideline, but it's a really solid start to bulk up on available calories and requires minimal cash and effort, so it's going in anyway. Ignore it if it's not for you.

    Buy two 50lb bags of white rice from a place like Costco or Sam's Club. Find 3 food safe 5 gallon buckets with lids. Get Mylar Bags and O2 Absorbers. Then hit Youtube for instructions on what to do with them. If the Mylar bags bit will hold you back from doing this, then skip them and just clean the buckets then dump rice in them straight. Seal, date, set aside. That's 160,000 calories in month 1. Given normal pantry supplies that stretches things out quite a ways. Plan on rotating out at 7ish years if put straight into the bucket and 20 years if you use the Mylar. Realistically, with Mylar, white rice may be good for much longer than 20 years (most people say 30, but for the minimal investment I'd rotate earlier to be safe).

  • Month 2:

    Grab a Water Bob (not right now though, hurricane season has prices high and stocks low for them). Also, a Sawyer Water Filter or two. That gives you an opportunity to grab an extra hundred gallons of water in your bathtub initially given enough warning, and some water purification options later on.

  • Month 3:

    Assuming you have storage capacity, start looking at #10 cans of food. Those are the cans that are around a foot tall and very wide. Look for things that you would eat and would be usuable in your daily lives, but also ones that would be calorie dense. For example, refried beans, nacho cheese, baked beans, white potatoes, chick peas, chili with beans, etc. Those are things you can use in recipes at home, but can pick them up and store them for a couple of years first. Getting them in the larger can is a better return on investment/dollar than buying smaller ones.

  • Month 4: This is probably more what you were looking for.

    If your pantry isn't topped up with the things your family normally eats, drop that money to get a little deeper on those things. Velveeta cheese, crackers, cans of soup, noodles, peanut butter/jelly, canned vegetables/fruit, pasta/sauce, salsa, dried/canned beans, seasonings, canned meat, canned chili, etc. Date them and make sure to work through the oldest first. Having the normal foods you eat in bulk will likely end up being what gets you through most things (like the current hurricane season, job loss, winter blizzard, etc). Spending on these things can be used to fill out whatever is left of your budget when it gets partially used up on other things. I'd also maybe consider having some flats of bottled water at home as well. I usually keep 4-7 Costco sized ones on hand for my SO and I.

  • Month 5:

    Start looking at longer term bulk water storage. I like 5 gallon stackable water cubes as they're easier to move and use and you buy them as you have a little extra cash here and there, but if you want to bump the budget up a bit for a month and your wife won't look at you like you're crazy, a 55 gallon barrel is a better price per gallon than the individual cubes. Sometimes there's just no replacing having your own clean water source ready to go. Barring all of that, if your family will use them just grab a bunch of flats of bottled water and rotate them. Stacked high they don't take up a ton of floor space.

  • Month 6 and Beyond:

    At this point you're pretty well set initially for both water and food. Keep the pantry stocked and rotating. Add on for long term stored water as you see fit and maybe invest in something like a Big Berkey if you really want to drop some money into it. At that point I'd probably begin considering longer term food storage. More rice, add in some dry beans (roughly 5 year shelf life in Mylar/Buckets), and if you're feeling really into it you can get unground wheat and that will last 30 years or better in Mylar/Buckets. You'll just need to have a hand crank grinder or two to use it.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I get wanting ready to eat foods, and that's pretty easy to do and a great place to start, but as one last recommendation... grab yourself a Propane Burner and a high pressure hose for it so that you can use regular propane tanks. You may be able to eat cold soup out of the can, but it's a lot more comforting when it's warm, and you can pretty easily have the ability to add more of your foods into your diet (like spaghetti or mac and cheese) when you can still have a burner to work with.
u/r_syzygy · 12 pointsr/CampingGear

Jetboils boil water better than almost anything. If you're eating freeze-dried mountain house meals or something, you can't really beat it. Otherwise, they're just like any other canister stove.

If you want something simple/light/cheap, you could get something like:

This BRS Stove and

This Ti pot or a bigger one for more people/larger meals

and a canister

u/DirteDeeds · 11 pointsr/funny

If your gonna carry a knife make it one that can be used for more than one thing. I keep a Becker Kabar in my glovebox. Its a pound of razor sharp steel that will work as anything you need in a survival situation and lop off any part of someone you swing it at if you have too.

I regularly travel deep outdoors so I keep a Flint steel, lifestraw, crank powered flashlight, Becker Kabar, along with cordage and wire for snares. All in a neat little kit I sling over my shoulder if I get out of my car on a hike or in case I breakdown deep woods.

Ok that was longer than needed but point being if you need a knife buy a damn knife

u/horthianflorff · 11 pointsr/washingtondc

This seems like a good place for a PSA:

Emergencies typically require one of two responses:

SHELTER-IN-PLACE (snowstorm, blackout, earthquake)

  • Generally, speaking you should have enough supplies to shelter in place for at least 3 days although other sources will say 14 days. That means clean water, food, and means to keep warm and dry if the power goes out or if there is flooding. Check out some of the FEMA resources others have posted.

    FLEE (fire, tsunami, attack)

  • As far as a "bug-out" bag, these should be thought of as a means to keep you supplied and alive while traveling away from danger (not as a means of long term survival).

    When I assembled my kits, one of the most helpful pieces of advice I got was that "a kit is useless if you can't access it". For me, I am 90% of the time either at home or near my car so it makes sense to have a bug-out bag in both places. If SHTF while I'm at work or on the road, my kit at home is not going to do me any good.

    Emergency preparedness goes beyond "did I buy the right things?" and has much more to do with the practical realities of emergencies. A good example someone else pointed out: having a giant water reservoir is great but won't do you any good if your water gets cut off before you can fill it. Similarly, having a car is great but won't do you any good if the roads are too clogged to drive. Solution? Make your bug-out bag light enough to carry comfortably and take the Heel-Toe Express out of town.
u/SquishSquash81 · 11 pointsr/malefashionadvice

Peoplesocks are the best deal in socks right now.

u/Almostcomatose · 11 pointsr/Ultralight
u/Spongi · 10 pointsr/AskReddit

Unless he's got some kind of weird complex about girls and poop just forget about it.

If you need to go to the bathroom, then just go. Don't worry about it. Spray a little air freshener if it makes you feel better.

Reminds me of the time I was at my grandmother's and took a massive shit then sprayed some pine-sol scented air freshener. My grandmother walks in a few minutes later and starts sniffing the air then say's "Smells like someone shit on a pine tree."

If it makes you feel any better. I don't even have a bathroom. I just have this and a bag of pine shavings.

I even had a lady friend come stay for a bit. Whenever she needed to use the bathroom I just left for a few minutes while she did her business.

u/jaweeks · 10 pointsr/news

Not even with this?

u/pointblankjustice · 10 pointsr/bugout

There is a lot wrong with this list, so I'm just going to work down it one by one with my thoughts on the matter.

USB flameless lighter? Why? That is going to be unreliable, at best. Throw a few BIC lighters and some stormproof matches in there and be done with it. IF you want to be fancy, get something built to be rugged, that will stand up to use in the field:

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Floating-Lighter/dp/B00C85NBA6/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173178&sr=1-2&keywords=camping+lighter

Speaking of, I didn't see any sort of firestarting material. Warmth is going to be important, and you need as few steps as possible between you and fire. Get some quality firestarters. I am trying to keep all my links relevant from amazon.ca, so some of the brands I'm most familiar with aren't there. But these work well (though there are options from Wetfire and other brands that take up less space):

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Fire-Stix/dp/B00C6SHODK/ref=sr_1_20?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173338&sr=1-20&keywords=emergency+fire+starter

What is with the mall-ninja "tactical" hatchet? That is a lot of weight and not a lot of utility. You'd be better served with a reliable and lightweight folding saw, and a good full-tang fixed-blade knife. Something like a 7 inch Corona saw:

https://www.amazon.ca/Corona-Cutting-Tools-RS-7041/dp/B00004R9YN/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173467&sr=1-1&keywords=corona+folding+saw

If you insist on carrying a hatchet (and their function in a bugout situation is debatable, especially for the weight) get something quality like an Estwing:

https://www.amazon.ca/Estwing-E24A-14-Inch-Sportmans-Sheath/dp/B00BNQR4SG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173510&sr=1-1&keywords=estwing+hatchet

Nothing wrong with duct tape, but you'd do well to wrap just maybe 3-4 meters of it around a small core (like from doggy waste bags, or even just around itself).

The self-crank radio/flashlight/phone charger is shit. You also don't need four lights, especially if all of them are crap. Buy one good flashlight, and maybe one good headlamp.

A flashlight like a Nitecore P12 or something that runs on an 18650 and offers long runtime would be ideal. If you buy a diffuser cap for it, you can replace the lantern. Pick up some spare, high quality 18650 cells, as well. The P12 has SOS and beacon modes, which will run for days at a time, in addition to a nice throw and excellent brightness on Medium and High.

https://www.amazon.ca/Nitecore-Flashlight-Lumens-Meters-Distance/dp/B00PQE1D2E/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173859&sr=1-2&keywords=nitecore+P12

As for headlamps, those don't need to be super bright. You want something with enough brightness and floodiness to work around camp. But ideally you also want a red-light or low-light mode for night time, when you don't need to destroy your night vision just because you need to take a piss or something.

https://www.amazon.ca/TACTIKKA-CONSTANT-LIGHTING-HEADLAMP-DESERT/dp/B00GCGIGHK/ref=sr_1_14?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173989&sr=1-14&keywords=petzl+headlamp

The powerbank thing in the crank radio is crap, only 1000mah. Not enough to charge most modern smart phones even 25%. Figure that of that 1000mah, ~25% will be lost just due to inefficiency in the charging process. Get a 10,000mah or bigger high quality battery, with 2.1A ports, and be done with it:

https://www.amazon.ca/Anker-PowerCore-Portable-Ultra-Compact-High-speed-Charging-Technology/dp/B0194WDVHI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482173708&sr=8-1&keywords=anker+usb+power+bank

Combine the money you'd spend on the shitty folding knife and the shitty Gerber multitool, and buy a proper multi-tool. You don't need two folding knives.

The Leatherman Wingman is a good value, though I prefer a nicer quality one like the Charge TTi, but at four times the price it may not be worth it just for an S30V blade.

https://www.amazon.ca/Leatherman-2996-831426-Wingman-Multi-Tool/dp/B005DI0XM4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482174264&sr=8-1&keywords=leatherman+wave

Ditch the camp toilet paper, that stuff is like wiping your ass with cardboard. Get some biodegradable camp wipes from an outdoor store. You can now use these to clean your ass, and they also are useful for wiping your hands, or taking whore baths.

Same with the camp soap. Are you bugging out or camping for a week? Nothing you are going to do in a bugout situation is going to necessitate body soap. Toothbrush, floss, deodorant.

Ditch the giant first aid kit full of crap you don't need. Those things are heavy and 80 of the 85 pieces are just different sized bitch stickers. Build your own first aid kit tailored around the likely injuries you would face: sprains, cuts, burns. Maybe throw some Quik Clot Z-pack gauze or a tourniquet (CAT or similar) in there for larger trauma, if that is a concern to you. Limit the bitch stickers to 5-10. All gauze, tape, trauma pads, alcohol wipes, tincture of iodine, moleskin for blisters, tweezers, surgical shears, gloves, maybe burn cream. Small containers of medications you might need: aspirin, antihistamines like Diphenhydramine, anti-diarrheals, etc.

That survival paracord bracelet thing is garbage. You already have 100ft of paracord in your list (which you could probably cut down to 50ft). You don't need some shitty firestarter, whistle, and compass thing. Buy a real lensatic sighting compass. Not going to do you much good without a map and the ability to understand it, anyway.

https://www.amazon.ca/UST-Survival-Essentials-Lensatic-Compass/dp/B005X1YI3Q/ref=sr_1_5?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174799&sr=1-5&keywords=compass

You have both a cookset AND a mug/pot. This is extra redundant and not needed in a bugout situation. Stick to food you don't have to prepare. Caloric density is your friend. Jerky, EPIC bars, Clif bars, etc.

If you need to boil water, use a single-wall metal canteen (NOT a thermos). Remove the plastic lid, fill with water, set in your fire. Widemouth canteens like those by Klean Kanteen are multi-purpose (multipurpose is your friend). You can sterilize water, you can cook and eat food out of it (because of the large opening), and you can fill with hot water, wrap in a sock, and warm your sleep system.

https://www.amazon.ca/Klean-Kanteen-Stainless-Bottle-27-Ounce/dp/B0027W6WHE/ref=sr_1_sc_4?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174908&sr=1-4-spell&keywords=klean+kanteen+widemouth

You don't need a can opener if you have a good multitool.

Lifestraws suck ass. They only work as a straw, and I am going to guess you don't want to get your water by drinking out of puddles exclusively. Get a Sawyer Squeeze mini filter. This can be used in-line with a hydration bladder, can be used like a Lifestraw, or can be used to filter an fill your water storage containers/bladder:

https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175065&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

One seriously lacking area for you is your sleep system. A tarp and a space blanket are not going to keep you functionally warm. You might survive a night, but you won't be useful the next day.

At the BARE minimum, you should get a good, reflective, breathable bivvy sack, like this one from SOL, AND a sleeping pad. A bivvy will reflect heat back onto you, helping with heat lost through convection, but no sleeping bag will help with heat lost through conduction (you touching the cold ground). That is why a sleeping pad is mandatory. I have used the Escape bivvy and the Klymit pad linked here together, and both kept me comfortably warm to about 50 degrees F. Below that, I've had to augment with base layers or jackets, and that still sucked. If you are hoping to sleep in below freezing temperatures, you'll need a properly sorted ultralight sleeping bag.

https://www.amazon.ca/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Escape-Bivvy/dp/B00EVGD0FQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175280&sr=1-1&keywords=SOL+escape

https://www.amazon.ca/Klymit-06SVGR01C-Camping-Mattress-Green-Grey/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175199&sr=1-1&keywords=sleep+pad

Other recommendations of mine would be to take survival, medical and foraging guides and put them on a smartphone, along with a GPS mapping software and pre-downloaded offline topographical maps at 1:24k resolution of your main bugout areas and 1:100k resolution elsewhere. Something like Gaia GPS for iOS or Backcountry Navigator Pro for Android:

u/Cixelsid · 10 pointsr/frugalmalefashion

They've sold as high as $35 on Amazon, but average price has been around $26.73. This is the lowest they've been ever. http://camelcamelcamel.com/Merino-Socks-4pairs-Charcoal-1xbrown/product/B009Y9QCCS

u/thegreatoutdoors44 · 10 pointsr/prepping

The Sawyer Mini is an great all around filter that can be purchased for $20. tablets aren't a bad idea either. Do not waste your money on a lifestraw though. the sawyers are good for like 10-100x the lifespan(in gallons of course)

u/shda5582 · 10 pointsr/preppers

Patently false, and shill for Lifestraw detected.

Sawyer (and the one I have, full disclosure): http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2

Lifestraw: http://www.amazon.com/LifeStraw-LSPHF017-Personal-Water-Filter/dp/B006QF3TW4

Sawyer has a .1 micron, Lifestraw is a .2. Next time please post accurate information, thanks :)

edit: my mistake on this statement, I thought the personal stick model was being discussed and NOT the Family model which can filter out viruses. I retract against the Family model but maintain it still applies to the personal "straw" model since that one is .2.

u/tatertom · 10 pointsr/vandwellers

> It's not so great when it's cold outside

Does its accompanying literature warn against filling with warm water? I use a camp shower pump like this in a big, sturdy dry bag, and it does a lot more than take the edge off. All I really need to do is stop wind from hitting me, and it's downright therapeutic at times.

u/NatesYourMate · 9 pointsr/shutupandtakemymoney

And $110 for a hammock, backpack, and some paracord is a bit much.

Hammock that folds into a little backpack type thing and has ties built into it $20

+

Eagle Creek Hiking Backpack $27.50

=

$47.50! You can buy one for yourself, and for your friend, and some McDonalds to eat together and still have a few pennies leftover! How nice!

But on the not being a dick side of things, cool backpack, but like most things on kickstarter, it's overpriced.

u/IronColumn · 9 pointsr/Hammocks
u/sasunnach · 9 pointsr/1200isplenty

My time to shine! I'm big into canoe camping. All the links I'm giving you are from Amazon Canada but you can get the same stuff on Amazon USA.

  • Get a backpacker's stove. You can get a cheap one from Amazon like this or this.

  • Get a cookpot off of Amazon too like a Toaks pot or Stanley pot.

  • Get a water filter like the Katadyn BeFree.

  • Get a spork.

  • Get a frying pan that has a handle that can fold up. There are a ton of options for this on Amazon.

  • Don't forget a spatula. You can get smaller, lighter options for this on Amazon.

    Now you're all set for anything you have to cook.

    Food suggestions:

  • Frozen meat for the first night
  • Frozen bacon for the first morning
  • Eggs for the first morning
  • Salami
  • Bagged tuna
  • Bagged salmon
  • Fish (if caught)
  • Babybel cheeses
  • Nuts
  • Seeds
  • Beef jerky
  • Low carb tortillas
  • Avocado for the first day
  • Mayo packets
  • Dark chocolate
  • Oatmeal packages
  • Dehydrated fruit like peaches and strawberries
  • Dehydrated veggies like peppers and onions and mushrooms
  • Parmesan cheese
  • Salt, pepper, seasonings
  • Dehydrated meals from MEC or REI (you can get regular options and low carb options)
  • Bagged quick cook rice

    I tend to not eat three meals a day when paddling. I have breakfast and dinner and maybe some snacks during the day.

    Be mindful that if you are paddling and hiking and portaging you're going to be burning huge amounts of calories. If you're just lazing about on a dinghy maybe not so much.
u/onoku · 9 pointsr/army

I used this sleeping pad for two weeks and I slept like a log every night. Also a side sleeper.

u/blue_27 · 9 pointsr/bugout

Personally, I don't like hatchets. Too much room for error. I'd advise the Bahco.

I'd also consider the Sawyer for water filtration, as I think most water purification tablets taste nasty. If you are going to use them, bring some Crystal Light, or sweetened Kool-Aid or Gatorade to kill the taste.

Definitely need a map and compass, otherwise ... how do you know when you've reached your destination?

What are the Sharpies and the tampons for? How long is it supposed to sustain you? Are there any options to procure more food after the 4 days of rat bars run out?

I'd say that it needs work. 5/10? But these things really aren't quantifiable like that. Try it out for a weekend, and objectively analyze the deficiencies.

/$0.02

u/GoonCommaThe · 9 pointsr/Outdoors

Get a Sawyer Mini and some disinfectant tablets or drops (Aquamira is popular). Use the Mini when you need water right then, use the tablets when you can wait.

So say you have two water bottles and you come up to a stream and need water. Fill one with water from the source and put the disinfectants in there (making sure to bleed the threads), and put it in your pack. Then take the Mini and fill your other bottle using the squeeze bag OR you can get a bladder and fill it with water straight from the source and have the Mini connected between the bladder and the mouthpiece so it filters as you drink. By the time your bottle with the filtered water runs out, the other bottle of water will be purified. You can also fill both bottles with the filter when you stop if you're gonna take a rest, but you should always have drops or tablets as backups.

EDIT: Outdoor Gear Lab did a good review of water treatment options. It's very comprehensive (as are all their reviews).

u/minusfive · 9 pointsr/Ultralight

At that point you're probably paying the same or only saving a couple of bucks from a direct Amazon order, so probably not worth it.

https://smile.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Carbon-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

u/JoeIsHereBSU · 8 pointsr/preppers

Although I think 6+ months is unlikely, but here is what I would do.

  • Cook
    • Over the fire
    • Make a fire over
    • Buy one for the house beforehand, currently in the worlds smallest house but want to build in the next couple years
  • Shower
    • Camp Shower
    • You can also make something like the camp shower using a 2L bottle or 2.
    • Good old boil water and add it to a tub
  • Wash Cloths
  • go to the toilet
    • This is a whole subject on its own. Hard to say just dig a hole because where does that hole go? How do you get your water? Will disposing of waste contaminate your water? Will it contaminate your neighbors? Making a septic tank is hard, but you might have to do it by hand.
u/cyclefreaksix · 8 pointsr/knives

http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK2-Campanion-Fixed/dp/B001N1DPDE/ref=pd_sbs_sg_37

The BK2 is a better all purpose knife. It can baton wood or aide in meal prep. Also has a kydex sheath which won't hold moisture like a leather sheath will.

u/GrumpyMonk5454 · 8 pointsr/preppers

Reliance Products Aqua-Tainer 7 Gallon Rigid Water Container https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001QC31G6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_SukNDbJDHKBZV

u/graywh · 8 pointsr/CampingGear
u/0x18 · 7 pointsr/CampingGear

Snowboard clothing is overkill unless you plan on staying through a winter storm. Just remember: cotton kills and wool is your friend. If nothing else get yourself a pack of wool socks and some wool underwear and then wear your normal clothes over those. The coldest I've seen Yosemite get to (in the last ~7 years of visiting every winter) was about 30F in the day and ~0-10F at night (really easy to manage). A good wool hat also helps for staying warm at night.

I'm jealous; I just moved from SLO to Oregon and won't be able to do my normal yearly winter Yosemite trip :( I'll miss wandering around in a kilt and tshirt when it's 30F and making everybody think I'm insane, but I can give some misc advice on Yosemite winter camping:

  • Bring snow chains appropriate for your car. Even if the road is clear up into the park it's not guaranteed to be de-iced the entire stretch into the valley, and for most of winter the park rangers will deny you entry if you say you don't have chains even if the road is clear. There's stores not far out of the park that sell them but they're far more expensive than your local car parts store.
  • Use the bear boxes for all food, deodorant, hair spray, tooth paste, and anything with a scent you could imagine a pet animal trying to consume against all logic because the bears, coyotes, and racoons will try and are much larger and smarter (and I have watched them all try).
  • Last time I was there sleeping in your vehicle was verboten. I'm not sure on the exact reason why, but I think it's because bears are known to break into (and ruin in the process) cars while looking for food. You're safer outside the car than in it.
  • Good sleeping bags are great but don't forget to put an insulating layer between yourself and the ground. Air mattresses are okay but suck for temperature control; one of those thin roll-out insulating pads are seemingly worthless but great for staying warm through the night.
  • For $25 you can get 40 chemical handwarmers -- activate two or three (or four if you're cold) at night and toss them into the bottom of your sleeping bag to stay warm at night. Wear a shirt with chest pockets and put another two there, then get a wool beanie and slip another one between it and your head (if there's a blizzard...)
  • Don't go to bed wearing wet (including sweat) clothes! It will cool through the night and wisk away your body heat. Before going to bed change into a fresh suit of dry clothing.
u/OriginalSyn · 7 pointsr/Calgary

Just be aware when you're shopping, if you ask a Canadian for recommendations you're going to get stuff that is much lighter than you will probably want to get. Up to -10C many of us consider this light winter wear weather, but you will probably be wanting full on baselayer, gloves, boots and heavy jacket.

Calgary winters are fairly mild (averaging lows of -10 to -15C), but they come with wild swings due to our proximity to the mountains, you might go to work and it's -20C and when you leave its +10C so be prepared with layers as other have mentioned.

In the middle of Jan/Feb it's going to get real cold, often reaching -30C to -40C for a few days and a couple weeks below -20C. Be prepared for these days, if you have a vehicle make sure to plug it in (all vehicles sold in Canada have a block heater installed) if you take transit make sure to get some hand and feet warmers (like this). Wind chill is no joke it's not usually is listed as a "feels like" when looking at forecasts, if you're outside a lot pay attention to that number.

Also if you have a vehicle and street park at home or work make sure pay attention if you're in a snow route, they will ticket you if you're parked there during/after heavy snow fall.

u/cathredal · 7 pointsr/Tucson

I do long runs up there and camp nearly every weekend... I just bring a solar shower and put it on my dashboard or hood of my car, hose off afterwards... It's one of these, you can get them at Miller Surplus for 10 bucks or something: http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20

Edit: forgot to mention, there's also an ice cold spring just down the way from the Mt. Lemmon fire lookout. Take the Mt. Lemmon trail west from summit, stay R/straight at fork for Lookout trail, you'll see a metal building on your right, pipe sticking out of the hillside offtrail to the left -- flows hard year around. Maybe .2 miles total from parking area.

u/CitizenBacon · 7 pointsr/FireflyFestival

Elevated camping is just a hilarious concept to me. As if one person in a planning committee was like "I want to do everything identical to regular camping, but sleep 2 feet higher", and since they were a generally nice person, everyone else politely nodded their head.

Like I'm legitimately confused as to its merits over an air mattress in a regular tent. Feel like it just dramatically increases the probability of accidentally falling onto the ground during a groggy morning or drunk night.

That being said, I'm confident that whatever camping option you have, you're going to have a BLAST! Firefly is an awesome experience- great people, great music, and great vibes all around. In addition to what other people have suggested, I'd highly recommend a reusable water bottle to bring into the festival, as well as a handkerchief in case it's dry and dusty. Also a cheap camp shower works wonders if you don't want to wait on line for a shower!

u/minuteman_d · 7 pointsr/Lightbulb

https://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO

Get one of these and a "privacy poncho" and the entire road system is your outhouse.

u/LJ-Rubicon · 7 pointsr/cars

Unless it states that it's food grade, I personally wouldn't use it as drinking water.

Nothing wrong with plastic as long as it's BPA free, food grade

Example :

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001QC31G6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_g5jGDbQK5CNSZ

There's Jerry can versions of BPA free plastic, if you're wanting to stick with Jerry can style

u/xComputerblue · 7 pointsr/malefashionadvice
u/BigT2011 · 7 pointsr/motorcyclesroadtrip

I went with a ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1-Person Tent for sleeping with a Camp Solutions Lightweight Self-Inflating Air Sleeping Pad. Had a 40 degree bag/quilt from Walmart since I was traveling in August time frame.

Took this chair that really came in handy Moon Lence Outdoor Ultralight Portable Folding Chairs with Carry Bag Heavy Duty 242lbs Capacity Camping Folding Chairs Beach Chairs

Cooking set I used was 12pcs Camping Cookware Stove Canister Stand Tripod Folding Spork Wine Opener Carabiner Set Bisgear(TM) Outdoor Camping Hiking Backpacking Non-stick Cooking Non-stick Picnic Knife Spoon Dishcloth. It was good enough for the 3 weeks on the road and im still using it to this day.

Seat cushion which was good but I needed something much thicker by the end of the trip MadDog GearComfort Ride Seat Protector

​

I just put all that into a waterproof 45L bag I had and then shoved my clothes into a backpack on top. Jerry rigged a canvas bag on the side for quick access things like tools and such. The net thing on top of my bags was very very helpful as well. I used these hammock straps to tie everything down on the bike since I could use them again PYS outdoor XL Hammock Straps Heavy Duty 20FT & 40 Loops&100% No Stretch (Set of 2) Fits All Hammocks

Other than that it was miscellaneous stuff...

u/InvalidUserAccount · 7 pointsr/preppers

Why would you not just buy the Sawyer Mini for $18.97 on Amazon?

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_qhWfub0018FS9

u/resamay · 7 pointsr/shutupandtakemymoney

What do you think of the http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1406720934&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini It has a 0.1 Micron Filter. I believe that still won't remove Viruses in water though. And do you know what are the chances of North American Streams, or Lakes etc containing viruses in the water?

u/atetuna · 7 pointsr/Survival

$19.99 with shipping on Woot for 1,000 liters of filtering capacity or $19.06 with shipping on Amazon, which is strange because Woot is owned by Amazon.

Or you can get a Sawyer Mini for $19.97 with shipping for 100,000 gallons (378,541 liters) of filtering capacity, while filtering at 0.1 microns instead of 0.2 microns for the Lifestraw. It comes with a straw so you can use it the same way as the Lifestraw, plus has the greater flexibility of being able to be used with a hydration bladder or set up as a gravity filter systems, and also comes with a small water pouch.

u/GunaSoup · 7 pointsr/gadgets

http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2

Change the color to from the special edition black to blue or anything else and set the quantity to 1 and it comes out to around $20.

u/SmokeyTwoPeaks · 7 pointsr/OffGrid

Great discussion! I could definitely use one of those. I have to pump about 15 times to fill a glass of water with my hand pump.

I bought this shower two years ago and it was worth every penny and is still working great. Besides showeing, I have used it for many purposes like transferring rainwater from one conainer to another rinsing dishes and watering my garden. I have a bad back and this little beauty is by far my favorite off grid purchase.


https://www.amazon.ca/Ivation-Battery-Powered-Waterproof-Handheld-Portable/dp/B00IFHFJXI

u/Catxolotl · 7 pointsr/FireflyFestival

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00IFHFJXI/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1525918208&sr=8-1-spons&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=battery+portable+shower&psc=1
This shower is the best thing ever! I just bring two 5 gallon containers of water and it gets two people through two showers daily with extra.

u/trifonpapahronis · 7 pointsr/camping

I have also heard great things about the $18 stove on Amazon from BRS

u/CJOttawa · 7 pointsr/Ultralight

Or don't?

https://www.reddit.com/r/Ultralight/comments/58nlkz/what_gear_or_technique_did_you_buy_or_try_only_to/d91tmmf/

TL;DR: with a BRS-3000T, 25-gram, canister-top stove and a light-weight pot for boiling water, alcohol doesn't save you much weight on short trips, and on longer, un-resupplied trips, LPG wins.

See also: https://www.reddit.com/r/Ultralight/comments/5akas5/nifty_but_possibly_dangerous_refill_transfer_fuel/

EDIT - never have to check for "fire bans" with LPG either - the stoves have a shut-off valve and are typically exempt.

u/FeedMeCletus · 7 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I find the flick locks to be easier to use.

I bought these a while ago, and really like them for the price. Andrew Skurka recommends them as his value pick, if that matters to you

u/chronictherapist · 7 pointsr/flashlight

Sub is growing quickly!!

Armytec Elf for my office light

u/GIS-Rockstar · 6 pointsr/duluth

Duluth is an absolute mecca for outdoor winter sports. Gear up properly and you'll love your life in the 8 months of the Northland's winter!

If you're getting outside a lot in Eau Claire, you'll do fine in Duluth. If you plan on spending significantly more time outdoors in Duluth, then that's another story. Depending on where you live in town, you'll have different levels of need for snow tires; either way I'd strongly recommend them. PM me - I'm selling a set of snow tires in great condition over on the Online Rummage Sale for Duluth/Superior facebook group.

  • Thermal regulation is the name of the game. Not enough protection and you're cold. Once you're cold, you're done. Too many layers and you start to sweat. If you can't wick the sweat away or stop overheating, you're done

  • Cotton kills. You need 100% wool/poly/synthetic layers. Cotton absorbs moisture from your sweat, then freezes or just becomes a frigid sopping sponge against your skin

  • Layer selection is important. Something like a North Face Thermoball is great as a mid-layer under a parka for those insanely cold days. I have a SmartWool Marino wool base layer that was expensive but it was essential for keeping me warm and dry. Otherwise, synthetic long sleeve Under Armor kinds of shirts are perfect base layers.

  • Jeans are great at breaking wind and worked pretty well for me as a mid-layer. I usually just used synthetic long-johns to take care of wicking water from my skin. Roll both legs of the jeans up your shin to make room for boots and to keep the bottoms away from the snow or they will just get sopping wet. It's added warmth for your shins too. I'd finish off with a pair of snow pants that can go on and off easily

  • I used solid boots that were comfortable and insulated, with 1-2 pairs of various smartwool/puffy wool socks. Don't over-do it with socks. If your boot is too tight, it'll cut circulation to your toes and then you'll be cold. That's a delicate balance between "it's literally too damn cold out" and "I don't have circulation and I feel like it's too damn cold out."

  • A solid parka that goes below your butt is ideal. I got my North Face parka for around $300 and it was an excellent investment

  • Consider a shell that can break the wind. If you're hiking in Lester/Chester/Munger/etc. it won't be too windy; and if you're geared up properly those super cold temps are really a cake walk

  • Ice chains were important for my wife and myself. ICEtrekkers' Diamond Grip were my favorite. They really bite into glare ice where as coiled wire like basic Yak Trax were more slippery

  • I have a stack of the cheapest bandannas I could find in every color and pattern available. They're usually on sale for a buck each. The problem is that they're cotton, so my breath would condense on them quickly and they would freeze solid within 10-15 minutes, but the point is to keep the wind off of your mouth and cheeks. Even when frozen, they worked very well, and at 32° it was easily 30-50° warmer than the ambient air temps! I usually had 2-3 on me at all times for face protection and to wipe my nose/forehead (in case I started sweating) and I was very happy with them considering how cheap they were. Wash them once or twice before you use them to soften them up. I'd be interested in seeing other options for face covering.

  • Nothing beats a nice long wool knit scarf. Wrap it straight around your face and lay the tails flat against your chest or back for another insulating layer, or tie it in various ways for style and function around town

  • Sunglasses are a must to keep sleet and ice out of my eyes. Consider a set of very lightly tinted shades for evening/dark walking. There was nothing worse than hiking at night when it was sleeting. I've been told snowboarding goggles were lame, but ya know, Lake Superior is fierce before it freezes over. Ha. I would snowbaord all the time with amber tinted wrap-around shades that were snug to my head, and I'd hike with light Wayfarer-style frames

  • Finally, gloves are a real mystery to me. I'm not down with leather/animal skin, but it may be the only option to cut wind, and insulate the most efficiently. I usually used a thin woven wool base layer to wick sweat, a medium sized glove liner that usually comes with a decent set of gloves, and the thickest, heartiest, most beefy damn glove you can find. Pro tip: Make sure ALL gloves work with smartphones (capacitive touch). Never take a glove off to do something because you will never regain that heat without going inside

  • Just get a case of hand warmers. They're good in your gloves; next to your Achilles tendon in your boots; and against your camera or smartphone to keep those batteries running longer

    FIY: I spent 3 years in Duluth as a Floridian with no experience with real winter. Gear up properly and you'll be outside all winter long! It's expensive, but it's TOTALLY worth the investment. Otherwise you'll be cold and miserable; and that is one hella long-ass winter.
u/noreallyitsme · 6 pointsr/wayhome

[Coleman 5-Gallon Solar Shower] (https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_OGwBzbR7ZV7AV) is currently on sale for $9.97

u/Wytch78 · 6 pointsr/hulaween

You can still do GA and have flushable toilets, but it depends where you camp. There’s a “Jon condo” between the amp and meadow stages at the heart of the venue, for when you’re enjoying the shows. If you (arrive early enough to) camp near the bath house by Spirit Lake or the Grand Hall you can have access to flushing toilets, but there will be lines at peak times.

I fest and camp with my 8 year old daughter and we have one of these for just in case. Dudes piss innawoods but that’s not always possible for womenfolk, so we travel with one of these. #1 only.

u/F--K_the_mods · 6 pointsr/Truckers

Use a garbage bag before sitting down. Then take bag to dumpster.


Get a real seat. Much easier.


https://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO

u/Mobius01010 · 6 pointsr/pics

Cutting things can be done in probably an infinite number of ways, so it's really about having the right tool for the job. You could thicken the blade, sure, but that makes cutting with the knife harder. This is why kitchen knives are thin in the first place. Buy a Becker BKII (a ~$100 knife) or some other glorified crowbar and you won't have this problem, you'll have others.

u/Woltz_Sandage · 6 pointsr/Bushcraft

So for shelter, I'd suggest this tarp. I also suggest checking out the forum that the tarp is from (www.bushcraftusa.com) because it's a forum all about bushcraft but has sub forums in ultralight and backpacking. The tarp is https://bushcraftoutfitters.com/coyote-tarp-10x10/ which is priced at $67. The reason I suggest this is because this tarp specifically, there's lots of way's to set it up. Check out this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxtHJm51NPY&t=


So for cooking, it's pretty simple. This video will show you what most bushcrafters use and the links that follow are the two items. I use it myself and in fact have two sets because of how much I enjoy it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00gwQ4z_nQQ&t and the following links for the items. https://www.walmart.com/search/?query=Ozark%20Trail%2018-Ounce%20Stainless%20Steel%20Cup
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Stanley-Adventure-Camp-Cook-Set/16784406
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Ozark-Trail-9-5-Round-Frying-Pan/49332895


Hammocks are over rated, sleeping pads are a mess to figure out, get a cot. In fact, get this cot. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Outdoor-Super-Ultralight-Portable-Folding-Aluminium-alloy-Cot-Camping-Tent-Bed/112355265955?hash=item1a28e54da3:g:-PUAAOSwTM5Y365i:rk:2:pf:0


And now you need a knife, saw, and hatchet right? Well let's tackle all three.
https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-4-1-Inch-Military/dp/B004ZAIXSC?ref_=w_bl_hsx_s_sp_web_6501052011
https://www.amazon.com/Bahco-396-LAP-Laplander-Folding-Inch/dp/B0001IX7OW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1540606867&sr=8-1&keywords=Bacho+Laplander
https://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-X7-Hatchet-Inch-378501-1002/dp/B0002YTO7E/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1540607032&sr=8-2&keywords=Fiskars+X7+Hatchet+14+Inch%2C+378501-1002
And as a added bonus here's a fire steel.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/4-x-2-5-Drilled-Ferrocerium-Ferro-Rod-Steel-Flint-Fire-Starter-w-Lanyard-Hole/131485475489?hash=item1e9d2522a1:rk:4:pf:0


And finally to end it all, we have a sleeping bag. This one is well known in the world. Kelty Cosmic 20 Degree. It's a dry down bag which means it's made of down that can handle some moisture but still keep you warm. It's rated for 20 degree's. I'll post the same bag as well but is rated for 0 degrees'. It'll be more expensive but it'll let you stay warm during the winter.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Kelty-Cosmic-20-Sleeping-Bag-20-Degree-Down/253894865275?epid=1152349824&hash=item3b1d50317b:m:mFpUvLXnvtZZETXdugDHwvw:rk:2:pf:0

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Kelty-Cosmic-0-Sleeping-Bag-0-Degree-Down/253375355468?epid=28012067594&hash=item3afe591a4c:m:mCrEnOYV72CJ257e08pGR4Q:rk:2:pf:0


Check the sizes of the sleeping bag before you buy.


Also a pack, this one works as two in one. Really nice for a 60L https://outdoorvitals.com/products/rhyolite-60l-lightweight-internal-frame-backpack1
________________________________________

If you do plan on doing any winter camping, I'd edit a few things. One of them is I'd get the 0 Degree sleeping bag posted. Instead of the tarp I'd get this pup tent. https://www.ebay.com/itm/USGI-Military-Issue-2-Man-Canvas-PUP-TENT-w-Poles-Stakes-Complete-VGC/392111853275?hash=item5b4bb00edb:g:JEQAAOSw~jJarA5E:rk:1:pf:0 Which comes with poles and stakes. I normally toss the poles and get some branches outside. I get four branches and make a bipod that I tie off on either end. That gives me more room inside the tent and less weight I have to carry on my person.


I'd still get the cot but I'd also include Thermarest Z-Lite sleeping pad to put on top of it https://www.ebay.com/itm/Therm-a-Rest-Z-Lite-Sol-Ultralight-Foam-Backpacking-Mattress/132801349129?epid=1900010560&hash=item1eeb93c609:rk:1:pf:0 as well as one of those super heavy duty emergency blankets. It's a reflective blanket but it's also the same thickness as some of those heat reflectors you use for a car windshield. Not those flimsy things you see "survivalists" use. Those placed on the cot, with that zero degree bag, and that shelter works amazingly. Just don't throw a heavy blanket on the sleeping bag and don't wear a lot of clothes in it either. That'll make everything for naught.
______________________________________
So with everything listed, the pack, cooking stuff, tools, cot, sleeping bag, and either the canvas shelter or tap, you'd be looking at around $560 assuming you got the 0 Degree Sleeping Bag instead of the 20 Degree. Which you really should. A 0 Degree is much better in my case.


Also if you do get a down sleeping bag, NEVER STORE IT IN THE COMPRESSED STATE!!! Always store it someplace with it out of it's bag. If you keep it compressed 24/7 until you use it, you'll destroy the down.

u/Kromulent · 6 pointsr/knives

It depends entirely on what you expect to do with the knife.

Food prep is a common task, which is best done with a small, slender fixed blade knife (folding knives are harder to keep clean - very important with food prep! - and slender blades cut food better than thick blades do). If the food prep knife is carried with the cooking gear, it does not require a belt sheath. A $9 victorinox paring knife is light and strong and would work fine for all but the largest jobs.

A saw or hatchet is far superior to a knife for preparing firewood, if that's going to be necessary.

General woodworking tasks - such as forming tent stakes, or notching wood to build a shelter or something like that - is best done with a thicker, stronger knife. A $20 stainless mora is very hard to beat for these sorts of tasks. If the hatchet/saw are lost, they can help with firewood prep, too.

See /r/Bushcraft for lots of helpful advice and knowledge.

u/Cyno01 · 6 pointsr/AskCulinary

> I'm seriously considering getting a quality portable range so I can fry them outside

Yes, if your kitchen has shitty ventilation, a propane grill with a side burner, or a butane rechaud or something is great for searing stuff outside and not coating the entire inside of your kitchen with a fine layer of grease.

https://smile.amazon.com/Iwatani-Corporation-America-ZA-3HP-Portable/dp/B006H42TVG/?th=1&psc=1

u/anachronic · 6 pointsr/camping

I love my Klymit. The thing folds up to the size of a Nalgene bottle and is way more comfortable than you'd expect. I'm 5'10, 190lbs and like to sleep on my side and sleep great on this.

