Best outdoor decor according to redditors

We found 2,124 Reddit comments discussing the best outdoor decor. We ranked the 1,169 resulting products by number of redditors who mentioned them. Here are the top 20.

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Subcategories:

Backyard birding & wildlife products
Outdoor flags & banners
Outdoor clocks
Sundials
Wind chimes
Thermometers & weather instruments
Outdoor plaques & wall art
Decorative fences
Outdoor fountain accessories
Weathervanes
Cupolas & accessories
Flagpole hardware
Garden bridges
Outdoor fountains
Yard signs
Outdoor decorative lighting
Rain chains
Outdoor curtains
Decorative garden stools
Boot scrapers
Mailbox covers
Decorative address signs
Decorative mailbox accessories
Decorative garden stakes
Outdoor rugs
Garage door decorations

Top Reddit comments about Outdoor D‚cor:

u/takeout777 · 167 pointsr/funny

A guy apparently won $58,000 in a civil rights lawsuit against corrupt police because of this doormat. Here's his review of the doormat on Amazon. And here's the story in the article with details about the arrest. The article has no mention of a doormat, but the guy claims it was key in the case. Seems legit.

Direct link to buy this doormat: http://www.amazon.com/Come-Back-Indoor-Outdoor-Doormat/dp/B00020O572

u/mrturcot · 73 pointsr/funny
u/Thelinkr · 49 pointsr/IRLEasterEggs

Every time this gets posted, i die a little inside.

God im bad at formatting

u/_ataraxia · 35 pointsr/snakes

i've been paged for my link dump, so here it is. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions. let me know if any of the links don't work.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/knerys · 34 pointsr/snakes

FYI those stick on hygrometer/thermometers are very dangerous and sometimes even lethal - he is strong enough to accidentally pull it off the wall but not able to get it off himself if he gets stuck to it afterwards. Pet stores hawk them like candy and I wish they didn't, well intentioned snake parents buy them not knowing. Not only are they dangerous, they are also highly inaccurate. I'd suggest removing it ASAP and replacing it with something digital without adhesive. This is the one I use in my enclosures, the probe lets you get cool side and warm side in the same unit!

u/mstaralynn · 33 pointsr/HomeImprovement

We have this & it’s great.

Kwik Sip Brass In Home Faucet Attachment Water Fountain https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CH4TYXQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_w.aQCbRMWMTRR

u/1angrypanda · 30 pointsr/TrollXChromosomes
u/matt2001 · 28 pointsr/Futurology

If you are willing to cut 4 inch pvc and use a heat gun to mold the openings, this guy shows you how. I then put them in a 5 gallon bucket, food grade from Lowes, with a hole in the top for the tower and another one for adding water and nutrients.

I use a small pump rated for around 5 to 6 feet.

There are 3 nutrients that you can get on Amazon.

Hydroponic Tomato Fertilizer 4-18-38 1lb. 8 grams (10 for tomatoes)

Calcium Nitrate Fertilizer 15.5-0-0 2lb. 8 grams (10 for tomatoes)

Hydroponic Organic Magnesium Sulfate Soluble. 4 grams

I wrapped mine in kevlar Reflectrix. to keep them dark and insulated. Keep the water at around 4 gallons. Change the water and add new nutrient solution every couple of weeks... I use a hand pump, but there are other ways.

edit: I just wanted to add that I have towers connected to a timer. 1/2 hour on and off.

You can also purchase the plastic net pots and clay pebbles on Amazon.

u/postingfromjail · 26 pointsr/funny
u/msuts · 18 pointsr/funny

You can get it right here.

u/popcornrevolution · 14 pointsr/liberalgunowners

I couldn’t find a “no step on snek” rainbow flag but here’s this

Wait actually here’s a sticker

u/Keifru · 13 pointsr/Sneks

Sounds like you were getting outdated or flat-out incorrect information and those 'experienced snake owners' are likewise misinformed. There are very few snakes that legitimately have evolved to thrive on sand-based substrate (irony being the Sand Boa is not one of them; they live in sandy soil which is very different composition than straight sand). The Ball Python is native to the svannah/jungles of Sub-Saharan Africa. Its dirt, soil, and burrows. Not a majority or even significant amount of sand.