Other alternative (which is decidedly NOT convenient and is bulky, but is insanely comfortable if you're going car camping or using it stationary in your apartment and don't need to lug it around) is getting a memory foam mattress like this. I pull this out when friends crash at my apartment and they have all raved about how comfy it is. It's also great for cold weather camping, since the foam is a great insulator. I had this one on a trip that got down to 37 overnight and it kept me super toasty.

u/Tymanthius · 6 pointsr/motocamping

Yea, spend more. I bought mine online, but I don't recall where now.

It's designed similar to this one, but is classed as 2 man. It is, if you snuggle. But good enough for me & gear. It rolls up to about 18" long, 6" diameter. Probably a little smaller.

I saw a similar one for $20 when I was browesing, but no idea how good it is.

What you want are 'backpacking' tents.

u/real_parksnrec · 6 pointsr/CampingGear

I've been very happy with the ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1, which is less than $100.

However, since you have the van for when the weather gets rough, why not get an inexpensive 2-person tent at Walmart or Target? If you look at these links, you'll see some decent ones for around $50 or less. It would certainly be roomier for you and your furry pal. :)

u/geofox784 · 6 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Including shipping its the same price as on amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2

u/asunderco · 6 pointsr/CampingGear

For trail hiking the LifeStraw didn't meet my expectations or my needs. Ever try hiking a 14er in Colorado while one hand hold your Nalgene of "dirty" water and the other is holding a straw with your trekking poles tucked under your arms? For the same price the Sawyer Mini beats the life straw hands down. The Sawyer is even on sale right now. Though it was 19.99 yesterday...

u/Ace-of-Spades88 · 6 pointsr/ElectricForest

Tip: Bring earplugs for getting rest at the end of the night/morning. We Foresters can be a rowdy bunch.

Trick: A couple car batteries and a power inverter works wonders for charging small electronics throughout the weekend.

Tip: make note of the cleaning schedule for the porta-johns near your campsite. (Hint: early morning seems like prime time.) Nothing like getting an early morning shit out of the way in a freshly cleaned john. Also, they wont have hot-boxed in the sun yet.

Trick: I bought one of these electric shower heads last year and brought a 5-gal bucket for water. Thing worked like a charm! It's less than $50 and rechargeable. Could easily split the cost among your group. Everyone in my camp loved it.

u/milesahead89 · 6 pointsr/Coachella

My own means to shower. The line in Lot 4 last year was brutal. I'm thinking I will just buy this and a bucket.

u/insert_comment · 6 pointsr/vandwellers

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00IFHFJXI/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I'm in the UK. It needs a bucket. I typically boil a kettle & mix that with a bucket of 'cold' water to make it not freezing. Works... OK :)

u/LoadSM5 · 6 pointsr/CampingGear

I've used pocket rockets and alcohol stoves for a good while. Lately I've been using the BSR Ulralight stove http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U. Really cheap and light if you go the canister stove route.
Any stove you use will need to kept steady and level. As long as the canister isn't rocking you shouldn't have an issue.

u/ThunderousApache · 6 pointsr/Ultralight

I assume you and /u/fire_0 mean this one? Because it's $45 right now, and Camelcamelcamel tells me it's only been $40.47 at its lowest.

There's another one that was $30 but it's a twist-lock model.

This is on the .com version, the Canadian version is just....ridiculous.

u/IPlayTheInBedGame · 5 pointsr/okeechobeemusicfest

Replying to my own comment with some purchasing recommendations:


2. Next level folding chair. The locking feature is sick, most comfortable camp chair I've owned.

My goto folding table. I've got a bigger 8 foot one if I'm camping with a big group but this small one is perfect for 1-4 people.

3. Highly recommend this charger. Will charge a typical iPhone like 5 times and has QC 3.0 built in (quick charge, which is a nice feature at a festival). Currently on sale for $40 if you clip the coupon, I've seen it as low as $30, they'll probably go on sale for black Friday and Christmas too.

5. Bring a box of these babies and if it gets cold, you've suddenly made like 40 friends.

6. Something like this is a good choice for makeup. In case you have to go back to camp and freshen up, the light is a nice touch.

u/mightychip · 5 pointsr/Shambhala

They're usually hot. Sometimes, the hot water runs out and they are... er... mountain fresh. Quite cold, but it's exhilarating. There are also times when the showers are shut down because the water table is low.


If you're one of those, "I must shower every day" people (I certainly am!) then you should invest in a solar shower. These bad boys are super cheap, hold about 10L of water and can... kind of substitute for a shower. You'll need a tree or something tall too strap it to.

u/jaredschaffer27 · 5 pointsr/Drama

>How much did you save up for this trip?

About 15k. Can theoretically go 18 months or longer on that.

>Is it safe?

I mostly hang out with friends who live rurally and camp in the woods, so yeah. Every now and again I have to park somewhere in a major city where I'm not 100% comfortable leaving all my shit, but I've only had one confrontation where I was in personal danger, and it was because I got "too close" to a homeless guy stacking things in a trash can in Portland.

>Where do you shower?

I usually get 2-3 showers a week, in between my solar shower, hot springs, friend's houses or (last resort) truck stops.

u/Mistacowman · 5 pointsr/BlackPeopleTwitter

My bad it was 3 hours I looked up the arrival about it. These are the buckets. They were filled with emergency packets of water and something else like a emergency blanket and we conveniently had gotten them like 2 months before it happened.

u/Copenhagen23 · 5 pointsr/battlefield_4

http://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO people buy this prodcut for "SHTF". It's the perfect shit bucket.

u/jimjoekelly33 · 5 pointsr/wallstreetbets
u/troyemcintosh · 5 pointsr/bugout

I like your organization on those shelves! I need to do something similar.

What's your sanitation plan? I see Lots of people with > 72hrs of food / water but no way to handle 72 hrs of human waste.

Can I recommend you throw a cheap 12-pack of toilet paper and some disinfecting wipes in there? maybe store a portable toilet & supplies or ensure you have a shovel & knowledge to dig a latrine ?

u/yanawhite · 5 pointsr/hammockcamping

I have a Grand Trunk Brand Hammock that looks and feels just like the expensive Eno hammocks, but i got it off Amazon for $19.99. It doesn't come with straps, but I found an awesome set of straps for $4.99 on Amazon as well. If you are interested, let me know and I will send you the links!
Edit: spelling, and heres the link for the hammock: Grand Trunk Ultralight Hammock (Forest Green) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001AIHB76/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VHywxbV0QYDTV

u/xueimel · 5 pointsr/motocamping

I'm a big hammock fan, so I'm sorry if I get long winded. Been through a few hammocks in search of perfection (never worn one out). I started with this one, have the most experience with this one, most recently started using this one. Used hammocks to cover the south half of Wisconsin's state parks in 2013 on a CB750 wearing this backpack.

Finding trees the right distance was (impressively) never a problem for me. I've been thinking there should be a way to hang one side on the motorcycle should the need arise, but haven't yet had to test it. I'd really like to be able to hang from the motorcycle on one side and the frame on that pack on the other side, but don't know if the pack will support a person (hasn't been warm enough to test since I thought of this).

In terms of rain, I started with a generic big blue tarp from a hardware store. This was a bad idea, thing was bulky, loud, and inflexible to the point of being hard to work with. Now I use this and it does the job pretty well. I used a large size of this tarp for a while, but the one I got was too big and ultimately heavier than needed.

I'm sorry to bust your bubble, but hammocks can get cold at night. I used this sleeping pad, after a while added this to keep the shoulders warm. Sleeping on what feels like a massively oversized menstrual pad never felt right, plus they get a little awkward in a hammock. Everybody I've heard from recommends underquilts for proper insulation, and it took me until this year to bite the bullet and get one (they're not cheap). I just got this yesterday, and intend to test it tomorrow night.

This book has been widely recommended. I haven't read it yet, but at $4 for kindle, that's not a bad price. You can read it on a smartphone or computer with the kindle app (which is free).

It wasn't until I typed this all out that I realized how much money I probably spent on all this stuff. I didn't buy it all from Amazon, just convenient links.

u/crispyscone · 5 pointsr/knives

now If you actually want a functional knife that will cut off branches without breaking, get a bk2

u/_2_4_8 · 5 pointsr/india

Ka-Bar Becker BK2 short of the mythical 'valyrian steel', this is the knife you would pick up when you see the Night King proceeding. Failed torture test.

Morakniv Companion HD Think Sweden without the girl with the dragon tattoo but a dragon waiting to shave you on a budget. Bang for the buck, come razor sharp out of the box.

No, these aren't EDC, even though you could carry them around.

u/Gagewhylds · 5 pointsr/VEDC

I keep one of these in my car. It says BPA free on it. I’ll change out the water once or twice a year though.

u/pdxcoug · 5 pointsr/EDC

I keep this bag in my truck in case I need to get home on foot and for day hikes. It's an REI Stoke 9, jam packed with the following (left to right):

 

GSI Outdoors Glacier Stainless Bottle Cup/Pot

Etekcity Ultralight Portable Outdoor Backpacking Camping Stove

Food - Cliff Bars and GU

Gorilla Tape To-Go

Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife

SecureLine 100-Feet 550 Nylon Paracord

Petzl Pro Am'D Screw-Lock Carabiner

LifeStraw Personal Water Filter

Coast 20266 HL46 Dual-Color LED Headlamp

Extra AAA batteries

Coast HP2 Universal Focusing 85 Lumen Penlight


Waterproof Windproof Matches

Nite Ize Gear Tie Reusable Rubber Twist Tie, 6-Inch, Blue, 2-pack

Small Flask

Headphones

Mophie Powerstation and cord

PackTowl Personal Towel

Nylon Tarp with Bungee Ties - think this came with my REI 2 person tent - awesome instashelter

Extra Underwear

SmartWool socks

Wool beanie

Vinyl poncho

Adventure Medical Kits Ultralight & Watertight .5 First Aid Kit

Also in the FAK pouch: Bic Lighter, Rubber gloves, Emergency Blanket

Coast BX310 Lock Back Folding Knife 2.63-Inch Blade

Coast LED145 LED Micro Pliers


REI Stoke 9 Pack

 

*Full disclosure, my wife used to work for Coast.

Edit 1: hella formatting errors

u/thomas533 · 5 pointsr/foraging

No pictures being as I am at work but:

u/fidelitypdx · 5 pointsr/CascadianPreppers

Here's one kit that is mostly complete that I built for my GF for Christmas. This is more of a "get home kit" since she works on the other side of the river, and post-CSZ the majority of bridges will be down.

https://www.amazon.com/registry/wishlist/3N30PO64I9BZM/

A couple tips with this list:

  • You don't need the expensive batteries I included, you can use less expensive ones.

  • 2x of the 4oz fuel cans and the burner will fit inside the Stanley Camp Kit once you dispose of those worthless cups.

  • This kit doesn't include shelter.

  • If you're thinking about this as a "get home kit", be sure to include good shoes.

    You can jam it all into the shoulder bag with the food going into the dump pouch. All of this stays in the back of her car.
u/pseudodit · 5 pointsr/bugout

For extended bugout, it's better to carry a nestable camp cooking set.

I got an old Primus one with 2 stackable quart sized pots and a frypan as a lid.

Means you can boil water in one, then cook food in the other while the water is cooling down. If I'm not frying with the lid, that gets uses as a plate.

When it's packed down, I keep various kitchen items inside (seasoning/condiments/penny stove etc) giving you an efficient use of space

I have a smaller BoB, so I recently got a Stanley camp cook set, without the plastic cups, and will get a titanium cup that will fit on the bottom (with all the various items inside)

u/Sierrasclimber · 5 pointsr/vandwellers

Do you have any stove? I like a simple and cheap butane stove. Work on stuff with one dish and often canned food. Watch out for the sodium.

I like bean tacos for in car cooking. Can of beans can of veggies (corn or mixed); peppers if you got them. Cost for people about $2. Unless your rig is just always parked make a habit of just cooking in parking lots of grocery stores or Walmart. Dollar store sometimes works but often they don't have bathrooms. You get easy access to everything, plus a bathroom. AND it is always a good idea NEVER to use the bathroom or cook where you sleep.

https://www.amazon.com/Iwatani-Corporation-America-ZA-3HP-Portable/dp/B006H42TVG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1474584564&sr=8-1&keywords=stove+burner+butane

u/postmaster3000 · 5 pointsr/KoreanFood

Why not a portable butane stove burner? Top it with a Korean BBQ rack for tabletop grilling excellence.

u/SkippyMGee · 5 pointsr/HikingAlberta

This time of year you can get away with a cheaper -4C sleeping bag, but if you have a little extra coin, get a better one.

A compression sack for the sleeping bag.

These are good mattresses.

Bring a light coat. This can double up as a pillow at night.

If you plan on cooking anything, a pocket stove and a fuel canister, and a 1L stainless steep pot. Spoon or fork (I just cook dehydrated food).

A tent with a fly.

Headlamp.

Bear spray and small air horn.

A few pairs of socks and underwear.

Baby wipes.

Ziplocks for trash. Toilet paper. Ideally a bear canister.

Toque, long johns, pair of sandals.

Food.

50' of parachord.

Light clothes that are NOT cotton.

Cook a very decent distance away from your tenting area, and clean a good distance away from your tenting area. Avoid strong smelling food. Know what a bear hang is and learn how to use it if it's available.

u/Fents_Post · 5 pointsr/canoecamping

I have the Klymit Static V. Better than a foam pad. Packs down small. Within your budget. https://www.amazon.com/Klymit-Static-Lightweight-Sleeping-Green/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1499701452&sr=8-3&keywords=klymit+static+v

My "go to" is my Exped SynMat 7. Packs small. Very comfortable. Built in pump. But outside your budget but worth the money IMO. https://www.amazon.com/Exped-SynMat-Sleeping-Terracotta-Long/dp/B0018MC976/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1499701508&sr=8-3&keywords=exped+mat

u/BraveLilToaster42 · 5 pointsr/JustNoSO

You got this. Start sneaking the things that matter to you into the truck you want to take so long as your wife won't notice (i.e. put the tarot deck you like in the glove box). It's not much but it will feel like something.

One trick I've heard from people who voluntarily lived in their cars was that they joined a cheap 24 hour gym so they could shower. When you're ready to leave, check Good Will for secondhand camp gear if you need it. If you want to splurge, this is the one I used at a music festival. It was great.

If you feel like putting down roots on the east coast and need a safe place to park, give me a buzz.

u/Whispertron · 5 pointsr/de

Nimm eine erweiterte Erste Hilfe Ausrüstung mit und sorg' dafür, daß deine Reisebegleiter davon wissen und im Notfall dafür sorgen, daß die verwendet wird. Diese Seite hat eine gute Liste von dem, was man einpacken sollte. Besonders die Einmal-Spritzen, Kanülen und Disinfektionsmittel sind notwendig. Bei der Abreise kannst du alles nicht verwendete an jemanden Spenden, der dort wohnt.

Medikamente gegen Durchfall und Verstopfung kann ich auch empfehlen. Wasserfilter wie diesen oder diesen, und zusätzlich noch Wasserreinigungstabletten, sollten auch nicht fehlen.

DR Kongo hat die zweit-höchste Malaria Infektionsrate der Welt, also sollte Malariaprofylaxe und Insektenabwehr hoch in deiner Prioritätsliste sein. Kleidung sollte wenn's geht leicht sein aber die Arme und Beine bedecken. Das hilft sowohl beim Sonnenschutz als auch gegen Insekten. Es gibt mit Permithrin imprägnierte Kleidung die sehr empfohlen ist. Ansonsten gutes Insektenabwehrspray mitnehmen und ausgiebig verwenden.

u/YogiIan · 5 pointsr/camping

You can buy a Sawyer Mini SP128 for not much more and get .1 micron filtration. Clean sip doesn't even list its filter specs on its website, most likely because it doesn't compare to more reputable manufacturers. Just because it's "the world's smallest", doesn't necessarily make it a smart purchase.

u/Zooshooter · 5 pointsr/camping

Do not get a Lifestraw! Get a Sawyer mini filter instead. They're back-flushable (you can unclog them if they get clogged) and they're guaranteed for more gallons of water than a Lifestraw. The mini filter will also screw on to a lot of plastic drink bottles, like the 12-20oz bottles you can get from vending machines.

u/SomeTwelveYearOld · 5 pointsr/raleigh

As a back up, you can buy one of these pretty cheap:

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_8tgBDbGGF66B7

u/Sinjhin · 5 pointsr/Charlotte

Or just grab a couple sawyer filters for $20 a pop. Still good to have some backup bottled water I suppose and fill up the tub, but with a sawyer I can literally just go drink out of a puddle if I need to.

​

https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1536624885&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=sawyer+mini&psc=1

u/ib4student · 5 pointsr/EDC



| Lifestraw | Sawyer Mini
---|---|----
Membrane | 0.2 microns | 0.1 microns (2x better)
Capacity | 264 gallons | 100,000 gallons (378.8x better)
Bacteria | 6 LOG | 7 LOG (10x better)
Bacteria% | 99.9999% | 99.99999% (10x better)
Protozoa | 3 LOG | 6 LOG (1000x better)
Protozoa% | 99.9% | 99.9999% (1000x better)
Price | $19.89 | $19.41 or 4 for $67.51 ($16.88 each)

The mini is also smaller and comes with a 32 oz squeezable water pouch, 7" tube, syringe for cleaning (if it clogs)

>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable bottles (28 mm thread), hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source

http://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

u/My_comments_count · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

Sawyer mini with water bottle
it's the best system in my opinion. However, the Sawyer squeeze might be better, but still use it with the water bottle.

u/hamslamwich · 5 pointsr/vandwellers

I have the RinseKit, as its gaining popularity down here in SoCal. I love it for its purpose - I keep it in the trunk of my car to hose off diving/surfing gear. But debating whether to make space for it in the van. Like others have said, after a quick few minutes, its just a waste of space until you find another spigot.

I've also seen this which is intriguing.

u/1984Society · 5 pointsr/vandwellers

The shower builds I've seen in smaller places usually consist of a metal basin you can stand in, with a hole drilled down through the floor for a drain, with basically a shower curtain however you want to hang it (hula hoops work nicely) and then using some sort of pump (electric or manual) for the shower.

I don't have a shower IN my van, but I do use this - https://www.amazon.com/Ivation-Portable-Outdoor-Battery-Powered/dp/B00IFHFJXI - With a 5 gallon bucket and it works great

u/OrganicRolledOats · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I haven't hiked the JMT so I can't comment on your clothing system but here are some general thoughts:

Ditch the headlamp for a sub 1oz USB rechargeable flashlight $30

Ditch the Leatherman for a Victorinox Swiss Army Classic $15

Ditch the paper maps and use Guthook's since you already have it. $Free

Ditch the Sea to Summit X-Cup and I wouldn't bother with the hot lips either $Free

Replace the trash compactor bag with a Fumigation bag $2.49

Ditch the compass $Free

Replace the stove with the BRS Stove $15

All this should save you about ~11 ounces for ~$63.

If you are worried about fitting in the superior 35 I would take a look at the MLD Prophet $195. This should be plenty of room and will save you an additional 18+ ounces.





u/ohnovangogh · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

This is an option if you want to shave some weight replacing the pocket rocket.

u/MrClahn · 5 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

I've spent over 2 months with one had no complaints, and plan to take it on my thru starting next week (Ahh!). Just have to be more careful when you're cooking and watch out for winds/make a good windscreen for it. The biggest downside to them is you can't use them in a tent vestibule in the rain.

If you just want a light/cheap stove aren't set on alcohol, there's the BRS 3000, sub 1oz canister stove http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/nept_r · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

This really depends on your gear. The biggest weight savers are firstly bringing less (such as getting rid of extra clothes, knives, tablets etc) but then getting a lighter tent, sleeping bag, and pack. If you're good on those or can't lose weight there, next up could definitely be the cookset. A cheap light titanium pot and a light stove can make a big difference. Far down the list is tent stakes, imho. If you have cheap heavy stakes, sure swap them out. But there are bigger fish to fry if you're a novice.

u/admckillip · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I was reluctant to try trekking poles because I thought I didn't need them and I had been hiking for years. To try out poles I snagged some Cascade Mountain Tech and I now really like them. Life savers for elevation and spiderwebs, haha.

For a cheap, but decent pair to try you could grab [these] (https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Trekking-Climbing/dp/B01055BZDA/ref=pd_sbs_468_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01055BZDA&pd_rd_r=AHB8XKJMJ4XVHCWDZ7TE&pd_rd_w=QLBlN&pd_rd_wg=UGPPr&psc=1&refRID=AHB8XKJMJ4XVHCWDZ7TE) ($20) and see if you like them. Cascade Mountaion Tech are generally considered the best cheap trekking poles, and you can upgrade if you do? I went middle of the road on those up above, and they're good enough to not upgrade, but saving 5-7 oz on mine with better poles would have been nice weight savings on something you pick up and put down constantly (way more than 5-7 oz in your pack). SO, my thought is, if you're not sure. By super cheap, and if you like trekking poles, buy nice and light YMMV.

I had the HV UL2 and ended up returning it. It was pretty darn nice, but I wanted something that was lighter, felt a bit more durable, and more flexible in terms of options for pitching so I grabbed the [Tarptent Saddle] (https://www.tarptent.com/saddle2.html). When I'm using the inner, on the saddle I feel ZERO need for a footprint, but I did with the Copper Spur, though you could always just repair... I also like that if there are no bugs I can pitch just the Saddle Outer Tarp with a ground sheet and total weight would be about 20 Oz. Either tent are pretty good options though.

EDIT: Added context.

u/FroggattEdge · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I got the highly recommended Cascade Mountain Tech poles from Amazon here

u/Dorkamundo · 5 pointsr/flashlight

Never heard of the light, wouldn't trust it or the battery that comes with it. May not have low voltage protection.

Honestly, I fell in love with the Nitecore NU25 Plenty bright, lasts a long time, has the high CRI option and is very small so it doesn't hit things when you are sticking your head back behind a strut assembly.

u/dmoney247 · 4 pointsr/aves

Buy some hot hands they work miracles. I remember someone last year gave me one for my wife and I definitely made the cold bearable and they're pretty cheap for big pack maybe you can pass them out like I will be doing!!
HotHands Hand Warmers 40 Pair Value Pack https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_vq2hAb1GVX2GY

u/SenorJoseDirte · 4 pointsr/ElectricForest

One of my best purchases ever. Limitless showers

Coleman 5-Gallon Solar Shower https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_jFJlxb3FDCW8T

u/dotchianni · 4 pointsr/vandwellers

Clothes: 5 gallon buckets and a laundry plunger wand.

Or, if you are going to be driving for a while, this will work well if your shocks aren't the best and the road is bumpy... 5 gallon bucket, add clothes/water/soap/spiky drier ball thingies. Put a lid on the bucket and tighten it, put it in the back. Drive.

When you are done driving, rinse, spot check, wring, and then hang dry.

I have a piece of rope going across the van that I used when doing laundry.

Or you can use a laundry mat but that kind of kills the adventure.

Showering and bathing.

Highly love the solar shower bag by Coleman. You might want to get a pop up shower stand but you can totally bath in your vehicle. A tarp on the floor is helpful.

I took a lot of bucket baths too. Fill a small bucket with soapy water (not tons of soap) and wash up. Then rinse in fresh water. I think that bucket was a gallon bucket.

Wipes are helpful also. When we traveled a lot, some days were crotch and pit wash days since we couldn't shower. It happens. These made that easier for us.

u/thewhitecrowflies · 4 pointsr/hammockcamping

There is always the Grand Trunk Ultralight Hammock!! It has served me well.

u/aidanpryde18 · 4 pointsr/Hammocks

For that price I would go with This

Grand Trunk is a well known company that has a great reputation. Also, once you factor in shipping, it's actually a couple bucks cheaper. Both of them have pretty lackluster hanging solutions, so you will probably want to pick up something different for either of them.

u/macbooklover91 · 4 pointsr/onebag

Are you looking to travel a lot in the middle east? The reason I mention it is you might want to look at something that serves the same purpose without being a tacti cool or potentially irrational racial trigger with the climate in the states and parts of Europe right now something like:

u/eldorel · 4 pointsr/LifeProTips

> Is drying yourself too slow? Hate how damp and smelly common bath towels get? Be enlightened with space-age materials!

This really looks like the hook from a crappy 3am commercial, or the results of a 1000 level marketing course final project.

Instead of the campy product focused sales-pitch, focus on the results instead.

> LPT: Use PVA or Microfiber cloth as bath towels instead of Cotton.

The other day I used a PVA cloth like THIS instead of a regular bath towel and was amazed at how effective it was at drying me.

I've grabbed a few yards of PVA and microfiber cloth to experiment, but just wanted to share the discovery.

End result: Subtle product placement, without 1000 downvotes.

u/Brutally-Honest- · 4 pointsr/knifeclub

Ka-Bar Becker BK2

Ontario RAT-3

Becker BK-16

Depending how big of a knife you want

u/jassack04 · 4 pointsr/knifeclub

If you really want a monster sized knife, sure. But I'd definitely get the carbon steel version that some others have suggested as well. It sounds like their quality isn't too bad.

However, I don't know if I'd really want to take something that huge hiking. Maybe SHTF-type hiking I suppose.

A couple of knives that I'd think would be similar priced or less (and have proven reputations) and would slightly more practically fall into the "only 1" category:

u/brianw824 · 4 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Honestly Id go fixed blade and I'd get something decently sized, ive been looking at the Becker BK2 (you can find this for $50 a few other places)
http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK2-Campanion-Fixed/dp/B001N1DPDE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1302310192&sr=8-1

Reason why is that its alot easier to work with wood, fixed blades are going to be alot stronger then any folding knife, its just all around going to be better for most situations.

Things to look for in a knife, well to start with you have to think about what you may use it for, is it a survival knife are you going to have to use it to work with wood, make fires, or maybe pitch up a shelter? Maybe just for cutting bandages, moleskin? Prepping food?
Alot of people will argue about the type of steel, stainless is supposed to be harder to sharpen but honestly its a some metal with a sharp edge pretty much anything will do, just watch out for the $5 wall mart knives, reading a few reviews will help.

Don't buy a kbar or something like that, anything that comes to a very sharp point is used for stabbing people, not for cutting stuff and I hope you dont plan on doing alot of that.

How thick the knife is, thicker blades tend to be better for prying or hacking stuff, but they will be heavier too.
Watch out for how the blade attaches to the handle, alot of knives skimp out on the steel and the blade is kind of just glued on or lightly bolted on and it makes them really flimsy. I know with the kbar the steel for the blade goes all the way back and the handle is bolted on to the steel for the blade, most non-cheap knives should be like this.
Blade length, longer blades will be better for hacking/chopping think mechette, but it will be more difficult to use them to cut smaller things like moleskin, bandages, or doing food prep.
well that's a few things to look at someone else suggested a SOG seal pup that's a good knife as well something else to look at. I probably wouldn't spend more then maybe $60-70 and avoid anything super cheap.

u/hessmo · 4 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Mora knives have always served me very well as outdoors knives.

they might look cheap, but they have great steel, and have really held up (I typically buy the stainless version like this one)

https://smile.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1466474771&sr=8-1&keywords=stainless+mora

u/CreativeRealmsMC · 4 pointsr/Bushcraft

I had been making photo albums but just started a YouTube channel. My friend was nice enough to let me borrow his GoPro and mounts but most of the time I record with my phone (also have another camera but it's a bit broken and can only take pictures). Part of what I'm ordering from amazon is a new monopod/tripod/selfie stick which I'm very much in need of at the moment since my videos are a bit shaky.

Haven't gotten around to do any solo 2 day trips yet (most of the time I'd be with a group and there would be designated campsites to fill up water at) but if I was going out with no means to fill up I'd take anywhere from 4-6 liters of water. The climate here is very hot and there is no such thing as bringing too much water. If there was a water source I could potentially allow myself to bring less since I could boil any water I find.

Amazon list:
-5.11 Rush 72 55L backpack
-Mora Companion (stainless steel)
-Bahco Laplander
-Headlamp
-Jetboil 10in frying pan
-Whetstone

All together that weighs 7.9 pounds and at some point I'd like to get a sleeping pad and tarp bringing it up to ten pounds (not including food, water, and other supplies which might get me to around 15-20 pounds depending on the duration of my outings).

As for the grill it's just a makeshift one. Four tent pegs and a small grate.

u/PeevedGuy · 4 pointsr/EDC

I'm a big fan of Mora knives. Good knives at a very reasonable price. All of the ones linked come with hard plastic sheaths.

u/InfiniteWhisks · 4 pointsr/Cooking

This is one recommended by Eleanor Hoh whom I rather trust when it comes to cooking with a wok:

https://eleanorhoh.com/stove/

https://www.amazon.com/Iwatani-Corporation-America-ZA-3HP-Portable/dp/B006H42TVG

It goes up to 12000 BTU which is better than most camping stoves, which only go up to 8000 or so. The butane canisters may be hard to find but many Asian stores sell them, or you can find them around camping gear. It doesn't need to be that brand necessarily but you'll want something that has around 12000 BTU since you won't get nearly as good heat for stir frying on weaker stoves.

u/dharmabum28 · 4 pointsr/camping

This one has treated me extremely well, being that I'm an ultra light fan, that it's comfortable enough, pretty sturdy, packs tiny, and the price is great: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007RFG0NM/ref=abs_brd_tag_dp?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

u/joylongdivision · 4 pointsr/frugalmalefashion

People Socks are nice.

u/Hotsauceeverywhere · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

I can't comment on the MSR but I figured you wouldn't mind someone else's comment about their gear. I use the ALPS Mountaineering Lynx and have been nothing but happy with it. Of course since the top is a mesh you need a very warm bag in the winter, but it's light, freestanding, and has kept me dry in the rain.

Unfortunately, the only vestibule for gear is a small hanging pouch that came with it. But it's actually on sale for about 90 bucks on amazon if you want to check out some other reviews.

(http://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-5024617-Lynx-1-Person/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=sr_1_1?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1452111816&sr=1-1&refinements=p_n_size_browse-bin%3A2204488011)

u/tony3011 · 4 pointsr/bicycletouring

I completely ditched my rear panniers. I went from this to this. If I can do it, so can you.

Having space constraints has been the biggest help for me. Simply forcing yourself to take fewer panniers will quickly force you to make the best use of the space you have.

The specific products that I bought were a compromise on packability and price. Tent was $80, sleeping bag was $40 ($60 now?). Bottom line is your don't have to break the bank to upgrade your equipment.

u/uneakbreed · 4 pointsr/motocamping

It's the ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1-Person Tent. Got it on amazon for a good price. Fast set-up, mostly mesh for ventilation but has a waterproof fly you can put over very quickly.
If you're on a budget, fantastic tent.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BMKD1DU/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/so_there_i_was · 4 pointsr/Bushcraft

Sawyer mini is the way to go for water filtering.

u/Mexicanpizza1 · 4 pointsr/preppers
u/Prosapiens · 4 pointsr/EDC

Gorruck 34L GR2 Coyote Tan - a good bag, heavy, uncomfortable, probably give it to my grandchildren in like 50 years

Flip Flops - generic things

Bigblue 28W solar charger - very good, can charge my battery up during the day if i leave it in the sun which I've never really done honestly

Jakemy hardware tools - seamed useful? i've never needed this

Army glove shells - i thought i used these a lot and were indistructable but now that i think of it, i don't use them that often and are probably pretty cheaply made.

Sharpie, pen, all weather notebook - probably should switch over to a fisher space pen...

Straws - these are probably already broken.

Whistle - really really really loud

Fire-striker, matches, lighter - i'm not sure i have enough ways to start a fire

Fresnel lens - ok, now i have enough

LED flashlight - i used to go running in the middle of the night with this flashlight, its tiny

LED flashlight - this isn't the one i have but looks kinda similar? i don't remember where i got mine

Earbuds - generic cheap earbuds

Leatherman Surge - given to me by my wife for passing the bar. thanks wife!

First Aide kit - i put mine together from stuff i've stolen from friends houses whenever i go over and use the bathroom

playing cards - these look very similar to the ones i have, they are plastic so they won't get rained on

glasses/ sunglasses - i have really bad vision

personal hygiene kit - aahhhh dry shaving

Sawyer Mini / syringe, collapsible canteen (dirty), heavy duty straw - i've never used this

collapsible canteen (clean) - i've never used this either

sewing kit - i've used this a lot

ID tags - i guess if i get blown up they'll know my blood type?

garbage bag - for when my pockets are full

elastic bands - i use these when packing to keep rolled socks and things from falling apart

Salt - i have nooooo idea why i have this

cooking grate - i'm not going to hold meat over a fire with a stick like some sort of caveman

heavy duty ziplock bag - in case my mapcase breaks and other reasons

rip-patch - leftover from when i needed a pack because i bought a crummy cheap inflatable sleeping pad.

Army Fleece Beanie - i always keep this at the top of my pack

4 Bungie Cords - not the one i use but similar. to make a field-expedient shelter

Trowel - for disposal of biological wastes

Lensatic compass - because GPS should only be a backup

Pocketboy 130 folding saw - i have a bigger one for yardwork, this small one is really great

Tent stakes - for tent staking

Ravpower 26800 Battery - use this all the time can fast chage my stuff

Battery Battery holder, cables, wall charger - all fits togehter like glove!

Army Poncho - wear it, make a tent out of it etc

Microfiber towel - not the one i use but similar. i mainly use this for when the kids accidentally fall in a lake like they tend to do for some reason

Down Jacket - cheap chinese knockoff... i feel bad for not buying american

Wet weather top - not sure this is worth the space/weight

Wet Weather bottom - not sure if this is worth the weight/space

Silkweights - PJs! and warmth

Jungle Blanket - this is a lot better than the army's woobie. lighter and warmer

Gransfors Bruks Wildlife Hatchet - again, gift from wife. she wanted me to chop things and be more manly, generally. now i come home with parts of wildlife for her to cook

Map of New England - or, how i stopped worrying and love dismounted land navigation

PT belt - keeps me safe in all situations

Compression straps - i don't like lashing things to the outside but i guess i can if i wanted to

Fork and Spoon - stole these from the kitchen. i'll probably be replacing this soon with something titanium.

​

EDIT: i just priced it out: $1,585.08 total

u/Graybealz · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Here is a great little stove. It's a Chinese whisperlight, but I've been using it quite a bit over the past 2 years and have no complaints whatsoever. Also super cheap, which gives you more money to play with.

The Sawyer mini squeeze is also a great item to have. You should have $20-25 left after these two items.

Here's a decent magnesium fire starter for cheap as well.

With these items, all essential/survival items, you should have about $15-20 to play with. Maybe some socks?

u/biggyww · 4 pointsr/CampingandHiking

It's probably fine, but if it concerns you at all, it's probably worth the $20 to just buy a [sawyer mini] (http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2). You'll gain some peace of mind and save some weight off your back.

u/Jordan-5 · 4 pointsr/ElectricForest

Add this shower head for extra credit. I had the pocket bag already so now I'm just gonna put the one end into the bladder of water and boom I have an almost fully functioning shower.

Ivation Portable Handheld Shower - Turns Water from Bucket/Sink Into Steady, Gentle Stream https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IFHFJXI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_GAazybJAGK131

Here's the tent I just got. Doesn't support the weight of the pocket bag but nether did my last one that claimed it did, and actually just collapsed in on itself

Faswin Pop Up Pod Toilet Tent Privacy Shelter Tent Camping Shower Potable Outdoor Changing Room Dark Green https://www.amazon.com/dp/B013HP8NTY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_OCazybADX7GXD

u/defygravty · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

OK, here is a brain dump of whatever comes into my mind. Just hoping to spark your memory so don't get mad if I say a bunch of stuff you already know...

Put all the pieces into a lighterpack.com account and checkout r/Ultralight before you buy (head over there and burn down the sidebar reading list and the incomplete-wiki, it's worth it).

Is that Osprey really 70 L? That's huge. Probably weighs a ton, what are you bringing that fills up 70 L on a 3-5 day summer trip? A 50 L beer keg? Maybe you have some sweet luxury items that take up a lot of space in the pack, but I'd drop the volume on the pack to at least 50 L. If you can manage it, Try a Ultimate Direction Fastpack 30. But if you just can't get your volume that small, get what works. Weight is an issue too, in frameless packs the straps are uncomfortable over 30 lbs, sometimes less. But if you make some smart choices right now, you shouldn't bust 30 lbs. (It's also smart to get the rest of the gear first to get an idea of how much volume you'll need in your pack and if you'll need a frame.)

Research quilt vs sleeping bag. Quilts are big these days unless you are a crazy sleeper. Enlightened Equipment is the shiz. I've bought 4 quilts and made 3 DIY and EE are the best I've tried. EE also sells a synthetic quilt called the prodigy which I use in the summers or as a layer in the winters. I hear that Katabatic quilts are truly the best if the price tag doesn't scare you away. And a super cheap, but quality option though on aliexpress, it's buy at your own risk. Worked for me last time, doesn't mean it will next time.

Massdrop is selling a skinny UL static V (and the insulated verion) right now for cheap. (I own the insulated option and bought it from massdrop.) But there's a lighter not-as-skinny pad called a Thermorest Neoair Xlite. Also the sea to shining sea ultralight pad gets high marks. So look at those, see what other pads are popping on r/ultralight, the balance the weight and costs to your preference. (Assuming you know about r-values and what your needs will be in Maine/Vermont. I'm guessing spring is a little cold so maybe r=~4 in the early spring or high altitude?)

Nemo tents are great. If you're only camping spring/summer I'd get a much lighter weight tarp tent. Like 3 lbs or less including stakes/cords (and footprint if your tent has a bathtub floor).

11-14 oz MSR Whisperlite is awesome. Stoves are pretty personal, it's best to go with one you trust. MSR is probably the right choice for you. I use a tiny 2oz stove and a homemade windscreen. My stove is finicky and too small if you're cooking for 2 or more. However, there's a whole mess of stoves between the 2oz and 14 oz which might still cover you and save you a few ounces or half a pound. Like the Kovea Spider which I also have, and use in the cold (gas liquefies and fuel can must be inverted, so I need a freestanding stove with a tube). I'm personally biased against the jetboil because of how much space it takes in my pack, but I own 2. They are fast, good for groups. Again the MSR is NOT a bad choice.

You also need a cook pot. Titanium is a waste of money, find a cheap Aluminum one for the same results. Like the olicamp ones, or if you want a real lid, you'll have to spend more (the metal lids cost way more for some odd reason).

Water filtration. Everybody ravs over the Sawyer Squeeze and I guess I'm out of the loop having never tried it. Fretting about making sure my filter doesn't freeze seems like a source of anxiety. I'll try it eventually though. I like the hand pump water filters. I rock an MSR hyperflow. And if I'm in a big group, I'll break out my Katadyn 6L Gravity Filter.

Get a down jacket from costco or sams for 20$, if you're camping in it, you'll wear it out so no use spending a ton there. (Down packs small and won't take up nearly any pack space)

Get a headlamp, I prefer blackdiamond or Fenix. For BD this image sums it up very nicely. For fenix there's a variety but I am currently using the HL55 (900 lumens). Again look at the weights, but also look at the battery requirements and the longevity/efficiency. Find what you like.

Ok my brain is dumped. Hopefully I hit on something worth your time. If I were you, I'd go as cheap as possible, then put the savings into funding your travel for hiking or buying a kayak. Random, I know, but having blown tons of money on gear I feel like there's quality for a good price if you look for it. And using the extra money to break into a new hobby opens the door to a potentially mind altering experience. Especially a related hobby like kayaking, fishing, snowshoeing, rock climbing, diving (though this one is lots of money), or whatever's clever.

u/metarchaeon · 4 pointsr/Ultralight

Your stove is fairly heavy, you can save 9 oz with a BRS3000 (.9 oz) and a light aluminum or Ti pot. This is the cheapest way to lighten up if you want to stay with a cannister. A DIY ethanol stove is cheaper and lighter still.

Do you need such a heavy battery?

Are you bringing a phone?

u/BlueJeans4LifeBro · 4 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Sounds like you probably don't NEED the Whisperlite as you're not really taking advantage of its features and carrying all the extra weight of a Whisperlite.


There are tons of cheap canister stoves on Amazon. Since your friends use a Jetboil, it sounds like you can buy canister fuel. I currently use this stove. https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1510073163&sr=1-1&keywords=bsr+stove&dpID=41J7KacqzpL&preST=_SX300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch I do find it is loud, but I bet it's much quieter than the Whisperlite which IIRC is very loud.


I've never understood the advantage to the Jetboil systems. IMO, they add a lot of extra weight to gain the fuel efficiency advantage of having a heat exchanger added into it. To me, they are simply not worth the extra expense and weight penalty.

u/pto892 · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

The quality is all pretty similar. The real difference is in feature set and ability to control the flame-for example there's a world of difference in flame control between a Primus Omnilite and a MSR Whisperlite even though both are high quality products with a proven track record of reliability.

Some of the cheap canister stoves are also pretty good quality, since there just isn't too much engineering that's needed to make one. The BRS stove is a good example of such. These things are really just a screw on valve assembly and a burner, not much else is needed.

u/YourBrainOnJazz · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

This is lighter then the micro rocket and much cheaper then both the pocket rocket and micro rocket.

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

Others on the Ultralight subreddit have recommended this stove as well.

u/NotSure098475029 · 4 pointsr/camping

Here is what I think is the best stove for backpacking and it is $12.

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U


Add a fuel canister to that, a cheap pot, a mini bic lighter and a spoon and your kitchen is complete.


Rent the Big3 from REI (sleeping bag, tent, pack). Buy the Sawyer Mini water filter for $25 and use Smartwater bottles to store water. Take your existing clothes (no cotton) and use your existing shoes.

u/travellingmonk · 4 pointsr/CampingandHiking

As others have said, it really depends on what you are doing and what you plan to cook.