Additionally, if I extrapolate correctly from this singular picture, your BP is also in a glass enclosure and has a log-style hide. The former makes keeping humidity in the 55~80% range a difficult exercise, and the latter, is a stressor as BPs do best with a hide that has a single-entrance or is cave-like; the more points of contact, the better, and a single entrance means they can feel safer.

I'm going to steal _ataraxia's ball python dump and toss it below:

i'm going to dump a bunch of links to get you on the right track. the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Sharptoe1 · 13 pointsr/funny
u/mdsprague · 12 pointsr/gameofthrones
u/ColoradoBadger · 12 pointsr/microgrowery

Absolutely, here we go:


Essential Hardware

$80 Clones - $20 from dispensary.

$325 Lights: Horticulture Lighting Group 260 QB LED Kit

  • I cannot say enough about these lights. I had to run them anywhere from 50-75% during veg to prevent light burn. Great coverage for a 2x4 tent. Nothing but praise 10/10 would buy again.

    $70 2' x 4' x 5' Mylar tent

  • Holding up well, easy build. Is not 100% dark, light leaks outwards from spots along the zipper and pinholes but no light leak into the tent during dark.

    $90 4" Inline duct fan and Carbon Filter

  • This puppy can SUCK, I have to keep it on the lowest setting to prevent the pressure inside the tent from dropping (need to work on my passive intake next grow). Carbon filter works great. Lowers humidity in a pinch.

    $10 - Ducting/Clamps from ACE

    $21 Osculating Fan

  • I have it on a small stand and osculating 24/7. It pushes air, not a jet engine though.

    Already on hand: Box Fan

  • Had one from years ago. Sometimes I open the tent and blast this on high right on level with the buds just go shake out the leaves, gets a bit crowded in the scrog and I'd like to eliminate any humidity caught between leaves sticking together. Think you can scoop one from Walmart for like $15 bucks, $20 max.

    $25 [Humidifier] (https://www.walmart.com/ip/Sunbeam-Warm-Mist-Humidifier-SWM6000-BWM/32664862)

  • This puppy does well. I use the first setting, usually can run 16+ hours on a full reservoir of H20. No filter which keeps cost down, just need to clean it one or twice a week with a brush for the hard water deposits. 5-10 minute process.

    $45 Dehumidifier

  • This was a bit of a mistake purchase. I wanted to test and see if a small model offered on amazon (this looked to be one of the best for sub $50, and has the biggest holding tank out of them all) could put in any kind of noticeable work in a tent. What I noticed is that it will be able to roughly maintain humidity at times, after I run the exhaust fan to lower the levels. When the lights are out and the temperature drops, this thing has no chance. Go with a full size dehumidifier or rely on the dry Colorado air + passive intake + duct fan. I was struggling with humidity issues during the cold of the winter, now that I can have my windows open my ambient room humidity is usually 40% or below.

    $18 4" inline duct booster fan

  • Also a mistake purchase. Does not move a lot of air. Had plans to use this for an airflow/passive (not) intake system but it's not worth the electricity cost to run this thing. I'd stay away.


    $13 Ph Meter

    $12 TDS PPM meter

    $9 Soil Moisture, Light, Ph meter - Does it's job

    $9 Ph Control Kit

    $14 Ph Calibration solution

  • For the life of the Ph meter, I store the tip in 7.0 solution that I pour into the cap. Good to have on hand for calibration.

    $6 Spray Bottles (Did not use these much, only very early during transplanting.)




    $7 for 30ct Starter grow bags

  • Do not recommend, breathe terribly, water stagnates even with modifications. Had to feed lightly and often, and really monitor dampness. Needed these for the outdoor garden anyways)


    $18 Hygrometer for Temp/Humidity

  • Worth it to get the wireless monitor so you're not opening the tent all the time)

    $8 for 6ct 5 gal Smart Pot knockoff

  • Do their job, hold up well. I cut the handles off to make watering under the scrog easier.


    $40 - Soil: Two bags of Happy Frog. Ocean forest was sitting around.