For car camping, I've got a big dual burner Coleman propane stove. With a griddle, I can cook up bacon, eggs, and potatoes and feed an army. I also use this stove for BBQs and backyard parties, it's a beast. If I were to buy one now I'd probably get a Camp Chef Everest.

If I'm car camping but flying to my destination, or backpacking and want to do a little cooking, I'll bring a Kovea Supalite (without the piezo). It's a great little Ti stove, big enough to hold a normal size frying pan but folds up nice and small. The MSR Pocket Rocket 2 is very similar.

When I'm just out on my own and only need to heat a mug of water for freeze dried meals, I'll bring the BRS-3000T. Got it on Amazon for $12, it's a nice litte stove... but some have had issues with the stand collapsing from heat when running full blast. I don't use it full open to conserve fuel so I haven't had a problem. The BRS-3000T is a knock-off of the Fire-Maple FMS-300T (which I didn't know at the time); I picked up the US version for my son, the Olicamp Ion Micro Ti, again a great little stove.

I've got an old Jetboil (link to the updated version); it's an integrated stove which means the pot is connected to the stove; this can be useful in some situations. The main benefit of the Jetboil is that the pot has a heat exchanger so it's very efficient heating water. With the integration and heat exchanger, it's a bit heavy compared to other options, but it's very convenient. I don't bring it backpacking too often due to the weight, but it goes car camping so I can heat water for coffee while other things are cooking on the dual burner propane stove. Today, I'd probably get the MSR Windburner or the Fire-Maple FMS-X2.

Lastly, I've made several alcohol stoves BITD. The benefit of an alcohol stove is that you can make one for free, you only need to bring as much fuel as you're going to use (as opposed to a canister where you may end up carrying around a half-empty canister at the end of the trip). One downside is that it's slow, in the mornings I like to have my water heated quickly for coffee. Another is that it's considered an open fire, some places with fire restrictions won't allow a stove that doesn't have a valve to turn it off.

u/chopyourown · 4 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Sterno is a terrible fuel for backpacking. I'd use a canister fuel stove. A cheap option is the BRS 3000 - link here.

An alternative would be to build your own alcohol stove, which is easy but slightly more finicky. Follow the rough directions [here] (http://andrewskurka.com/2011/how-to-make-a-fancy-feast-alcohol-stove/)

u/packtips · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Try to get a pair with flip locks, instead of twist locks. Twist is the old tech, doesn't work well, and you'll wish you had flip if you put them side by side.

These cost more than the ones you link to, but are worth the price (still reasonable considering.) Have cork grips (better in sweaty hands), carbon fiber (lighter in weight but stronger than aluminum), flip locks (way easier to adjust and more trustworthy).

u/huffalump1 · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

To clarify, the Nitecore NU25 (Amazon link).

I love it! Super light, rechargeable, very bright, decent battery life, redmode. Perfect for a weekend trip.

I'll recommend the Wowtac A2S NW as well - brighter and way longer battery. It's a little heavier, but that pays off with more battery life (and an interchangeable cell).

u/davidguydude · 3 pointsr/bengals

It will be cold as fuck, bundle up good and bring some of those hand warmers

he will likely catch a bit of harassment, but it shouldn't be all that bad.

parking will fill up early. it will be a lot of traffic, but imo its worse at the end of the game when leaving.

i dont know exactly where 333 is, but imo, this stadium has some of the best views from the upper levels compared to the old stadium especially.

who dey!

u/Neeko6ix · 3 pointsr/Overwatch

They're heat packs. Commonly used by skiers and snowboarders on very cold days. I got a real kick out of seeing them used in OWL. Voila

u/crispychoc · 3 pointsr/CasualConversation

Do you have the regular planet fitness membership or the black one?
http://www.planetfitness.com/membership-types

If you have the black one you're golden ;)

Other than that, get a good portable stove so you can make some food and boil water for tea or coffee.

Buy a jerrycan for water with a little tap on it, fill it up regularly, it also means you can wash yourself even if you don't have access to showers etc.

A small camping spade is good for number 2s in the woods :)

Get a mosquito net hammock, and maybe a cheap tent it means you can sleep outside or on campsites on hot nights.

Your biggest expense will be gas for the car.

Planet fitness is a good idea, but it's urban areas, I would do some (wild) camping more often.

I have no idea what campsites cost in the US per night, but if you do that every other night, or even once in 3 nights, it beats sleeping in a car park, and is cheaper than a hotel.

Have a look at some of the national parks, some of them have basic (cheap) camp grounds too. Campgrounds are really cool places to meet people, much better than a Walmart car park ;)

Shopping list:

Solar shower

Water carrier

Folding spade

Hammock

Cookware

Camping canister stoves are cheap, between $10 and $50
Cheap tent is around $50

Total expenses before hand, around $150-200 max.

I just went for the first items I found on amazon, there are probably cheaper or better products out there.

Source, I did a 6 month trip by bicycle through Europe, so not the same, but the basics are the same. You have the advantage of not being restricted by weight or size of items, which makes it cheaper.

If you need more ideas, packing tips or anything else, I'll gladly help ;)

Have fun, explore and enjoy, it's fun!

u/mfanyafujo · 3 pointsr/peacecorps

It is a bag that you fill with water and leave out in the sun. It's designed to heat the water pretty quickly, and it has a little nozzle and can be hung so you can take a hot shower... or at least be dripped on with hot water, anyways. I just used mine to heat water for my bucket bath.

Example: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1481853223&sr=8-4&keywords=solar+shower

u/crisnavarro23 · 3 pointsr/okeechobeemusicfest

Unless you wanna pay whatever money it is for showers then i suggest you get one of these bad boys! http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1451936963&sr=8-3&keywords=camping+shower Partner it with some bio degradable soap or whatever and you can shower at your camp. While it wont be the best it'll definitely help get you clean and feeling fresh.

u/Glittrsweet · 3 pointsr/FireflyFestival

Bring rain boots just in case. Last year's mud fest turned into a shoe graveyard and I ruined several shoes that I brought.

Also Walmart /camping stores have solar powered shower bags for real cheap (like under $20) bring a big jug of water and dedicate that jug solely to shower water, its not the cleanest feeling (if you don't have a shower tent you can wear a bathing suit and wash up outside of your car) but i certainly hope youre not going to a camping festival thinking you're going to be clean anyway, its definitely better than waiting in a long line and paying for a shower

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0009PUT20/ref=mp_s_a_1_sc_1?qid=1452773074&sr=8-1-spell&pi=AC_SX110_SY165_QL70&keywords=solar+powerd+showe+bag

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B010GSU294/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?qid=1452773182&sr=8-3&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=shower+tent&dpPl=1&dpID=41VMyC7Bm0L&ref=plSrch

*sorry about the links I'm on mobile

u/Inigo93 · 3 pointsr/camping

Alternatively, for those who are more interested in a bit of comfort I recommend the Luggable Loo. Combine that bad boy with a trash bag and some kitty litter and you're set!

u/TheDragonzord · 3 pointsr/Battlefield

Well we PC guys sometimes have to just make do with what we have on hand while we save up money for what we need, but, if you really want to get efficient I'd suggest one of these maybe on some sort of custom wooden platform. Desk height and all that.

u/Yeti_or_Not · 3 pointsr/preppers

A five gallon bucket with a snap-on toilet seat is a good idea. Wag-Bags are a compostable liner for the bucket that comes with the neutralizing powder to treat about four uses before needing to be replaced.

u/SnapshillBot · 3 pointsr/MGTOW

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u/LogicalyImpaired · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

First off, you two rock seriously. I am amazed by the generosity, and wish I had the means to do the same. Just know, even if its not me thats selected, the gratitude and appreciation is there.

That being said. The item that I want/need that is on my WL is this here (Its in my random stuff list, first page): http://www.amazon.com/Competitor-729-Olympic-Weight-Bench/dp/B00245LJX6/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=GZ23EIUTDBK0&coliid=I1BHEALAEBYP80 I have finally cleared out the space in my spare room and will be turning it into a workout room. I really want to, and need to get healthy. This is part of my plan to do so.

And onto part two (its in my camping gear list).... C'mon...gimmie.
http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Trunk-Ultralight-Hammock-Forrest/dp/B001AIHB76/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=3MBIYM75BTZOF&coliid=I1457MYHZJCKIR&psc=1

And last but not least...while I can not see what you two look like at this current moment, your beautiful souls are shining through and making you two look amazing, seriously.

u/TundraWolf_ · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

this one

instead of using the tie mechanisms that come with it, i use the slings/webbing/oval carabiners from my slackline kit.

u/shazbot28 · 3 pointsr/Hammocks
u/GCDubbs · 3 pointsr/Survival

Grand Trunk Ultralight Hammock. I just bought one in Hawaiian floral. $20-$30.

u/betyouknowtabari · 3 pointsr/electricdaisycarnival

Buy these, it makes you feel about 25 degrees cooler Ergodyne Chill-Its 6602 Evaporative Cooling Towel, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001B5I57I/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_tpEDybRP6REFQ

Ergodyne Chill-Its 6700CT Evaporative Cooling Bandana with Cooling Towel Material - Tie, Lime https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005H58ZWI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_hqEDybMDENS0B

u/housemusik_luvr · 3 pointsr/MDMA

Sun Block.. A breathable hat (not a baseball cap) like a safari type hat.. drink plenty of water.. like everyone else said.. lots of sips instead of just downing a bottle every hour.. here is the deal once you get dehydrated you can't get out of it.. I know it's a a lot to ask but keep the dancing at a minimum. Once your lips get dry you know you're dehydrated.. seek medical attention if that happens because your brain will swell. We just had 2 deaths and 57 other people sent to the hospital at a Festival here. Oh one last thing.. Don't take 400mg+... Do your normal dosage plus your re-dose..

Get yourself a couple of these.. they are amazing
http://www.amazon.com/Ergodyne-Chill-Its®-6602-Evaporative-Cooling/dp/B001B5I57I

u/SoManyQswithAs · 3 pointsr/MultipleSclerosis

I saw your reply to u/vedsten. Your friends should be understanding if you have to sit out for a little bit because of the heat. That's what friends are for. I went to see The NBHD a couple summers back and my friends and I got SUPER close to the stage. However, I couldn't take the heat like I used to. I told them I'd go stand in the back and meet them later. They came and stood with me, sat with me when I needed to sit... it was still a fun night. Your friends will probably surprise you, especially if you talk to them about your fears beforehand.

You can still do the things you love, you just may have to adjust a little bit. Will you still dance all night? Maybe you still can. Maybe not. Take care of yourself first. Never give up something you love for fear of what others are going to think.

Hydrate. Also, look into getting some cooling scarves. You could wear it while you're out and that might help keep you cooler while you're enjoying the show! Something like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Ergodyne-Chill-Its%C2%AE-6602-Evaporative-Cooling/dp/B001B5I57I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1464378214&sr=8-1&keywords=cooling+neck+scarf

u/Velkyrion · 3 pointsr/migraine

Those cooling cloths they sell are really great. You soak it in water, wring it out, and then it just stays cold all day. Doesn't even feel damp or wet, just cool! You can wear it on the back of your neck or keep it in the container (while wet, not dry) it comes in in a bag and use as needed. Using it on the back of your neck, inner wrists, back of your knees, etc.


Here's an example: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001B5I57I/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_9lwhzbS8WGH5W

My local Academy sells some (l think a different brand) that has a full size one and also comes with a smaller travel size one, each in their own sized container. I'm getting one for my Disney vacation to keep in my bag.

u/MrMakeveli · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I like that these gifts are quality items and "general purpose", and by that I just mean that they are accessible to most people. Let's face it: those who want niche high end gear will be purchasing that themselves because they'll know exactly what they are looking for. This is the sort of stuff that almost anyone would be pleased with.

Here are a few random things off the top of my head I might add:
Mora Knife - $15.
Casio Pathfinder watch - $40
Light Tripod and phone mount $22 + $15 (added these because a lot of people use their phones as cameras out there
[Constellation Playing cards]( Night Sky Playing Cards https://www.amazon.com/dp/1591932424/) - $6
Anker 10,000 mah battery pack - $26
Chill-Its Cooling Towel - $8
Nite Ize S-Biner - $4

u/rockstang · 3 pointsr/MultipleSclerosis

I've been to the islands a fewntimes since my diagnosis and didn't need one. I would rate my heat intolerance as moderate. Usually there are good breezes so it is often just the intensity if the sun. I was in the Bahamas in June once and the heat really varied. I bring a [cooling towel] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001B5I57I/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?qid=1463079471&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65) with me when traveling to Florida now. I feel like it works pretty well.

u/Dogwithrabiez · 3 pointsr/mallninjashit

Let's see...

http://www.fedtacticaldirect.com/Kershaw-Camp-10-1077_p_49809.html

Kershaw Camp. Great kukri style blade on a budget that performs excellently.

http://www.bladehq.com/item--Kershaw-Cryo-Spring-Assisted--11101

Kershaw Cryo. Hinderer design for a cheap price! Small blade, but feels big in the hand. The Cryo 2, the larger version, will be coming out soon.

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Made-in-Sweden-511/dp/B004GAVOUU/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1372063610&sr=1-2&keywords=mora

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Companion-Heavy-Duty-Knife/dp/B009NZVZ3E/ref=sr_1_3?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1372063610&sr=1-3&keywords=mora

Moras. 1095 carbon steel, strong and used to do a lot of good things in the woods. Very tough, very sharp, very cheap.

At higher prices, the BK2

http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK7-Combat-Utility/dp/B001IPMG8K/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1372063915&sr=8-2&keywords=bk2

http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK2-Campanion-Fixed/dp/B001N1DPDE


And of course, the tried and true classic Kabar

http://www.bladehq.com/item--Ka-Bar-Short-USA-FightingUtility--16358

A few to get you started, though, with knives, you generally get what you pay for. Generally, you'll want to figure out exactly what you want in knives, especially in how you use them to find the best deals and blades.


Collecting knives is an expensive habit that ends up going into 500 dollars knives and 1k customs. ;) Budget and collecting don't mix!

u/TOUCHER_OF_SHEEP · 3 pointsr/EDC

It's definitely enough for a nice knife, though you might want to go a bit higher for a great knife. The KaBar BK2 is actually designed with things like batoning (hammering the knife through wood as a kind of faux hatchet using another piece of wood against the blade of the knife as the hammer itself) or chopping. It's a bit over $60, currently available for $69 to be precise, but as long as you don't flat out abuse it (prying heavy things, for example) it'll serve you well and quite possibly for the rest of your natural life.

At a lower price, you can get the Condor Bushlore, which at $35 is a perfectly valid choice that will serve you well indeed.

For an even lower price yet, the Mora Heavy Companion is from one of those few cheaper knife companies that does incredible work. I wouldn't baton with it, honestly, but even if you did it'd probably hold up just fine.

At a more expensive range, the Ontario Rat-5 is an amazing bushcraft knife. The Fallkniven Pilot Survival Knife is also an amazing knife. The Benchmade Bone Collector is spectacular knife made in D2 tool steel, one of the better steels available at that price. Another amazing knife is the Spyderco Bushcraft made in O1 tool steel. Finally, the Benchmade 162 is a pretty amazing knife.

One thing you'll notice about all of these knives with the exception of the Pilot Survival knife and the BM 162 is that they're all carbon steel knives. Carbon steel is a lot tougher than stainless (with a few very, very rare exceptions I'd never trust a long knife to be stainless steel) with the trade off of being a lot more of a hassle to take care of, since it needs to be regularly cleaned and oiled.

If you want a fire starter, carry a magnesium fire starter. With the carbon steel knives, you can probably strike it against the back of the blade to create the sparks you'll want and if not (like with some of the coated ones) you'll be carrying the striker anyway.

For sharpening, you'll want to get a decent sharpening setup and start stropping. A couple of easy sharpening systems would be the superior Spyderco Sharpermaker (usually available on Amazon around the $50 mark) or the Lansky Sharpening system which while cheaper isn't as good. You could take the time to learn how to free hand it, but most casual users don't care that much because it takes a long time to get proficient at freehand sharpening. Stropping is running the blade against something like smooth leather (usually smooth leather, actually) to remove burrs along the blade of a knife made by use and sharpening and the restore a blade to a better edge without removing metal. Stropping allows for a level of sharpness unachievable by sharpening alone and extends a knife's lifetime by allowing sharpness to be achieved for longer without removing metal from the blade. To learn how to strop, watch videos on YouTube or check out guides from the sidebar of /r/knives.

Finally, if you want a whistle, just carry a whistle. If you want a mirror for signaling, carry a small signaling mirror or mirror polish the knife you buy (a process where you sand the blade with increasing grit level sandpaper until it shines like the sun and you can see yourself in the blade).

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

u/baron32191 · 3 pointsr/knives

It really depends on what you want, size/price/use. Are you using it for wood processing or just general light use? Are you looking to spend under say $100? If you want something that can take anything you throw at it for a decent price check out this http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK2-Campanion-Fixed/dp/B001N1DPDE/ref=wl_it_dp_o_npd?ie=UTF8&coliid=IR4DJ93EW5I7A&colid=3DVWN7LG1J27P

u/merkon · 3 pointsr/knives

Here's a few:

Becker BK-2 carbon steel, decently sized though maybe big by your definition. This knife will take anything you throw at it, comes with a sheath.

The ESEE Izula is also pretty popular around here, definitely a lot smaller.

Can we get specifics on:

Carbon/Stainless?

Approx length?

Price range?

These will help us figure out what would be ideal.

EDIT: clarity

u/genericdude999 · 3 pointsr/camping

BK2 is a similar size and use, but with a better reputation for quality.

u/emmber · 3 pointsr/knives

For $50, you can get a good knife from Glock, and that would leave you with enough money to get another one if you wanted.
YOu could also go with the Becker BK2
I also have good experiences with this

Though this may be a little smaller than what you're looking for, my favorite fixed blade right now is the Dajo Survivor

u/WillPhillips · 3 pointsr/knives

If I was facing the end of the world and had to have an absolutely bomb-proof knife for under $70, I'd choose the Becker BK-2 and never, ever look back. Thing's a dang tank.

u/phig · 3 pointsr/knives

so BK2 or BK7?

Anyone have experience between the two? For camping I want a big ass knife that can take a beating, and both look like they can do that. I have a kabar USMC. Do I need to buy another knife?

u/ChaosOnion · 3 pointsr/TropicalWeather

I would suggest getting a large, reusable water container. An insulated water cooler or normal cooler with a spout can be filled up in your tub. Then fill up your tub.

As another option, I have some of these for changing water for fish:

Reliance Products Aqua-Tainer 7 Gallon Rigid Water Container https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001QC31G6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_njPzDbV5QAAJF

We fill the tub so we can flush the toilet if the water goes out. Water is a lot cheaper filling from the spigot than buying from the store.

u/RounderKatt · 3 pointsr/BurningMan

I brought 3 of these for my own personal use for drinking, cooking, and swamp cooler. I used all but about 5 gallons

u/mvhsbball22 · 3 pointsr/Homebrewing

There are two common plastic containers used in the no-chill community. I use this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Aqua-Tainer-Gallon-Container/dp/B001QC31G6

There's also one from USPlastics that is pretty common:

http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?sku=75032&catid=459

Both of these do not melt at or near boiling temps. They deform slightly, which is beneficial because you can squeeze out almost all of the air after pouring the wort in.

u/HIM_Darling · 3 pointsr/TropicalWeather
u/guysquatch · 3 pointsr/camping

Been using a couple of these for a few years now, way better than the soft collapsible ones, in my opinion: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B001QC31G6/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Edit: If the water is warm due to temperature, just bring extra reusable bottles and keep some in the cooler.

u/arveng · 3 pointsr/raleigh

Buy a couple of these and fill them with tap water. They work great, I keep one in my car when I go on long road trips and/or hiking. No funky taste even after days in the sun.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001QC31G6/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/super_swell · 3 pointsr/gundeals

You're better off buying a Mora knife for that purpose.

u/Gullex · 3 pointsr/Survival

$150 is plenty of budget for a good knife. This one is just slightly over that budget but will last you the rest of your life. It's kind of my dream survival knife.

The Fallkniven F1 is very popular as well and right in your price range.

Currently I use this knife which is also very good.

If you want to go a little less expensive still, Becker makes some good ones such as the Bk16. I know the Becker doesn't look anything like "hand made", but I have the BK2- I used paint remover to take the black coating off the blade, replaced the plastic handles with micarta and stained it to look more like wood, and built a leather sheath for it. It's a beautiful knife now. Too bad it's so goddamn heavy.

You could also go with something like the Mora bushcraft. I have that one also, very decent knife.

You could even just get a regular Mora or a Condor bushlore which are even more economical options.

u/Patrick_Spens · 3 pointsr/bugout

A hatchet and a small knife are ideal, in my experience. A Mora Companion and a Fiskar's X7 will do darn near anything you need to do. Less than $50 together.

u/BadHumanGoodGnome · 3 pointsr/knives

I prefer two different types of knives.
My EDC is a Kershaw Leek
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0009VC9YA?pc_redir=1412830846&robot_redir=1

And my camp knife is a Mora.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004ZAIXSC?cache=4ddea882c23be704873c7e83fe4a9622&pi=SX200_QL40&qid=1413465404&sr=8-1#ref=mp_s_a_1_1

They're both solid and the pair should still come in under budget.

u/AGingham · 3 pointsr/Bushcraft

Depends a lot on what your vision and current understanding of what "Bushcraft" is.

TL;DR: Start basic, check it's for you, be comfortable in a new learning journey.

The craft part of the word is important - it's about actually doing something, not just knowing and understanding the what and why. And certainly not about just possessing things and displaying them.

So - there are two aspects of this - you need to be comfortable "in the woods", and there's the creative aspect of doing and making "stuff" in that environment.

Being comfortable: It's important to be comfortable - otherwise the learning experience aspect is jeopardised. You'll see that some Bushcraft course providers have really minimal kit requirements on their courses, because they provide shelter, food and drink in order to get on with the particular skills they're teaching.

There's a really big marketing led "Leisure Camping" industry in the UK, with a lot of gear aimed at festival goers. If you're starting out on this journey, use all that to your advantage - get a basic tent (but one with a porch so you can sit outside, under cover, to make things and talk with others if you're at a communal event/course), sleeping bag, gas stove.

Pretty much everything else can - and I would suggest should - come from your normal, regular home kit. Perhaps the second-rate things that have been replaced, but not yet scrapped. If you lived with them once - you can do so again. This enables you to maintain home comforts and the security of being able to provide for particular personal necessities - diet, health, cultural etc. as a starting point, and then modify things as you learn more.


You'll find after a couple of outings why some things work "outside" and others just fail: Too heavy, too complicated, too dependent on other infrastructure after time (the gas stove for example).

Just make sure the basic Survival needs are met of:

// Protection / Water / Food / Fire / Navigation / Communication / First Aid, Medical, and Self Care / Illumination / Documentation and Information / Repair, Construction and Maintenance / Entertainment / Cash //

and you can support a good camping experience at the very least.

Turning to the craft - there's so much to observe, learn, understand and practice.

The activities you choose initially will reflect your existing abilities and interests, but some basic skills involve fire starting with just a spark or two - or an ember, careful precision woodworking with knife and small saw, and structure construction, that will likely require cordage and knowledge of knots.

So - a small starter kit specifically for the Craft:

  • ferro-rod and scraper
  • folding saw
  • small fixed-blade knife - and the usual one suggested isn't too bad at all ... Be wary of UK knife law, especially if you are essentially "urban".
  • big hank of paracord. At the beginning you don't need the more exotic types, and natural fiber alternatives may be something you come to appreciate later.


    EDIT: s/hunk/hank - the mind boggles as to a paracord "hunk". Perhaps best not to go there ...
u/akobie · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Stanley Adventure Camp Cook Set 24oz Stainless Steel https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_gmXsDbDGKCPZV

This one has been great for me! Also comes with two cups.

u/BBoneClone · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

All of the items below are very inexpensive but not necessarily cheaply made. You can get lighter, but you’ll pay a lot more.

This tent:
Featherstone Outdoor UL Granite... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0727Y4XLT?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

This stove:
Hamans BRS BRS-3000T Ultralight... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07H77FV4C?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

This cookset:
Stanley Adventure Camp Cook Set 24oz Stainless Steel https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_ybHgDb62GJ9VQ

u/outrushoutdoors · 3 pointsr/SuperiorHikingTrail

I M a big fan of fancee feast alcohol stoves and have been using them for years. I've made mine for around 10 to 12 dollars. There is a small learning curve to them, but they are very lightweight, silent, and you can find the fuel in just about any gas station. Shug does a pretty good job showing them in this video https://youtu.be/dKAFAsPfC4s

I used to use your standard msr jet type of stove and they work great. Just really loud and the fuel is kinda bulky/costly.

For a pot, I use this stanley cookset Stanley Adventure Camp Cook Set 24oz Stainless Steel https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_GcsnDbZ7P54M3

Or a small grease pot from Walmart. https://www.walmart.com/ip/Mainstays-Aluminum-1-5-Quart-Silver-Grease-Dispenser/32263277?wmlspartner=wlpa&selectedSellerId=0&wl13=1999&adid=22222222228021183567&wl0=&wl1=g&wl2=m&wl3=40345415312&wl4=pla-78310592552&wl5=9019700&wl6=&wl7=&wl8=&wl9=pla&wl10=8175035&wl11=local&wl12=32263277&veh=sem&gclid=CjwKCAjwmtDpBRAQEiwAC6lm4yzlMy9LvWgAfk6fMkFrx4_ld_Myqyu724RFpnmhAV6mooHaSjAXkxoCl8wQAvD_BwE


If I know I am going to be gone for a while and want to keep my fuel weight down, I bring my fancee feast stove and a twig stove (bush buddy). This allows me to boil over a wood stove when I have dry sticks and I have the option of putting the fancee feast stove inside the bush buddy when I want to boil over alcohol.

u/shroom_throwaway9722 · 3 pointsr/preppers

Add an alcohol stove, bottle of denatured alcohol, cook kit, and pot stand.

Ditch the water packets and get a Klean Kanteen bottle. Keep it filled with water, and add another non-crushable container for extra water.

Now you can make hot tea, hot chocolate, coffee, grits, oatmeal, etc.

Add a hooded blanket tarp thing, some paracord, and a surplus military wool blanket. Maybe some cheap trekking poles or bamboo garden poles. Now you have a poncho and shelter! Add a few "contractor grade" trash bags just in case.

Add a pair of wool socks and comfortable shoes.

Extra batteries for the flashlight.

Safety vest or some kind of reflective thing.

PS: those lifeboat rations taste awful

u/lone_purple · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

All you need is this Stanley cook pot (just don't use the extra cups) and you can fit your fuel, stove, lighter, a small sponge, and still have a little room. Only $14.

EDIT: Also, if you're looking for a mug in addition to a pot, there are designs that match the popular GSI for half the price...I think it might nest in this set-up too.I heard Wal-Mart has them but I can't remember the name.

u/tcmaresh · 3 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Just as important, or more, than backpack, tent, bag, & pad are your boots & socks. Your carrying yourself and all that weight in them!

Get good hiking socks from your local Outdoors shop. At least two pair of thick and two pair of thin. They should be "wicking" socks that take the moisture away from your feet. Wear the thin set inside the thick set. Put on the dry pair of thin socks at night to keep you warm. Never go to sleep in your bag with wet clothes, whether from falling into the stream or just sweating during the day, especially wet socks, if you can help it. (That's why you should always bring a set of extra clothes). But you may also want to bring a pair of socks just for sleeping.

When you shop for boots, get a good brand (e.g. Merrell or better) and don't skimp on price. These will last for years. Buy cheap and you'll be getting a new pair in just a couple of years. Shop at the end of the day when your feet are swollen and put on your two pair of hiking socks. Try several pair. Walk around the store a few times to really get a good feel for how those boots fit your feet. You don't want your toes to touch the front of the boot. EVER. unless you like yanking toe nails off your big toe. So walk fast or even run and then stop fast and try to jam those toes forward. If they touch, go up in size or find a boot with a bigger toe box. Your heel shouldn't slide forward when you're doing this.

For the stove, get one of these [cheap guys from China] (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ultralight-Outdoor-Backpacking-Canister-Foldable-Mini-Camping-Stove-Gas-Burner-/252013224278?hash=item3aad28a156:g:kygAAOxyIv5TkRfF). Heck, get two in case you lose one! They work jsut as well as the name brands, have a little piezo lighter so you don't need to light it with a lighter or match, and they are SO much cheaper!

For a cook kit, you can start with the [Stanley Adventure Camp Cook Set] (http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-Adventure-Camp-Stainless-Steel/dp/B005188T90/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1458828657&sr=8-1&keywords=stanley+adventure+cook+kit). I bought mine at Walmart for $15. Get this - take out one of the plastic mugs and you can fit both the little stove AND small fuel canister into it! And the [standard GSI mug] (http://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-Glacier-Stainless-Bottle/dp/B001LF3IB6/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1458828752&sr=8-2&keywords=gsi+mug) fits right over the bottom of it, AND the lid to the Stanley set is a perfect fit onto the GSI mug. I bought a knockoff at Walmart for $5.00.

As for the sleeping bag, some will recommend down because it's lighter for the same warmth rating compared to synthetic and compress for packing better than synthetic, but I will recommend synthetic because it's cheaper and down is useless if it gets wet. I have a 3lb synthetic bag that is rated at 15 deg. I sleep in a hammock and a like the synthetic bags better because they are thicker so wind doesn't rip right through them as it does for really light bags.

The "waffled" Closed Cell Foam (CCF) pad at Walmart, while not the most comfortable, will get you started. It's cheap and light and will do well enough. You can also pile leaves under the tent for extra padding.

Don't forget a groundcloth/footprint that goes under the tent! It acts as a moisture barrier and prevents damage to the bottom of the tent. The woven polyethylene (typically blue) are really heavy, so I'd recommend a thick sheet of plastic instead. It should fit completely under the tent so it doesn't catch rain and funnel it under the floor of the tent.

If you have a Big 5 near you, that's a great place to get some good gear for cheap. REI & Cabella's get kind of expensive.

u/BlueFalcon2009 · 3 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I was using the Stanley cook set: Stanley Adventure Camp Cook Set 24oz Stainless Steel https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_amhKzbGT131ZZ

And using regular boxed Mac and cheese. Without a windscreen. I think that was the biggest problem was the lack of a windscreen. Combined with my frustration of that, I turned it up a bit too high and ended up burning the Mac Noddles on the bottom. That and it was hard to stir due to the depth of the pot. My friend bought a cook set at big5 (discount sporting store) near me, for about as much as I spent, which came with 2 pots, a burner, a mini sponge, and a can of fuel for about as much as I spent. The burner was way better in the wind and she had no issues with it. That and I think I may have warped my BSR a bit from turning it too high... I'm probably gonna pick up that set soon. Seemed to work well enough. Think it was a bit heavier than my setup, but I know where I can shave some weight elsewhere.

I brought too much food for dinner. I didn't divide up the Mac and cheese boxes. I should've halved them at least. Needless to say I had a bunch of spare food, which I had to pack out. So lesson learned in that regard. I basically carried 6 dinners at least when I should've had 3. I think repacking ez-mac containers would've been better. Boil water, then pour into quart freeze bags as someone else explained. That would've prevented the mess, and the excess food I think.

u/godlessgamergirl · 3 pointsr/legaladvice
u/JohnnyBoy11 · 3 pointsr/preppers

They make indoor gas stoves. It doesn't have to be for camping. I mean, regular kitchen gas stoves use propane or other type of natural gas.

u/SpoookyAction · 3 pointsr/zerocarb

Iwatani Corporation of America ZA-3HP Portable Butane Stove Burner https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006H42TVG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_jLZaBbY4A6G6E

u/Charming_geek · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Hey all. Relatively new to the ultralight scene, but have been trying to go lighter weight over the last few years. Will probably still be a while before I'm true ultralight (6lbs for the big 4?), but my current plan would have me at 7-7.5 lbs for the big 4. Was curious about your input / any suggestions for improvements:

  • Tent - Naturehike CloudUp2 (owned) - $120, 3.30 lbs (shared with wife, 1.65 lbs)
  • Pad - Klymit Static V (owned) - Bought for $50, 1.15 pounds
  • Bag - Mountaintop 40 Liter Hiking Backpack (owned) - Bought for $27 in an amazon lightning sale, 2.05 lbs.
  • Sleeping bag - Hyke & Byke Eolus 15 degree 800 FP down bag (plan to buy) - $150, 2.54 lbs

    Overall, $350/7.4 lbs for the big 4. I definitely know there's room for improvement and I will probably be replacing things as I can afford it. The most obvious place for improvement is the bag, but I'd actually bought one for my wife as a temporary hiking bag for our first hike-in camp together but we ended up both really liking it. It's comfortable and for $27 it was hard to pass up, especially as it has all the compartments I like in a hiking bag (i.e. access to the bottom section for the sleeping bag). Welcome to criticisms and suggestions.
u/rtothewin · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_2elDCbPHNFCCB

u/nestiv · 3 pointsr/Sacramento

I'm just going to drop in and advocate approaching backpacking with the ultralight philosophy. The key principle behind ultralight is to bring only what you need for any given trip and, ideally, nothing more.

Now I'm not saying don't pack things that will add value to your trip, but one of the biggest pitfalls to backpacking is packing in your fears. When people first start, they often bring excessive amounts of clothing, safety gear to outfit an expedition company, more entertainment than one might realistically want or use, or an entire kitchen - sink included. However, most people will discover that if they can lighten the load on their shoulders, they will end up enjoying trips much more. It's best to consider what you need (or even what can be shared in this instance!) - e.g. sharing shelters, cook systems, entertainment, food. Clothing-wise as long as you have an insulating layer (fleece or down jacket) and a rain jacket, and you're more than likely good to go.

So with all that in mind, let's talk about gear more specifically. If you're just getting started, it's best to borrow gear if possible. Sans that option, trying cheap gear is totally reasonable. However as with any hobby, there can be massive differences your random Amazon gear and even the bottom-of-the-barrel hobbyist gear. If you expect you'll want to pursue backpacking more in the future, consider looking into the ultralight and ultracheap gear list recommendations as well as the alternative options.

Since we're looking at coastal trips in California, you can safely estimate lows to be no lower than 40° unless you're truly up in the mountains. Sleeping pad-wise I'd recommend either an inflatable like the Klymit Static V or a CCF pad like the Z-Lite Sol or RidgeRest. I hesitate to recommend an ultralight quilt for a first-timer due to cost, but for reference a 30° HammockGear Econ Burrow weighs 18.62 oz, whereas the one OP linked weighs ~4 lbs.

There's a lot more to be said than what I've mentioned, so I invite y'all to check out /r/ultralight for more discussions on ultralight philosophies and gear. The wiki is a tremendously helpful resource as well. If any of you want a pack shakedown to have someone look over your gear list, feel free to reply or DM me, and I'll try to get back to you when I can. I'll most likely either be out in Texas or climbing Shasta for the weekend this trip will be planned, but have fun out there!

Also paging /r/ulnorcal - /u/Sharp_LR35902 /u/id3550

u/zortnarftroz · 3 pointsr/rawdenim

Costco's Kirklands aren't bad and People's socks from amazon are nice too, this from a Minneapolis native.

u/x_glo · 3 pointsr/TeenMFA

I recently got these to go with some Beckman Rounds I ordered. They're amazing. They fit snug on my feet, I always seem to be too small for socks. Really warm, nice cushioning. Couldn't recommend enough of you're wearing boots.

u/TheRockDoctor · 3 pointsr/BuyItForLife

People Socks are excellent. Pricier than Kirkland, but less expensive than Smartwool. I've found them to be very comfortable and durable.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009Y9QCCS/

u/neanderthalsavant · 3 pointsr/Construction

u/666kate, you don't need sock-garters or whatever the fuck they are called.

Try these

PEOPLE SOCKS 4pairs merino wool mens womens socks CharcoalX 2pairs, Navy X 1pair, Brown X1pair Large https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009Y9QCCS/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_PSY0DbMF0YWJ8

I am a frame to finish carpenter in coastal New England. Once it gets cold out, these socks are my go to

u/can_has · 3 pointsr/frugalmalefashion

GET THESE if you need warm socks whatsoever, or will. Crazy good deal considering the quality, made in Brooklyn I believe http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B009Y9QCCS/ref=ox_ya_os_product_refresh_T1


I took some FMFA and tried them out months ago, they are wonderful warm socks. *down to 19.90 shipped, for 4 pair (prime, amazon)

u/Jobeanie123 · 3 pointsr/EDC

A bunch of wool socks and a Gerber Shard!.

The shard seems a little strange, but right now I need something else to put on my keyring just to give it something more to grab onto when I pull it out of my pocket! The shard seems like a good solution. If I can get one use out of the little phillips and perhaps the pry bar it'll probably be worth it!

u/Priapulid · 3 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Gold Toe (100% wool) makes some and Wigwam (34% wool blend), although I can't attest to them since I rarely wear dress socks. Wigwam pretty consistantly get good reviews from what I have seen.

My current favorite budget wool work/hiking socks are People Socks (71% wool and USA made!)... but they might be a tad thick for dress shoes.

u/iamprobablynotjohn · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

I use the ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1. It's 3 pounds 8 oz and only $78. Not the absolutely lightest, but I've used it for dozens of nights camping in all conditions and it has never let me down. I also have an ALPS 20 degree mummy bag that is fantastic. I love their gear

u/tesla_100 · 3 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

I'd recommend a light weight small 1 person tent. The lighter the better. Some people get larger tents to fit there stuff waste of weight in my opinion.

Next comes your budget, you can spend a lot of money on a tent. Just like buying a car you can get a 1990 Honda or a new Ferrari.

If your on a budget I hiked the PCT with this tent:

Alps mountaineering Lynx 1-person tent. Used ones going for $78. 3.8 pounds. Held up does the job. https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=sxin_7_af-pna-1_c600956ebde1baf8592371faedf0cf781eb071ae?keywords=tent&pd_rd_i=B00BMKD1DU&pd_rd_r=33b407bc-ebcb-4ba9-818d-a3a3e7db6d0d&pd_rd_w=e3KvM&pd_rd_wg=Zf92I&pf_rd_p=3892bc23-5fa8-4a18-8855-22c23bd2e202&pf_rd_r=4P2HDHKKN7KQE3CPKBGR&qid=1573250503

If you got a little extra money, you get what you pay for. These tents are lighter and some of them are lighter and a little bigger. You are fighting between size and weight. Some tents are bigger but weigh more, some weigh less but are too small for some people. This is a preference and only you can pick the right answer. Everyone has a different opinion. Here are some awesome tents Ive seen hiking:

Big agnes copper spur

https://www.backcountry.com/big-agnes-copper-spur-ul1-ultralight-tent-1-person-3-season?skid=BAG00B3-GRA-ONESIZ&ti=UExQIEJyYW5kOkJpZyBBZ25lcyBUZW50cyAmIFNoZWx0ZXJzOjE6MTM6MTAwMDAwMDEyX2JjLXRlbnRzLXNoZWx0ZXJz

NEmo Hornet (My personal favorite. )

https://www.nemoequipment.com/product/hornet/

MSR Elixer

https://www.moosejaw.com/product/msr-elixir-1-tent_10368196?hybridPLA=true&ad_id=GooglePlusBox&utm_source=GooglePlusBox&utm_medium=PLA&utm_campaign=MSR&scid=scplp4197589&sc_intid=4197589&adpos=1o1&cm_mmc=PLA-_-Google-_-SC_Shopping_NoPromo_Brand_Desktop|SC_Shopping_NoPromo_Brand_Desktop-_-google|762455646|39930674093|182268966899|aud-223426839163:pla-840516347932|c|9016466|4197589&gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OVfNzVg9Dx6vr7IfpqP6uLZJNCL0nIHtVHhK7KeYErN6jYeBIASwnRoCCJcQAvD_BwE

These style tents are very light but are very expensive. They are also a pain to set up and break easily. As a begginer id stay away. They are for rich people who backpack all the time.

https://zpacks.com/products/duplex-tent?variant=9365267316772

Hyperlite has a similar style for a stupid

You can also use a tarp, or a hammock. I stay away im a tent person.

A lot of backpacking is what you like! Its personable, if you go with any of the middle tents you cant go wrong! Just recomend finding a light one person tent! let me know if you need help choosing a style! Happy trails!!

u/roadalum · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

I'm in the same boat. I had not seen the Zephyr, but I was looking at the ALPS Lynx. Any idea where the price difference comes from?
p.s. Nice sleeping bag! It's on my list! :-D

u/daneelo · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

This has served me well so far, been on a few backpacking trips with it now, held up well and not too heavy

u/phirebug · 3 pointsr/camping

As others have mentioned, it will depend on what kind of camping he likes to do and what he already owns, but here are some of my favorite pieces of gear I've picked up over the years:
This little guy is a pretty good rechargeable lantern/flashlight with magnets so you can stick it to stuff and a usb output so you can charge other things with it.

I've had one of these for YEARS and I just lost it the other day. There was $200 worth of gear in the pannier that fell off my bike and I'm more pissed about that cup than the rest of the gear combined. It looks like they made it a little taller, which I do not like, but he may. There are several other brands that make something similar in both steel or titanium. It's not just a cup though...it will slip perfectly over the bottom of a nalgene, you can cook directly on a stove or fire with it, and you can pair it with the smaller jetboil coffee press or the guts of a standard bodum press and turn it into a french press. It's the exact same diameter.
A Sawyer can be an AMAZING if you're going to be anywhere long enough to pack water in. The squeeze bag it comes with sucks, but it has standard bottle threads, so you can screw it into a 2-liter bottle with the bottom cut off and it turns it into a gravity filter. Just pour more river/lake water into the 2 liter every minute or so and it will keep pouring clean water into your bottles. Also, you notice the weird skinny part in the middle? It's exactly the width of duct tape. You can wrap several yards of it around there.
EDIT: forgot some words

u/parametrek · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Replace the $70 Katadyn filter with a $20 Sawyer filter.