    Nutrients: $165

  • I have a local grow shop that I purchased a lot of these from. The 1 litre Cyco nutrient bottles ranged from $10-$18 and I have 7 different nutrients - call that $100 after tax.

  • Grow A, Grow B, Bloom A, Bloom B, Dr Repair, Potash, Silica

  • I purchased Key to Life - Uptake For just shy of $20. Great for calcium uptake.

  • Cyco Grow XL Super Phosphoric Acid was $45 - not cheap for 100ml but I think the potential yield improvement will cover that cost, especially over 3-4 grows which I expect to get out of the bottle.

    $13 - Scrog net: for something like 50-100ft of plastic garden fence from Home Depot. Using a lot of it for a garden.


    $15 - Miscelaneous: Eyedroppers, duct tape, zip ties, and odds and ends: Call it $15.




    So to total that all out we're looking just over 1000 that I spent, could have kept it under $950 if I had not purchased the small duct fan or dehumidifier. Also: Soil and nutrients for $205. Could work that down to under $150 by dropping a couple unnecessary yet desirable nutrients.


    Sorry for the formatting! I'm going to do a big post write up and this is a great place to start at least. Thanks for the motivation.




u/7itemsorFEWER · 12 pointsr/delusionalartists

Reminds me of the don't step on snek flag, making fun of the don't tread on me flag.

Edit: Link https://www.amazon.com/dp/B079NXS1GC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_dAi7CbVMDVCMZ

u/DaSilence · 11 pointsr/ProtectAndServe

I don't think so.

Given where this pic was posted, I think it was assumed that everyone would recognize that door mat (we've all seen it before), and that the tac team was mugging for the camera with the mat and the warrant.

Then the BCND/AMIFREETOGO crowds showed up and started whining.

It was supposed to be a funny and lightheated photo, similar to this album. But you'll never make the perpetually offended happy. They have to have something to fill their empty lives.

u/ThePienosaur · 11 pointsr/ballpython

Red light isn't good, you'll want a heat mat (MAKE SURE you have a thermostat for it or it will get too hot) and possibly a ceramic heat emitter (also needs a thermostat) for air heat. What are the temps and humidity and how do you measure them? Glass tanks usually don't hold humidity well and often aren't good for bps. You need at least 2 good hides, one for each side. They should be snug and enclosed with only one opening, preferably identical, half logs don't work.

Someone should come by with a really good care sheet, read it, it has some great info. I know this might be a lot of information, but having a good setup is important and will save you headaches in the future.

Edit: I found the care sheet. Credit to u/_ataraxia.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/never_noob · 11 pointsr/liberalgunowners
u/birdsbirdsbirdsbirds · 10 pointsr/snakes

OK, some specific advice to your situation follows. However, I recommend you carefully read through _ataraxia's post (pay special attention to the caresheets). That should answer a lot of your questions, and give you good advice for keeping a BP in a tank.

---------------------------------

I've never heard of corn substrate before, how does it do under high humidity? Keep an eye out for mold issues.

Humidity: 80-90 is fine, but will be incredibly difficult in a glass tank with a mesh top. You can get away with ~60% humidity most of the time.

Hides: In the wild, BPs hide in tiny rat holes/rodent dens. They like to feel tight, snug, and secure in their hides. These log hides aren't great at replicating those natural conditions because they have large openings at two ends. Please consider switching both hides to something more secure (even cardboard boxes are fine in a pinch, and these are highly recommended).

Mesh Top: Use tin foil to block off everything except where the lamp sits. This will reflect heat and humidity back down into the tank.

Temps/Humidity: I don't seen a digital gauge in your enclosure. Analog temperature and humidity gauges are notoriously inaccurate (like... WAY off). Digital gauges are cheap and reliable ways to monitor snake-level conditions in the enclosure. You can usually find them at your local Wal-Mart, even.

Water Placement: Most people put their water dish under the lamp so the evaporation increases ambient humidity. However, real estate in your enclosure is limited, especially when you add that second hide. So putting the water dish in the middle might be your best bet. Especially because you do want hides on each of the warm and cool sides.

But yeah, read _ataraxia's caresheets and follow that advice.

Edit: Instead of getting a new tank as she grows up, please consider getting a PVC reptile enclosure instead. Many are designed and made for snakes (whereas tanks are designed for fish!), so they'll make it much easier to maintain heat and humidity and keep your snake comfy and happy. Right now your tank appears a bit small and sparse...

u/bquad · 10 pointsr/PlantedTank

This is the one I have. It's cheap, small, and effective. It's also pretty fun to play with. When I first got it I couldn't resist making my kitchen counter spooky.

u/beefjeeef · 9 pointsr/snakes


First of all. It's very good you recognize that you need help in learning how to care for the snake.

Second, here is a big link dump created by another regular user u/_ataraxia all credit for this goes to her.

the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/HeyImJerrySeinfeld · 9 pointsr/Firearms

I don't want to lose that flag to racists. Fuck em. Personally my favorite iteration of the Gadsden flag was the one with a rainbow in the background rather than yellow.

Found one

u/hello_josh · 8 pointsr/Homebrewing

Cheaper than a prechiller is using a cheap submersible pump in a bucket of ice water. You can recirculate or run your hose into the bucket to keep it topped up as you pump your ice water through the chiller.

u/Vaporhead · 8 pointsr/snakes

u/ataraxia has amazing information for ball pythons. You should definitely read it through. Glass tanks are not ideal for Bps, so this should help. Here is her normal dump of information I took from another post.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/Cadder-12 · 8 pointsr/snakes

I'm just going to drop this link dump from u/_ataraxia. The first three links are fantastic care sheets and will talk about feeder size vs snake size and age. The rest of it highlights products you may need.


  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/oldaccount · 8 pointsr/funny

A quick google search shows that it is an actual product and can be yours for only $12.

u/FlamingWeasel · 8 pointsr/gatesopencomeonin

I thought about getting one of those, or one of these

u/hellobeffy · 7 pointsr/snakes

Home: For the heating pad, you need a thermostat, which will turn it on and off automatically around a specified heat range. Mine is set to 86 degrees with the probe placed between the heat mat and the bottom of the tank. This keeps the glass on top of the tank around 83-85, and the paper towel I have over the glass is around 81-83. You may need to have a different temperature setting, depending on your setup. You shouldn't turn the heat mat entirely off, unless you notice it is malfunctioning and overheating.


To make sure that your temperatures and humidity are decent, you will want a digital thermometer/hygrometer and a temperature gun. The cool side should be in the low-mid 70s and the warm side in the low-mid 80s. The humidity should be 30%-60%. If it isn't, you can make or buy a humid hide, block off some of the venting on the screen top with aluminum foil or acrylic panels, or switch substrates to something that can be misted. This last measure will likely not be necessary unless you live in a low-humidity area.


You should have two identical caves, one on the warm side over the heat mat and one on the cool side.


Diet: What you were told may be appropriate for an adult snake. If possible, weigh her and post pictures. Do a quick Google search on how much adult corns should be eating and how often. I only have a hatchling, and don't want to lead you astray with my lack of adult corn experience.


Handling: If you got her recently enough that you haven't fed her yet, you shouldn't be handling her yet. You should feed her at least once, preferably twice before handling her the first time, and wait 48 hours after feeding to handle her.


Depending on the snake, many can be held multiple times per week. Some are conservative and say only once a week for 15 minutes. Some people allow for more handling than this. But 3-4 times a week for 'extended periods' is almost definitely too much, and as she's new to you, you should be slowly working your way up to longer periods of handling. You also should never be handling her in the 48 hours after she eats.


Shedding: Their color will usually dull and their eyes will turn milky or blue. They might have some minor changes in behavior, like more resistance to handling or possibly even refusal to eat. Mine just shed, and hid for three days prior to that. Note that the shed should come off all in one piece -- if it doesn't, it may be a sign that your snake is dehydrated and doesn't have sufficient access to clean water or the humidity in the tank is too low.