Replace the $60 Petzl with a $20 Wowtac A2.

> I am also looking for a set of hiking poles.

The $30 Monoprice CF poles are considered the best/lightest for the money. You really don't want heavy poles.

> Do I need any other cookware?

Are you planning to actually cook or are you eating trail mix the entire time?

u/arrbos · 3 pointsr/vancouver

Get a Sawyer filter over the lifestraw. https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/


You don't have to suck water through, and it's rated for way more water.

u/innoutberger · 3 pointsr/Flagstaff

Forgot to mention above, I do have a water filter, and was planning on filtering on-the-go as I was camping. Does that change anything?

u/holganaut · 3 pointsr/camping

Uhh.. Since nobody else is helping, I will give it my best shot. On a normal day, the average reccomended amount of water per person will be 64 oz., or .5 gallons. This is a rough estimate for an average person. If you are larger, pack more. If you are smaller, pack less. Depending on the heat, you may end up sweating alot of the water out.

I would reccomend no less than .75 Gallons per person per day.

As far as containers go, something like this would probably be best. I think that stores like walmart have a similar option....

To purify lake water you have several options. There are a multitude of water filters that backpackers use to make drinking water safe. /r/ backpacking raves about this one in particular for its low price, easy use, and low weight. It should filter out bacteria and other nasty things in water.

Alternatively, water purification tablets can be bought to do the same thing. These will not filter out sediment though. They only kill bacteria.

Since this is car camping and the weight/size of gear is not as big of a concern, simply overpacking on water will do no harm. Just keep track of how much you drink as a gauge for next time!

u/dasponge · 3 pointsr/hiking

Are you dead set on a Geigerrig filter? They seem awfully expensive for something that will only last 50-100 gallons.

I'd get a sawyer mini - http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

u/WhiskeyandKittens · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I'm going deep in to the woods. We are going to stay in awesome hammocks and we will be wrapped in fleece sleeping bags. We will also bring a water filtration system so we can drink from the spring rather than lugging water with us. After all, lugging a cooler or four full of beer and whiskey will be enough of a task for us.

I'm so excited that the weather is getting better that I have super duper camping on my mind. :)

u/AngeloPappas · 3 pointsr/preppers

For anyone thinking this is a good buy, please check out the Sawyer Mini. It may cost more, but the Lifestraw filters up to 1,000L. The Sawyer does 360,000L and also filters out more than the Lifestraw. The Sawyer also works with fittings and attachments for hydration bags meaning you can set it up to work as a gravity filter in addition to using it as a straw.

It's better than the the Lifestraw in every single way. I have used both and have no affiliation with either company.

u/hi_in_fiber · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

You're welcome!

>Is there a good compass or gps you would reccomend?

I'm afraid I'm not a good authority on GPS. I use a DeLorme InReach which is a two-way communicator with GPS ability if tethered to a phone. It's overkill for someone starting out, I wouldn't recommend it unless you've got piles of money burning a hole in your pocket.

As for compasses, I carry a cheap Brunton baseplate compass. Similar to this Silva, but I don't go off trail or crosscountry. More importantly is that you know how to use one. Watch some youtube videos first, figure out if you need a compass that has sights, or if you live in a higher/lower latitude and need something to match your magnetic zone.

Hold off on the GPS and learn how to use a compass and map first. Then if you think it's necessary (or more convenient) step up to a GPS. Remember that maps and compasses don't need batteries.

>How much water is enough water?

General rule is 1 gallon/day, but it varies from person to person, terrain, temperature, etc. If you're in an area with decent water sources, get yourself a Sawyer Mini.

>When deciding where to go in back country do most people just choose a thing and then travel there and back and around or are there trails that people take and camp along?

Choosing a thing and traveling there is called "cross-country hiking" which means hiking off-trail and making your own path. This is allowed in some places and frowned upon at others, depends on how fragile/protected the terrain is. If you're going cross-country, you better be proficient at orienteering.

I'd wager the majority of people hike on trails and camp along the way at established camp sites.

u/archbox · 3 pointsr/preppers

Filters better and filters more:



| Lifestraw | Sawyer Mini
---|---|----
Membrane | 0.2 microns | 0.1 microns (2x better)
Capacity | 264 gallons | 100,000 gallons (378.8x better)
Bacteria | 6 LOG | 7 LOG (10x better)
Bacteria% | 99.9999% | 99.99999% (10x better)
Protozoa | 3 LOG | 6 LOG (1000x better)
Protozoa% | 99.9% | 99.9999% (1000x better)
Price | $19.20 | $19.97 or 4 for $67.51 ($16.88 each)

The mini is also smaller and comes with a 32 oz squeezable water pouch, 7" tube, syringe for cleaning (if it clogs)

>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable bottles (28 mm thread), hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source

http://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

u/HeyRememberThatTime · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Direct link to the single blue filter that's $18.69 w/ Prime shipping: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/?psc=1

Woot's still a better deal if you're ordering more than one, like OP said, since you only pay the extra $5 once.

u/Ksrugi · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I grew up in Louisiana and always had these at the ready in case another Katrina came by. Barebones and lightweight in case you need to get up and move.


Multitool - Something that's sturdy, offers plenty of options, but also is lightweight. If I got washed out, this would be one of the top things I'd want coming with me.

First Aid Kit - You just never know. Water can hide a lot of nasty stuff like sharp metal edges, broken glass, etc. The kit I've linked to also comes with a multitool.
Water Filtration System - Dehydration will get you before anything else. Southern heat combined with physical exertion takes a lot out of anyone and tiny filtration systems like this will take care of you without adding bulk.

Meal Replacement Bars - You'll ideally want a few days emergency food. I recommend meal replacement bars that are high in protein and fiber and no less than 500 calories. They'll provide decent nutrition and should make you feel satiated for at least 2-4 hours. I don't have a recommendation on this one because there are so many brands and flavors.
Hand Crank Lantern - A reliable source of light that you can crank on your own. Generally, I avoid using generators and the like. I'm paranoid about electricity after flooding occurs.

Whistle - Great for alerting people without tearing up your vocal chords. It's also very, very, very good to have in case animals that shouldn't come by are nearby.
Dust Mask - If your city floods, there's going to be a lot of crud that comes up from the sewers and a lot of things accumulating inside buildings. Save your lungs and your noses.
Portable Battery - I love this age of technology we're in. Charge this a few days before the storm hits and you'll be able to keep your phone charged for days if the power goes out.
Insect Repellant - The ample amount of still water after a hurricane is prime bug nesting. A little repellant goes a long way.
Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick Offerman - Or any book really to help pass the time. This is a fantastic read though. :)

u/MrMaxPowers247 · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I thought you might like this a Mini Water Filter. Happy tax day

u/gizram84 · 3 pointsr/preppers

I remember reading that the Sawyer Filter is a much better product than the LifeStraw.

LifeStraw claims it can filter 1,000 liters. The Sawyer claims 100,000 gallons. Also the Sawyer filters protozoa much better (99.9999% vs 99.9%)

u/columbus_uncle · 3 pointsr/MTB

I have one of these filters and it serves me well if there is a water source on long rides http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2

u/Christof3 · 3 pointsr/camping

I would go with a squeeze or gravity fed filter instead. They'll be lighter and usually cheaper than a pump filter, too. Most people prefer the Sawyer Squeeze or the Sawyer Mini.

u/possumroadkill · 3 pointsr/Winnipeg

Sawyer Mini

  • Best filter out there.
u/minkgod · 3 pointsr/okeechobeemusicfest

I bought one of these and one of [these

after leaving the grove at 1 am, showers are closed. I'm not going to bed gross

i bought the tent and shower thing on ebay for way cheaper. I assume you do the same.

u/scumteam14 · 3 pointsr/SkincareAddiction

Hey, I was in a very very similar situation. I don't know how intense you want to go with it, but here are some things that I've done at various points:

  • For face cleansing, use gallon water from the grocery store (costs ~$0.80 where I'm at and honestly a gallon lasts a long time)

  • Or fill up a small water container (if you have a spot to fill up at that has good water) - plastic or a lemonade dispenser both work well, depending on the counter size

  • If you're having issues with your scalp/body, you can try rinsing with gallon water after showering with the sketchy water (will take about a gallon or two)

  • This one is more long-term very-very-bad water type situation (brown water, no water, etc.), but if you have a good water spot to fill up at you can fill up a large water container, get a camp shower (pricey but very good, charges very quickly and holds a charge for a while), and a bucket. Boil half your water, use cold water for the other half, bam. Sounds terrible if you're used to having safe running water, but honestly isn't half bad

    I know there are water filters out there, but idk if an affordable system would fix the issues you're describing.
u/cr0ft · 3 pointsr/vandwellers

You can build a van with underbody tanks and a shower, but that's much more involved. You also need a heating system to keep those from freezing, etc.

But there are any number of ways you can keep clean between showers, and in the states Planet Fitness (as has been mentioned) lets you both work out and shower almost everywhere.

Washcloths and basins of water would be plenty to get clean, if not as luxuriously as a shower.

Put room temperature water in a bucket, pour in a pot of boiling water to get it lukewarm, and use this: https://www.amazon.com/Ivation-Portable-Outdoor-Battery-Powered/dp/B00IFHFJXI (drop the pump into the bucket and shower away. If you get a wider basin you could even stand in it and let the water circulate a couple of times and extend the shower time.) Or combine with a drop-in bucket heater, to shower in hot water. Just have to get creative.

People have kept clean for centuries without showers. It's not as nice but it's doable.

u/sargon2 · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

You could consider the BRS-3000T stove instead of the MicroRocket -- it's cheaper and lighter.

For the pot consider the SnowPeak Trek 700 -- I have one and it fits a canister well.

u/ben_gardner · 3 pointsr/camping

I have a bunch of them - MSR pocket rocket, Kovea Titanium stove, 2 cheap ones off Amazon. Only difference is the name brand ones feel more solid. If I could buy and try another, it would be the BRS stove, http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U


I also use the Kovea LPG adaptor so I can use propane cans with these stoves when car camping: http://www.amazon.com/Kovea-LPG-Adaptor-Small-Silver/dp/B00CFPISZW


Get one without an igniter, as they all go bad sooner or later. Just bring a lighter to light the gas.

u/iskosalminen · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

As a tip, just don't bring alcohol stove on the PCT. Fire bans are everywhere and you don't want to be that guy who sets the trail on fire.

Get the BRS-3000t and ~650ml titanium pot, like Toaks 650ml pot or Evernew Ultralight Deep pot.

More than likely you'll go stoveless at some point.

u/prototofu · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Honestly, if weight is priority, I would just grab a BRS stove. Test it a couple of times, and if there are issues, buy another.


I'm not keen on the waste of doing this, but I've got one and it has been working perfectly over the course of half a year or so. Just keep in mind that it won't perform as well in wind relative to your candidates. But boy is it tiny.

u/GarlandOutdoors · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

I know you wanted the rubberized handles, but that limits your options significantly. I'd say apply the rubber yourself with a tool handle dip.
BRS Stove - $16
Snow Peak Trek 900 - $45
Rustoleum Grip Dip $17.50

That leaves a solid $10. You can have them pick you up a canister or two!
I've been using both the BRS Stove and Snow Peak Trek 900 and they both work great. Now, if you have a windy situation, you may need to build a windscreen or get a MSR Pocket Rocket.

​

u/lpmarshall · 3 pointsr/JMT
  • For around $50 you could get a Toaks 700ml pot ($40, 2.3 oz) and a BRS stove ($15, 1oz) and drop about 1lb.

  • For around $200 you could get a 20 degree HG Econ Burrow quilt and save 2.5lb (wide for ground sleeper).

  • Your big 3 are heavy in general but as you stated you aren't really to invest heavily in that.

  • I'd personally drop the solar panel and kindle and save another pound.

  • I'd add bug spray if you do not have it. And I assume you are probably taking a phone.

  • There are a few others areas like clothing that could be lighter, but if took the above suggestions you could drop 4.5 lbs for about $250
u/bacon_boy_away · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

So is propane the best for weight right now besides alcohol? I love my white gas! Is this the stove you have for solo? https://www.amazon.ca/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

I'm leaving for my solo wct in two days, Tuesday May 7!

u/7861279527412aN · 3 pointsr/Ultralight
u/alaskaj1 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

The brs 3000 also gets a lot of mentions for inexpensive backpacking stoves.

I will say this though, it is nice to have a quality backpacking stove like the pocket rocket 2. I have both the etekcity and the pocket rocket. The pocket rocket feels sturdier and has bigger arms. Here is a photo of the same pot on the PR and etekcity. Those little arms on the etekcity just kind of flop back and forth too. I dont have any experience with the brs 3000 though

u/jcb272 · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Stove: BSR Ultralight stove

Spoon: Toaks Ti Long handle

Pot: Toaks Ti 750ml

Fire: Bic Mini

Seasoning: Tabasco in 30ml plastic dripper bottle

Water bottle: Smart Water 1L (x2)

Purification: Boil (winter) Sawyer Squeeze (other 3 seasons)

Meals: Mountain House, Packit Gourmet, SPAM singles, trail mix

I eat right out of the bag for the dehydrated meals

u/bcgulfhike · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

I second the Fizans! I've had a pair since '09 and they've been everywhere with me with never a problem. They look pretty battered but they work as new!

My girlfriend has the Cascade Mountain Tech carbon poles and they are OK. Although they are not exactly heavy, they seem so after using the Fizans! They are also not as well made and I'll be surprised if they last 10 years without replacing the flick locks (Andrew Skurka has an article on his blog about this issue and how to fix it)

u/yardboz · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

That's what I have and what I was going to suggest. I'm not convinced that I need to spend $100 on hiking poles.
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=twister_B00YHMJ6BQ?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

u/MotherofAllNoobs · 3 pointsr/GearTrade

These are pretty well recommended for their price if no one else offers a trade.

u/purebishop · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Incorrect. The twist lock version is $39.99. The quick lock version, which is what Costco has, is $44.99.

Green Graphics with Cork Handle https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_s8K4ybRHS6MNX

u/ddickson83 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

These are pretty popular over at /r/ultralight

u/mdzealot · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00XM0YGW8 if you're in Canada.

Or, check Costco for them. They're cheap, light, durable enough. If you really like poles, look to upgrade in the future. But give those a go first imo

u/thisisGLADOS · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

you can still get those on amazon for $43 I have them and they are pretty nice

u/benh509 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Great, super light, can hold in hand for better trail illumination or clip on to a hat for hands free.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LUO028U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_b2l2Cb31GDXSB

Awesome headlamp. Super light, lots of levels and a red light and lockable. Get it from Litesmith.com with the shock cord band for an even lighter option.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077Z3LNX9/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_Q3l2CbTEV8FDE

I have both and love both.

u/King_Jeebus · 3 pointsr/PacificCrestTrail

I used my phone for Guthook/camera (and podcasts) so it was pretty much a necessity to be charged before I could leave town... so I made sure my wall-charger, powerbank, and phone were all quick-charge and it made a massive difference for me: I would hit town and put phone/powerbank on charge first thing, do my re-ration etc, then be able to hit the trail again within a few hours with full charge ... whereas I knew other folk who had to stay overnight when they didn't want to.

I got:

  • AUKEY USB Wall Charger with Quick Charge 3.0 & Dual Ports (surprisingly large, but worked great.)
  • Anker PowerCore II 10000 (great, quick charge both in and out. Only 1 port, but I 95% of the time just charged the phone.)
  • Nitecore NU25 (awesome torch. not quickcharge, but never really needed it)
  • 2 USB cables (came with the above stuff, I switched one out for a shorter one eventually)
  • Motorola G4+ (good for Guthook, meh camera but did the job well enough and it was kinda disposable as it only cost $100 unlocked)
  • iPod nano (I just like music so much while I walk I wanted a backup in case phone started getting low, and this thing is tiny. I actually used it a ton!)

    I think 2 ports is enough really, I would just charge the headtorch/ipod when I got the chance or a longer town stay. Ontrail I would kinda start running low if I used the phone a lot for 4 days, and have to be a bit conservy... there's likely better stuff now, but just fyi!
u/soproductive · 2 pointsr/videos

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_D-TtDbHKSV25B

If you live somewhere where this is a risk, why not stock these in your car? Probably a safer alternative to a space heater that you could sleep soundly with.

u/KjoeLjan · 2 pointsr/leagueoflegends

> Like can they go on facebook in picks and bans or draw in paint?

I think I've seen some players play OSU! as a warm-up once or twice, but I'm not sure if it was during LCS. I assume they have limited access to internet and the computer's software though.

> Also what is that squishy thing in their hands all the time?

They use it to keep their hands warm. As /u/CFThirty mentions, they are called "HotHands".

> And are those face cameras always on? or just when broadcasting?

It's another assumption I make, but I think they're always on. The LCS producer will probably tell what images are showed on stream.

> Can they hear the crowd or announcers?

Sometimes, because it is very hard to cancel out all sounds. The huge black things on their ears are meant to keep out the noise though.

> Is it illegal to remove their headsets?

Yep, unless the game is on pause and the referee needs to ask the player something. In that case communication is just easier by removing the headset ;-)

More information about all the LCS rules can be found here.

u/not_a_throw_awya · 2 pointsr/GlobalOffensive
u/stevegcook · 2 pointsr/hockeyplayers

These! Boot-specific versions exist and they stick onto your socks, but the hand ones work just as well and are easier to find. Plus they're usually bigger. Quality varies brand to brand.

u/ThePinkPanther2 · 2 pointsr/AskWomen

I don't think it is necessary to give a gift card for a lowkey care package, but if you know they are struggling financially or they have a favorite grocery store or clothing shop then it sounds like a great idea. You can utilize things like Groupon, Amazon home services for cleaning and home repairs, BlueApron or equivalent food prep boxes. I have heard that many people like those type of subscription boxes.

My personal favorite care package goodies are shared below. I would wrap a pretty scarf around a small bundle of goodies. And to make it all pretty, I would pin artificial flowers and a thoughtful card to the front.

HotHands Hand Warmers

[Nature's Approach Aromatherapy Neck Wrap Herbal Pack, Celestial Indigo] (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0027VH7GK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VuuYBbQY3GTYH)

Handcrafted Goat's Milk and Olive Oil Soap Bar with Attached Natural Organic Sea Sponge - Sweet Strawberry Scent

Tervis Sunflowers Tumbler

Power Thought Cards

But in terms of "adulting" you could give them Groupon vouchers for cooking classes or yoga/meditation. But if they are strapped for cash, I would definitely include a gift card to their local grocery store.

u/SkinII · 2 pointsr/cycling

They're expensive but I absolutely love my Lake winter boots. Got them used on eBay about 5 years ago for $180 in excellent condition. For gloves I use Pearl Izumi lobster gloves.

I've always had cold hands and feet and sometimes even the above isn't enough. When it's really cold I put Hot Hand hand warmers in my gloves, against the palm/base of fingers, and in my boots on top of my toes. They are very toasty.

Tip: The Hot Hands last quite a while and are still useable after a ride. They heat up with air contact so when I finish my ride I put the Hot Hands in a plastic bag and squeeze out as much air as possible. They can't stay in the bag forever but will stay in limbo for a few days. I've used one pair on three different rides. Another trick is that they get hotter the more you shake the package so the first time I only shake it a bit. That way I can be sure they'll be good for another ride.

u/jrwreno · 2 pointsr/preppers

Write yourself a reminder of how to start a fire with the items within your car:

How to start a fire with your car battery

You know, in case you do not have a cigarette lighter working in your car.


It is REALLY. IMPORTANT. To stay dry. Get a slicker for each member of your family, as well as sturdy, water proof foot gear. If you can get a combo snow coat/water proof whatchmacallit, that is perfect. I personally take all items, and vacuum seal them in ziplock Space bags (including first aid, flashlights, flares, everything, to ensure they are protected from moisture before being placed into the duffle bag)

Handwarmers. A buttload of handwarmers. The can last up to 10 hours!


first aid kits, -40 degree sleeping bags, solar rechargeable/hand cranking latterns/flashlights, a simple manual on field survival (scavenging for food, simple traps, signaling for help, a small sum of money in case you need to purchase gas/towing/food, flares, freeze dried, high calorie foods (nuts work amazing))

Water. I am a bit miffed at the person that said he does not store water, but carries a water filter. ALWAYS. CARRY. WATER. A 24 pack of water bottles in the trunk with the tire is good, or a few liter bottles with some air space for expansion. Having a water filter does nothing if you do not have a source for water, or the means to melt snow/ice. Get a water filter as something supplementary. Pack a cheap multi tool and a good knife as well.

A fire starter (flint) and some simple kindling(a sandwich baggie of cotton balls) added tip--coat your cotton balls partially in vaseline, it will increase the flammability of the cotton, and help repel water.


Something I also include, is a pair of foot long 2x4 pieces. I name them the 'clackers'. Smacking 2x4's together is akin to a gun shot, and will get the attention of someone if you do the typical SOS morse code pattern. They also scare away wildlife. Although I always travel armed.

A typical portable jump starting battery
You can often find these little systems with ports which can charge your phone.

A tarp or tent in case your car is compromised and cannot provide adequate shelter

Maps, both local and national (in case you travel) and a compass.

A simple dig out kit for getting your car free (shovel, kitty litter, or a tin can and candle trick, ropes, tire chains, etc)

u/Offthepoint · 2 pointsr/Advice
u/kingofpluto · 2 pointsr/AskReddit

Doesn't matter - get some of these - they are cheap and they last for 10 hours. I have a pair in my socks right now.


http://www.amazon.com/HeatMax-Hot-Hands-Handwarmer-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/dgxshiny · 2 pointsr/discgolf

I always make sure to pop 4 hand warmers in my pockets.

cheap on amazon - http://www.amazon.com/HeatMax-Hot-Hands-Handwarmer-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/ShockaJesus · 2 pointsr/cannabis

You're in luck!

tight underwear or the boxer briefs that run down your legs 6-8 inches preventing anything from falling out. buy an extra pack of hand warmers read the instructions on how to get them to warm reliably. Either preheat the urineluck in a microwave with the cap off in ten second increments (two should be max needed) or set it in a ziplock bag in a cup under hot water for five minutes to raise it up to temp. I let mine stay above temp and then drop it down to the right temp just outside the test clinic (two heaters will do this well) remove one heat pad and head in. Before I drop it in their cup I make sure its below 100 (some can measure initial too hotness) but above 90. Having it not be warm enough is the big risk.

If you get screwed like that a last ditch effort is to rub your thumb on your jeans until its real hot and then touch the temp strip till it hits 96 or so (risky)

Fuck Ronald Regan he was a B movie president and his workplace drug laws are a joke. A MAJORITY or near majority of people here in WA actually smoke pot regularly and fake it like this or in a similar fashion.

u/akaganyaku · 2 pointsr/aves

Something not much people do, but handwarmers really help and give me a sense of warmth in the cold!

u/Electrogypsy1234 · 2 pointsr/cigars

Who need a hose when you can get one of these ?

u/kmung · 2 pointsr/Coachella

We buy one of these $9 portable showers fill them up and throw them on top of our cars. It gets so hot the water is plenty warm and you don't have to wait in lines.

u/GenericUserLogon · 2 pointsr/DIY_tech

You could get (or build) something like this - https://smile.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1509528443&sr=8-8&keywords=shower+bag

Use the hot water from your dispenser to fill up the bag and then use the bag to shower with.

u/plastrd · 2 pointsr/HomeImprovement

If you still have cold water you could heat it on the stove and hang a camp shower in the shower stall. It's basically a water bag with a shower head under it, fill it with warm water and you have enough time for a very brief shower.

u/starkraver · 2 pointsr/BurningMan

Right. The shower is the killer. Showers make the burn soooo much more tolerable, but logistically it doesn't scale well. Evaporator systems clearly have limited effectiveness. They can evaporate enough water for a small camp, but there's no system that effectively evaporates the shower water for 50 people. (if somebody else has a different experience, I'm always happy to be contradicted). But with 50 people the need to evaporate is greater.

Here are my two solutions to the problem:

  1. Conserve on shower grey water. Instead of using a traditional gravity fed solar shower bag use a pump pressurized garden sprayer set on coarse mist. You will be amazed at how clean you can get with just a liter of water when its under pressure, and pumping it up tends to last half of the shower. Just re-pump and finish.

  2. Make camp members responsible for hauling out their own grey water. If everybody takes out a few gallons of shower grey water with them, its really no burden at all. Many hands make something something. This has the double effect of encouraging conservation and engages your whole came in resource management and planning.
u/TripAndFly · 2 pointsr/ElectricForest

something like this


paired with this

and you're set for like 30 bucks

or you could just bring a black 5 gal bucket, fill it up in the morning and let it sit in the sun to warm up and just dunk a washcloth in there to wipe down and use wet wipes on the naughty bits. that would cost you like 4 dollars.

or, you could skip the tent part all together and just plop that bag on the roof of your car and spray yourself down in your underwear/swimsuit or naked if that's your thing...

edit: never tried the shower trailers, heard they aren't too bad though.

u/ssirish21 · 2 pointsr/ElectricForest

They're a little pricey, but a solar shower always did me well. They're like $15-$20 at dicks or target. It's a black vinyl bag with a hose that you fill with water and leave in the sun. It's not a perfect replacement, but for rinsing off the grungy bits, it beats 10 bucks a day


https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awdb_t1_bmwZDbPWFTDW8

u/trippy-vibes · 2 pointsr/ElectricForest

this one has worked well for us. it's a pain to dry out, but for $9, it does the trick. it's easy to fill up, put on top of your car, and wash from there. I don't know about the tent set up though.

https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_3?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1526669441&sr=1-3&keywords=solar+shower

u/mysickfix · 2 pointsr/vandwellers

or one of these for under 10 bucks...... solarshower




hold 5 gallons, need no running vehicle (promise that thing will kill the battery after 2-3 uses, if not one with a weak batt, without the engine running)


feel free to church it up with a sponge or something like that.

u/nootay · 2 pointsr/camping

These Solar Showers work fairly well and small enough to pack.

u/catsasss · 2 pointsr/legaladvice
u/jarenmorris · 2 pointsr/overlanding

Pooping in the woods tho is so liberating! There are some portable toilet options and they make little pop up tent style bathrooms that you can also use to shower in.

Tent - WolfWise Pop-up Shower Tent Green https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AT3T0GC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_5WXmDbGHCSTYH

Toilet - Reliance Products Luggable Loo Portable 5 Gallon Toilet https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000FIAPXO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_aYXmDbGPG18AJ

While trailer might be super comfy, you might end up limited in exploring back roads while you are out.

u/BootyTrain716 · 2 pointsr/bonnaroo

They make seats for buckets too btw. Or you can buy the full kit.

Reliance Products Luggable Loo Portable 5 Gallon Toilet https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000FIAPXO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_9Sw8CbA26Q8J0

u/NoNotTheBeeeees · 2 pointsr/preppers

A very important thing people forget about when prepping. Especially if you are hunkered down/bugging in, you're going to need a place to do your business. Multiply that if you have family.

I got this, although I'm sure there are plenty others just as good. A rigged up 5 gallon bucket could probably do the trick, as well.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000FIAPXO?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

u/StarvingIsVerboten · 2 pointsr/CrohnsDisease

Terrible idea, unless your idea of a good idea is getting diarrhea spatters all over your tires, legs and shoes.

A 5 gallon bucket with a toilet seat lid and a biodegradable plastic liner would be a much better idea for a road trip.

u/ShoegazingStardust · 2 pointsr/bonnaroo

I always bring my own toilet. I have this one: http://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368218018&sr=8-1&keywords=luggable+loo

Nothing is nicer than to use the bathroom at your own camp. We have a huge tent, so we can set up the bathroom in there. We've also brought a pop-up shower and used it to set up a bathroom, kinda like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Portable-Changing-Camping-Privacy-Outdoor/dp/B007ZJ99HE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368218091&sr=8-1&keywords=pop+up+camping+shower

u/pyramid_of_greatness · 2 pointsr/Hammocks

Good call on the Amazon source.. It's coming up at $17.43 right now for green, which might be even cheaper when you factor in shipping.

u/morrisom · 2 pointsr/Hammocks

Since it is sold out on REI, it is on Amazon for perhaps a few dollars cheaper at $19.95.

In addition, I have this hammock and as an inexperienced hammocker it is wonderful, very compact (not sure on weight but it fits in a bag that just about fits in my [small] hand). I've been using it on my back porch in the Southeast, but plan on taking it out as a sleeping apparatus as soon as I can get a reasonable shelter.

u/pawildernessskills · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

Grand Trunk Ultralight is all I use now. Never had an issue with them and they're only around $20.

u/mercurysinking · 2 pointsr/ifiwonthelottery

I'm not so sure about that [Edit: I misread and though you said incredibly expensive, but here's some data anyway]. It looks like it's just steel pipes that are bent to make a tube, and then welded. You can get 240 inches of steel pipe for ~$100. Taking the diameter of the ring to be 10 feet, each ring would need 2pi10 feet (377 inches), so each ring would need 1.5 (~$150) worth of tubing. You could get 3 lengths of tube (~$300), weld them together, cut them at the correct spot, then bend them with a pipe bender. Weld the three rings together (somehow), and you have a rough prototype for the structure. Add in some smaller pieces of pipe for stability between the rings, get some S hooks, and get three hammocks for ~$60.

Total price: ~$500 with the proper equipment (pipe bender, drill, welder). You could probably whip together a pipe bender fairly easily (plywood bent into the correct shape, and some leverage points for bending the tubing).

But now, when you're done with it, you have an unstorable gigantic ring hammock. Hopefully it doesn't turn into an eye sore.

u/droidpoo · 2 pointsr/shutupandtakemymoney
u/rottenpossum · 2 pointsr/Hammocks

Why not this one instead? http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B001AIHB76/

cheaper and lighter.

u/greatgolferhugeass · 2 pointsr/phoenix
u/biglebowski55 · 2 pointsr/BabyBumps

I have a couple of these and they work wonders, especially combined with a fan.

u/rainbowterfly · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

They are made of some magical material. You get it wet, and then put it around the back of your neck. It totally cools you down! I got one in my swag bag for a marathon a few years ago and became obsessed with them! And they are really reasonable price-wise. Here's one for like $8: Ergodyne Chill-Its® 6602 Evaporative Cooling Towel, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001B5I57I/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_hedMxbW5NEAH6

u/atesbo · 2 pointsr/xxfitness

I just got this towel. It's just like a diver's shammy if you are familiar with those. It's crazy absorbent, stays cool because you dampen it before use, and has a very smooth texture so it shouldn't rub you raw while trying to use it.

u/ismon · 2 pointsr/Welding

there is no way to escape the heat. I'm in the southeast US in a building that retains heat well, after a couple hot days it will be 100-105 heat index. have to drink a lot of water to avoid heat stroke. I always wear a cotton long sleeve work shirt, very rarely will I put on a heavy jacket unless I'm doing overhead work.

they handed out these cooling towels the other day but I haven't tried it yet.

u/bboromatt · 2 pointsr/LifeProTips

I would suggest buying moisture-wicking clothes. This will make things a lot better and it is not heavy material. Also you can buy cooling towel (https://www.amazon.com/Ergodyne-Chill-Its%C2%AE-6602-Evaporative-Cooling/dp/B001B5I57I) to stay cool

u/RipcitySun · 2 pointsr/Construction

I work in Hawaii and the sun and the humidity is super brutal. The best stuff on the market in my opinion are the "Chill-its", they include bandana's, neck towels and neck shades. Other than that bring a ton of sun block and water.

Here is an amazon link for the products.

https://www.amazon.ca/Ergodyne-6602-Chill-Its-Cooling-Towel/dp/B001B5I57I

https://www.amazon.ca/Ergodyne-6630-High-Performance-Cap-Blue/dp/B00419TVCY/ref=sr_1_3?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1493078247&sr=1-3&keywords=chill+its

u/BrittB1974 · 2 pointsr/discgolf
u/redd255 · 2 pointsr/BurningMan

This works really well: Chill-Its 6602 Evaporative Cooling Towel, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001B5I57I?ref=yo_pop_ma_swf

u/im_sooo_mature · 2 pointsr/WaltDisneyWorld

Maybe take a cooling towel or two in the parks. My family went in July and these helped a lot!


u/ShiftedClock · 2 pointsr/MultipleSclerosis

This cooling towel was a life saver this summer. I haven't been able to afford a cooling vest yet, but I'm amazed at how effective this thing is. Just soak it in cool water and wrap it around your neck. I was able to get a lot more done this summer because of it.

By the way, I absolutely love this thread. Such a great idea for a post, and the comments have been very helpful.

u/geekymama · 2 pointsr/beyondthebump

Sun shades for the window. Make sure the vents in the center and on the passenger side are aimed toward the back. You can even have someone sit back there while you adjust them to check on the air flow. If he's still in the infant carrier with the little canopy, make sure that's down.

There's also this cooling towel that could help.

u/andthebatman · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Well there's a different kind of knife for every job. It's hard to do a one-size-fits-all. But, if you're specifically looking at a general purpose camping knife, look no farther than the
Becker Campanion
Also, /r/knives is a good place to ask. I'm recommending the Becker because it's tough and you'll never break it. Can't speak to the Buck, never owned their stuff.

u/Sung-gil · 2 pointsr/knives

Cheaper side go with the SOG Seal Pup.

For something of better quality go with the ESEE 4, or the Ka-Bar BK2.

u/Hammerhil · 2 pointsr/Survival

Here are some recommendations. If you are doing batoning and splitting, I would recommend something with a thick spine (and learning how to do it correctly). I wouldn't open cans with my knife because it's a poor tool choice for that and there are plenty of dirt cheap can openers.

Here are a few options:

KA Bar Becker companion in 1095 steel

Ontario Rat 3 in 1095

Morakniv Companion Heavy Duty carbon blade

cheap US army can openers so you don't damage your knife or hands opening cans

​

These are some good high carbon blades in a variety of prices. I do recommend buying one you can feel to get a good idea if the grip is right, but this should give you some variety of makes and what they offer. These are all black anodized coatings which will help keep rust away. My preference is for a knife in the 7 inch length range for chopping, no serrations (pain to upkeep and don't cut, they rip) and a neutral finish because black knives are hard to find if you drop it in the dark. NEVER buy a knife that isn't full tang.

Go out and get a feel for handles, blade shapes and lengths and try what you can borrow before making a decision.

u/stylus2vinyl · 2 pointsr/knives

I'm currently eyeing the BK10 or the BK2

The BK2 seems better suited to heavier tasks, some light chopping and batoning whereas the BK10 seems like a nicer all around knife that can handle batoning and the abuse but is also thinner so it can carve and feather stuff.

u/TheEnterprise · 2 pointsr/funny

Sorry bout that I thought I had a link:

Becker

u/RunsWithSporks · 2 pointsr/AskWomen

My wife has to bring a go-girl when we go camping. She swears by it. As a man, I would have to advise bringing some type of blade. I would suggest a fixed one not a folder in case you need to split wood etc. An affordable but capable option is the KaBar Becker. It should last you a long time and is very versatile. Have fun!

u/malecky · 2 pointsr/knives

The Becker BK-2 is a fine beater of knife for your first decent quality fixed-blade. Great size, great price.

Edit: If you really want something "cool-looking" but still functional, the new Becker BK-5 could fit the bill.

u/flyingmx5 · 2 pointsr/knives
u/homrqt · 2 pointsr/Survival

Pros: classic design with a lot of history behind it, fairly rugged, easy to sharpen, holds an edge, not too heavy, inexpensive, good for batoning wood, I've opened plenty of cans with mine

Cons: if you spend more money you can get a slightly better steel in some knives

This is the one I have.

Ka-Bar 2-1212-3 Black Fighting Knife https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000BSY9D0/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_c2wNzbZPACSBG

A good alternative could be the Becker BK2 variant of the KABAR which is a little newer and more heavy duty. Better at batoning and holds up a little better. But to me it has more of a kitchen knife appearance instead of the traditional KABAR military/survival appearance.

Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade Knife https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001N1DPDE/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_dgrNzbTY2SGCD

Both are solid outdoors knives though.

u/jimmyd1911 · 2 pointsr/preppers
u/Geodyssey · 2 pointsr/knives

Others have mentioned it but the Ka-Bar Becker BK2 is widely loved as a survival/do everything knife.

If the BK2's blade is too big and heavy for you, you might consider its little brother the BK16.

Also consider one of the Scrapyard Knives like the 311, 411, or 511.

Good luck!

u/unrealtrip · 2 pointsr/knives

That was also my worry as well. I got mine off amazon and it is the second generation in spite of the product photo which shows a first gen.

edit: Price was $52.40, free shipping, no tax of course. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001N1DPDE/ref=ox_ya_os_product

u/diversionmary · 2 pointsr/knifeclub

Idk I'd prefer less than 5" for bushcraft. I generally like 3 or 4.

OP, check out the Becker BK2 for 62

u/ZombieKingKong · 2 pointsr/knives
u/NOCIANONSA · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

I also use Kroger RO water (now 39 cents/gallon) to fill these 7 gallon containers: www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Aqua-Tainer-Gallon-Container/dp/B001QC31G6

u/snugglebandit · 2 pointsr/Portland

I haven't really looked in to long term storage treatment that much. Usually around this time of year, I'm dumping them into the rain barrel and refilling. The rain barrel is still quite full however.
I have 2 types of 7 gallon container. These ones and these ones. If I get more, they'll be the jerry can style as they are easier to move around and take up less floor space. If you have a lot of space, something like this could keep you in water for a month and maybe be a hero to your neighbors as well.

u/LarsAlereon · 2 pointsr/homeowners
u/GeneralMalaiseRB · 2 pointsr/preppers

The cheap bottles and water containers that they sell at the grocery store are not really meant to least very long. The water doesn't expire, but the container does... sort of. After a certain amount of time, the plastic can begin leaching into the water. It degrades, to an extent. That's why people are always talking about "food grade" and "BPA free" plastic containers for longer term water storage.

Forget hoarding bottles and grocery-store jugs of water. Get some BPA-free jugs (or better yet, a 55 gallon drum) and fill it up yourself. If you have chlorinated city tap water, you're probably fine. If not, just add some water treatment to it (or look up the proper amount of bleach to add, for a cheaper alternative).

This is the sort of water jug I'm talking about.

u/satcomwilcox · 2 pointsr/preppers

Consider the Reliance Aqua-Tainer. They aren't as cheap as clean food grade 55s, but the are a lot easier to find places to put. You could put a few of them in the bottom of a closet and put a board over it to make a shoe shelf or something. The seals are really good. They are kind of tall but possibly with a set of these Bed Risers you could line the underside of your bed with the laying on their sides.

u/leahcim435 · 2 pointsr/VEDC

Heres the one I use. It's not the same form factor, but it's similar in size to having two Jerry cans

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001QC31G6/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1504656959&sr=8-3&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=water+storage


Edit: I see a negative review on there that claims the company doesn't make these to the same quality anymore. I bought mine a few years ago and haven't had any issues, but I guess buyer beware

u/pseudo_mccoy · 2 pointsr/vandwellers

I have four of these 7 gal jugs but only used them my first month. Then I got lazy and started buying water in bottles and jugs. It's less weight to carry and provides a supply of piss containers.

u/TheStuffle · 2 pointsr/EDC

Can't go wrong with a Mora. Good size, good sheath, good steel, cheap as dirt.

u/fromkentucky · 2 pointsr/Survival

I had an Ontario RAT-5 for a while. About the same size as an ESEE 5, but with a thinner blade and full-flat grind. The handle was uncomfortably bulky and although it held up to my abuse, I just didn't like it. The blade was thin enough to do finer carving tasks, but it was too wide and the edge profile was terrible. I ended up using my Mora knife and Fiskars hatchet more and the RAT-5 was relegated to batoning duty and even in that I preferred the hatchet. In fact, I carved my first bow drill kit with that Fiskars.

I was considering stepping up to an Ontario RAT-7, but instead I traded the RAT-5 for a KaBar Becker BK7, which is a BEAST of a knife. Longer than an ESEE 5, but just as thick and with a similar profile. It really impressed me with the amount of work it could do and how easy it was to use, but it was heavy and just too fat to do anything but chop and split, so again, I was using my Mora and hatchet for most stuff.

I finally decided to try a different direction and traded the BK7 for a much smaller ESEE 4. Around the same time I bought a Bahco Laplander, and I am in love with this combo. The Bahco eats through 1-2" branches with ease (while generating plenty of sawdust for tinder) and the ESEE is just long enough to baton them into kindling and carve up some feather sticks. The best part is, the ESEE 4 and Bahco together weigh about as much as the BK7 in its sheath, and take up about as much space, but they are FAR more versatile.

I realize the ESEE 4 may be just out of your price range, but Kabar makes a similar knife called the BK16. However, the ESEE comes with a lifetime warranty.

I still take my Fiskars with me occasionally, but for weekend camping, I can process plenty of firewood with the ESEE and Bahco faster than I ever could with any of the bigger knives. If I needed to build a shelter or was venturing into unfamiliar territory, I'd want the hatchet because it's such a capable tool.