Another quick note on water: You should be changing it at least twice a week, plus any time the snake soils it. I buy filtered spring water from the store, which doesn't have some of the chemicals in tap water that are fine for humans but not so good for snakes. It's kind of a pain in the butt, but it's only about $2 a month, so whatever.

u/Nerochi · 7 pointsr/ballpython

Picture of the setup

Im using a 20 gallon long glass tank with this surrounding the sides and back, its a perfect fit. A day night timer hooked to a non heated light. I dont use heating that sucks the humidity out of the air by using a heat pad for both hides regulated by thermostats one for each pad. Substrate I use is coconut husk, this one lasted me a whole year and people say it wont mold as easily compared to other non coconut fiber substrates. The tank itself uses a screened sliding locked lid. I cant speak for how to lock down other types of lids for tanks. The screen however I covered most of it with 3 layers of foil followed by tape around the edges of the foil to keep it attached and sealed better to the screen. A hole for the non heated light was made and I used a cut up piece of a zipblock bag along with tape to cover over the hole for humidity reasons. Finally the hides are medium sized from reptile basics, I remember when he could easily fit in the small one, was such a tiny noodle and of course a simple plastic water dish big enough to soak in and aid in humidity.

For times when he is in shed though, I lightly spray down the substrate and sides and back of the tank once a day. I think just spraying the glass walls and keeping that large surface area wet is good enough though.

Other items include thermometer, fake plants, gram scale, and one ball python

u/PlausibleDeniabiliti · 6 pointsr/Bad_Cop_No_Donut
u/SmaugTheMagnificent · 6 pointsr/ballpython

I don't know if anyone has told you yet, but you really should remove that nasty stick on thermometer thing you have. Not only is it likely not very accurate, it could fall off completely and get stuck to your snake (not very fun).

I'd definitely recommend going with a nice digital hygrometer like this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001BO8CUE/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's accurate enough for snakes, and it can take ambient temps on both sides of your enclosure and measure humidity.

u/Scrubbb · 6 pointsr/gameofthrones
u/PhantomDeuce · 6 pointsr/RoastMe
u/Trimblco · 5 pointsr/politics

Who knows, haha. That's one reason why I wanted to buy this for my home.

u/MoonKnightFan · 5 pointsr/Homebrewing

Without a doubt it is my Counterpressure Bottle Filler. I hate bottling, and almost exclusively Keg these days. However, sometimes A beer turns out so well I want to either save a couple bottles for later, or bring it to people who won't be drinking it quickly enough for a growler to be reasonable. Option one was to bottle while kegging and bottle condition. The problems with this involve A) Not knowing if your beer is great yet, possibly wasting time. B) Having to clean the bottles and bottling equipment along with kegging equipment, adding time. C) Having trube build up during bottle conditioning, contributing to off flavors for long aging. D) unavoidable high DO / Oxygen levels in the bottles, also causing oxidization and other off flavors after long periods of sitting. The counter pressure filler allows me to bottle beers directly from a carbonated keg. The bottles are cold and carbonated immediately. But more importantly, allowing you to cap on foam like at most craft breweries, you can insure very low DO levels. Combined with the lack of trub, your bottles are likely to age very well for archival purposes. And for people asking, whats the best reason to save a good beer? Well, if you are trying to perfect a recipe, being able to sample the last several batches with your current one together really helps point out what your method changes do to your beer quality.


Another important purchase from the last few months is a combo of these two items: Faucet line Jumper and Submersible Pump. I use these in combination to clean my beer lines. I have a twin faucet tower kegerator. I keep two kegs on, and when they both cash, i clean my lines. I disconnect the line from my first keg, and attach it to this submersible pump, which is sitting in a gallon of caustic liquid line cleaner (from five star, but PBW would work too). I use the Faucet jumper to connect the ends of both faucets, and I disconnect the line from keg 2, and have it dump back into the bucket. What i have created is a recirculation that I let run for 30 minutes. It doesn't need to be supervised. This is so much better than how I used to do it, which was using a squeeze bottle and doing one faucet at a time. It took forever, and required me to be there. This new solution allows me to walk away and let it do its thing. Furthermore, I also use this time to defrost my kegerator if it needs it.


Edit: I would like to add that I think this might be the most interesting and useful post on this sub in a long time, good job OP. I have spent quite a lot of time googling other peoples purchases, some I haven't heard of, and am planning some purchases.

u/toolatealreadyfapped · 5 pointsr/Homebrewing

You're in luck. I bought the 396gph ecoplus pump just a few weeks ago, for exactly the same purpose. It's been used twice now with my immersion chiller, and has the perfect flow rate.

In Houston, ground water is over 80 degrees right now. An IC simply can't get things below 100. So I run regular hose water through until I get below 110 (about 8 minutes if I keep the wort constantly moving). Then I switch the hookup to that pump sitting in ice water, and another 8 - 10 minutes gets me to 70 degrees. Best $22 spent.

Notes:

1- The pump has a 1/2 inch female output, and a handful of different size hose barbs, none of which are useful. I went to a hardware store, and got a connector to go from that to a male hose receiver for a few dollars.

2- Yes, you could use this to save water by recirculating. However, as your source water heats up, you get less efficient. (Unless you had like a swimming pool or something to draw from)

3- It works fine lifting from ground level, but it works even better if you can raise it to an even level. I have my kettle on the propane burner, so my ice chest (with water and pump inside) sits on a chair.

4- If you can avoid it, don't waste your money on corner store ice. It's insanely over-priced. There's a "Twice the Ice" vendor by my house that sells 20lbs for $1.75. This suffices for the day.

Ask any other questions you have.

u/Dergins · 5 pointsr/snakes

Ok. he needs a basking spot of 85f in order to digest properly. His cool side temps should be between 70-75F. He should have two snug fitting hides, one on each end, and a decent sized water dish. Aspen is the best bedding for them. Amazon has a reallly good digital thermometer/hygrometer combo that I use in all my tanks, it's this one. does the tank have any sort of heating at all?

u/Rickdoes · 5 pointsr/SkincareAddiction

I was thinking of getting something like this

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00CH4TYXQ/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?qid=1420652628&sr=8-3&dpPl=1&dpID=419ghJUZAZL&ref=plSrch

Its a drinking fountan attachment for your sink.theres a soft silicone thing you can get too, but I dont think it would fit on my bathroom sink.

u/outdoorandyrocks · 5 pointsr/pics

Amazon link for the head.

u/just_like_arcadia · 5 pointsr/Whatisthis
u/Fadawah · 5 pointsr/freefolk
u/guyw2legs · 4 pointsr/aquaponics

This one does.

u/blacklabel8829 · 4 pointsr/Homebrewing

I use this pump with this adapter, works great.

u/lapagecp · 4 pointsr/snakes

Ok I will give tips in the order you presented the info.

>40 gallon tank.

This could be a bit on the large side for your snake so I would start by blacking out the back and sides. You can do this with construction paper, foamcore board, or spray paint if you have someplace else for the snake to live for at least a few days. Pet stores usually sell a scenery backer meant for this. Doing this will make the snake feel less out in the open and thus safer.

>Aspen bedding

I get my aspen bedding from tractor supply in a big bail. You might consider trying coco husk which will help with keeping humidity up.

> 1 hide

I would have 2 identical tight fitting hides (This is how tight they should be)so that your snake can thermo regulate without prioritizing safety.

> 2 branches

Make sure these are secure and won't fall over.

> and a sugar skull for design

Cool.

>Have a UTH because ive heard those are best forglass tanks.

These are great for many setups but you should have temperature controlled. I recommend a thermostat. Here is a cheap one. You should place the probe on the inside against the glass or you can place it under the UTH if you have an infared thermometer to check your glass temp. remember to point the these thermometer directly at the glass from the top straight down. You must shoot perpendicular to the surface you are measuring.

> Havent fed him yet because he was fed before I bought him.

That's good. I would give him a week and offer a rat that is 10% of the snakes weight. If the snake will eat frozen thawed I recommend that. I would feed every 7 to 10 days at that size. I would thaw the rodent in hot (not boiling) water in a ziplock bag until you are sure the rodent is thawed in the center. The ziplock bag is to keep the rodent dry so you can feed in your snakes enclosure. You don't want substrate to stick to the rodent and it will be fine if its dry and you supervise the feeding.

> Whats a good way to control humidity?? Having a hard time keeping it steady.