The ESEE 5 was designed for downed pilots who can't fit a hatchet or folding saw into their kit but may need to build a shelter, so they made it big and heavy. I understand first hand that big knives are appealing and certainly have their strong points, but their size, weight and thickness can make them difficult to use in a lot of ways and in reality, a big knife will never chop as well as a decent hatchet, because the knife's weight is centered just above the handle, not directly behind a huge wedge that drives into the wood. What you really want in a survival knife is versatility and I've spent a lot of time, money and energy figuring out that size doesn't add versatility.

u/Loki3050 · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

I'm new to Bushcraft in this past last year myself. I posted the link to the first and so far only knife I have purchased below. Its a Mora Companion and runs under $15. I've cut rope and cloth with it, carved wood, batoned wood and generaly tried to abuse it within reason and thus far I'm impressed.

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396450010&sr=8-1&keywords=mora+companion

When I finally do upgrade I think I will go with the Mora Bushcraft Black.

From one beginner to another.
Theres my two cents.

u/Vanq86 · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

First I'd make sure you both have all the clothing and footwear you need to be comfortable and the things you'd need for an urban day out (pack, water bottle, some snacks, etc.). Nothing ruins a day like an unexpected blister / rain shower that causes a chill / burned hand from a fire.

After that I'd consider basic survival needs and comforts that might be different in the woods. A small survival kit (and the knowledge required to use it), toilet paper, bug spray, gloves to protect your hands from heat and thorns, a tarp (which you already say you have) to escape the sun or rain, etc.. One suggestion I have that I don't see mentioned often is a lightweight foam kneeling pad. You can get them at the dollar stores in the gardening section usually and for the negligible weight and space they're worth having in my opinion. They are great for kneeling on (obviously), which you'll be doing a lot when practicing bushcraft skills like fire making, and they make a huge difference for the backside when sitting on ground / logs / rocks that are hard / wet / dirty.

With comfort and survival covered you can look at the real 'tools' of bushcraft. The most important thing, in my opinion, is a good knife for each of you. Soooo many projects / skills that are considered 'bushcraft' require / are made easier when you have a decent knife. You don't need to spend a lot (a Mora Companion is a great choice for under 10 dollars), just be sure to do your homework before spending money so you don't end up with something that looks cool but isn't practical for your bushcraft needs.

Beyond the knife I won't go into details about the rest of my suggestions but I think you'll find reasoning behind them fairly self-evident. I've been bushcrafting / camping / hunting for the better part of 2 decades now and all items I list below are all ones that I've personally used many, many times and wouldn't recommend if I didn't find them awesome and reliable. If you look into them further I think you'll find most / all are considered the best 'bang for your buck' option in their given class.


Mora Companion fixed blade knife - carbon or stainless doesn't matter, both are great: ~$12-15

Nalgene leak-proof water bottle - The cheaper HDPE bottle is actually better believe it or not: ~$5-8

Bahco Laplander folding saw - Silky saws are worth the upgrade price in my opinion but are definitely just a 'nice to have', considering Bahcos can't be beat for the price / function / reliability: ~$20-25

Sawyer Mini water filter - filters twice as good as the LifeStraw (0.1 vs 0.2 microns), lasts 10 times longer (100k vs 1k gallons), is much more versatile (you can screw the Sawyer onto a 2 litre coke bottle), and costs less to boot: ~$19

Fiskars X7 hatchet - I know you already have one bust I figured I'd mention it. For a bombproof, light weight, made in Finland hatchet it can't be beat for the price: ~$20-25

Tramontina 18" machete - great balance and blade, just sand or wrap the handle in some tape if yours isn't finished perfectly to avoid potential blisters (this is also where good gloves come in) - ~$15-18

u/DAEFlair · 2 pointsr/VEDC

Hah, funny you linked the EAB Pocket Knife - I actually found one of those (Or something comparable?) in my things from when I was in boyscouts and I laughed at how small it was and almost threw it out.

I am very tempted to just go rambo and buy a Ka-bar but I probably won't. Lower price will make it disposable and hopefully I won't ever have to use it anyway. Thinking the same way as you, quality...but functionally a waste of money

What are your thoughts on this one? https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZAIXSC/?coliid=I2WSGFIH1CDNP4&colid=ZZRP77UIJCYE&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it I Found it in another thread highly recommended and it's cheap. If not, will probably get one of the first two you linked.

u/freeshavocadew · 2 pointsr/knives

Morakniv makes some great budget fixed blades, some are quite small and most have a general utilitarian use. Here's a model for less than $17 and these have built a really good reputation for value and hard use.

However, maybe that isn't quite what you're looking for. Maybe you want something thicker, more substantial? Continuing with fixed blades is the ESEE 4P which before shipping is $99. Another option would be the Ontario Knife Company's RAT-7 for currently $63. Being an avid knife collector, I have maybe 150 total knives total. That said, I think if I had only 1 knife to take out with me and feel secure in doing so, the Kabar/Becker BK7 would be it. For ~$78 new on Amazon, it's just a big hunk of steel (1095 steel specifically) that can tear through almost anything you put in front of it from wood to meat to a car door panel lol. I would recommend looking into some customization for it for a couple for reasons. The black plastic handle scales that it comes with are not so great. This can be resolved by using a bike tire inner tube mod OR just grabbing those ~$40 micarta scales that the link suggests below the photos of the knife itself. The sheath is definitely serviceable for your needs, but you may eventually want to upgrade it to a kydex sheath, or even a leather one if you really like leather. Finally, the coating that's on all of the Becker knives has the benefit of protecting the blade very well but the cost is a lot of friction and eventually that coating will wear off and it'll look different. Many modders just strip that coating off and blue or force patina it and frequently oil after use. Or go the other route and spend hours up front polishing it to a mirror polish and now you have a knife that will look really Bowie-ish.

u/dnietz · 2 pointsr/Survival

I have two Leatherman tools. I have used them for over a decade and have never had any trouble with them. They are easy to sharpen and they don't have a single dot of rust on them. Every tool is going to have its limits. I wouldn't use the knife on a Leatherman as a crow bar. I have never heard anyone complain about their Leatherman.

I have seen many people complain about the Sven Saw. It seems to be high quality and the design is very convenient. However, because of its triangular design, it actually can only cut smaller branches. Perhaps you aren't intending to cut a 6 inch limb. Just know that anything thicker than probably 3 inches is probably a big pain to cut with the Sven. Also, from what I understand, the Sven Saw only takes Sven Saw Blades, which is an added inconvenience and expense.

I have a basic cheap bow saw (one piece, non foldable) that I think works great. Bonus is that you can, if needed, use it with standard hack saw blades.

I don't currently own a Mora knife, but they do seem to be universally loved. Please note however that there are several Mora knives that range from $8 to $18 (both stainless and non-stainless). They don't seem to be substantially different from the one you mentioned that is $65.

This is the Mora Bushcraft Survival knife you mentioned ($65):

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Bushcraft-Survival-Stainless-Steel/dp/B005CAPU80


Different Mora knives are either non-stainless carbon steel or stainless. Also, the thickness of the blade varies. You can get the thicker stainless steel knife in the cheaper model ($14):

http://www.amazon.com/Lime-Green-Mora-Companion-Knife/dp/B00BU9ATS8/ref=pd_sim_sg_12

I'm sure you can find one without a lime green handle. There seem to be a thousand models of Mora knives.

Another example, slightly thinner but still stainless ($11):

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Stainless-Steel-Camo-Knife/dp/B005K994QM/ref=pd_sim_sg_11

This one is not stainless but the steel is even thicker than the one you mentioned ($40) if durability is your priority:

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Sandvik-Stainless-4-3-Inch/dp/B009O01H0Y/ref=pd_sim_sg_9

This last one is almost exactly the same as the knife you mentioned, except that it is $17 instead of $65:

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376873143&sr=8-1&keywords=mora+knife+stainless+steel

Perhaps the price of the one you mentioned is inflated because of the sheath, but the reviews rate that sheath badly. They mention the clip disconnecting unexpectedly and also it does seem like the sharpening stone and the fire steel to be a bit of a gimmick. Fire steels are like $3 at Walmart and maybe $5 if you want the bigger military style model. The sharpening stone attached to the sheath seems to be toy like and not really functional.


Another one that seems to be the same as yours without the gimmicky sheath ($38):

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Outdoor-Stainless-4-3-Inch/dp/B003FYJU9A/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1376873143&sr=8-12&keywords=mora+knife+stainless+steel

There seems to be a huge variation of prices on Mora knives. The best ones seem to be the ones that are Stainless Steel and the thickness is around 0.1 or 0.098 inches.

I already own several high quality expensive knives, so I don't have a need to purchase the $65 range Mora knife. But the ones that are around $11 seem to be a great deal to use in situations where I might want to avoid damaging my expensive knife.

My favorite to purchase cheaply right now is:

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Stainless-Steel-Camo-Knife/dp/B005K994QM/ref=pd_sim_sg_11

Because it has the hook at the front of the grip, which will help prevent your hands from slipping on to the cutting edge if you have to push into something. I think in survival situations, you hands may be tired, shaky, wet and dirty, which might make them prone to slipping. And of course, a survival situation is the absolute worst time to cut your hand.

Those are my 8 cents worth of contribution.

u/projectself · 2 pointsr/BBQ

they are. when i divorced I did not want to buy "steak knives", so I bought the two knives I had used for years in the past and knife blocks for them.

6 of these kershaw pocket knives..
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009VC9YA/

6 of these mora knives..
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004ZAIXSC

and two knife blocks..
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004X6M97O

u/gandothesly · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

I'll have to disagree here. The Mora Bushcraft Triflex is one of the finest blades I've used. It is light weight, yet, is extremely durable. It sharpens easily, holds and edge, and is about the right size for bushcraft in my hands.

I've used them to prep meat and vegetables, carve wood needles, baton firewood, cut cordage, fell tiny trees, and most other tasks one needs in the woods or at home. It is a joy to use.

I've used other brands at 20 times the price and have been left not nearly as satisfied.

Don't take for granted that you won't feel bad about really using this blade. At less than $30 you won't worry about replacing it (but you might never need to).

I've held and used the Mora Companion and the Mora HighQ Robust, I give them to folks that go into the woods with me as gifts. They are fine knives as well, with the same qualities as the Triflex.

If you are cheapo, grab one of these knives and try it. I'd bet most people like them.

As for the knife is not an axe part, we'll disagree there too. The Parang type machete, and other long knives of similar design is a type of tool used in many parts of the world. It can be used very skillfully for rather delicate tasks, such as food preparation, or it can be used to cut down a tree. In some areas that's all a person carries.

Firesteel, I'm with stupid_guy, hit Amazon: Light My Fire Scout has been working for me. I like that when it feels like you are holding it right, you are. Works good in the dark that way.

Guyot Stainless Steel Bottle, 32-Ounce

And one more thing you didn't ask for, but I love. And I like to spread the love:

GSI Halulite Ketalist

I've got a compass that I've used for 30 some years, but can't find it anywhere.

Let us know what you get and how much you like it after using it a bit! :-)


u/Lurkndog · 2 pointsr/bugout

I like the 32 ounce single walled stainless steel nalgene bottle. The one with straight walls is best because it nests snugly in the GSI/Walmart steels cup. Because it is single walled, you can boil water in it with a campfire. It is also the exact right size for a single dose of water purification tablets if you don't want to boil it.

It is hard to find now, Nalgene has switched to a tapered design closer to a tall coffee cup. That one rattles around in the GSI/Walmart cup, but apparently fits snugly inside the Stanley Adventure Camp Cook Kit.

u/red_rhyolite · 2 pointsr/backpacking

Ehh I'd be wary. You can find gear for cheap, you just have to do some searching. Looks like you've got plenty of time to do that, too. If you're not willing to commit to backpacking as a hobby just yet, don't worry about buying the $300 sleeping bag. I have a $40 one I got on Amazon and it works amazing if you run hot. We have a "guest" backpack that we got from Costco for $25 (yeah it's not the best engineered pack, but perfect for someone who only goes once every few years). Costco is also great for cheap, non-cotton clothing and socks. They should be getting all of that stuff in in a few weeks.

REI gear sales are the way to go for headlamps, pads and tents. This is a good mid-level cooking set for two, and the Pocket Rocket is a good quality, low price stove option.

Basically, for the cost to rent, you could get mostly set-up with mid-range gear you can keep. You've got the time to find the good deals, why not take advantage of it?

Also, super jealous. I've always wanted to go to Glacier N.P.

u/iacobus42 · 2 pointsr/IowaCity

Have you considered getting a Stanley Cup?

u/Shepsdaddy · 2 pointsr/bugout
u/lambchopper71 · 2 pointsr/GoRVing

I use a GSI JavaDrip. Works awesome.. I use it camping in my RV and it fits in the saddlebags of my motorcycle too.

https://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-Javadrip-Portable-Coffee/dp/B00OHCLO0W/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1497043828&sr=8-5&keywords=gsi+outdoor+java

I also use this Stanley Cook set Comes with two cups and the pot is big enough to fill the JavaDrip most of the way.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90?psc=1

u/brandoneil · 2 pointsr/coffeewithaview
  • Here's the Cook Set it comes with two mugs.
  • This is the exact stove I'm using but there are plenty of other ones.
  • And here is a mix of fuel, stoves, and accessories.
u/joeldleo · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I suggest Stanley Adventure Camp Cook Set 24oz Stainless Steel https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_tPdSAb2ZQ65Y6

And a small plastic plate. Remove one of the cups and you stove will fit in the pot when packed.

u/phobos2deimos · 2 pointsr/hiking

Stove - Video
Mug
Pot, Pan set or this, depending on cooking preference.
Cutlery or this
Get fuel locally, such as the MSR butane mix for $5.99/8oz at Sports Authority
Total cost <$40

u/Ralmaelvonkzar · 2 pointsr/CampfireCooking

From my experience in scouts the only things that weren't shit were stainless and cast iron. There's such a weight difference that it's easy to know which to use based on what style of camping you're doing.

Currently using this bought it at target on clearence for less than 10 which was nice. Actually use it at home a lot for rice or when I'm too lazy to wash the real pots/pans

u/preps2017 · 2 pointsr/preppers

I like to have multi-fuel stove to keep my options open. I keep this Bushbox pocket stove in my bug out bag to cook in an emergency. I like it because it takes up almost no space, is very stable, is easy to put together, and can boil water using little more than twigs - no need to expend energy gathering and processing large amounts of fire wood. I use this mess kit to boil water. In case there is no dry wood available, I have a back-up alcohol burner that fits in the stove (a bit snug but works well enough) and I keep some denatured alcohol on hand as an alternative fuel source. There are lots of little burners like this on the market. I went with the Solo option because I would ultimately like to upgrade to the whole solo stove kit, which is cool but currently out of my price range. Finally, I have some Esbit fuel tabs that also work with the stove, but I view these as a last resort because I think they smell terrible! Some people swear by them though.

This set up works great for me as a single person.

u/Inquisitive_Cretin · 2 pointsr/TwoXChromosomes

This is a nice quality inexpensive mess kit (no spork)

This is a really nice quality flashlight!

Here is a good quality pocket knife.

u/RC0032 · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

This is a solid budget friendly pot I use (ditch the green cups). It boils water for backpacking meals and will take a beating.

this one



Now if you have deep pockets get any titanium pot from Amazon and save 4/5oz's

u/jeepngun · 2 pointsr/camping

I use this. It has everything you require and I got it for $14.99 at WalMart
It a bit smaller I guess but close enough. I can heat up more than enough water for two mountain house meals http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-Adventure-Camp-Cook-Set/dp/B005188T90/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425585044&sr=8-1&keywords=stanley+cook+set

u/sew_butthurt · 2 pointsr/PressureCooking

Ahh, awesome! I've made that recipe once and it was indeed delicious. If you haven't tried the chicken thigh version, IMO it's better: https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/04/pressure-cooker-fast-and-easy-chicken-chile-verde-recipe.html

edit to add: Have you considered a smaller burner like one of these? https://www.amazon.com/Iwatani-Corporation-America-ZA-3HP-Portable/dp/B006H42TVG/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=portable+gas+cooktop&qid=1566313614&s=gateway&sr=8-3

u/grainzzz · 2 pointsr/Cooking

We have a portable butane stove we can put on the dinner table like this. (This is also really handy for picnics and cookouts...or if you like hot pot, or shabu shabu, or fondue...very handy to have around)

And then we have something like this or this to put on the stove. Personally, I'd go to a korean grocery, as they'll probably sell something like this at a cheaper price.

You probably can get away with using a small pan too.

I wouldn't buy bottled marinade. The sauce is really easy to make, and there are plenty of recipes online.

Edit: note also that if you're planning on doing this inside there's going to be a bit of smoke. You may have to open windows! The 'smokeless' pan above isn't as smokeless as one would like.

u/mthmchris · 2 pointsr/Cooking

Yeah while you don't need a jet engine to stir-fry, I do think gas is preferable to electric. People make do, but I personally just can't stand electric ranges.

This's the burner we use, more or less. It seems slightly different (perhaps even a bit stronger? When I converted our stove's KwH to BTUs I got something a shade over 9k but that one says its 12k), but it's the same company and the same model name.

If you opt for something a shade stronger like this one, 15k BTUs is like literally exactly what a Chinese home kitchen stove is. Smack a wok ring on that for a nice large round bottomed wok and you got basically an ideal set-up imo.

u/thedreday · 2 pointsr/AskCulinary

I would be concerned about what the torch is burning and what residues are landing on your steak. Someone mentioned using the torch to heat up the pan, then throw the steaks in. I like that better. Or better yet, buy a single gas burner. So you can use it outside to avoid the fire alarm then bring it in to finish on the oven.

u/keeptrackoftime · 2 pointsr/anime

Hope you like it! Sorry it's not more organized. If you're stir frying often, maybe consider getting one of these. Every Asian household has one and most Asian grocery stores sell them. They run on butane cans that are pretty cheap. Cooking on gas is next level even compared to induction. You can set a wok ring over it for some pretty serious stir fry capability for not that much money.

u/bitterdick · 2 pointsr/AskCulinary

Regulating the temperature on an electric burner element is tricky. If you want to experience the joy of gas cooking, try a butane burner like this.

I have a gas range, but I also have a single burner induction cooktop I use occasionally when I don't want to heat up the house or for overflow cooking, and that also actually does a pretty great job of controlling temperature. It does require either cast iron or tri-ply cookware though.

u/FireStarterBob · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I have one and I love it. It is super hot, sometimes even simmer (the lowest setting on mine) is a little hotter than I want it.

The fuel is easy to find at asian shops and super cheap (~50c a can), while lasting 45min-1.5 hours depending on how high you have the heat

The one real negative I see is cooking in high wind. There is no protection for the flame, but even then I've never had the flame go out.

Here is a link to the model I have.

u/doodoo_gumdrop · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I am looking at some budget pads like the Trail Scout or the Klymit V Lightweight. Sounds like the consensus so far is manual. Might wait until I can afford a better manual one.

u/rouselle · 2 pointsr/backpacking

Yes they are off my list because I ended up purchasing them. The pad was the [Klymit Static V](Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_kesFxbNDWCCR4) and the bag was the [Teton Trailhead 20](TETON Sports TrailHead 20F Ultralight Sleeping Bag, Orange/Grey https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007JTLKCC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_dgsFxbG1YRZ7S). I wasn't feeling the quality of the Teton bag so I ended up returning that. Never used it on the trail but laying in my bed with it I didn't like the feel of the fabric. That's one thing that I'm going to put more money into. As for the pad though it's awesome. Took my sickly lungs about 20 breaths to blow up but it works well. It definitely doesn't need to be pumped up as tight as an air bed. Good quality item there that o would buy again.

u/M_Mitchell · 2 pointsr/MTB

I have the Lynx 2 person tent and like it.

The Lynx 1 person also looks like a fantastic option.

Only thing I don't like is their performance in the wind. If the wind hits the sides it'll blow into you a little but if you are not in a field you should be more than fine.

Are you trying to put your bike into it too? I just ran a chain around a tree and through the bike and then ran one of the tents supports through and made it supported by the bike so noone could remove it while I was sleeping.

Here is something that kinda includes your bike but it's not going to shield your bike if that's what you want.

My personal recommendation is to go with one of the lynxs and then use the rest of your budget for a decent flashlight/lantern, and a sleeping pad.

This is my sleeping pad and while nice, I would recommend getting something a little bigger because I would roll on the edges pretty frequently.

u/darthjenni · 2 pointsr/camping

I am old and fat, I like a lot of squish, and most of the time we are camping in the desert.

We have the old version of the Neo Air. It is good for car camping and backpacking. Coupler kit

We also have an old Dreamtime for car camping that has served us well over the years. It has a built in coupler.

This year we upgraded to Exped MegaMat 10 LXW. It is well worth the money. We camp 2+ months out of the year. And this mat should last 7+ years. So for us it is a good investment.

The guys over in /r/CampingGear would get mad if I didn't mention the Klymit Static V. It is dirt cheep compared to everything I have recommended. And they make a Double V

The best thing you can do is go to a store and try them out.

One more thought, if you are car camping you don't need sleeping bags. A set of flannel sheets and a cheep comforter will keep you just as warm.

u/J0BlN · 2 pointsr/Coachella

I don’t think you’re taking enough Benadryl is the problem (nsfw)

Real answer: I use this one and it’s treated my back well. Good for back and side sleepers.

u/any-major-dude · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring

I use the Klymit Static V

While I can't compare it directly to any of the other options here, it packs up very small and is not too expensive. It also has very solid Amazon reviews.

u/Sn0wland · 2 pointsr/bikepacking
u/xucchini · 2 pointsr/teslamotors

Model 3 does not have native camper mode as of 2018.42.2 which is what I currently have installed. Also, I went camping when I still had version 8.

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The HVAC if turned on via phone or API at that time would only run for 30 mins before shutting off. The overheat protection wasn't implemented yet. So I had TeslaFi send a wake up HVAC command every 30 minutes throughout the night which kept it on all night.

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I am about 6ft tall and found it comfortable space wise. Temp/humidity wise it was perfect with the HVAC enabled.

I used one of these in the back seat foot well to sort of extend the surface as I like to sleep on my side with one arm extended out beyond my head:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B074SV35KL/

I used this as a sleeping pad. It was very comfortable, but it did slide around due to being kind of slippery. One night I woke up with the lower half of my body off the pad.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007RFG0NM

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One thing that sucked for me is that with v8 I couldn't control the entertainment system with the app from the back of the car. But now you can! :)

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Referral code for TeslaFi is "ZJ" without the quotes.

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u/GeronimoRay · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

This is the best sleeping pad I've ever come across: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007RFG0NM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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Feels like I'm sleeping on air.

u/xsforis · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I'm in North Central Florida and don't find it too warm. They make one that is not insulated if you are worried about it being too warm. http://amzn.com/B007RFG0NM

u/ChefShimi · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice

I wear these pretty much exclusively. They might be a little thick, but they don't get too hot.

A lot of people also suggest smartwool or the costco brand wool socks.

u/einstein2001 · 2 pointsr/goodyearwelt

I just picked these Kirkland trail socks for a decent price. I've been wearing them with my work boots and they are very comfortable.

I hear Darn Tough makes some great socks with a lifetime guarantee. People socks are another option for thick boot socks.

u/Deuxstar · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

DTS has the return policy to make them awesome and they're definitely comfortable, but they're a bit pricey for me. I just found it silly to send back a pair of socks after I've worn holes in them with my caveman feet.

My most recent purchase was people socks and I've loved them. Three seasons with them and I am on my original 8 pair. They're definitely durable and a bit more reasonable on the wallet. I've hiked, worked and lounged in them and they still feel great.

http://www.amazon.com/4pairs-Socks-2pairs-X1pair-Mixed/dp/B009Y9QCCS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1462799529&sr=8-1&keywords=people+socks

71% merino wool

u/senator_mendoza · 2 pointsr/AskMen

specifically i'd recommend - this underwear, and these socks

life's so much better with awesome socks and underwear

u/Queef_Sludge · 2 pointsr/FixedGearBicycle

I do thermal pants and top (found some cheap at a REI outlet sale).

Wool socks

tshirt and shorts.

If it's below 35 I'll add a windproof riding vest because it keeps my pits open (rei sale).

The head is important. Balaclavas are great for coverage. I really like a scar for versatility and I combo it with Ear Bags. A ridiculous name but they fit perfect in between helmet straps.

u/NovaKnights · 2 pointsr/frugalmalefashion

I might also recommend People Socks on Amazon as an alternative. They're consistently $24-26 for a 4-pack and they feel great!

u/PresidentSnow · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife
u/glswindle · 2 pointsr/LifeProTips

I buy the brand people socks on amazon. 4 pair packs for like $28. I’ve been progressively replacing them when they wear out, and I love them. I wear them year round as well. Link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009Y9QCCS/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_r9RSAbZF9512W

u/johnny150 · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice

Just got a 4 pack of these. They were just like 17.99 and they're very warm so far.

u/telpnar · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring

Can’t help with sleeping bag but just picked up this tent and really like it.

https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU

Also that’s such a fun trail ! Make sure to bring a front light for the pawpaw tunnel.

u/smashwell · 2 pointsr/Dualsport

ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1

Overall pretty happy with the tent. Sometimes I wish I got the two person version but then I see how much smaller it packs compared to my friends' two person tents and I'm reminded why I got this one.

u/Middle_Eats · 2 pointsr/camping

Keep it simple at first. Find an easy loop (less than 10 miles so you don’t have to plan for water) near you. Alltrails is a good app that will help you start doing that.

There’s no need to start with car camping unless you already have the gear for that. Part of the fun of backpacking is gradually figuring out what gear you do and don’t need, what to bring, and what to leave behind. So release yourself to that journey. There is a joy in the ignorance of starting a new hobby.

That being said, your “big four” items are going to be a sleeping bag, tent, sleeping pad, and cooking system. For a cooking system, I would say an MSR Pocket rocket is absolutely the best go-to. That, plus fuel, and a lighter will be enough for you to get dehydrated meals made. I like to bring a measuring cup if I’m using dehydrated meals. That little bit of precision is really worth it.

To start fires at your campsite, you can put cotton balls in a plastic bag and soak them in isopropyl alcohol. Lint from your dryer also helps to start campfires.

Not sure what your budget is on gearing up, but absolutely avoid Walmart/Coleman brand stuff. Speaking from experience on that point.

You can find affordable, entry level stuff on amazon. A good starter tent for one person is here:

ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1-Person Tent https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_UG5QBb04ZP4E1

High quality sleeping bags that are warm and lightweight are going to be pricey, but you can find some inexpensive ones on amazon that will get the job done.

I really like the Big Agnes sleeping pad. Been using that for a while now. Also, Osprey backpacks are very much worth the price tag.

u/eyesontheskydotcom · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I don't have this Alps Mountaineering 1P tent, but I looked at it pretty closely while researching others. Should serve your needs pretty well and fits your budget. Keep in mind you need some air movement to avoid condensation, as u/makederr mentioned.

u/BigJewFingers · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring

The REI backpacking bundle is too heavy for a single person. You can do better for about the same price:

This tent is only $100 and almost 2lbs lighter than the one in the REI bundle: https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU/

The Kelty Cosmic 20 is lighter and warmer than the REI bag and can be had for $120: https://www.backcountry.com/kelty-cosmic-sleeping-bag-20-degree-down

Klymit Sleeping pads are great for the price. Their insulated one is lighter than the REI bundle one and can be had for ~$80:

https://www.klymit.com/insulated-static-v-sleeping-pad.html

u/fruntbuttt · 2 pointsr/backpacking

I hike the mountains in MT multiple times a month. Mostly day hikes but I also do 1-5 day trips whenever possible. I prefer the cold so my gear is oriented to that. I won’t give full descriptions but I’ll link you what I use very comfortably. You can check the items out up/downgrade as needed. At least you’ll have an idea of what can work.


Also, the bulk of my gear money is spent on comfort clothing, not the main items I list below. All wool. Head to toe. Can score nice wool at the good will/thrift store sometimes. Good luck!


Tent – 110.00 got mine on sale for 75.00 so look for deals


sleeping bag – ICW 84.95. I’m certain I paid less so shop around


backpack – Tenzig 2220. 149.95. Most comfortable pack I’ve owned. Currently year 2 of using it. I think I paid 200 so this might be a good deal


Boots – for day hike I use Field Blazer – 100ish bucks for above 0, and Woody Elite – 200ish bucks for below 0.


For multi day trips with no snow I use Ventilator – About 100ish bucks. They have low and mid. I own both but prefer the low.



My kit is always evolving but these are some things I always carry no matter what -


--My knife + ferrocerium rod. (I put hundreds of dollars into my knives - but you can carry a mora for 10.00)

--A lifestraw. (10 bucks?)

--My own medkit (pieced together based on needs over the years) (10-25ish bucks?)

--Extra socks. (Good wool socks - 6-15 bucks)

--Day hike - plastic military canteen. (buck or two at thrift) Multi day - Stainless steel cup/bottle system (40-80+ bucks, or can go aluminum for short term and half the price)

--Paracord + tarp. (15 bucks or less for both and in good weather + fire the tent isn't even necessary with these. If the bears are out I always use a tent though)

--Pocket fishing kit I made with extra fishing line. (5 bucks)


What's in my pocket - Bic lighter, phone, compass, chapstick, whistle, hand warmer packx3, instant coffee.


This is for me, solo hiking in the mountains. I often carry much more depending on what i'm out to do, but these are items that in my experience will never leave my pack. I also always carry my Alaskan.

u/docb30tn · 2 pointsr/preppers

Your pack is going to have weight or you're going to suffer. In the Army, as a Medic I carried standard load: Body armor, helmet, 240 rounds of 5.56, M4, 9mm with 4 mags of ammo, and a 30 lb Aid Bag.
I know you won't be using all that stuff, but a 30lb pack isn't that heavy. You should be wearing some of the stuff you need.
Water: I strongly invest in two items. A Camelbak with at least a 3 liter bladder and a Sawyer Mini Filtration kit:
https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1466464554&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini+water+filter
6 within a mile? It's short sighted if you're going to stay in the area, but bugging out has the goal of getting to a further away safe location where you have your permanent setup. If you have no place to go, it's pointless in leaving unless where you live/are is more dangerous if you stay.
You'll need to learn many various ways to filter water you find. Some water cannot be cleaned, like stagnant water in ponds have higher amounts of germs in them. Moving water doesn't go bad; rivers and fast moving streams. However this water must still be purified, but has less chance of being infected. Any prepper needs to master water purification.
I suggest getting a map of the area you live; larger if your BoL can be found on the map. From there you can mark any water sources you find as well as paths from your house (Point A) to your BoL (Point B)

u/aminalbackwards · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I stole the whole setup design from a friend, just a bladder and a filter.

https://www.amazon.com/Geigerrig-G2-070-0Z-p4-Hydration/dp/B00870DGDS

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2?psc=1

The pump adds air to a separate compartment to pressurize the water reservoir and lets you fill cups/pots with water straight from the mouthpiece, without it you would have to carry the extra Sawyer squeeze bag. Only thing I would change is using a bigger sawyer filter, this one flows pretty slow (maybe buy the geigerrig filter instead). The geigerrig is a really awesome piece of equipment though; super easy to fill and really durable.

u/jcrot · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Water Filter
http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1395805266&sr=8-3&keywords=sawyer+squeeze

this would be an easy, cheap upgrade and would save some ounces.

70.4 ounces for the half dome? REI Specs it at 92. I have the same tent, but am looking at upgrading to the quarter dome 1 person. When someone else is with, I can split up the weight for the half dome.

As some one else recommended, lose one of your knifes. For how much they're used, I don't find multi tools worth while and just carry a small folding blade.

u/memento22mori · 2 pointsr/todayilearned

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=2CXXD1Y7Z7KMA&coliid=I3S0PSH4ATHBEB&psc=1

This isn't an Amazon affiliate link or anything, I used to work for them and I never figured that out, this is the best portable filter money can buy and it's $21. It removes almost all of the bacteria and protozoa from water- though it doesn't removes viruses or pharmaceuticals.

>High performance filter fits in the palm of your hand, weighs 2 ounces and filters up to 100,000 gallons (30 times more than comparable filters)
>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable water bottles, hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source
>Removes 7 log (99.99999%) of all bacteria and 6 log (99.9999%) of all protozoa (Each filter is certified for absolute microns; that means there is no pore size larger than 0.1 in size. This makes it nearly impossible for harmful bacteria, protozoa, or cysts like E. coli, Giardia, Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella typhi (which cause Cholera and Typhoid) to pass through the Sawyer Mini filter.)

u/launch201 · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I don't know too much about that backpack, so I can't comment, but you should be able to pickup a pack in that price range if you're just getting started.

water

A lifestraw will work, but essencially you need to go source to mouth, so if you need water for anything but drinking (i.e. for cooking) I don't know if the lifestraw will be best. Sure you can suck in, spit out, but there is a better solution: the sawyer mini is about the same price point: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890779&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

meals

and that brings me to water for cooking. MREs are heavy, and while you won't be hiking far carrying that weight even for a short distance might not be the most fun (especially if you are saving money on your pack) - there a many commercially available freeze dried meals which are very light and you simply add boiling water to. Mountain house is the most common - http://www.amazon.com/MOUNTAIN-HOUSE-Beef-Stroganoff-4-80oz/dp/B0002YRNJK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890892&sr=8-1&keywords=mountain+house

besides mountain house there is backpackers pantry (better IMO):
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=backpackers%20pantry&sprefix=backpacke%2Caps

and finally if you want to try some of the best I recommend packit gourmet:
http://www.packitgourmet.com/CookInBagMeals.html

clothes

wool is good because it keeps it's insulation warmth when wet. wool can be expensive though. If the weather is going to be good I'd recommend a couple quick drying shirts (which are pretty affordable)
http://www.amazon.com/Russell-Athletic-Sleeve-Dri-Power-3X-Large/dp/B00719Y8HO/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891200&sr=8-3&keywords=quick+dry+shirt

and be prepared to own the worlds best pair of underwear - buy two pair wear one, wash one in a river:
http://www.amazon.com/ExOfficio-Give-N-Go-Boxer-Brief-Medium/dp/B001M0MN02/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891283&sr=8-1&keywords=exofficio+boxer+briefs

tools

this is probably one of the first things that gets "over packed" what to you anticipate needing a tool for? On the hand saw if you will be collecting fire wood there is a very nice lightweight handsaw that is perfect for backpacking, the Sven Saw:
http://www.amazon.com/SVEN-SAW-Sven-Saw-21/dp/B002J900EQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891413&sr=8-1&keywords=sven+saw

cookware

on cookware it all depends on what you'll be cooking. on a budget I'd recommend this cup:
http://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-Glacier-Stainless-Bottle/dp/B001LF3IB6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891523&sr=8-1&keywords=GSI+cup

and this stove:
http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891563&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove

with that you'll be able to boil water for your freeze dried meals, make ramen, and you can also make hot drinks like tea.

u/Bizzaroworld725 · 2 pointsr/bugout

this site has some good bags for the cheap.
Your priorities sound like they should be shelter, water,food.
Pick a bug out location. Go out into the woods you mentioned and maybe set up a campsite for the weekend. Maybe go back to the same site next weekend and practice some bushcraft skills and make your site better, practice building fire, hunting, things you'll be doing in a SHTF situation.
You'll need a means to treat water. I think I'm gonna be ordering a sawyer mini in the near future after reading some good reviews. But boiling water should be fine as long as it hasn't been tainted by chemicals.
Food kind of depends on how long you plan on bugging out for.

These are just a few quick ideas to help get the brain storm going and just to kinda throwing them out there. Pick up a few survival books, maybe hook up with someone that knows wild edibles in your area.

u/standardalias · 2 pointsr/camping

how do you define pure water?

don't water bottles become reusable bottles after yo drink them down?

why cant my tap water be filtered?

question 8, what type of water filter? the ones from question 7 where i had to decide which of two styles i like?

i use one of these. make something better and cheaper and i'll use that. http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_2?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1412024242&sr=1-2&keywords=water+filter

u/gunshyjohnny · 2 pointsr/socalhiking

I have the katadyn Vario and i've used the MSR Sweetwater EX. They are both good. My favorite now is the cheap ($20) Sawyer squeeze filter. I use it with a Platypus bag as a gravity filter. The Vario and MSR weigh too much and there is much more maintenance. The sawyer squeeze is very popular. You don't need the Platypus bag, you can use the sawyer squeeze by itself.

sawyer squeeze

platypus big zip

u/makinbacon42 · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Firstly for the sleeping bag what temperatures are you looking at needing it for? also have you considered the possibility of a quilt?

How much water depends on the availability of it where you're hiking, but generally 2-4L as a start is usually good. For purification I bring a Sawyer Mini with a 2L bag and aquamira as a backup.

I prefer baby wipes as they can be used for other things but make sure you get biodegradable ones as well

My stove is a MSR Pocket Rocket but as a cheaper option [this] (http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1411302345&sr=1-2&keywords=msr+pocket+rocket) stove works well too. You also have the option of small alcohol stoves and other liquid fueled types.

u/ForrestSmith151 · 2 pointsr/hiking

First Aid Kit - you might not need it ever, but you should always have it. All kits are different but there are fundamental items that should be carried, you can check out the NOLS Kits
and either buy one or for less, make your own that is custom to your needs and desires.

Tools - First, carry a knife that can cut decent size branches, again, you might not need it but its good to have. Second, I recommend getting a water filter such as a Sawyer mini or Katadyn Be Free as they are both lightweight and will probably decrease your pack weight if you hike near water. Third, Fire can be helpful in many situations but must be used carefully and with respect. If you live somewhere that allows it, a wood burning camp stove will be worth some warmth and also allow you to cook if you bring along a mess set. I personally use an MSR Pocket Rocket. As a day hiker, you might not use a stove often but it's not bad to have if you do longer hikes or are far from civilization so if that's the case, look into tablet stoves. generally, you should have a lighter or two just in case. You may also consider carrying a survival blanket just in case (as goes for most these objects).

The Front Pouch - So the idea behind having this pouch is to have things that you want quick access too on the trail, the most important of which is your map. Navigation is important when hiking so if you're not familiar with an area buy a map and bring a compass. I personally don't use a compass but I've learned how to navigate without one, however you should always have a map. You may also need to have a permit for some hiking areas and it's nice to have within reach, usually with your map. you may also like to have TP and a camp trowel in there so that it is not hard to find at the wrong moment. along with that, a trash bag of any kind should be carried. Finally, carry snacks in there so that you don't have to dig around to find them.

Summary - This is all advice from a Backpacker so there will be many things you don't need on every hike but could save your life if you get caught in a bad situation, many of the objects I recommend are the same. If I'm close to home or not going out too far on a day hike, I usually carry a Knife, Be Free Filter, Lighter/Stove (depending on mileage) an extra coat, and extra food, but each hike and hiker are different. You will eventually find a system that works well for you, but it's always good to carry things that make life on the trail easier and can get you through a night in the wild. With thought on my comment, you should also check out the Ten Essentials as they will almost always be worth their weight.

If you have any other questions feel free to ask!

u/Cool_Bastard · 2 pointsr/preppers

I skimmed through your list, but am short on time. Some of my stuff overlaps with yours, but I'm a firm believer in redundancy. Shit gets lost or you loan it out or it gets up and walks away and then you have none. You'll notice it happens to us even when we're NOT in a natural disaster emergency situation.

I'm assuming your bug out bag is for more than 3 days. I hate the 3 day scenario.

I did CTRL-F. What I did not find was:

  • tourniquet - I suggest two
  • The blue tarps are big and bulky. One would be great on the ground under a tent, but I'd suggest a large poncho or thin nylon sheet with grommets for a "roof" under trees to keep the rain out, or snow. Maybe something fireproof?
  • knife - specifically survival knife & pocket knife. Yeah, I saw your multi-tool...it's not a survival knife.
  • Is your TP in a ziplock baggie? Is it separated into separate sections so it won't get lost. I suggest two rolls, just in case.
  • Duct tape.
  • 100' parachute cord - I saw you had 30', Personally, I like to have a lot more. You'll need a knife to cut and a lighter to burn the ends
  • Lighters - You have one unopened set of Bic lighters, so if you lose it, you lose all of them. Maybe consider opening it and putting the in different locations so when you lose two, you still have three backup.
  • Backup flashlight & extra Batteries - I suggest rechargeables and a solar rechargeable pack. I like to standardize all my electronics with the same type, like AA.
  • Pen/paper - Yeah I saw you have it, but are they waterproof? I got some off Amazon (pads were in a pack of 5) where the paper pads were waterproof and tear proof. Pen was sposed to be waterproof as well.
  • Boots - with appropriate socks (3 pair)
  • Water purifier that's a little more robust than laying down in a creek bed and drinking through a straw. Maybe this one or this one along with your life straw. Do you have a collapsable container to hold water in? So you won't always have to go to the creek bed?
  • Solar shower? You don't know how long your disaster might be and a shower does wonders for the body & mind.
  • Towel, wash cloths. You always need to wash and dry your mess kit along with yourself and tools.
  • Soap for washing mess kit and for yourself. Shampoo or bar shampoo, extra ziplock bags, larger nylon bags (like shopping bags) to carry shit that you come across, like firewood or other cans of food or rocks.
  • Something for self defense or to chase wild dogs/coyotes away or even predators. Even if it's a high power sling shot with steel ball bearings, or a high power, full auto CO2 BB gun, anything to tell an aggressor that you're not just a sitting duck. Personally, I would NOT want to be hit with a full auto BB gun or even a steel ball from a sling shot. Don't make yourself an easy target, hence your knife.
  • A back up boot knife. Always have two. One they can see, and one that's hidden.
u/BarbarianNerd · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

If you want to get by cheap, pare the list down to essentials.
You need water, food, good shoes/boots, and shelter and to keep it light. Everything else is periphery.

The cheapest and lightest way to carry water is to use an empty quart milk jug or two with a rope on it. It's not as good as a camel back style bladder, but it's more reliable in my experience for fractions of pennies on the dollar.

I recommend a Lifestraw or a Sawyer filter for water purification. They cost about 20 bucks and they're really effective. Not necessarily essential for short trips, but it does a lot for peace of mind and you never know when bad stuff will happen. They don't filter out heavy metals or dissolved materials (ie anything <.1 microns).

REI has a really good info primer on sleeping bags

I wouldn't worry about poles for overnight stuff at all. That's for like weeks of constant hiking or alpine stuff. They can be useful and are helpful, but they can be passed by most of the time.

I get by with a rubberized army poncho and a blanket instead of a tent and bag. It's good enough to keep the rain off and a bit of body heat in, but it's not ideal and it's time consuming. I got it at a yard sale for two bucks. But for one night, it's good enough. A rain fly or tent foot print, or plain tarp is also effective. There are some pretty legit one person backpacking tents out there for about 70-100 bucks, I'll probably get one next. Not sure which brands are good though.

For food, I'd do the mountain house meals and hoist my garbage high and away from camp after wards, preferably in an air tight bag of some kind when you haul it out.

Normally I prefer to do something like pilot bread, PB, dried fruit, a big bag of spinach for the first day or two, green beans, nuts, and maybe some quality sausages and cucumbers, but the convenience of the MRE style foods is often appealing. army steel canteen cups are good for boiling stuff in, but the canteens are kinda useless.

A lighter, some matches, and wet fire packets are great.

Get a mid grade belt knife, like a buck or a k-bar or similar. It's a whole nother can of worms to discuss however. Just be careful as some buck knives are made in china, the ones made in idaho are always marked american made on the packaging.

Silva makes a good compass, a good topographic map, a small 10ths scale ruler (or any cheap one) are a good idea. Know your pace count and hwo to use these tools effectively. Compasses are pretty useful in foul weather or unfamiliar places, but navigational things aren't really essential.

I'd get some biodegradable toilet paper and read this.

That's about all I can think of right now, there's probably more to say and think about. Good luck! Park jobs are a ton of fun! Wish I was going with.

u/brainbacteria · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Lifestraw is good, but for the same amount of money you can get a Sawyer mini filter. http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1412635189&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini
It seems to be the go-to backpacking filter, has 100,000 gallon guarantee on it, and a smaller micron filter at .01. I agree with 12pieces though, a filter is a good way to go.

u/jhulbe · 2 pointsr/BWCA

I've rarely had people stop in at my campsite, we usually hang a clothes line out front so they know the site is taken.

We've swung by on our boats if we saw people at a site we wanted and asked when they planned on leaving.


For water, i usually go with big groups. Boiling would be a paint.

We bring two of these: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-5-Gallon-Collapsible-Water-Carrier/dp/B000088O9Y/

picked up a hose to filter it through: https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

Then I just take the dirty 5 gallon bucket down to the water, fill it up, and then hang it from a tree and drain it into a clean water tote. The clean tote is used for filling nalgenes and such. Then if you just need a little water to brush your teeth grab it from the dirty bucket hose.


I dug through some photos and found a picture of my setup in the background.

http://imgur.com/a/jjFD2


as for the wind... Paddle slow, tie your gear into your canoe. We use Gear Ties by nite ize to secure most things.

I've paddled in some sketchy stuff.

u/cast_away_wilson · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Sawyer Mini water filter. 1 for $15.46, 2 for $29.47
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=twister_B06XVV54DF

u/mjern · 2 pointsr/trailrunning

I carry a Sawyer Mini Filter. Haven't had to use it, though.

u/desktop_version_bot · 2 pointsr/preppers
u/SilverSeven · 2 pointsr/ottawa

Just an FYI, I spend a LOT of time in the woods and put a lot of research into which leatherman to buy. Im so very happy I let a guy at Le Baron talk me into buying the Victorinox SwissTool RS. Its locking mechanism is way better IMO, the selection of tools is a little better, its got a much higher quality feel...all around just a way better product.

Does he spend time in the backcountry? Id highly recommend a Sawyer Mini. Pretty much the best filter you can buy. Can throw it right in line on a camel pack too. Super cool.

u/MrMagicpants · 2 pointsr/Design

Every few weeks a post emerges somewhere on Reddit talking about this amazing innovation called the LifeStraw, and inevitably someone chimes in saying the Sawyer Mini is objectively better for the same amount of money.

This time, I'll be that guy.

http://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1417660764&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

u/zed_brah · 2 pointsr/sydney

Awesome, I'd like to see it in action. I am looking at getting a Sawyer Mini for my trip.

u/xxxm310ion · 2 pointsr/bugout

So I want to think you’re going for “grey man” due to your backpack, but carrying around an AK might make you stand out a bit. You could try storing your rifle in one of those bags that come with folding chairs. It would help a little at least.

You have a lot of heavy stuff like people have already said. That backpack won’t hold up to much weight over distance. You shouldn’t ever cheap out on the one thing that holds all of your gear. I understand backpacks can get quite expensive, but it really is a must.

You should pack more cordage. That can be used for a million things.

Get you a smaller bottle of water and a water filter. (Sawyer Mini )

I’m sure everyone is talking about weight, so I won’t say much about that other than cans, pots, and pans are heavy.

I’d like to see what changes you make, so feel free to post again once you have updated it a bit! Good luck! Welcome to the club!

u/Brettc286 · 2 pointsr/camping

Do you want to cook with filtered water? If so, these systems are not great. I really like this Sawyer filter, it's very versatile.

u/FindYourFemaCamp · 2 pointsr/camping

Iodine is blegh. Takes a while to purify the water and leaves a taste.

instead get a
sawyer mini from amazon for 20 bucks.

Removes 99.99999% of all bacteria, up to 100,000 gallons.

u/thelastboyscout007 · 2 pointsr/preppers

Becker BK22 - This knife is a freakin beast. I've batoned 4in thick hardwood logs with this badboy with no problems and it still held its edge. And at 1/4 thick you could pry open a car door with it if needed.


Sawer Mini Water Filter


Mountain House Meals - Lightweight long storage and taste great.

Laplander Folding Saw

u/AnotherProject · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Good inexpensive water filter http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2?pc_redir=1395985123&robot_redir=1

For a first aid kit just build your own; a few band aids, bandage, neosporin, ibprofin, anti diarrhea

u/II12yanII · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

For a water purifier I would go with the sawyer water filter. You can filter water into any bottle you want or use it like a straw. http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1457621423&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=sawyer

u/cdougyfresh · 2 pointsr/financialindependence

I have a straw filter in my bug out bag, but for home I keep this one around.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I also have some water purification tablets.

I honestly haven't tried any of the freeze dried food yet, need to do that! Canned food rotation is good, but we don't really eat much canned food regularly, so doesn't work too great for us. We try to eat as much fresh / local produce & meats as possible.

u/og_boyscout · 2 pointsr/preppers

The life straw and aquamira are both good choices. However I found that the life straw was overly bulky and large for the job it completes. Also I had two of the aquamira carbon elements break on me. My suggestion is to go with the sawyer mini - http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1417445721&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX200_QL40

Or the sawyer squeeze- http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B005EHPVQW/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1417445858&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SY200_QL40

(Sorry I don't know how to condense these links.)

If you look at their weight vs. Filtering capacity it's almost unbelievable. They weigh just ounces and it's something like 100,000 gallons for the mini and 1,000,000 gallons for the squeeze. Plus walmart sells these so they are never to far away. Best $20 I ever spent!

u/ThirstyOne · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

High-Vis version of this kit.

I'm not a fan of the Knife+Ferrocerium rod combos. The Mora Survival one specifically is more expensive than the counterparts purchased separately. I prefer purpose built strikers because trying to exercise mechanical force using something other than the business end of something sharp and pointy sounds like a recipe for injury. Plus, if you lose your knife you're fucked because now you don't have a striker.

Get some:

u/who_killed_my_fish · 2 pointsr/motocamping

Get a cheap Sawyer water filter. I usually only take a 32oz bottle of water with me and take my mini water filter. You can get one for $20 on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2

I have a few of these. I keep one in my car, one in my motorcycle saddlebags, one in my hiking backpack. It's always the first thing I check for when packing my gear.

There's a bunch of different ways to use it, you can even use it as a straw and drink from a puddle in a muddy pothole in a dirt road. But mostly I fill the bag full of water from a stream and squeeze it out of the filter into my regular water bottle.

u/chadcf · 2 pointsr/worldnews

If you're not worried about viruses, this is a better option. If you are worried about viruses I'd get a Steripen in addition to that. With some iodine, bleach or aquamira as a backup for course.

u/aerosol999 · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Highly recommend the Sawyer Mini. It might not be the most efficient but it's crazy lightweight and get's the job done.

u/climbing-kevin · 2 pointsr/preppers

Based off my many years of backpacking, 70 pounds is way too heavy. Honestly, I would seriously try doing a 20 mile 2 day 1 night backpacking trip with that setup (replace the guns and ammo with water that weighs as much and you cant touch if you are backpacking in gun restricted areas). However, I'm 90% sure you will find that you're ditching your stuff left and right. Even when I am backpacking and sleeping out in 5 degree weather, my pack weight is only 25 pounds at max. I would look at the r/ultralight to learn what you really need.
Ways to lighten up your pack load:

-titanium pot

-alcohol stove instead of the butane/propane stoves (http://www.woodgaz-stove.com/starlyte-burner-with-lid.php)

-use a sawer mini (only $20 at 2 oz and filters 100,000 gallons) instead of a pump filter https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2)

-Switch to a cuben fiber tarp and try tarp camping (https://www.hyperlitemountaingear.com/flat-tarp.html)
-if bugs are an issue you can get a net tent insert with the tarp http://www.yamamountaingear.com/bug-shelter-2p/)

-ditch the nalgene water bottle/stainless steel kleen canteen (you already have the titanium pot that weighs less, just use a platypus soft water bottle, they weigh less/can be rolled up for storage/can hold boiling water so you can put that in your sleeping back to stay warmer at night) (https://www.rei.com/product/849826/platypus-softbottle-water-bottle-34-fl-oz)

-switch to a hydrophobic treated down sleeping bag instead of a synthetic bag (https://www.rei.com/product/895819/marmot-hydrogen-down-sleeping-bag?cm_mmc=aff_AL-_-34947-_-46631-_-NA&avad=46631_cdb0d0a3&CA_6C15C=120217890002095893)

-Ditch the wilderness gps. Put your phone on airplane mode, turn on the gps, and use the app gaia gps. (https://www.gaiagps.com/)

u/tstokes_ · 2 pointsr/backpacking

If you can stay away from iodine tablets in the long run, especially for a 3 month trip, try to do so. Iodine tablets are okay to use for short periods of time, but can be extremely unhealthy and damaging to your kidneys and liver if used for too long. I would recommend the Sawyer Mini Water Filter. Sounds like an awesome trip though!

u/my-spatula-is-huge · 2 pointsr/EDC

the sawyer mini is so much better than the life straw and it's less money. The sawyer is smaller, filters 10x smaller particulates, and has a lifetime much longer than the lifestraw (100,000 gallons).

u/chinaman223 · 2 pointsr/preppers

if it's an urban area (i'm assuming because you said apartment its a city/town) your going to need to leave. and local streams won't be safe whatsoever possibly even after boiling if sewage systems are no longer functioning. not to mention the types of people you could find in control of a water source. best to leave to crown land and find a pond/stream. also lifestraws great but the sawyer http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2 is my go to. i use both and one huge drawback i've found on the lifestraw is in the winter you can't get all the water out after use and the ice REALLY degrades the filter

u/cmonster_75 · 2 pointsr/MTB

If I'm going to be near water on a really long ride or hike, I'll throw my Sawyer Mini in my pack. Cheap, light, and you can fill a Camelbak through the drink tube by taking off the bite valve.

http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2

u/SoldierOnce · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking
u/bostonwhaler · 2 pointsr/AdviceAnimals

Stepped up the game this past June in my buddy's boat...

50gal fresh water tank, but it's cold, and the wet bath is mostly for storage.

Fill a blue 5gal Lowe's bucket with water and it's hot tub temp by noon in the sun. Bought a rechargeable nozzle for $35 and it was a game changer.

Ivation Portable Outdoor Shower, Battery Powered - Compact Handheld Rechargeable Camping Showerhead - Pumps Water from Bucket Into Steady, Gentle Shower Stream https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00IFHFJXI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_IFvjDbN0A5VRN

u/Serial_Buttdialer · 2 pointsr/dogs

Handheld portable shower

Ends 13 hours from now. Was $40, now $28.

Wahl nail grinder &
Scruffs bed

Both start at 7:30pm UK time, an hour from now.

u/MulletWhip · 2 pointsr/surfing

I recently bought one of these portable showers, and i fill up a soft sided ice chest with warm water. The water seems to stay fairly warm when I get back to my truck after dawn patrol sessions

u/AbsolutelyPink · 2 pointsr/HomeImprovement

Agreed. Those propane units are awesome.

You could also use a camp shower bag. Hang outside during the day to warm. Now, those aren't going to be very long showers, but enough to get a person clean. I suspect you'd need a bag per person.

Another option is this added to this. Again, it's going to be a short shower, but it will work.

u/BLUMPKINFORCE · 2 pointsr/surfing

I have an electric one that plugs into my ac adapter or can use batteries similar to this: ($39) https://www.amazon.com/Ivation-Portable-Outdoor-Battery-Powered/dp/B00IFHFJXI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1495650013&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=portable+shower&psc=1

I bought one of those big blue camping jugs and I fill it once every couple weeks. Works great for rinsing off my kids after a day at the beach too. I leave it in my car all the time and it's like a hot water shower.

u/dr_mrs_the_monarch__ · 2 pointsr/vandwellers

https://www.amazon.com/Ivation-Portable-Outdoor-Battery-Powered/dp/B00IFHFJXI/

/+ a bucket + a shower curtain to direct water back into the bucket is a very simple DIY recirculating shower. I'm planning on using upgraded versions of those parts in my more permanent build. All the other recirculating showers I've seen seem wildly overcomplicated

u/cospaceman · 2 pointsr/FireflyFestival

I think I may be in the minority on this, but the shower bag never really did it for me. I brought one like this and it was really lack luster. Im 6 feet tall and after hanging the bag, the nozzle was below my waist. That would have been fine, if not for the fact that the shower head just barely dripped, Placing the bag on the roof of the car got the water nice and hot within an hour or two. But if you want to get clean I might go with one of these with some kind of wash basin, or a kiddie pool and a bucket work really well for a quick cleanup

u/tomstaplez · 2 pointsr/preppers

The best way I have come up with to heat water for a shower is warming water on a portable induction cooktop, then drop in a battery powered shower head Any ideas out there to heat water when wood campfire is not available? Without propane. Thanks!

u/echodeltabravo · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

Someone here in r/ultralight said the BRS 3000 simmers well. I have one but have not tried it. However, for $16 it might be worth buying and trying out yourself.

u/GrandmaBogus · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Titanium mug and a mini gas burner? Then buy your own butane in Reykjavik.

The smallest 100g canister will be good for 15-20 cups of smoking hot coffee.

u/BecauseSometimesY · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Olicamp mug/pot $12, 4oz weight, 20oz capacity

BRS 3000T Burner $15, 25g. It really is an amazing little micro stove.

Jetboil Flash LID This lid fits the Olicamp mug/pot perfectly! $6, plus shipping. About 1oz

A 100g canister fits perfectly inside, plus the BRS and a bic. The jetboil lid fits securely and keeps everything together.

Ditch the canteen.. carry your water in 1L and/or 750ml smartwater/lifewater bottles. Seriously. It’s durable, and weighs significantly less.

u/gooberlx · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Last year I picked up this stove. Light as all getout and works well.

I also purchased zelph's fancee feast stove, but have yet to try it out at high elevation. This guy swears by his custom one though.

u/forrey · 2 pointsr/Israel

In that case, I'd recommend going as light-weight as you can. A set like the one in the photo will be fine for car camping, but too heavy for backpacking, especially multi-day. Here's what I take when backpacking:

Toaks titanium 700ml pot

BRS ultralight gas stove

Toaks titanium folding spork

And a 4 or 8oz gas canister like this one, depending on how long I'll be going for. Don't get the gas canisters online though, get them at a camping or outdoors store, they'll be cheaper.

Honestly, that's all I need for solo backpacking. If you're backpacking with other people, you would maybe need a bigger pot (like 800 or 900ml), but I prefer to use the smaller one and make batches of food if need be. If I'm going car camping, I can bring more stuff as needed (cups, mugs, bowls, etc).

You don't need to get the exact items I have, but basically just ask for a simple, ideally ultralight gas canister stove, cooking pot (ideally titanium, not stainless steel), and a lightweight spork.

I also don't think you need tupperware unless you're car camping. When I backpack, I bring primarily dried foods that require not much cooking (asian style noodles, oatmeal, couscous, etc), and augment with some packaged tuna or chicken (in a bag, not a can) and spices. You can browse through /r/trailmeals for inspiration on cooking while camping.

u/WahFuDrumSong · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Ever heard of the BRS 3000T?

u/izlib · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

I've had good luck with Toaks products. You can hold the handle without it being too hot, even with boiling water. This should fill your requirements:

https://www.toaksoutdoor.com/collections/pot95/products/pot-550-l

For a stove I use this popular item:

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U

Super light, heats water up just fine.

u/SupportingKansasCity · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Out of convenience, I usually use an artisan instant coffee like Voila.

If I really want actual coffee grounds, I’ll bring the grounds in a plastic bag and use a tea strainer. It works well. Just get water near boil, drop in tea strainer with grounds, lightly stir. This is the exact one I use: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075K57B73/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_UUA6BbJCMDBJN

As for a stove, I use this ridiculously light and cheap Chinese stove. Quantity is not great but it’s dirt cheap and I’ve never had one show up not functional. Some will leak gas for an instant when you screw the stove on (more than you’d expect), some don’t. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_2VA6BbGGSBA02

u/zerostyle · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

A few items that look heavy:

  • compressible pillow @ 9oz is super heavy, but if it's the only thing that will help you sleep that's ok (-6oz for inflatable)
  • could use a BRS stove that's lighter, but the pocket rocket is fine (-2oz)
  • could go to a smaller power bank (6700mAh around 4oz) to save 2oz or so

    Also, as I reiterate to everyone, lyme disease is VERY rampant in the northeast. Don't by shy about packing more DEET or picaridin. Soak all of your clothes in permethrin before the trip, particularly socks.
u/dfsw · 2 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

This ultralight canister stove has been making the rounds lately, I've been pretty impressed with it. http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/CedarWolf · 2 pointsr/Shoestring

Hey, you can also make quite a bit of your own gear if you're feeling up to the challenge. Check out /r/myog for more information about that.

Fancy, fold up cook kits can run you $20 to $70 or more, plus fuel, but you can also make your own cook kits real easily from soda cans, cat food cans, and grease pots. You can get one from Walmart for $7, and an aluminum pot handle from any outdoors store for a couple of bucks. Here's a basic one for $4, but you can find them for $2, too. You can also use a folded bit of aluminum foil as a wind break around your stove.

The best part about those is not only are they light and cheap to replace, but your can stove and your aluminum handle should fit neatly inside your grease pot. Depending on how tall you made your windbreak, you might be able to fit it inside your pot, too. If not, it's just aluminum foil; it'll fold up.

It really depends on what your budget and your conditions are. You can grab a cheap, fairly light tent for $50 or $60. (If you want to go crazy cheap, there are $20 tents that you can set up between two trees or support with trekking poles.)

I wouldn't suggest depending on a cheap tent for the long term, but use them as something you can test out, beat up, and not be too heartbroken over. They're just the basics.

Woot.com often has sales on camping gear, including backpacks, light blankets, sleeping bags, and hammocks. Decent backpacking hammocks usually run about $15 to $25 online, don't stress about getting one that's really expensive and has a lot of features. They're pretty much all parachute hammocks. Worry about investing in the expensive stuff later.

My advice, though? Don't stress about your gear at first. Get some cheap starter gear, read about it, test it, make a plan. Drop on by /r/trailmeals and find some simple recipes that you like. Find a nice state park nearby and look at their maps. Find a camp site and see what's there: Do you have trees available for hammocks? Is there a fire pit already set up? Do you have wood available for fuel? (You probably won't need much more than your cook pot and utensils if your campsite has a firepit with a grill, for example.)

Make your plan and execute it. Let people know where you're going, and what you're up to. Invite a friend if you can. Put your comfy shoes on, toss your crap in a backpack, go out for a weekend, and test your gear. Get some experience with your new stuff, see what works for you and what doesn't. Learn where you want to focus if you want to shed weight, and check your reviews. Go to places like REI: they'll often let you see or set up any tent you're interested in, in advance, so you can check out how easy or how difficult it might be on the trail, in the dark. That last part's important. You can have the fanciest tent in the world, but it doesn't mean a hill of beans if you can't set it up in the dark. (Because at some point, you will be setting up your tent in the dark, in the rain, in some sort of adverse conditions. It happens. Be prepared.)

Practice with your gear, learn your gear. Learn your limits and your preferences.
Knowledge is easy to acquire, useful to have, and doesn't weigh anything, so pack a lot of it.

You're gonna want to get that experience on your cheap stuff, so you can learn and make mistakes without ruining some high-end piece of kit that's really gonna cost you. Get your experience in and add the expensive, fancier stuff as you go. I like to focus on pack, shelter, and shoes. They're going to be your main sources of weight and your big comfort items. Bad shoes and ill-fitting packs hurt. Insufficient shelters suck. Upgrading those early on, or starting with some mid-tier gear if you can afford it, is handy.

And if you decide that maybe this isn't for you, that's okay, too. You can back out without having dropped several thousand dollars on all the latest gear. It's easy to spend hundreds on fancy gear. Try to avoid falling into that trap.

It's probably ultralight heresy, but I often bring a cheap paperback book with me. Sure, it's sort of heavy for a luxury item that I don't need, and if it falls in a creek then my book is destroyed; I get that. However, for me, you can't beat hanging out in a comfy hammock under the trees with a good book. That serenity is why I go hiking and backpacking in the first place.

I also tell myself that if things ever go incredibly sour, a cheap book or a trail journal is also a good source of tinder and toilet paper. Not that I would do such things, but if I was ever stranded somewhere and I had to, the option is there. Similarly, you can signal other hikers or other people in your party if you have a trail journal - just pull out a page and leave a note for them.

Oh, and it's also wise to bring a couple of trash bags along with you. Get the big, kitchen sized ones.

They're great for:

| | | |
|:--:|:--:|:--:|
| holding trash | separating wet clothes | good laundry bags |
| dirty shoe mat | tent hole repair | emergency ponchos |
| emergency pack covers | food bag | extra warmth |

------

Oh, and remember the simple principles:

Pack it in, pack it out. - Any gear (or people) you bring, you're responsible for getting it (or them) back out.

Leave no trace. - You have a responsibility to leave your campsite as you found it, or better than you found it. Any trash you bring, you pack it right back out with you. If someone before you has been an asshole and has left a bunch of trash all over the campsite, try to clean it up, even if you can't pack it all out.

Hike your own hike. - This means that you can have all the excellent advice in the world, but how you do your hike is up to you. No one else can tell you how to live your life, and if you want to carry a little extra weight for a luxury item, or if you prefer a bit of kit that isn't quite in vogue this season, or if you can't afford the high-end, cuben fiber this or that, don't stress about it. You're out there to enjoy yourself, focus on that.

Be prepared. - This is the Boy Scout motto. Things will happen that you're not going to expect. Don't go overboard and don't get too crazy about it, but have a plan and know how to execute it. Learn the area you'll be at and know what sorts of conditions to expect. If you get hurt, know who you can call. If you're in a state or national park, those phone numbers are always on the freebie trail maps they provide - grab one at the ranger station or the trail head and keep it with you or keep a photo of it on your phone. Are you going to need extra batteries? Is your phone going to have service? If you can, sign up for a first aid course or a trail-specific first aid course. That's information you'll want to know if you ever need it.

u/voodoodollbaby · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

r/ultralight reporting

This stove is my pick. Uses canister fuel, very fast boiling time (about 3 minutes, but will vary by altitude) and only weighs 25g with an adjustable flame. I pair it with the toaks light 550mL pot.

That said, it's pretty much only suitable for boiling water. If you're car camping, you could still use it to make poached eggs or soups if you have the right ingredients. Cooking food inside a plastic bag is also a great option that allows you to get more creative.

u/echoawesome · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

These are the costco ones, a bit cheaper and well regarded.

u/KenBalbari · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

For shelter, you really have a choice, tent, tarp and hammock, or tarp and net tent. If you want to hang around camp, you might want a bigger tent. If you plan to do hiking, many people only use the shelter to sleep in, and go with something small and lightweight, like a small solo tent, or even bivy.

I would point you towards some lightweight hiking gear here. That gives you the option to hike off to primative sites, carrying your shelter and supplies on your back. You don't necessarily need to go to the ultralight extremes that serious distance hikers go though.

You could start with a tent like this or this. If you wanted to get more serious into distance hiking, you would maybe spend more on something even lighter in weight (like maybe 2 lbs).

In Florida, I like the combination of a bug bivy (like this ) and a good tarp (like this). Though you would need poles as well. Hikers tend to use their trekking poles (like these). You would also need paracord (550 cord works well) to pitch a tarp.

For a stove, I mean something like this. Those are inexpensive and work fine.

For clothes, you can probably use mostly things you already own. Avoid cotton and linen. Synthetics like nylon and polyester will dry much more easily and do a better job in the heat and humidity in FL. And if you are going to go out there now, in hunting season, make sure you have some things that are bright orange. The hunters can be more dangerous than the bears.

As for bears, you don't really need any special container. Just learn to hang a stuff sack with any food or toiletries which have any scent. Using an odor barrier bag as a liner isn't a bad idea though. They'll generally leave you alone unless they smell what they think is food (and their sense of smell is very strong).

For shoes, again existing walking shoes are probably fine for now. Especially if you stick to sites off existing hiking trails to start.

For now, I'd start with a less primative site in a campground in someplace like Ocala. You can explore from there (there are sites near to trails), and have an idea next time you go out where you might want to try more primative camping. For now, focus on developing skills like how to use a compass, how to pitch a tent or tart, learning usefull knots for pitching tarps or hangning bear bags, etc.

It probably is a good idea to have a sleeping pad right off. A RidgeRest Classic might do the job for about $20. You can spend more on an inflatable pad if you think you will be more comfortable.

u/peeholestinger · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

I bought some of these for my first set of poles. Andrew Skurka has a pretty good write up and for $45 I figured it would be worth giving them a shot. So far they have been great. Right at about 16oz for the pair.

u/_OldBay · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I'm going to post a link to my gear that I have. Everything in the picture is about $800 total

https://www.reddit.com/r/CampingGear/comments/arck5m/2019_gear/

Definitely shop around for sales. The Gregory backpack in my post, I was able to find it for $130 online and then they had a first time 20% discount that I applied, ended up getting it for $106 after S&H. That was with Campmor.com.

You definitely don't need to spend a lot on a water filter system. Most people here and in r/ultralight will swear by the Sawyer Squeeze. It's about $30, not really going to find it cheaper elsewhere unfortunately, trust me I tried. Tablets would probably work just fine to be honest, especially in the Smokey's. I did an Outward Bound 14 day backpacking trip in Pisgah which is next door to it and we only used iodine.

My sleeping bag in my post, normal MSRP was $340. I got it for $170 at an REI garage sale in Dacemeber. Saved a lot of money there.

For a sleeping pad, really depends on if you're a side sleeper or not. If you sleep on your side, you do not want to get a closed cell foam pad, which is that one's you mentioned earlier about people using them down to their butts. Personally I have the REI Flash insulated and it's comfortable and not too expensive. Another popular pad here and on r/ultralight is the Klymit Static-V insulated which is about $90.

For trekking poles, personally I would absolutely invest in a pair. Especially in the Smokey's, the terrain isn't always forgiving when you're carrying a larger backpack and they'll help with any stream crossings. The one's I have are these. Very cheap, but very durable. Definitely no need to buy $100+ poles.

Definitely keep shopping around though if you find something you like.

u/younevermo41 · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

probably the same exact product with different branding and they get great reviews https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8?th=1

u/kylorhall · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

They may not be at Costco though, they really come and go. This is my recommendation as well, but I had to buy mine off Amazon (link). They did well when weighed ~250lbs and a far heavier pack than I have now; they lock really well and did great with a lot of elevation. Saved my butt on one trip and I definitely used them thoroughly.

u/kyuss80 · 2 pointsr/Ultralight
u/NotSoUltralight · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

Cascade Tech Carbon Trekking Poles

Check these out. Have em and love em. Great budget option. Recently switched out the tips for some BD tips and couldn’t be happier!

u/CobaltyDan · 2 pointsr/myog

Why not just get a set of Cascade Mountain Tech poles and have a decent set of inexpensive poles?

u/meg_c · 2 pointsr/hammockcamping

If you go for trekking poles, I can recommend this set: Cascade Mountain Tech Carbon Fiber Quick Lock Trekking Poles. They're great, especially for the price :) I've got a set with the foam handles, and they're still going strong after a couple of years :)

u/alphabennettatwork · 2 pointsr/flashlight

Nitecore NU25 Please and thank you, this is awesome!

u/I_Met_Bubb-Rubb · 2 pointsr/running

I run with a Nitecore NU25 on the medium setting and this reflective thing. The NU25 is the best headlamp I've ever used. It's USB recharable and it's really lightweight and doesn't protrude far so it doesn't bounce around while running.

u/PonyThug · 2 pointsr/flashlight

Thanks for being you. Annnnd Need a decent head light soNitecore NU25

u/Ffaattccaatt2 · 2 pointsr/flashlight

I recently purchased the Nitecore NU25 for camping/hiking and think it would work for your needs.

u/pomod · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Stock up on these

u/jstricks87 · 1 pointr/AirForce

What about when I toss one of these to you?

u/guinnevere · 1 pointr/infertility

PS- I love these for thick injections. Wrap 'em in a washcloth and apply. Also, w the PIO, letting it run under hot sink water can thin it out a bit before injecting.

http://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-40-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/MacabreChaos · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I'm a college student, so I totally understand buying cheap stuff. Here are some of my personal finds.

I bought these cute rain boots for myself about a year ago, and they've held up well! They come in a lot of patterns; I have the argyle plaid just because I like plaid, but the polka dots are cute too. :)

I have this scarf in red. It's super warm and comes in multiple colors. :)

I'm pretty attached to my phone, so I have these gloves. I love the knitted pattern, and it's a must for me to still be able to do stuff on my phone while I have gloves on.

I have some heated purple slippers (battery operated) from Sears, and they're really nice since my floor is wood. I have my eye on these adorable slippers though because they're just so cute. I love food with cute faces on them. :D They're kinda pricy though.

Also, Hot Hands are a savior. I would buy them from Walmart or Target; it's cheaper, and you can get however many you want. These kept my hands warm when I was outside in freezing temperatures from midnight to 10 am!

u/jeifurie · 1 pointr/teslamotors

I bought a pack of handwarmers off amazon (~$25 for 40 pairs, but you can cut in half so its actually 80) and will keep them in the trunk. Hasn't gotten cold enough in Boston to need to use yet though. But, I think they would get warm enough to unfreeze the handles & trim areas w/o damaging anything.

u/cecikierk · 1 pointr/translator
u/ImmovableMover · 1 pointr/medicalschool

I have the same problem. I started using hand warmers, slipping them into my boots and pockets, and it's been great.

Something like this: https://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-40-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/eloreb · 1 pointr/femalefashionadvice

I wore these when I was in Iceland in March 2016 (so. freaking. cold.) and they were great! I can't stand having my hands cold, so I bought some wool liners for the gloves and Hot Hands to stash in my jacket pockets too. Have fun in Iceland; it's an amazing place!

u/alohaepicure · 1 pointr/dji

I went to Iceland this past February and took my Mavic Pro. Some tips I have for you are:

  • Keep your batteries warm! The color temperature can really kill your battery life, or prevent the drone from turning on if the batteries are too cold. I put some of these hand warmers (https://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-Odorless-Activated/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=sr_1_3?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1536981832&sr=1-3&keywords=hand+warmers) into a sock and placed them next to my batteries in my backpack. They did wonders to keep things just warm enough to maintain charge, but didn't make me worried at all that the heat would damage the batteries or anything else in the bag.
  • Be careful of the wind! The wind in Iceland can be super unpredictable, especially as you move over steep drops or cliffs. I saw someone lose their Phantom when they flew it up over a ledge (we were standing below a cliff). My best guess is the wind gust above the cliff was much stronger and took the drone in the opposite direction from where we were standing. He tried to throw it into sport mode (I think) and fly it back, but the wind was too strong up over the cliffside.
  • Be prepared to bring your drone back from flight at a moments notice. Again, the weather is unpredictable and can change in minutes. I arrived at a landmark and it was bright/sunny with barely a cloud in sight. I took the drone up and no joke, ten minutes later it was full on snowing with sleet and the entire sky above me was overcast. Just be aware and be ready to bring the drone back when things change. In Iceland they say if you don't like the weather, wait 10 minutes. This is 100% true of my experience in the winter.
  • Be respectful to others. Icelanders are SUCH nice people. If there's a no drone sign I'd really encourage you to respectfully keep the drone in your bag and just enjoy the amazing scenery.
u/TubesBestNoob · 1 pointr/learnprogramming
u/TabbyFoxHollow · 1 pointr/AmItheAsshole

https://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-Odorless-Activated/dp/B0007ZF4OA

http://nymag.com/strategist/amp/article/best-hand-warmers.html

Prepare to have your life changed. I use them on the slopes, look into gear people use for the snow, there’s all types of heat gear.

u/glombus · 1 pointr/chibike
  • These giro winterproof shoe covers have been lifesavers when I want to wear normal shoes/non-boots. I just wear them with my gym shoes and platform pedals and they work fine. They're not waterproof, but they're water-resistant enough and warm. I've found they're good enough that my shoes keep totally dry in snowfall. Just don't try except them to stave off heavy rain
  • champion base layers from Target keep my legs just warm enough. I don't even wear the thermals, but I'm sure they'd be great
  • Topside's helmet light is bi-directional (front and back) and really bright with steady and blinking modes. I find it's handy to have a light this high up when visibility is tough in winter
  • Showerpass waterproof socks are fantastic if you think your shoes are going to get soaked. I've had days where my shoes are drenched from the rain but these keep my feet dry. The only downside is they get a bit clammy if your shoes are soaked

    I typically adjust my helmet so I can just put my hoodie or a normal winter hat under it, which keeps me pretty warm on my ears and head. Barring that, a balaclava is nice too

    I have yet to find gloves that are good enough to keep my hands from freezing so I often take the time at lights to rub my hands together. I really want to try out Bar Mitts or similar "pogies". I keep Hot Hands in my backpack in case of emergencies

    I've found that cheap light waterproof non-breathable jackets can be helpful because they're thin and really trap heat. Most rain shells are breathable so they don't suffocate you in warmer weather, but I've found that the crappy non-breathable ones are great for winter for that same reason. I can go with just a sweatshirt and one of those and I'm usually sweating by the end in freezing temps. The only problem is I have to keep moving. It's useless if my body's not doing work to keep the heat building up, which is problematic if you may get stuck somewhere remote.

    I want some clear glasses as well, for windy/snowy days when the precipitation stings my eyes. I think something like these would probably do the trick. REI sells, Tifosi, a brand of bike glasses, but I think these would be overkill for me
u/slapplebags · 1 pointr/hab

[foam box, apply duct tape to hold shut] (https://www.grainger.com/product/12F276?gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OYmFsxWbQPsZ6q6G2LcJL5M4zB0FDx7diAlZz8JqX1lQ9P6GeFZPjBoCnbAQAvD_BwE&cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&ef_id=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OYmFsxWbQPsZ6q6G2LcJL5M4zB0FDx7diAlZz8JqX1lQ9P6GeFZPjBoCnbAQAvD_BwE:G:s&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!50916733197!!!g!82129239837!)

just a thing to hold your electronics in to keep them insulated from the cold during flight, and cushioned for the impact of landing.

[piezo electric buzzer, attach to arduino to give an audible alarm to help track down your payload after landing] (https://www.adafruit.com/product/1536?gclid=CjwKCAiAwZTuBRAYEiwAcr67OVsUCcFPwRh9nBWLsDKDr9_VNEnteEJxQoZ5P8Z_j0ddqz6boPAyfRoCeLkQAvD_BwE)

not required but can be helpful when hunting down your payload

[hand warmer] (https://smile.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-Odorless-Activated/dp/B0007ZF4OA?sa-no-redirect=1)

also optional, i've never used them, generally used to keep your batteries warmer as warm batteries perform better than cold.

[GPS Antenna] (https://store.uputronics.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=72&search=gps)

gotta get GPS signals somehow, i highly suggest the MAX M8Qs from Ublox

[AA battery packs, i suggest using the energizer ultimate lithium batteries] (https://www.digikey.com/products/en/battery-products/battery-holders-clips-contacts/86?k=battery+holder&k=&pkeyword=battery+holder&sv=0&pv91=355996&sf=0&FV=-8%7C86%2C32%7C306832%2C1989%7C0&quantity=&ColumnSort=0&page=1&pageSize=25)

you'll likely use a 4-6 pack that has the batteries connected in serial to supply the 5v the arduino needs

[trackuino shield and guide] (http://hab.education/pages/trackuino.html)

this tells you where your payload is via sites like aprs.fi

[cheap external temperature sensor] (https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/maxim-integrated/DS18B20/DS18B20-ND/956983)

the trackuino code already has provisions for this temp sensor so it requires very little modification to the code to use.

[antenna, no coat hangar required] (https://www.byonics.com/antennas)

Any antenna thats made to operate on 144.390 mhz (assuming you are in the US, other countries you'll have to check your band plan) will work. I make mine from 2 19" pieces of 20 gauge wire.

u/camopdude · 1 pointr/AskReddit
u/oldlinuxguy · 1 pointr/Survival

http://www.amazon.ca/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-40-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

They are single-use chemical heating pads. You activate them by shaking them and they get very nice and warm. Handy to keep around.

u/ArtieLange · 1 pointr/snowmobiling

Last winter was ridiculously cold so I tried to find the best gloves this year. I came to the conclusion that you need at least 2 pairs (maybe three) for the varying conditions.

For the super cold days I settled on Black Diamond Soloist finger gloves. I also bought a case Hot Hands for when the conditions change on the trail.

u/FlukesAndVolts · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/justnotthatcool · 1 pointr/Construction

I do construction in Michigan and feel like I need extra warmth for my hands. I use the nitrile or rubber coated gloves that are insolated for winter. Then wear a knit or cotton glove inside the insolated one. On really cold days i add the small hand warmers in between the glove layers in my palm. I can hammer, carry stuff and never be bothered by the handwarmers. I use one set of both kinds of gloves in the morning and then put on a dry set after lunch. I use these hand warmers.... http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0007ZF4OA/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1418862991&sr=8-1&dpPl=1&dpID=51%2Bk8z12gRL&ref=plSrch&pi=AC_SY200_QL40

u/cheezypooofz · 1 pointr/FireflyFestival

Buy one of these. Fill it up stick it on the roof of your car and you should be good to go. We bought two and filled them once and it was enough for 4 guys to make it through the festival washing every morning.

u/chastrength · 1 pointr/aves

I understand. My girlfriend and I brought a portable shower to Coachella this year to use for our hair. Other than that, we really just didn't want to waste valuable sleeping, eating, partying festival time on waiting in line at the showers. If it is the first world amenities you need, then a hotel is your way to go.

u/mrCloggy · 1 pointr/SolarDIY

Square-plastic-bag + lots-of-water + gravity = spherical-blob + stress-points = fun-for-audience = safety-requirement-for-self (steam explosions are 'not funny').
You can try one of these (example) to experiment with.

Even with a simple 'flat plate' collector it is possible to reach 200⁰C+ temperatures, a pressure relief valve is mandatory (in my opinion), having some way to control to about 90⁰C maximum is a lot smarter.

u/rumpie · 1 pointr/homestead

Do you have game on your land? Maybe check reddit, craigslist, the bulletin board in town, and see if anyone would be willing to help you for a few hours in exchange for a place to hunt? I saw that offer on AirBnB a while back, you could camp for free for a week, with 2 hours of help per day.

Maybe empty out the qounset hut and make that more habitable, so you aren't all cramped together in one room all the time? Make it a simple retreat, just somewhere that you can decompress, sit in a chair and drink a beer, maybe take a solar shower out back and spend a few minutes naked in nature? Maybe she could read a book for an hour, or listen to the birds? Smoke a doobie and listen to Adele? Yall need to carve out some space for your emotional state and have a retreat from EVERYTHING - or else you're going to get so snappish and short with each other as all the stress is piling on. Good luck man, you're long on heart and grit, and you'll handle stuff. Baby steps. You're learning.

u/jhams13 · 1 pointr/ElectricForest

You'll definitely be roughing it in GA. Portapotties only and $10 a shower. My friends and I brought a portable camp shower this year and it helped tremendously https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20

u/becksftw · 1 pointr/bisco

Pro tip: Buy a camp shower. They work like a charm.

u/DrScientology · 1 pointr/Coachella

http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1452901857&sr=8-2&keywords=solar+shower

For $10 these are so fucking money. They heat up in the sun in an hour or two, although cold isn't too bad. 1 bag is good for about 2-3 showers. We brought two for a campsite of 9 last year and it was perfect. Highly recommended

u/nineknives · 1 pointr/Coachella
u/doublestop23 · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

Item I'd never buy for myself: It would be [this] (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MD7DIVQ/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_S_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=12DLECSTE4XR5&coliid=ISYW2S21PZQTK&psc=1). It's on my "Other" wishlist, and it's $9.98. While I like it, I already have several flash drives. If someone bought it for me, I would simply add it to my collection (I might even use it for a specific class, so I could have one flash drive for each class).