Try covering most of the screen top. You don't need that much ventilation as your snake won't be soiling its bedding regularly. You will spot clean any problems and so you can get away with much less airflow then with rodents. Here is a tutorial if you want to do it up nice. Adjust how much ventilation you have until you get the right humidity. On that note I like this for a thermostat/hygrometer.

>And should I have a heat lamp ?

I would not use a heat lamp unless you need it to keep a warm side of 90F under the hide and an ambient temp of 80F. A heat lamp will suck humidity out of the air.

u/discovolanate · 4 pointsr/homelab

wait, your saying i can sniff for acurite things like this https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001BO8CUE/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1?

this would be great, i could better monitor my snakes set up.

u/stupe · 4 pointsr/Whatisthis

This one is quite similar. 4.5 feet tall.

http://www.amazon.com/Foam-Filled-Alien-Halloween-Prop/dp/B00BMDGZWQ

Same one as above but a little cheaper. (no clue about shipping though)

http://www.hauntedprops.com/product-p/hp%202286.htm

u/RelaxationMonster · 4 pointsr/MushroomGrowers

AGPtek Aluminum Mini Mist Maker Fogger Water Fountain Pond Fog Machine Atomizer https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00P91ZFPA/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_i_pU-0Db9B7N2M5

u/NeoBahamutX · 4 pointsr/gameofthrones
u/DoritoMage · 4 pointsr/vexillology

Here’s the one I used: The red wasn’t the exact hue I was hoping for, but it was definitely still acceptable. I’m just really picky.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07CVDH92V/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_obTBDb00A8919

u/MichaelApproved · 3 pointsr/HomeImprovement

There are a ton of variables here which make it difficult to diagnose. I'll give you a few tips.

Did the system ever work properly?

I’m guessing you have an issue with pressure. Your system might be on the boarder line of the pressure needed and you're not getting that fast pop to raise the heads instantly.

When the heads go up only partially, they gush a bunch of water which robs you of even more pressure. It's a feedback loop.

You might have dirty heads which causes them to need more pressure to go up all the way. All the dirt and grime inside the head causes friction which makes you need more pressure to get the pop.

They’re a bunch of videos on YouTube that I’ll show you how to clean the heads but basically you unscrew the top and rinse out all the components.

Another issue could be that your pipes keep draining after you’re done watering. Empty pipes means you have to wait longer to fill up the pipes before you get enough pressure to the heads to give them that pop. As the water fills the emtpy pipes, it delivers partial pressure to the first heads which cause them to partially go up. If only partial pressure is going to the head you going to get that partial rise which will cause the water to gush out and rob you of pressure.

You can resolve that with a check valve in each sprinkler head. The check valve will prevent the pipes from emptying between uses. It keeps the water from draining through the sprinkler head after you’re done watering. It’ll keep your pipes full of water which will mean you’ll have an easier time getting pressure across the entire system all at once. Pop.

Check valves are easy to install, you just unscrew the top and stick the check valve at the bottom of the riser. Every head has a different valve so you’ll need to look up the valve for your head. They’re pretty cheap, maybe a quarter or a dollar for each check valve, depending on where you buy them.

Here's an example check valve but make sure you get the one that matches your sprinkler head https://sprinklersupplystore.com/products/437400-pro-spray-check-valve?variant=43672132873

Also, you can check your PSI at a hose bib using this cheap gauge from Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004RACK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_lVy0Cb967B97E

u/TheRealFender · 3 pointsr/Homebrewing

I recirculate BLC with a small pump.

http://imgur.com/a/6hl4H#0

Run water for a couple minutes, oxyclean for a few, water again, then BLC for 15 minutes, then rinse with water again.

u/machinehead933 · 3 pointsr/Homebrewing

I've heard of people doing this and some shop, I think Williams Brewing, actually sells this as kind of a kit. I think the most commonly used / most economical are the "EcoPlus" pumps. You can get them for about $25 on Amazon.

u/philthebrewer · 3 pointsr/Homebrewing

I use this cheap little pump for a ton of stuff in the brewery

my only gripe is that it did not come with a 3/8ths barb, other than that, super useful for cleaning kegs, draftlines, post brew day cleanup and recircing ice water through my IC.