Alternative item: [This] (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=3URPXS9PLKD4W&coliid=I36SKAWB5RI97W), for emergencies (I'd keep it in my car emergency kit). It's on my "Car Stuff" wishlist, and it's $8.97. I could use it to take a shower if the power went out, and if my car broke down in an area where there was no running water.

All my exes live in Texas, that's why I hang my hat in Tennessee.

u/Impudence · 1 pointr/florida

Check out solar camp showers. They come in a wide variety of styles and sizes. I have this one it takes a fairly long time during the day for the water to get warm and it will never be as hot as it would coming out of a water heater, but if you just want something for warmer water for soaking dishes or bathing, most of them will do just fine. btw- with the coleman one, the hose and "showerhead" are absolutely awful. Make sure you look at reviews.

Aside from that a camping stove or rigging up coffee cans or something over a fire.

u/smashtheqube · 1 pointr/BurningMan
u/hagermah · 1 pointr/FireflyFestival

Absolutely! We bring something along the lines of this: https://amzn.com/B0009PUT20
Just have to fill it up with water, let it sit on your car in the sun and in a few minutes it warms up and you can use the spigot to hose yourself down. It was perfect last year

u/dahlberg123 · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/mlchrist · 1 pointr/GhostAdventures
u/borgchupacabras · 1 pointr/USPS
u/FERRISBUELLER2000 · 1 pointr/vandwellers

The Porta makes a good seat but emptying it is a nono. Use plastic bags and paper towels to create a virtual absorbant diaper. The end product will be about the same size as a diaper and is easily disposable with ur daily trash.

Having said that, the Porta potti is going to take up permenant space in your vehicle. It may be best to go with a handicap assist seat like this one. Or just go completely minimal with a space saving bucket that can also hold extra bags, tp, and paper towels while remaining completely innocuous.


Although, looking at it now, I don't feel comfortable with a permenant toilet seat in my rig (that I have to look at). Or anyone else for that matter. So it may be just as beneficial to go with a home depot 5gal bucket and possibly modify it with a pool noodle lol

I think , for emergencies, this is the way to go

u/klevenisms204 · 1 pointr/HomeImprovement

if doing it all at once, i suggest getting one of these

u/RickyShade · 1 pointr/homeless
u/thehauntedgod · 1 pointr/ElectricForest

You're going to want more cars/spaces. 2 years ago my group had 12 people with 4 cars (so 4 spots) with around 9 tents and an EZup. That was full to the brim. No spots for shower or potty.

Last year /u/rubbersoul93 built a shower for our camp out of PVC pipe, connectors, a few shower curtains, duct tape, one of these, and a big tub of water. http://i.imgur.com/8fBGnJo.png

I guess you could use the stall for a bathroom too and get something like this to use, but then you'd either have to dump it at the portapotties, pack it out, or live with it for 4 days.

u/writer-lane · 1 pointr/LosAngeles

This: http://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO

No seriously. What if you don't have access? Sawdust (or biogel/bags, etc.) and this bucket will allow you use the restroom comfortably if the water gets turned off or you have no access for some reason. And until you do need it/use it, it can store all your other items.

u/jon909 · 1 pointr/pics
u/Wasney · 1 pointr/CrohnsDisease

So, my fiancée and I had to cave and get a 1 bath (no kids any time soon). Been pretty good the last 3 years.


But...flair is starting...very much considering one of these.

u/explodeder · 1 pointr/CyclePDX

It all really depends on what level of comfort you want/need. Like any type of outdoor gear, you can spend stupid amounts of money. This one seems really well reviewed and is very inexpensive. Plus it's lighter than even the lightest, most expensive tents.

It wouldn't work for winter camping, but you could buy some netting and something like this and have a really nice set-up for less than $100. Heck, even a tarp and rope could make a serviceable rain fly. It might not pack up really small for the bike, but it's better than nothing.

u/WiseGuy1020 · 1 pointr/Hammocks

Well if you think $19.99 is pretty expensive than I don't think I'm going to be of much help.

http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Trunk-Ultralight-Hammock-Forrest/dp/B001AIHB76

u/Darkersun · 1 pointr/zombies

Damn, good find. The pry bar and hammer seem like they could come in use.

Edit: So with the extra 20 bucks, maybe a travel hammock and rope to string up into trees?

http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Trunk-Ultralight-Hammock-Forrest/dp/B001AIHB76/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1395671953&sr=1-2&keywords=hammock

u/ajschuit · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

This would be really cool. It's green and it would get me out in nature, so it's kind of a double whammy.

u/theBullMousse · 1 pointr/auburn

Here's a link where I tried my best to give directions to the rope swing. Just explore it.

Also, just my 2 cents, but don't buy an ENO. They're trendy and what not, but they're really over priced and, if you plan on using it for camping or backpacking, not a great option. Head over to /r/hammocks and search around.

I've had an ENO for 2 years and it's too frayed now for me to feel comfortable in it. I treated it as nice as you can treat a piece of outdoor equipment. This is much cheaper and supposed to hold up much better.

u/applesforadam · 1 pointr/Survival

Not sure what kind of knife you have but here's what I'd do:

SHELTER:

If you are bushcrafting it, then move on. If not, at least a tarp. A cheap plastic one from a big box store will do ($10). Shit, if you're bushcrafting it you should be good with just the knife and a bowl to eat from.

SLEEPING:

Grand Trunk Ultra Light. And just bring a blanket from home if it is going to be cold. I like hammocks because fuck sleeping on the ground for more than a night.

PACK:

Just wrap everything up in the tarp and make a shoulder sling with some paracord. You did budget for some paracord right?

COOKING/FIRE:

Buy a stainless dog bowl from a dollar store along with a cheap lighter.

Other than that, I'd say go thrift shopping. For $50 you could buy a pack, blanket, food bowl, and a water container at least with money to spare for your meal budget and that book you've been eyeing for a trail read. You won't look sexy, but you'll have your bases covered.

Oh, and buy a bandana. Single most useful piece of gear ever.

u/diredesire · 1 pointr/Hammocks

Just a heads up for those of you out there looking to buy, the same thing is on amazon for <$20 shipped:
http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Trunk-Ultralight-Hammock-Forrest/dp/B001AIHB76/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1332538165&sr=8-1

Not a thread crap, just a heads up. I know lots of those interested in Hammocks will have REI gift cards or something to make the deal worth it. (I checked the dimensions, they're the same)

I've got the ultralight as a "starter" hammock (it's on a stand in my living room), It's not bad at all.

u/nerex · 1 pointr/Hammocks

yeah, if you're not even sure you'll like sleeping in a hammock, a cheap one is the way to go- I have this $19 Grand Trunk Hammock

http://www.amazon.com/Grand-Trunk-Ultralight-Hammock-Forrest/dp/B001AIHB76

though it doesn't come with a suspension. A quick way to make one is to get ~16 feet of 1" nylon webbing, cut it into 2 pieces, tie loops at the ends with overhand knots, then on each tree, loop one end through the other end (of the same length of webbing), then hook the metal loop of the GT ultralight to the end of the webbing reaching from the tree. then do the same with the other 8 foot length on the opposite tree.

if you can get even a half-decent night of sleep in that (provided you are warm enough, etc- summer is the best time to try it out), you will probably love sleeping in a hammock while camping.

u/Nynes · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon
u/dandydandy · 1 pointr/AskReddit

you're competing against this at $20, so a $30 hammock would be pretty reasonable.

No way I would buy for $50 when I can get the aforementioned product for less than half the price.

edit: The camping/backpacking crowd might give you some great support if you can get a good price/weight value.

u/korruptedone · 1 pointr/ElectricForest

Grab a cooling bandanna! Get it wet and it stays damp and cool for hours. Saved my life in the heat last year. I rock this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Ergodyne-Chill-Its%C2%AE-6602-Evaporative-Cooling/dp/B001B5I57I?ie=UTF8&keywords=cooling%20bandana&qid=1465344356&ref_=sr_1_4&sr=8-4

u/AlanBeforeTime · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

Digital drawing http://i.imgur.com/HsyCskj.jpg

I can't access my WL

item

u/clearlyrambling · 1 pointr/OctoberBumpers2017

The heat is killing me too! I had a friend recommend one of these cool towels (she is due in Oct too) and said it's completely worth it - she basically lives with it on her neck now.

u/CrFrk11 · 1 pointr/photography

I always have water, some sort of food, change of clothes, a bridal emergency kit that was mentioned earlier, of course spares for all equipment, baby wipes (these suckers take off damn near everything), and cooling towels.

I have a bunch of these. They are great to cool off or wiping yourself down.

u/gym_rat90 · 1 pointr/LifeProTips

Cooling towels work similar to wet washcloths and might be a good alternative since they have re-useable, flexible stuff. $10 on amazon

u/ASnugglyBear · 1 pointr/dragoncon

To carry (these aren't affiliate links):

nut butter packs (http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004ULUTF6/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?qid=1409096620&sr=8-2&pi=SY200_QL40) they're like giant chocolate condiment packets which are very tidy to eat, very filling, and popular with hikers and politicians

Collapsible day bag (http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FOHJF1Y/ref=mp_s_a_1_17?qid=1409096766&sr=8-17&pi=SY200_QL40) so much easier than a backpack for long hours

Cooling towel (http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001B5I57I?pc_redir=1408940289&robot_redir=1) will drop your personal temp 10 degrees during the parade or just a hot day

Extra power for a phone, even after you turned the screen down, and turned the phone off during panels (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=867673&gclid=CJHDrJ6PssACFSgV7Aod8nkApw&Q=&is=REG&A=details)

http://us.moo.com/mobile/new.html if you're taking pictures, lots of little slips with you info to hand out to people you snap if you want to give them copies

u/nosacredcows · 1 pointr/Survival
u/SlotCarSteve · 1 pointr/secretsanta

I was all set to send him a tactical knife and a Totoro hat. Maybe next year.

u/patrickeg · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

I'll remember that for next time. I've already packed it all away, but I might drag it out and take some pics. My foot is pretty banged up so it'll be a minute. But Ill give you a short list :)

Pack: Osprey Exos 58

Sleeping Bag: Teton Sports Tracker

Tent: ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1

Tarp: Ultimate Survival Hex tarp

Mess kit: Mess kit and Mug

Water Filtration: Sawyer Mini

Tools/Defense: Note: Normally I would only take one knife, but I wasn't sure which I would prefer as they're two quite different blades. Ka-Bar Becker BK2, Condor Bushlore, and Bear Spray

Stove: MSR PocketRocket

First Aid: I had the Adventure Medical Kits Day Tripper, and then added to that with Celox and an Israeli Bandage

Trekking Poles: Cascade Mountain Tech CF with Cork Grips

In addition I had a few little things in a small kit; Ferro rod, duct tape, trail blazes, chemical water purifiers in case my Sawyer failed, bug spray, a small thing of sunscreen (which I didn't end up needing as it was overcast), deodorant, TP, etc.

u/thehonorablereese · 1 pointr/knives

I'm a fixed blade fan, though what's "EDC" for me (large knife in a belt sheath) isn't for most people. However, a full tang, fixed blade knife will always be more "indestructible" than a folder, so I stand by my opinions.

The KA-BAR BK series are extremely tough knives. My favorite is the BK-2: https://www.amazon.com/KA-BAR-Becker-Campanion-Fixed-Blade/dp/B001N1DPDE/. This is about as close to "impossible to break" as you can get. It's a big, thick chunk of steel and I've used it for everything from cutting rope, splitting wood, removing tile and grout, and as a pry bar.

At about half the price is the Ontario 499: https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Force-Survival-Knife-Black/dp/B001CZDQPI/ It's smaller than the BKs and has a rough finish, but it's extremely tough. It has been indestructible as far as I can tell: I TRIED to break it by banging it into hard logs and carelessly batoning with it and it barely lost an edge. Great knife for the price.

I could give you some strong examples of folders, but I know other commenters on here will do way better than me on that.

u/clicker4721 · 1 pointr/knives

I would recommend a Ka-Bar Becker BK-2 Campanion (of course) and a Kershaw Skyline, if you're interested in a folder. Total for less than $100.
(BK-2 Abuse links.) Those two sets of tests should be more than enough evidence for the Campanion's awesomeness. It's $62 on Amazon.
The Kershaw Skyline gets great reviews. Amazon has them for $34.

EDIT: Added all the links, and decided to provide an actually comprehensive and helpful comment.

u/letsplaywar · 1 pointr/EDC

The Amazon comments describe it better than I can. HERE
It is a way heavier, way thicker, in all ways a much sturdier knife. You can use this as a prybar, to baton wood, and it still comes sharp enough to shave with out of the box.

u/Golden-Fox · 1 pointr/EDC

$300-400 is plenty of budget. You should be able to get a reasonably durable knife, flashlight, and wallet for about $50 a piece.

You could get a Saddleback wallet, which have been popular on reddit. Many different sizes and layouts to choose from. The front pocket ID wallet is popular. I personally prefer Bifold wallets though.

Many of the flashlights suggested are $50 or less, such as the FourSevens Preon line.

After that, you just have the knife left, with about $70-$130 spent depending on your taste. You could get a perfectly acceptable knife from Kershaw or Spyderco for about $50. Any knife from either manufacturer in that price range should be satisfactory, though make sure to at least google a review of it first. I personally own a Kershaw Leek and while it is a good knife, I would not recommend it to you. It's rather delicate.

If you'd like to spend more on a knife, go for some of the more expensive Spyderco knives, or Benchmade. The Benchmade mini griptillian is one of the most highly reviewed modern pocket knives. many different handle colors, blade colors, and blade shapes are available. It's expensive, but you can even design your own.

By this point, you may have spent as little as $163, not factoring in shipping. If you're looking for a true survival knife you need a fixed blade. Folding knives are very helpful, but if you want a "stranded on a desert island" knife or a "lost in the woods, days from civilization" knife, you need fixed blade. The Becker Knife & Tool BK 2 (made by KA-bar) is a great example of such a knife. It's too big to carry on your belt daily without scaring people, but if you keep it in a bag or a car then it's fine. This thing is truly indestructible. The blade is a 1/4" thick. You could use it as a hammer.

u/mr_biscuitson · 1 pointr/gadgets
u/Thjoth · 1 pointr/Bushcraft

In that pricerange I'd spend the extra $10-$15 and get a Becker BK2 instead. Everyone that uses them seems to love them. I don't use one personally because it seems a little oversized, but I've handled them and they have really solid construction.

If you want my tool recommendations, personally, I use the ESEE-4, Gransfors-Bruks Wildlife Hatchet and Tramontina 24" Machete combo. Three tools to do just about anything.

u/HandBanana22 · 1 pointr/Survival

Thirstyone has the cons of that blade covered, I think. So heres some other options.

You could go with a BK2 or a BK7 over this. The BK9 is an option but it's on the large side.

Straying away from Ka-bar You could go with an ESEE Izula.

u/FlyFreak · 1 pointr/bugout

As has been posted alreadg I do like the Gerber LMF II, but another one to consider, and what I think i will be putting on my pack is the Becker BK2 Campanion. Or it's twin the Becker BK22. They are made in the USA by Kabar out of 1095 crovan steel. This knife is a beast for its size it is good for a chopper, but is still small enough to do delicate work.

https://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-Campanion-Fixed-Blade/dp/B001N1DPDE

https://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-Companion-Polyester-5-25-Inch/dp/B00BT49UVG/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1504101875&sr=8-3&keywords=Becker+bk2

The only real difference in the two is the sheath. They are great knives straight out of the box, but with a few personalisations they get even better.

I'd be happy to elaborate on that here or by PM but, will not bore everyone here if not needed. If the BK2/22 isn't your particular ideal check out the rest of the Becker line. Ethan has designed many great knives something is sure to fit the bill.

u/LustyRazor · 1 pointr/preppers

Go with Amazon. You're buying from the same company for a much cheaper price.

The Blackbird SK-5 is a good choice. It's just the right size, fairly affordable (~$120), and has a full tang blade for batoning wood.

Here's a great video on what you should be looking for and why.

The Ka-Bar Becker BK2 would be a more affordable option ~$75.

u/Einsteins_Taint · 1 pointr/preppers

Just checked out the Campanion on Amazon. Currently listed around $80 with free shipping. Get it now.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/ol/B001N1DPDE/ref=mw_dp_olp?ie=UTF8&condition=all

u/RhapsodyInRude · 1 pointr/preppers

I've got a stack of these, filled:

https://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Aqua-Tainer-Gallon-Container/dp/B001QC31G6

This model previously had a pretty weak spout that was easy to break if you handle it with the spout out (it's normally stowed on the inside of the screw-cap).

These containers are to get our household of 3 people through a short-term problem.

On top of that, I have a Sawyer Squeeze and a Platypus gravity filter system: http://www.cascadedesigns.com/platypus/filtration/gravityworks-40l-filter/product

These are for medium-term use. I've also got a map of fresh water reservoirs nearby.

And, last, but not least -- purification tablets since they're cheap and very portable.

For me, none of it feels like wasted money. I also camp and hike, so the filtration gear gets used for that as well.

u/skyshadow42 · 1 pointr/sanfrancisco

Water cubes are cheap, stackable and can be stored away from your house. The water heater trick is great unless your house burns down or it tips over the ruptures.

They sell stabilization kits that'll keep the water drinkable for 5+ years, also not expensive. Just remember to label them with the date and set a reminder to refill them.

u/redditbeccag · 1 pointr/ZeroWaste

I would recommend a water storage container like this: Reliance Products Aqua-Tainer 7 Gallon Rigid Water Container https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001QC31G6
When you get back home you can continue using it to store water for a 72 hour emergency kit in case of hurricanes, etc.

u/SifuSeafood · 1 pointr/shrimptank

I got the 4 stage 50 GPD and it's been good so far.

I only have a 7 gallon and 9 gallon tank. So, I don't need much for water changes and top-offs.

I have a 7 gallon jug with a spigot which makes dispensing it very easy. I fill two 1 gallon jugs throughout the week for top offs and water changes.


It takes about 2.5 hours to fill the 7 gal. It varies with temperature.

I've heard you can get resin for the DI cartridge and save a lot more money that way versus replacing the cart each time.


Oh yeah, I use this faucet adapter instead of the included one. If your faucet is compatible, it makes connecting and storing so quick if you need this kind of solution.

u/theGalation · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I have a cheap old mini fridge from Craigslist. I didn't feel like ripping it up just to fit a bucket so I bought a 7 gal water aquatainer. My first batch is running now but I've seen older posts of people successfully using it.

u/heygreatcomment · 1 pointr/NorthCarolina

Yeah I am actually on a well now but I don't drink that water either. Too close too the river. I like to buy water and store it in something like this

u/ktg0 · 1 pointr/pics

Lots of us planned to do that, however all of the large water storage containers are also sold out locally, on backorder on Amazon, or Amazon is allowing price gouging on the containers that are available. Check out these aquatainers that normally sell for ~$15: Reliance Products Aqua-Tainer 7 Gallon Rigid Water Container https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001QC31G6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_.D9Rzb8Q5JZ3R

u/isolatedvirus · 1 pointr/pics

Why? Because she bought all the water? Its first come first serve. Sure, a little compassion would always be nice but you should never expect people to show it, especially during an emergency.

The fact is: If seeing this pisses you off, you're woefully unprepared yourself. Most Americans don't even have the FEMA recommended amount of supplies, and wait until something is imminent before doing anything. This is why stores are flat out of stock and its a giant shit show. If you'd spend time/money on basic emergency preparedness (and were prepared yourself) you'd be looking at this photo and instead of getting angry at the woman buying all the water, you'd worry for the obviously under prepared.

Water doesn't need to be in a bottle to be clean. You can filter/sanitize it yourself if need be, but most tap water is absolutely fine.

Here are some solutions for water in an emergency:

WaterBOB Emergency Drinking Water Storage (100 Gallons) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001AXLUX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_DY9RzbVQSJNTDHS

New Wave Envrio Products BPA Free Bottle, 5-Gallon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003B27RAA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_k19Rzb8JNTDHS

Reliance Products Aqua-Tainer 7 Gallon Rigid Water Container https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001QC31G6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_129RzbHHVHTV4

If all else fails, get a steel cup and a bunch of those butane/propane camping fuel sources. You can boil your own water. Filters can and do work, but I usually don't recommend them unless youre willing to at least read how they work, and what they can/can't filter. I never recommend the iodine tablets for water purification unless its an absolute emergency.

u/Sehc · 1 pointr/vandwellers

I used a marine type freshwater pump that lifts the water. Needs power. Other wise get a diferant reliance can with pipe thread in the cap. https://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Aqua-Tainer-Gallon-Container/dp/B001QC31G6

u/mrthedon · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I tried "No Chill" brewing this weekend using an HDPE Aqua-Tainer as my container. After transferring the hot wort and squeezing the air out as recommended by a few of the guides I read, I let it sit overnight to cool and then transferred to the fermenter. The container seems to have retained its "squeezed all the air out" shape though and looks all deformed, however.

Will it eventually regain its original shape, or have I managed to ruin it somehow and need to toss it? Am I going to die if I drink the final product due to something harmful being released when the container got all deformed?

u/Peoples_Bropublic · 1 pointr/knives

A fixed blade would be perfect. Mora knives are excellent inexpensive knives that are quite commonly used for camping. They make some with wooden handles, composite handles, stainless blades, and carbon blades. My understanding is that their stainless blades don't hold an edge quite as well as their carbon blades, but carbon blades have the disadvantage of being susceptible to rust. So for an outdoor camping application where you're likely to be running around in dirt and mud and rain and lakes and streams and not likely to have a supply of rubbing alcohol, clean cloths, metal polish, and mineral oil, a stainless blade with composite handle would probably serve you best.

On the other hand, Cody London, that hippy dude from Dual Survival pretty much exclusively uses classic Moras with wooden handles and carbon blades. On the other other hand, he also doesn't wear pants or shoes.

Here are a few to look at.

u/Magneticitist · 1 pointr/knives

In that case I was also thinking for a budget of $200 you could get him a nice fixed blade and a nice folding pocket knife. Without more details you may have to just go with your gut feeling on a couple of the more popular brands mentioned since they rarely fail to please. Fallkniven, Benchmade, Bark River, Buck..

The Buck 110 is always a well received pocket knife and I would happily receive any of their fixed hunting knives.

I've also read that Morakniv makes a great all around blade even for working with game. I love all the Mora's I own and the best thing about them is the price. You could add one of those in for only an extra 15 bucks and it may end up being a really well used knife he likes and can beat up using it for things he may not want to do with his nice pretty knife his wife got him. Just a possible thought there if you can't land that perfect single knife for him. A nice little folder, solid fixed blade that will last and he can admire, and an all around utility knife covering all 3 bases.

u/discretion · 1 pointr/XTerra

Lordy, you can run a sawzall off your inverter?

I just got one of these, one of these and a cheap true temper axe and have been served well so far.

u/nl2134 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Thanks!

Is this the Mora Knife you are suggesting:

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Stainless-4-1-Inch/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1499099295&sr=8-2&keywords=mora%2Bknife&th=1

Is a multi-tool even necessary then?

Also, based on what you said, and based on the fact I'll be hiking for a week, do you think it would be better if I just carried the titanium bowls, or would the kit be better?

u/woodlandcraft · 1 pointr/Fishing

I was going to link you to /r/CCW but it sounds like your too young to carry a gun or a knife depending on what state you live in.

My advice to you is to carry a decent fixed blade knife on your belt that can easily be removed from the sheath until you are old enough for a gun. I know it sounds a bit extreme to some but its something that you should consider especially knowing that there are predators in your area.

It doesn't mean you have to stab someone, I actually had an instance where 3 homeless men tried to corner me at my car after I went fishing, they left after I had moved my shirt to the side showing my knife, never even took it from the sheath.

In terms of legally carrying a knife, comply with your local laws but also keep in mind that if the police see you with a fishing pole, tackle box, and any knife that doesn't look like a fucking Rambo knife on your belt... they probably wont glance twice at you. my suggestion
morakniv

Remember, the people that do this are cowards, they may hate you but they probably don't hate you enough to get stabbed.

or just carry pepper spray if you like.

In terms of them having a gun you are pretty much shit out of luck after they get the drop on you, at that point just give them what they want, if they hit you just go fetal and protect your head/neck and scream to attract attention.

The best thing for this is situational awareness, if you see a group of people or even a single person that makes you uncomfortable don't feel bad about going somewhere else, your personal safety isn't worth making some random guy/girl a little mad because you crossed the street.

best of luck to you bud, hope you heal quickly.

u/AlGeee · 1 pointr/knives

Yes!

Glock KB17281 81 Field Knife https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000W32PIK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_x6RNBbWQ0HCE5

$30!

Or Mora (Companion)

Starting at $15

Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Sandvik Stainless Steel Blade, 4.1-Inch, Military Green https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_giSNBbDZWQZHH

u/justateburrito · 1 pointr/Wet_Shavers

What about this one?

u/NoxiousDogCloud · 1 pointr/knives

OK

or this one, which is quite well reviewed and popular but it's over $30. If you gotta buy me one, i'd prefer this one.

u/gamerwill253 · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

Lord of the Rings and Taegukgi: The Brotherhood of War

Lord of the Rings: Because its a movie about adventure, camaraderie, and saving middle earth from Sauron and his minions!

Taegukgi: because its about a movie where two brothers are drafted into the military during the Korean War. They eventually get separated and the older brother ends up joining the north koreans after a certain event happens. Its just a story about my people and it is so heartbreaking.
this
or [or this] (http://www.amazon.com/Gamo-Buddy-Rifle-Sling-Rifles/dp/B00172KHAS/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_S_nC?ie=UTF8&colid=1RCQ4I52BGR59&coliid=IM13OYYPAED0D)

u/notimeforniceties · 1 pointr/Survival

Link to the Stanley Compact Cookset and the Camp Cookset , looks rather nice.

I'm generally a fan of the jetboil though...

u/wgg3 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Stanley cook set, DZO cup , gsi cup , snowpeak life max stove , jetboil canister holder , Keith ti spork . MSR fuel, lighter, small bottle, and micro fiber rag were found at either REI or Walmart.

u/reyomnwahs · 1 pointr/CampingGear

I have this, and the 4oz tank and stove pack perfectly into it if you take the cups out. Pretty much any cookset of the same form factor should work as well. Optimus Terra, the Esbit set, etc.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/ref=gl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=I0MRPGUG5HSP&coliid=I25X27QEKXLUNF&psc=1

u/SilentEarthThree · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Damn, that looks great, but man $80 is just outrageous. I just bought this recently. The seal is decent, I probably wouldn't trust liquid in it, but dry food would be ok.
http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-Adventure-Camp-Stainless-Steel/dp/B005188T90?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

u/Zoner1501 · 1 pointr/Survival
u/poestal · 1 pointr/CampingGear

hey man welcome to bushcrafting so far you have a pretty decent list but i'd like to give you suggestions from what I learned throughout the years.

knife- good choice for chopping and batoning but too much blade to use whittling and making small cuts. generally you want to use either large blade/small blade or axe/ small blade combos.

backpack- 65L is very overkill unless your doing 5 day+ with clothing for every day. I would suggest something in the range of 45L max.

compass- do you know the area your going to or do you really know how to use it? I know every person says to just have one just in case but if they already know their terrain or dont even know how to use the dang thing its just wasting space.

ferro rod- generally stay away from things like multi use gear. also just from my experience you want a long rod (5"+) for more surface area to generate more sparks for an easier chance to catch fire.


pillow- I would not use hammock pillows for on ground sleeping. they're extremely small and have almost no support on the count of your body is in a curling position in a hammock. I would suggest something like an inflatable pillow for you to adjust for your support and then covering it with something like a shemagh or t-shirt.


first aid- your going to get more cuts, scrapes and burns so I would buy extra of that stuff, but I would also add some quick clot just for the off chance of having a serious injury out in the field. and also some moleskin for your feet and pain relievers. and dont forget sunscreen.


now for some additions for your gear loadout.

saw and stay away from those stupid hand chainsaws


cooking vessal


cowhide gloves


Again; welcome and I hope you enjoy yourself and grow with your errors out in the field.

u/upsidedownbat · 1 pointr/BISMUTH

I use this camping pot and it's been great: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/

u/StolidSentinel · 1 pointr/vandwellers

For what you've asked for... I like these. I have 2.

It has 2 internal cups also, and a lid with holes in it... so the lid does not seal. They are like 12 bucks at walmart.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/

EDIT: Also... I can fit my alcohol stove inside one if I only take 2 cups (out of the 4 that come with 2 of these). If I could improve it, I would find a way to insulate the handle, since it gets hot while the cup is heated. Keep that in mind for the first time you grab it off the stove. You'll remember it the second time, and each thereafter!! :-/

u/not2day1024 · 1 pointr/gifs

Stainless steel camping cup from my local Walmart


Specifically this: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005188T90/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awd_924Cwb8EFZJ92

u/DasBarenJager · 1 pointr/Survival

You should check this out I don't own one myself yet but I plan to pick one up soon. I've got a friend who speaks very highly of his.

If $40 is more than you are looking to spend you can go with the much more affordable Stanley Camp Cookset for about $15 but I would suggest adding one of these and ditching the plastic cups in the Stanley to bring your total to $20. The Stanley even fits real nice into the steel cup for storage purposes and you can put some food and eating utensils inside the Stanley.
This is basically the set up I use now and it's great.

u/ArborealRob · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

$20-$50 Mr. BEER! Who doesn't want to try their hand at it?
$10-$20 Stanley Camping Cook Set Being able to cook on the go is nice!
$5-$10 Mimosa Pudica Touch Sensitive plant that pretends to die when touched, HOW COOL IS THAT?!
$0-$5 Rose Kissed Jasmine Tea You need to be able to unwind with something after playing with all the new toys, right?

u/michaelwentonweakes · 1 pointr/AskCulinary

I'm in the same boat. I'll probably just live with the electric for most things, and buy a single portable gas burner (like this one) for wok stir-frying and hot pot.

u/JuJuJuli · 1 pointr/Cooking

If you want something versatile I'd go with a portable gas burner (such as http://www.amazon.com/Iwatani-Corporation-America-ZA-3HP-Portable/dp/B006H42TVG/) and a pan (such as http://www.amazon.com/TAYAMA-TG-28C-Tayama-Hot-Pot/dp/B000K6LHC4).

I personally have a Zojirushi electric hot pot which is very awesome for many reasons but it may not be ideal for chinese hot pot because there is not a divider on the pot (for spicy half/mild half) and it is actually quite huge to store in a cabinet.

u/ruuuhhy · 1 pointr/AskCulinary
u/ff45726 · 1 pointr/KoreanFood

Everything is from the H-Mart housewares section. The stove is kinda like this and the grill is at Hmart too. There are similar pieces on amazon.

u/Ghigs · 1 pointr/NoStupidQuestions

Just as a counterpoint, in places like Japan they use those little butane cartridge burners indoors all the frickin time.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006H42TVG/

Like this. I don't know that there's any fundamental difference between that stove and yours, I can't imagine that there is, especially if it looks like that.

A regular gas stove with a blue flame produces nearly nil CO until you put a cold pan onto the flame. Once you do that, they all produce CO, even the ones built into kitchens. It's not very much and it reduces once the pan warms up.

I think the people in this thread so far are being absolutely overly paranoid.

u/monkeyhitman · 1 pointr/videos

You can always get something like this for fairly cheap. They're easy to store when you don't need it.
http://www.amazon.com/Iwatani-Corporation-America-ZA-3HP-Portable/dp/B006H42TVG

Not as high BTU as the commercial gas stove in the video, of course, but it'll be tons better at maintaining the frying pan at a consistent high temp when compared with an electric stove.

u/overstable · 1 pointr/festivals

I bring a folding table like this one. I have a 2-burner Coleman stove that runs off propane and a single-burner butane stove. I'll bring one or the other depending on how many fuel canisters I find while packing. I always bring gear for cooking (pan/pot, spatula, tongs, ladle, hot pads, seasonings, etc.) but the most common stove use is boiling water in a kettle (for making coffee in an Aeropress or french press). I'm one of those "it's better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it" people who brings EVERYTHING!

I usually camp with a large group. We try to plan so that everyone (or every couple) brings one meal to share to reduce the overall prep work and expense. Sometimes we have electric available at camp and I will do a slow-cooker recipe on site. Other times I make a dish at home, freeze it so it will keep in the cooler, then re-heat it on the stove. A 'one pot' dish like soup or jambalaya is easy to re-heat and serve and doesn't generate a huge mess to clean. Tip: add dish soap to a small scrubby sponge (or cut a larger sponge into a more manageable size) and keep it in a ziploc. The reduces the chances of a soap spill/disaster and it can be thrown away if no longer usable at the end of the fest.

I bring a few snacks and something to eat in the mornings (plus coffee - never go without a reliable caffeine source!) in addition to my group meal contribution. I rely on the vendors for everything else.

u/HugeAxeman · 1 pointr/sousvide

I've got this one from duxtop and I really like it, but have started relying more on this gas cooktop. I like the gas because it gets hotter than the induction (by a wide margin), its cheaper, and I'm not limited to magnetic cookware for it to work. I also appreciate that I have to worry less about tripping over the power cord and pulling a 600º pan off the table.

u/Scasa · 1 pointr/sousvide

If you need more power, get one of these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B006H42TVG/ref=mp_s_a_1_4?qid=1418188037&sr=8-4&pi=AC_SX110_SY165_QL70

I just got one since I don't want to smoke up the house. More than enough power out of that portable stove!

u/Lieutenant_Hawk · 1 pointr/preppers
u/oboz_waves · 1 pointr/camping

Here’s the one I bought and I love it. It’s a little on the pricy side of them but it comes with a little repair kit and I’ve used it as low as 15-20F comfortably

u/MadCabbages · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Wow, fantastic answer. Thank you!

By cheapish I mean all gear for the trip for under about €500.

Re Gear: I couldn't find suppliers for the gear you suggested in Europe and shipping was very expensive from the US so what do you think of these.
Tent
Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Mat
Stove set
with something like this as a bear bag (with rope etc)?

Re Food: Yes there is alot of villeges/towns along the way. However I was looking at this and thought it might be a good idea.. I will look into water purification device as well.

I don't think my budget will extend to a GPS device this time around so a map/compass + smartphone it is!

Sorry for all the silly questions. Your answer the last time helped a lot!

u/tupperwhatever · 1 pointr/bicycling

you absolutely want more than a red cross bivy....you can still get a light setup for decent price, and this gear will last you a very long time.

Kelty Salida 1 Tent

Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black

Kelty Cosmic 40 Degree Sleeping Bag, Regular, Smoke/Dark Shadow

u/RightTrash · 1 pointr/Narcolepsy

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/
This is a nice and lightweight, quickly inflated with a few breaths, sleep pad.

u/no1likesthetunahere · 1 pointr/motocamping

Yea, "craps table" :P


You guys sound rad! Keep it up. Just a few suggestions in case you haven't thought of them:

  • microfiber towel (cheap on Amazon, dry super fast)
  • headlamp (because you somehow always ending up arriving late and setting up a tent needs 2 hands)
  • Morrivoe Outdoor Folding Chair Portable Mesh Chair with Aluminum Alloy Support,Suitable for Camping Picnic Fishing Hiking + Free Carry Bag (Green) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B01M8IBYVC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_DI6RybVGZ2D8Z
    Packs up very small, lightweight, super comfy. Because your butt needs a good lounge after a full day of riding. A rock/stump/picnic table doesn't cut it
  • Klymit 06SVGR01C Static V Camping Mattress (Green-Grey, Large) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VM6RybFHWN4Z1
    There is no better mattress for bike camping. It packs down the smallest and lightest. While being 100% comfortable.
  • zip ties, paracord and duct tape wrapped around an old credit card. Because you can fix absolutely anything with this trifecta


    Hope that helps!
u/BoogieJeans · 1 pointr/festivals

i wouldnt bother with tent stakes. she will find plenty of those at festivals. Ive never had to use a first aid kit, either... get her something she mightn't have thought of, that she will constantly have to use.
https://www.amazon.com/Klymit-Static-Lightweight-Sleeping-Green/dp/B007RFG0NM?ref_=bl_dp_s_mw_6764188011
these are amazing.
Maybe a hydroflask and/or camelbak if she doesnt already have those things.
flashlight/headlamp.

u/LackThereOf13 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Just thought I’d chime in here and say if you are looking at getting the klymit static v Amazon has it on sale today for 41 bucks and some change

Klymit Static V Lightweight Sleeping Pad, Green/Char Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_4wRTzb65DNP21

u/crimsontongue · 1 pointr/onebag

A Coleman fleece sleeping bag (basically a thicker liner) from Target/Walmart will give you a little more padding, and significantly more warmth than a sleeping bag liner, but isn't really much better than just sleeping in a jacket. If padding is what you're after, get a Klymit inflatable sleeping pad (there are a bunch of variations like this), which will also serve well outdoors (get the insulated version if you're serious though, at the cost of extra weight). Are you crashing on the floor or a couch? Carpet or wood? For two nights do you need to take something potentially bulky?

u/Dzdimi14 · 1 pointr/backpacking

I recommend [this sleeping pad] (https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B007RFG0NM/ref=ya_aw_od_pi?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

It's pretty light, packs down to smaller than a Nalgene, and is super comfy. All that and it's pretty cheap for what it is!

u/MacintoshEddie · 1 pointr/Edmonton

I suppose I should follow up on this and mention sleeping pads. I recommend staying away from the huge ones that require an electric pump. The pump always breaks. It's a rule of the universe that some poor bastard has to spend what feels like three hours inflating the mattress manually. Usually right after you've inhaled some smoke and your lungs are already compromised.

I use the Klymit Static V
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/aw/d/B007RFG0NM

It's been pretty great so far. I'm at the bare edge of being too tall for it at 6', but having my feet hang over isn't the end of the world. Packs away small, doesn't take too long to inflate manually, and is even okay for side sleepers. Some sleep pads can't handle the smaller footprint of side sleepers and they don't provide any support. I can also recommend the Snugpak jungle blanket. Packs away small and is decently warm. A good thing to have just in case. Nights in a tent can get colder than you'd think.

u/Zip668 · 1 pointr/BuyItForLife

13EE with a high arch/instep and I swear by these.

u/Bfeezey · 1 pointr/BuyItForLife
u/danksause · 1 pointr/flashlight

ALWAYS need more lights!

Thank you as always

u/WOgles · 1 pointr/backpacking

I have been wearing these, People Socks for awhile now, and I will never go back. I love 'em. It's summer in Oklahoma and my feet are always comfy in them.

u/JaxTellerr · 1 pointr/goodyearwelt

don't know why I commented in such broken english lol, but there are different people socks. The cheaper ones or these ones.

Which percentage merino wool are yours, 71 or 42?

u/fxsnowy · 1 pointr/snowboarding

First time going snowboarding in denver in a few weeks, will this jacket be fine?

Also do I need ski/snowboarding socks like this
or can these wool socks do the job?

u/berwyn_urine · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

That sweater looks good and the price is good. Go for it.

The socks look okay, but the reviews are rather mixed. Apparently Costco brand wool socks are supposed to be of good quality and receive much praise from frugalmalefashion. As another option, these People Socks are on a great sale and have great reviews. I own 4 pair personally and they are quite thick and warm. Seem like they are going to hold up well through the winter.

u/penguinsuitman · 1 pointr/rawdenim

I have a few pairs of people's socks that are really nice and reasonably priced for high quality MiUSA wool socks. They ship w/ amazon prime so that's also cool.

u/TonyOstrich · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

I don't think I am there yet. There are quite a few outfits I have, where I have no idea objectively if they look good or not. I am pretty good at seeing whether something fit's properly, but not very good with color and style matching. That said there are certain items I do know go well together, and this is one of them

The outfit:


Waxed Olive

Canvas in black

Express Crew Neck (Small) in Black

Gustin Brass Roller - Saddle Brown Belt (Second notch) Size 32

Redwing Beckman 9016 Size 9 (Probably a half size too large, but made better by thick merino wool socks)


Levi 511 Rigid Dragon 29x32

People Socks - Merino Wool Blend

All in all it's a super simple outfit, and not very hard to pull off. The belt is not naturally the right color to match the shoes. It's a much lighter shade of brown, and with all of the other dark pieces does not work well. I darken the belt by massaging cocnut oil into it, letting it sit for 24 hours, and then polishing with Red Wings Dusky Brown polish (same polish I use on the shoes). I do this whenever I notice the color getting a bit too light.

u/flynnski · 1 pointr/motocamping

Merino. Effin'. Wool.

People socks, in particular, seem to be the best deal running. I bought a bunch of 'em and they held up really nicely over a three month trip mostly spent in Keens. Wore 'em a couple days in a row, no problem, no stink.

They're absurdly comfortable, warm in the cold and reasonably cool in the heat. I can't say enough about 'em.

Also, put your dirty and clean laundry in separate bags.

u/AdviseMyAdvice · 1 pointr/goodyearwelt

Semi-urgent as I'm wearing these to work today (driving though...) and I'm worried I should return them.

Do these look like they fit correctly? One Redditor said they might be too narrow for my feet. They feel a little tight but I am wearing some thick-ish socks.

http://i.imgur.com/lcnCYRa.jpg - sitting

http://imgur.com/sjvUo36 - on my toes

u/monster_snowgoon · 1 pointr/OkCupid

Dis and dis and dese and dose.

u/Russian_For_Rent · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

+1 for people socks. $26 dollars right now on amazon and I just snagged my second set.

u/slow_one · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

The Spirit of Detroit...
If you don't already have smart wool socks, buy a couple of pair now! It's the only way to go. They seem expensive but they keep your feet warm and dry faster than cotton.
Like these but in your size:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B009Y9QCCS/ref=aw_wl_ov_dp_4_14?colid=3SHLFA9GMR2ID&coliid=IYRO9TXN6JRFB&vs=1.
Also, if you can find some Ex-Officio underwear, these are great!
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001M0MN02?cache=55404ae8e247335d09249fab5f69df62&pi=SY200_QL40&qid=1411767898&sr=8-1#ref=mp_s_a_1_1.
They're warm and they wash and dry over night while traveling!

u/Raewynrh · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

People socks!!!

They aren't super cheap but they last sooo long and are super warm and comfy. We have 8 pairs that have lasted us three winters of heavy use and are still going strong. Plus they are made in the USA! Stay warm!

u/Huskie407 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

I would not recommend this. choices differ between if you are backpacking/hiking to a camp or just driving in/car camping. Gear can be expensive or reasonable but If you are just starting out, I would not recommend buying expensive gear before you know what provides you value. Everyone's different so some questions only you will be able to answer once you go a few times. I would recommend going conservative on cost to start out until you know what you prefer (Checking out other peoples gear on camping trips/ REI browsing sessions are a gold mine)

​

Sleeping Bag depending on what the night time low temps are (based mostly on how high the elevation youre going to be sleeping at this time of year) you don't need a sleeping bag, I would instead recommend a light packable down quilt like the one from Costco or This cost: $20-$40

​

pricier sleeping bag option

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XE2SKG2/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=darwionthe-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B00XE2SKG2&linkId=faa0813c08ae84dc66e192d16eef9fde

​

​

Sleeping Pad Basic sleeping pad :https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LZWW2FD/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=darwionthe-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B01LZWW2FD&linkId=7f466defe405f13e4d8f457436a33b6c $35-$40

​

I personally use the Klymit Static V, You can get them refurbished for very little on Amazon/Ebay

​

Tent Lots of options here, a few of them good for a low price. Decision is if you're going to be going solo or taking company (Size) and again how light you want to go on the weight. Freestanding tents generally provide more shelter but can be hotter in the summer and generally heavier. Some people choose only a light tarp setup for ultralight backpacking. its a personal choice but I would definitely take some time to think what suits your need on this. A few options.

​

(requires trekking poles) light

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01J9XWJEI/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=darwionthe-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B01J9XWKHY&linkId=df511cfe28f404892810dfcda5f5560d&th=1&psc=1

​

Freestanding option $112

https://www.amazon.com/Kelty-Salida-Camping-Backpacking-Tent/dp/B00NFCFO0Q/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1563337921&s=gateway&sr=8-1

​

Cheaper $95

https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=1p+tent&qid=1563338006&s=gateway&sr=8-3

​

​

For the tent I would recommend spending a little more if you are strictly buying for car camping, itll have more longevity and youll be using it for a few years. This is my car camping tent. $260

​

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00M87LPMU/ref=twister_B07BWCR88J?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

​

I would highly recommend investing in some permethrin/bug spray, a good hat and a Head Net to go along with it.

​

Happy trails.

u/schmuckmulligan · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

You've got a few of these, but just in case you want to hit the trail soon, these are Amazon available. I'm emphasizing lighter but similar gear to what's in the package. I think buying ultralight gear when you first start backpacking is questionable. It's expensive, there's a learning curve for a lot of it, and it's hard to know what you like until you've done some actual backpacking. My "bundle" weighs in at 7-ish pounds and costs $180.

A 2.5-pound sleeping bag of similar rating to the Siesta one:

https://www.amazon.com/Kelty-Tuck-Degree-Sleeping-Bag/dp/B00V84TXMI

A 14-oz standard sleeping pad that's less comfortable than the one in the bundle but will serve decently well and can act as an adjunct to an inflatable as your needs evolve (I still have one in my winter kit):

https://www.amazon.com/Therm-a-Rest-RidgeRest-SOLite-Mattress-Regular/dp/B004534D6K/ref=sr_1_3?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1469111490&sr=1-3&keywords=thermarest+zlite

For a tent, I'd grab the ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1 instead: https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-5024617-Lynx-1-Person/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1469111834&sr=8-1&keywords=alps+lynx+1

u/jehoshaphat · 1 pointr/camping

Something like this could work https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1523911276&sr=8-5&keywords=alps+mountaineering+tent

As for the water, you should be drinking a lot per day, so you need to have a water source. Be it that stream, or something else. A stream is more likely to have issues with water. So make sure to boil or purify.

The issue isn't really weight, but space. Even freeze dried stuff (which requires even more water) takes up a god amount of space.

As someone said above, maybe shoot for a rustic site, that has a short walk to get there. Then you will have closer access to your car in case of emergency.

u/PrivateTumbleweed · 1 pointr/CampingGear
u/Durkbeef · 1 pointr/motocamping

https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU

Sorry for the late reply. I've been in the woods

u/ConsciousCourtney · 1 pointr/CampingGear

I have this tent in 1 man and 2 man and they're both awesome! Top notch qulity for the price. Just read the reviews for yourself. Don't sleep on amazon. Plus you'll have extra money to spend on other camping gear that you'll need. https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU

u/GremlinDoesThat · 1 pointr/AustralianShepherd

ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1-Person Tent, Clay/Rust https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_MGKYCb58N5DJQ

First solo tent I’ve ever purchased has done me wonders in three seasons and got me through a 3 day hike in the Colorado Mountains in October.

https://www.rei.com/product/110837/rei-co-op-passage-2-tent

The second is what we bought before we got the dogs, also great for 3 seasons. Definitely heavier than I’d like but for short excursions it does the job.

Both are on the cheap side but have done well for what I need.

u/thomasjordan717 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Here are a couple options with brands that have a bit better of a reputation. Ultimately it’s your choice, but I would recommend going for a company that has a bit more of a following:

Kelty Salida 2:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NFCFO0Q/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_PhXyCb0V6QC8Y


Kelty Acadia 2:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01JBSFI1M/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_RiXyCbT3QEMH0


Alps Mountaineering Lynx 1 (also has a 2 person available):

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_pdXyCb85G6NR9


I don’t personally own these tents, but I know the quality should be there and the price point is in line with what you were thinking. Hope this helps ✌🏻

u/SuddenSeasons · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Check out this guy: https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU/

It's lighter (just under 4 Lb), it's listed as JUST too wide for your bag, but do you think you can squish it in? It's lighter, cheaper, really well reviewed, and a much bigger floor space. Your tent only has 20 sq feet!

Listed as 6"x17.5" so the volume works, may just need some re-configuring? Ditch the stuff sack.

I have a tent which is almost exactly these dimensions and man, I love it. I backpack, so it has room for my sleep pad, stuff next to me (water, phone charger), room for my pack at the end by my feet, and I never ever feel cramped. It sucks to be unconstrained by weight (motorcycle) and still sleeping like you're UL hiking. It's heavy, so it's not my ultra-light setup, but it takes literally 45 seconds to set up camp.

edit: You can get the Static V insulated for cheaper. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Klymit-Insulated-Static-V-Sleeping-Pad-06IVOr01C-/191504068900 $62.76 right from the manufacturer - it's a great pad. I have the regular and the insulated as my only sleep pad (side sleeper, wide dude), just switch out based on weather. You have the best in price/class product there.

edit2: This could be had for $90 if you're an REI member, or can find one who will let you use their coupon. https://www.rei.com/rei-garage/product/110867/kelty-dualist-22-sleeping-bag

This one is 8x13: https://www.amazon.com/Kelty-Tuck-Degree-Sleeping-Bag/dp/B00NFCFIR0/ref=sr_1_14?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1491157929&sr=1-14&keywords=20+degree+sleeping+bag

Can't really speak to any of those specific bags, but if price is a primary concern it looks like you can do all around a little better, especially if that tent can fit. I think youll have a much comfier trip.

u/unconcealable · 1 pointr/tall

I've used this one, and have been very happy.

ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1-Person Tent https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BMKD1DU/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i3TzybB4ARH9P

It's easy and quick to set up, has held up well through several trips, and there's sufficient room for me and just a few other items (boots and pack stay outside for me).

I'm a bit taller than you, as well

u/Circle_in_a_Spiral · 1 pointr/camping

I have this and like it, especially for the price:

https://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Mountaineering-Lynx-1-Person-Tent/dp/B00BMKD1DU

The vestibule is a pretty roomy space for a pack.

u/TheTrain2000 · 1 pointr/camping

I have and use the ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1p, and it works great. It seems to fit your price range and requirements, as well.

u/planification · 1 pointr/hiking

ALPS seems to be having a sale right now. It's really difficult to get a durable, lightweight tent at that price, but sometimes you can luck out and get something on sale farther into the season. According to the manufacturer, that one's about 1.8 kg.

u/williamdacuck · 1 pointr/Ultralight

I was looking at this one. https://www.amazon.ca/gp/aw/d/B00BMKD1DU/ref=aw_wl_ov_dp_1_1?colid=2CGHUTUO55MXA&coliid=IPYZXNNK6TQ9N&vs=1

I'm not too sure what to make of it, it's gotten good reviews on backcountry.com

u/ldt003 · 1 pointr/assholedesign

DUDE! These caps are the best! Get yourself a sawyer mini like this. They fit those caps perfectly! I think it’s the reason smartwater is dominating the premium water market. Because backpackers keep buying them up.

u/keepsharp · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Try the Sawyer Mini! Its half the weight, and $21 on amazon.

u/VGooseV · 1 pointr/backpacking

+1 on the sawyer mini. It works like a champ.

u/alphasixtwo · 1 pointr/Survival

Starter knife look at the Buck Nighthawk(you dont need the tops version.) Amazing knife well priced and near indestructible. The choice of steel also makes it fairly easy to sharpen.

The one thing Sukram 85 is missing is a water filter. All you need though is a cheap basic one like the life straw or the sawyer mini.
.

I saw go with the sawyer. The price is similar but it will last way longer and can be used in line with a water bladder.

Don't use a plastic water bottle. Try and find one with made with steel(not aluminum) then you can boil water in it too in case you don't have your filter on you or the filter broke.

u/The-Internet-Sir · 1 pointr/flashlight

Armytek elf c1
Thanks for these giveaways!!! Also your website is great.

u/rukiddingdood · 1 pointr/LosAngeles

Might I suggest people check out this or a similar water filter for such emergencies. Could really be a lifesaver.

u/NATOMarksman · 1 pointr/zombies

The [Sawyer Mini water filter] (http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/) is smaller, can be screwed onto standard disposable plastic water bottles, and is capable of filtering far more water since you can reuse it. If you pick up a [stainless steel water bottle] (http://www.amazon.com/Klean-Kanteen-40oz-Classic-Loop/dp/B0093IRPSA/), you can boil water in it as well.

You should always have a backup when it's a survival situation; [Israeli water purification tablets] (http://www.amazon.com/Taharmayim-Israeli-Water-Purification-Tablets/dp/B0077TB65U/) will both look legit and be legit if she actually needs to use them.

There are always more items you might add to a first aid kit, but [this one is pretty well rounded] (http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Weekender-Kit/dp/B000G7YIL4/). If you want a cheaper base kit (i.e if you want to add your own items), [this other kit] (http://www.amazon.com/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Tripper-First/dp/B0033B4I9C/) will also do the job.

Battery-free lights can be good, but AA batteries are common enough that a [good tactical light that takes AAs] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006O4CELO) might be a more convenient option.

If she has a tablet (if tablet, go for the 12W) or E-reader (7W), [solar power might be an option] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00F3LPODY). With [rechargeable AA batteries] (http://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-BK-3MCCA8BA-Pre-Charged-Rechargeable-Batteries/dp/B00JHKSN5I) and a [USB recharger] (http://www.amazon.com/SunJack-Battery-Charger-Ni-Mh-Batteries/dp/B00PZ6V99U/), the flashlight and any other AA device (like a [small, separate radio] (http://www.amazon.com/Sony-ICF-S10MK2-Pocket-Radio-Silver/dp/B00020S7XK)) could work indefinitely, as well as any regular USB-charged device.

[ResQme] (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000IE0F12/) may not be strictly zombie-related, but if you buckled up as per Rule #4, you may want a way to quickly exit your vehicle if your seatbelt jams and the windows and door won't open normally.

There are a lot of compasses out there, but [this one] (http://www.amazon.com/Suunto-SS012063013-A-10-Compass/dp/B000FEXZGW) is simple, reliable, and won't break easily. It's also designed to be laid over maps without getting in the way of reading them.

[Pocket chainsaw] (http://www.amazon.com/Chainmate-CM-24SSP-24-Inch-Survival-Pocket/dp/B0026OOS60). Won't be useful against zombies, but if you ever needed to cut a tree or thick branches and don't want to carry an axe...

...You can also carry a [hatchet] (http://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-78506935-X7-Hatchet-14-Inch/dp/B0002YTO7E/) instead. This one has a short blade, which will cut into their heads and not get stuck like others. It'll also do a fine job cutting smaller branches.

For non-zombie/woodwork related tasks, the [Victorinox Forester] (http://www.amazon.com/Victorinox-Swiss-Army-Grip-Series/dp/B003EH82TC/) has your bases covered.

You should also include World War Z (the book, and the movie if you'd prefer), I Am Legend (both the book and the film), and the Walking Dead series (TV, comics, and both seasons of the Telltale game series on Steam).

u/TheEyeofEOS · 1 pointr/camping

There's a cheaper model that works just as well, but doesn't have a screw adapter on both ends so the clean water you just gotta kinda point and shoot when filling bottles.

https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=br_lf_m_j5pekp3jae389p3_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&th=1&psc=1

u/xBIGxTITIESx · 1 pointr/kzoo
u/RenegadeBurrito · 1 pointr/onebag
u/Flagrant_Geek · 1 pointr/CampingGear

The closest thing I used to a life straw is the "Soldier water filter". An ultra small membrane type filter built inside a real tiny hand pump.

While it worked incredibly well as a filter, as a pumping device it sucked. Took circa 30 minutes of minutia pumping while crouched by a water source to suck up a single liter of water.

To me those straw, look more like a last resort type of water filter for similar reasons. They probably work well as a filter but are rather tedious to use. They have a truly limited use scenario.

Also because of it's method of use you are likely not to be fully hydrated as you will likely not drink as much as actually needed for long hikes in hot weather, as it's designed to be only used at the water source. Water sources can be rather far apart. Good sucking skills are also required.

I have images in my head of sucking that straw until I turn blue with my face suspended a few inches above the lake or river bank attempting to suck water then sliding and falling into the water while simply attempting to have a drink.

I don't know about you but it seems likely to produce some rather comical photo opportunities for other hikers while simply attempting to get a drink.

I personally used the Katadyn 6L base camp water filter (The revised Version #2) and found it an amazing high speed device that allowed me to filter enough water to fill my 3L bladder and cook dinner and breakfast as well as provide water for other hikers with me. This each and every night at base camp. This in a mater of minutes. it filters really fast. An entire days supply only takes minutes.

Aside this I would perhaps consider the Sawyer squeeze filter, which is somewhat similar but designed for smaller quantities of water. You don't have to suck until you turn blue.

Simply fill bag and squeeze, Around a liter per squeeze bags and is about the size of a life straw while stored in your bag. This is the real economical yet highly functional solution. Small, compact. The only draw back is you have to do this multiple times a day. Other than that it's the perfect kit.

Katadyn and a few others make better hand pump type water filter that are more usable than what I had. However they are truly cost prohibitive and I personally cant see why pay this much makes sense for me.

In the end for me it's a gravity filter, less work, fast, more quantity per water pull from lakes and rivers and fast easy filtering. It is a real blessing to have ease of use, when tired and having to setup camp and prep food etc. I cant say a single bad thing about that filter, yet.

Albeit I have read some rather bad reviews on the same filter I use, but so far it's not my experience with them. Not a single issue ever...

u/Gffcom · 1 pointr/Documentaries

Man, it must feel great to be that self righteous!

To bad it won’t last. This will give you 100,000 potable gallons for 20 bucks.

https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1527296707&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=sawyer+squeeze+mini&psc=1

u/langzaiguy · 1 pointr/camping

Water purity concerns are for bacteria, viruses, protozoa, and chemicals/contaminants. In the past, I've used a Steripen with good results. It protects against the first three dangers. I recently bought one of these but haven't tried it yet:

http://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=oh_details_o07_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It only protects against bacteria and protozoa. If you're going to the Boundary Waters, I think that would be your primary concern. When I did my portaging trip there, we drank untreated water from the middle of lakes. Probably a baaad idea, but my point is that the water quality is generally pretty good there.

u/defeldus · 1 pointr/drumcorps

Related note for anyone that hates dealing with nasty tap water, I use one of these for hiking but you could easily take it on tour (it's the size of your palm) and always have safe and clean tasting water for $20.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=B00FA2RLX2&linkCode=as2&tag=cleve05e-20&linkId=63MQIKRUTLVEUC52

u/Brute1100 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2?pc_redir=1405213547&robot_redir=1

Yes it is. One of the cheapest and also one of the highest filtration ratings on the market. The regular has like a 4 oz field weight. The mini is like 2-3 oz.

u/vibeee · 1 pointr/coloradohikers

Thank you so much. Thank you taking your time to explain it to me.

I have this Sawyer. I think we might have drank some water from one of the lakes in Titans but we survived that without getting sick. We also mostly boiled it as it was really cold outside(October).

I'm definitely going to get the tablets for treating. It sounds it's good to have them in your pack.

Lastly, which USGS maps do you use? I just went to their website and I am kinda lost. I have been buying the National Geographic maps where ever I go. Are those good enough? Would they show mining sites?

Thanks again. I really appreciate you typing all of this. It's super helpful.

u/brighamthediggler · 1 pointr/LifeProTips

Sawyer water filter

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=abs_add_sc_?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Have one in my kit and it has been extremely useful.

u/Shibbyman24 · 1 pointr/CampingGear

My wishlist for this year:


  • ZPacks 900 Fill Down - Lightest warmest 900 fill down sleeping bag on the market and for a reasonable price! Sadly I can't afford it for my 6 month bicycle tour that I'm going on this year :'( I'm stuck lugging around a 4lb synthetic sleeping bag that takes up about 25L of volume - If I had the ZPack sleeping bag I wouldn't need a front rack and two front panniers which would save me considerable weight as well.

  • Ortlieb Folding Bowl 5L - This folding bowl serves multiple purposes and can be used for doing laundry, washing dishes, washing smelly feet, and can even be used reverse side for food prep.

  • Sawyer Mini Water Filtration System - Most versatile compact water filtration system (I don't really need this one yet but it will come in handy for future trips outside of North America)

  • Keen Commuter 3 - Hiking/Biking sandal with SPD cleats (Apparently Keen Commuter 4 is coming out this year so I will wait and see how much that one has improved)

  • Icebreaker Anatomica Boxers - I would have bought these for only $18CAD but they don't have any in my size :'( I can't justify spending $30+ on a pair of boxers on my budget

  • Therm-a-rest Evolite Plus - I have a feeling this is going to be on par if not better than the NeroAir XLite because apparently it doesn't crinkle nearly as much! If I didn't already buy a Trail Pro this year then I would be purchasing the Evolite Plus


    Future trips wishlist:


  • MSR Dromedary Water Bladder 4L

  • dhb Merino Zip Neck Base Layer 200


    Stuff I bought this year:


  • Hennessy Hammock Expedition Asym Zip - Can't wait to try this out, it only weighs 2.4lbs, takes up little space since no tent poles, and it can be used virtually anywhere

  • Thermarest Trail Pro Sleeping Pad - I don't why it's marked "Irregular"? There's nothing wrong with it, no blemishes or anything

  • Eureka Cimarron 15 Degree Sleeping Bag - This sleeping bag is stupidly heavy, but cheap and very warm

  • Marmot Zeus Down Vest - 700 Fill Power - Lightweight warm high quality down vest that I got for stupidly cheap (Originally $200CAD got it on sale for $76CAD 61% off!)

  • Icebreaker Tech Lite National Park Shirt - 100% merino wool T-shirt for only $40CAD, nothing to complain about there

    I actually have a Green MSR Hubba Hubba with Gear Shed that I bought last year and only used for a handful of days last Summer - no wear N tear at all. I'm going to be selling it soon for a steal at $420CAD on Amazon.ca (would cost you $620CAD+ to buy new) if you are interested feel free to let me know. Here is what it looks like http://i.imgur.com/hSjfpZb.jpg except the gear shed vestibule expands more than that http://i.imgur.com/ePVtarF.jpg
u/8bitmorals · 1 pointr/maui

When are you going to be here? I can loan you a water filter or if you have enough time, you should get this one https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2
Amazon.com : Sawyer Products Mini Water Filtration System ...

u/FFP-Papa · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/tiredofpegging · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

I day hike quite a bit and I've been backpacking for years.

For a long day hike I carry:

Water
Food(high protein/low weight)
Flashlight
Lighter
First Aid
Hat
Sunscreen
Weather protection(warm jacket/rain jacket depending)
Probably some other misc things I'm not thinking of.

Also with some modern water filters like this filtration is so cheap and lightweight that if you're hiking somewhere with good water sources(much of Colorado) carrying a filter only makes sense.

Backpacking is a bit more complicated of course. On top of the day hiking kit I carry:

Extra clothes/socks(you need less than you think, but don't skimp on the socks)
Tent/shelter
Sleeping pad
Backpack
some kind of pack cover/liner to keep your stuff dry
Stove/Pot
bowl/spoon
Camp food

I think that's most of it. Obviously there are more things you could bring, this list is a bit spartan so some luxury items might be nice.

The other big thing to think about is footwear. Everyone has strong opinions about what footwear is the best, but if I was starting out I would just pick up a nice pair of mid-height lightweight hiking boots, probably non-waterproof(for ventilation) from a good manufacturer(I swear by Merrell personally).

I have a pair of these that are great.

Nowadays I usually just wear lightweight hiking/running shoes that are really comfortable but don't offer a lot of protection. Just the other day I did a 15 mile day hike largely off trail at elevation in the Sierras with no problems. But I have strong ankles and tough feet so that may not be advisable for a beginner.

Hope that helps!

u/_Jias_ · 1 pointr/hiking

Very reliable, if you're looking to get one with longer use Id recommend the https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-Water-Filtration-System/dp/B00FHRADQ2

u/KhalduneRo · 1 pointr/AppalachianTrail

inline - so I use mine with a camel back. I put dirty water in the camel back... and the filter is between my bag and my mouthpiece. saves time by just filling my camel back and walking away. usually have to buy these adaptors in addition to the mini, but not always so double check.

screw top - fits on top of most plastic bottles (water, soda, etc). Already included as a feature of most sawyer filters.

I suggest these methods because the bags that come with the sawyer filters can be problematic and why should you have to keep up with one extra thing.

u/MmmmBeer814 · 1 pointr/FireflyFestival

I got something similar to this last year and it used it as a camp shower. If you split it with one other person it'll be cheaper than using their showers with no line. I also got this to use along with it, but you could just use water bottles.

u/bingbing20 · 1 pointr/ElectricForest

I don't recommend the shower bags.. Buy this off of amazon..

http://www.amazon.com/Ivation-Battery-Powered-Handheld-Portable-Shower/dp/B00IFHFJXI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1464906212&sr=8-2&keywords=shower+head+battery

Me and my crew used this last year and filled up buckets of water at the water stations. Its like an actual shower head but you need to charge the battery. We also had a small shower tent for some privacy. All our neighbors were jealous of our shower set up and were offering us money to use it. We also had one of the shower bags but it was a complete fail.

u/Way-a-throwKonto · 1 pointr/vandwellers

I'll copy paste something I wrote elsewhere just now. What do you think?

====

My plan is to use a shower pump like this:
https://www.amazon.com/Ivation-Portable-Outdoor-Battery-Powered/dp/B00IFHFJXI/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?keywords=Ivation+shower+head&qid=1567661650&s=gateway&sr=8-3#
Then boil some water on the stove, and mix it with room temp water and put enough in the floor of this to cover the pump:
https://www.amazon.com/Happy-Life-Portable-Plastic-Bathtub/dp/B008XSXQIO/ref=mp_s_a_1_6?keywords=Portable+deep+tub&qid=1567661792&s=gateway&sr=8-6

... set up underneath the roof fan, with some velcro holding up a hula hoop holding up the shower curtain tucked inside the tub. Get a thing to stand on so my feet aren't soaking, attach the shower head to the hula hoop, put a cloth bag over the pump as a rudimentary filter... Voila, recirculating, hot shower, for as long as I want, for just a few gallons of water.

Bonus, the shower water can be used to wash your clothes if you separate it from your regular gray water.

u/hedonistichippie · 1 pointr/Coachella

I highly doubt anyone is going be creeping on you, they generally have better things to do. But I still recommend bringing a portable shower like this. My group has been using it for the past 6 years and its a savior.

u/Goodbutt_istaken · 1 pointr/AirBnB

Get something like this.But, I think your space should be rented out as an office/ art studio/ or storage but not as accomadations, if guest can't take a shower there.

u/butterbal1 · 1 pointr/scuba

https://www.amazon.com/Ivation-Portable-Outdoor-Battery-Powered/dp/B00IFHFJXI/


Cheap, work perfect, and I just bring a 5 gallon water cooler of hot water that stays warm all day.

u/cajungator3 · 1 pointr/blackfriday

It runs off a USB so if you have a USB adapter that fits in the cigarette port, it'll charge.

Edit: Sorry, this isn't the one I have. Mine is similar.

u/be_to_the_bop · 1 pointr/FireflyFestival

Buy a shower tent and a portable shower, acquire something to stand on like SMALL wooden pallet so you're not standing on mud, bring a few 5 gallon jugs of water (empty or filled, you can fill it there) and you can shower right at your campsite. It won't be the best shower you've had but it'll do.

u/ErinWisneski · 1 pointr/ElectricForest

We have this one and it is amazing!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00IFHFJXI/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

and get a collapsible bucket to put the one end in.

​

But honestly last year I saw a girl taking a shower using a small watering can. That actually seemed even easier than my shower set up.

u/rambotoad · 1 pointr/CampingGear

This used to be my go-to stove until I discovered the BRS3000T. Weighs less than an ounce and functions quite well for an ultralight $17 stove.

BRS Outdoor Camping Gas Cooking Stove Portable Ultralight Burner 25g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_E-FJAbMW831GN

u/oreocereus · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Way too heavy. My cooker is something like this (it might even be the same thing) https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U

It weights 45g. You don't need a case for it either, I just put it inside my pot and make sure there are some socks or a buff around it so it doesn't stab a hole in my pack/other stuff.

u/maxillo · 1 pointr/trailmeals

And remember you can just bring the bits you need. I like mine better for the weight actually, and have 2 different kits:


https://www.reddit.com/r/CampingGear/comments/2h32ru/picked_these_up_at_the_store_for_1495_and_1995/

I reeally like them and when i go by myself i just take the small one, and when 3 people I take them all and 2 stoves. I have an older pocket Rocket clone but got this little baby a few months ago for $10 or 11 bucks:

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

I just try to be cheap thrifty so I do tend to look for sales and "clones". My buddy just bought the whole kit he needed for JMT and is in over 3 grand. My kit is pretty good and I am in for maybe $500-600.

I can always go back and buy the super expensive gram saving thing if I find I want to loose more weight from my pack down the road. But i figure at this point a diet will do more for trail weight than fancy gear.

u/_BALL-DONT-LIE_ · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Backpacking is what I love above all else, happy to help.

Finding a local Facebook Group or forum is definitely great advice, they're usually the best resources for learning about places to go/conditions to expect/anything specific to your area, plus find some people to tag along with. Starting out with day hikes is also totally the right thing to do, it will help give you a feel for moving through the woods. You could also combine this with car camping to familiarize yourself with your gear and with cooking/sleeping/etc. outside with a little less commitment than a backpacking trip.

I'd recommend /r/Ultralight over BackpackingLight, which is not particularly active and of much poorer quality than it was a few years ago, IMO. /r/Ultralight is quite welcoming/helpful and pretty active these days. I don't always agree with him, but Andrew Skurka is a well known hiker/adventurer who is also a great resource (both his website and his book). I think he is more approachable for beginners than a lot of others.

I disagree with /u/ImAtleastTwelve, at least to a certain degree, on cost. It certainly is not a cheap hobby by any means (especially considering even in great outdoors cities you're still almost certainly going to need to drive decent distances), but having a fairly light setup with solid gear doesn't have to be exorbitantly expensive—at least relative to say, fashion or photography. I could write endlessly about all kinds of gear, but just taking the example of stoves. You can get a little stove that screws onto a gas cansiter and weighs about an ounce for under 20 bucks. Startup costs can be high because there is quite a bit of gear you need, but it doesn't have to be too crazy. Also, it's a popular activity—lots of used gear (I rarely buy anything new) and people to borrow from out there.

And like he said, it's totally possible to do any number of amazing trips with whatever gear you can scrape together. The gear is a means to an end with backpacking, and all you need is enough to survive somewhat comfortably before you're ready to go outside and enjoy yourself. Everything after that is either making it more comfortable or extending your limits.

u/Meowmeowmeouch · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Ubens BRS Ultralight Camping Gas Stove Outdoor Burner Cooking Stove 25g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_43EPybPPWPHMC

I bought this and it's fine. Used a handful of times.

u/keananmusic · 1 pointr/Ultralight

The REI Magma 850 Down Jacket is on sale for 50% off right now (13.75 oz) I got the same one without the hood when it was available and have loved it so far. This is nerdy as hell but you could get this dope glow in the dark multi purpose swiss army knife and save some weight. Get the BRS Stove and save a couple ounces. You could probably get by with the Anker 13000. Don't know what your sit pad is but the GG 1/8" Foam Pad is super light. I emailed GG and they said the pads would be available soon

u/bennettpena · 1 pointr/trailmeals

I use these:

GSI Outdoors Halulite Boiler Cooking Pot, 1.1-Liter https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GP1GSAO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_gGI0CbV08N5W5

BRS Outdoor Camping Gas Cooking Stove Portable Ultralight Burner 25g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_HFI0Cb57SJ66E

Total weight: 135g or 4.76oz; Total cost: $47

You can get stuff that weighs less but I’m cheap.

u/farbrortumm · 1 pointr/PacificCrestTrail

You might want to check out the BRS-3000t as well:

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/benlucky13 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

but less than half the price for us cheap bastards. and has it's own source of ignition

u/98PercentChimp · 1 pointr/CampingGear

If you want lightweight and small, you can't beat the BRS 3000T. It's also cheap, too. You can also get it on Aliexpress for a few bucks cheaper if you don't mind waiting longer to get it.

u/DavidHikinginAlaska · 1 pointr/CampingGear

But it's become so popular on Amazon and eBay that now there are sellers with "BRS-3000T" in the description or title selling an entirely different small stove that weighs twice as much and, in one type I tried, conducted so much heat to the stem that the valve geometry changed and stopped the gas flow until it cooled of.


Here's one on Amazon that has (at least has a photo of) a real BRS-3000T:https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=asc_df_B00NNMF70U/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=198072135009&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=16301542988954434560&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033901&hvtargid=pla-317875287747&psc=1#customerReviews and the price looks right (currently $17-$19, it was $13 several years ago).


Here's a listing on Amazon for a "BRS-3000T" that isn't. That brass stem is both a warning sign and part of the problem (it conducts too much heat downward). You'd think "How can you go wrong for $6?", but you can. A stove that shuts off after 2-3 minutes is not only super annoying but also potentially VERY dangerous because once it's cooled off, it will vent unburned gas through the stove head: https://www.ebay.com/i/273601044072?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-117182-37290-0&mkcid=2&itemid=273601044072&targetid=595076215808&device=c&mktype=pla&googleloc=9033901&poi=&campaignid=6470636535&mkgroupid=77538519077&rlsatarget=pla-595076215808&abcId=1140476&merchantid=118868785&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1uaEj8um5QIVj_hkCh2nCwTLEAQYAyABEgI_rvD_BwE

u/gnosticpostulant · 1 pointr/camping

I'm an ultralighter and have been keeping an eye on this...

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

Lightest in the world (less than 1oz) titanium stove, and only ~$16. Reviews on it sound pretty decent.

u/Vapour78 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Stove-Ignition/dp/B00ENDROMW/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1454174592&sr=8-4&keywords=Cannister+stove

Super cheap and works pretty well.

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1454175219&sr=8-1&keywords=Brs-25

I picked up a brs-25 earlier this week (when it was shipping from the US instead of China) and it's a cool 0.9 oz stove that runs $10-$18 if you can find it in stock (or are willing to wait for shipping from china.)

Massdrop has nice deals on klymit insulated static v lite pads every month or so. Usually around $55 shipped and 19 oz with a decent r rating.

u/ewolin · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

The three stoves below have worked great for me.

My current favorite is the BRS top-of-canister stove:
https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U. Extremely light, seems sturdy enough.

For a more substantial remote canister stove I use the FireMaple FMS 117t: https://www.amazon.com/FMS-117T-Titanium-Outdoor-Camping-Equipment/dp/B00UX07EQU.

I also use alcohol stoves, Trail Designs Caldera Cone: https://www.traildesigns.com/products/caldera-cone-system

I have many other stoves, I turn them on once in a while for nostalgia sake or use them car/kayak camping. I used a Svea for decades (fantastic stove, but too heavy now), also my MSR Expedition stove for winter. I use my Optimus 111B when I need a blowtorch to heat really large pots (e.g. boiling a dozen ears of corn). I could go on and on...

u/mobile_monster_ · 1 pointr/PacificCrestTrail
u/gedster314 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

I have the BSR one off Amazon. I actually got mine from BuyGeek flash sale for $9.99, free shipping. Took 2 weeks to get here from a China. It's been a pretty good stove for me.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00NNMF70U/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1522032785&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=bsr+stove&dpPl=1&dpID=318GiUmpQkL&ref=plSrch

u/franks28 · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

My personal recommendation, especially if you are in only OKAY shape, take them (two of them) even if you were going with 0 pounds of gear. They are worth it on your knees alone, and can help your pace. You dont have to spend much. But if i had to recommend one set it would be these.https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Carbon-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1485792994&sr=1-1&keywords=mountain+tech+trekking+poles+cork

u/format120 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Looks like 70$ on Amazon. Are they still the most budget friendly at that price?

u/SuicidalCheezIt · 1 pointr/Ultralight

The same trekking poles are sold on Amazon for $45 if you can't find any in stores. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

u/dinhertime_9 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Tent: Tarptent Notch - $314, 1P, 28oz (w/ stakes), trekking pole supported

Pack: If you order the HMG Windrider from backcountry.com (which currently has a 20% off coupon), you can easily return if it doesn't fit; the return label is only like $7. FWIW I have the HMG Southwest and it's my favorite piece of gear.

Warm Jacket: I'm sure someone can explain better, but a fleece is better for active warmth; it breathes and allows sweat/moisture to pass through. A down jacket is better for static warmth; it blocks wind and has a greater warmth to weight ratio. REI Magma 850 Down Hoodie is only $109 right now and a good entry/budget option from what I've read. The North Face TKA 100 Glacier Quarter-Zip Pullover is a good fleece option ($55 retail).

Trekking Poles: Cascade Mountain Tech, there are a few options but the cork handle with quick lock mechanism is the most popular I think: https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Collapsible-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1542382742&sr=8-3&keywords=cascade+mountain+tech+carbon+fiber+quick+lock+trekking+poles

u/talahrama · 1 pointr/Ultralight

YMMV regarding finding them in store. I got them on Amazon awhile ago for roughly ten bucks cheaper. Here is the link.

u/rastalostya · 1 pointr/Ultralight

According to the comparison chart on this Amazon page a single pole is 7.8oz.

u/Cdfisch97 · 1 pointr/Ultralight

These are what I use and a good budget option. Basically you want something with cork handles to absorb sweat and a locking mechanism similar to these.

u/wesinator · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Try these cascade mountain tech poles. I have them and love them. I've put them through a couple hundred miles and accidentally stepped on them a couple times and seem to be doing great. Pretty light weight (about 8 oz per pole). I love the long cork/ foarm handles and straps. My only beef is that the tip covers fell off somewhere when hiking. But I've heard people bought them for as low as 28 dollars at costco in the northwest. When I find them at costco I'm going to get 4 or 5 pairs and give em out to friends they are so good.

u/GenuineMtnMan · 1 pointr/Ultralight

UL trek poles my mother in law gave me for my birthday about 6 years back have been a lifesaver on day hikes and multi night treks alike. They're sold through Costco or on Amazon. Cascade Mountain Tech Carbon Fiber Quick Lock Trekking Poles. They're $35 right now. Thank me later.

u/Zero25O · 1 pointr/CampingGear

Thanks for the link. I was about to pull the trigger on the Cascade Mountain poles on Amazon that have solid reviews, these look like they may be better and cheaper.


Link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00XM0YGW8/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_2?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1&th=1


Anyone have any recommendations between these 2?

u/lightscarred · 1 pointr/preppers

NITECORE NU25 360 Lumen Triple Output - White, Red, High CRI - Lightweight USB Rechargeable Headlamp (Black) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077Z3LNX9/

Thanks and good luck to everyone!

u/siege_tank · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/JustAnotherStranger- · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/SpeedyLou · 1 pointr/flashlight

The Nu25 would make a great headlamp for night hikes! Thanks for doing this and congrats!

u/flyfishinjax · 1 pointr/flashlight

Hard to believe we've had 1k join in that short of a time!

https://www.amazon.com/Nitecore-NU25/dp/B077Z3LNX9/?tag=parametrek-20

u/ragnarthesweet · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/GrandioseAnus · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/improbablydrunknlw · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/JMTaco · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/onewasbored · 1 pointr/flashlight

Nitecore NU25

Thank you!

u/nessie7 · 1 pointr/flashlight

https://www.amazon.com/Nitecore-NU25/dp/B077Z3LNX9/?tag=parametrek-20

I do need a headlight, so that would work, I suppose.

u/Richard_bender · 1 pointr/flashlight

This one please!

Thanks for the giveaway! Been putting my copper mini baton clipped to my hat for working under my house, could use a head lamp.

u/NanotechNinja · 1 pointr/flashlight

What a legend you are!

>Here's hoping!

u/zvan3 · 1 pointr/flashlight

Nitecore NU25

Thanks! So generous!

u/naughty_farmer · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/B-MONEY · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/Thatguy0329 · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/scheides · 1 pointr/CampingGear

I don't have one yet, but the Nightcore NU25 is on my list for my next headlamp. It has high lumen output when needed and is usb rechargeable.

Nightcore NU25 Headlamp

u/loves_tospoon · 1 pointr/flashlight

Nitecore NU25 360 Lumen Triple Output - White, Red, High CRI - Lightweight USB Rechargeable Headlamp (Black) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077Z3LNX9/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_a8b1DbEP5GFW8

u/fattypenguin · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/_dus · 1 pointr/flashlight

One day I'll win these giveaways... LOL. Thanks as always for your generosity!

u/Vortexbig · 1 pointr/flashlight

I'd like to try the Armytek Elf: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078XSPDJ2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_UMDpDb5Z4KKGD

Thanks as always!

u/BEAVS69 · 1 pointr/flashlight

Thanks for the giveaway! Amazon link

u/left_schwift · 1 pointr/flashlight

I’m going for the ArmyTek Elf C1, I plan on using it for early morning runs and first responder work if I win. Thanks for the giveaway as always!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078XSPDJ2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_Ia.FDbAA1957M

u/penguin941 · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/CarbonAltered · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/tasort · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/flextov · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/PotvinThePotman · 1 pointr/flashlight

ArmyTek Elf C1
Thank you for your generosity I’m sure everyone here appreciates it

u/brendanvista · 1 pointr/flashlight

Thanks for the giveaway!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078XSPDJ2

u/19b34413f6f60afd6e4c · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/birdthirds · 1 pointr/flashlight

I'd love one of these
ArmyTek Elf C1 Micro-USB Rechargeable 1050 Lumens Magnetic Tailcap Multi-Use Headlamp and LumenTac USB Cable https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B078XSPDJ2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_wJg3CbTR1PJAM

u/1011000100001100 · 1 pointr/flashlight

Thanks again!


Armytek Elf C1

u/MNLegoBoy · 1 pointr/flashlight

Thank you for what your doing in this sub

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Armytek Elf C1

u/afternoonjoke · 1 pointr/flashlight

The elf c1 would be awesome.

Thanks for doing this!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078XSPDJ2/

u/cap90 · 1 pointr/flashlight

ArmyTek Elf C1 Micro-USB Rechargeable 1050 Lumens Magnetic Tailcap Multi-Use Headlamp, LumenTac USB Cable and Battery Organizer https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078XSPDJ2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_w9mWCbSZ3V6C8

u/HoffWasHere · 1 pointr/flashlight

Thank you for hosting this! I love your site but my wallet says otherwise.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B078XSPDJ2

u/Moon_cow_firetrucks · 1 pointr/flashlight

Elf C1

I’ve been on this subreddit for about a month and I see that a lot of people have this light it look interesting an I was looking into buying it. If I could win it that would be great. If anyone knows any thing a bout the elf c1 or another great headlamp I would be glad to hear.

Thank you and happy 70k

u/Osz1984 · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/amerikassa · 0 pointsr/Suomi

Only realized later that you might have "seen" this on yt, so perhaps this is plausible. Why not get something off of amazon or ebay? Maybe start here or here; The knife is "Made in Sweden" so close enough.