u/freewaytrees · 3 pointsr/PlantedTank

Looks awesome and love the built in spool but can't get a sense of size. I use this pump and it works pretty well:

EcoPlus 728310 Eco 396 Submersible Pump, 396GPH https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0018X2XT4/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apip_bQP1GqSuczqht

u/merlyn923 · 3 pointsr/snakes

Acurite brand thermometers are a good option, especially this one. I would also advise getting an IR temp gun for spot checking. I take it you decided not to go with belly heat for now, so probe placement is going to be: probe attached directly to the basking spot (whatever that may be), body of the thermometer on the cool side. That's how my boa is setup as well.

u/rollapoid · 3 pointsr/ballpython

Reposting the famous u/ _ataraxia info:

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. It's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. They have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/dmgctrl · 3 pointsr/notinteresting

They are novelty plaques. Amazon has them

u/NISCBTFM · 3 pointsr/IRLEasterEggs

Or you can just order your own. Not that rare

u/trumpple · 3 pointsr/The_Donald
u/hyperchimpchallenger · 3 pointsr/whatisthisthing

Alien doll that someone dressed up

https://www.amazon.com/Foam-Filled-Alien-Halloween-Prop/dp/B00BMDGZWQ

Something along the lines of this

u/digital_end · 3 pointsr/wholesomememes

I had one and it was great! Got it as a joke, but it quickly became a legitimate thing I used a lot. It makes getting a sip of water after brushing your teeth easy, totally recommended.

Here it is on amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/JOKARI-Jokari-Whale-Faucet-Fountain/dp/B0019TUKV0/

And if you're looking for a fancier one, I recently replaced my whale with this;

https://www.amazon.com/Kwik-Brass-Faucet-Attachment-Fountain/dp/B00CH4TYXQ/

The cool thing about that is that it works like a normal faucet normally, but you pull the little thing on the side out to swap it to a fountain. And after you turn off the water, the button automatically goes back in so you don't spray yourself in the face tomorrow, haha

u/jumblegumby · 3 pointsr/SkincareAddiction

the one I have

Glad to help! I love it, sometimes the water pressure gets a bit high though...

I’m obsessed with bathroom attachments. I have 2 shower heads, water softener, a bidet, toilet light and the fountain 😂

u/LaxInTheBrownies · 3 pointsr/gifs

In case anyone wants one for themselves, they're available on amazon for a little more than $25. I personally haven't bought one, so I don't know how good the quality is.

u/repitwar · 3 pointsr/gameofthrones

The Stark and Lannister banners came from Amazon. I think the Night's Watch and Targaryen ones are from Hot Topic.

u/bolivar-shagnasty · 3 pointsr/weather

We used the Kestrel in the Air Force. It was accurate enough for us to use to take official observations with, so it will likely do well for you.

For indoors at home, Amazon has a pretty well received dedicated humidity sensor.

u/OilfieldDrunk · 3 pointsr/nfl

Anley Fly Breeze 3x5 Foot No Step On Snek Flag - Vivid Color and UV Fade Resistant - Canvas Header and Double Stitched - Tea Party Flags Polyester with Brass Grommets 3 X 5 Ft https://www.amazon.com/dp/B079NXS1GC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_yUZVCb0JS3Y6V

u/AnleyFlags · 3 pointsr/vexillology

If you need a single side custom flag, click here. (only $15.95 with free shipping)

If you need a double side custom flag,please click here. ($25.95 with free shipping)

it is Very cheap and they have excellent customer service. You can just simply place the order there and send the design you want to put on the flag , they will do everything for.

by the way, you can get more than 30% off if you use this code: WKT3KT3P , that means you only need pay $9.95, this code will be expired on 30th Sep, and if you order more than 5, you can use this code :CUSTOM20P, you will get 20% off . Hope I answer your question.

u/Agent_1812 · 3 pointsr/canadaguns
u/peasncarrots20 · 2 pointsr/homeowners

Easy to do, gauges are frequently $8 on Amazon and screw onto a hose bib or your hot water heater drain.

https://www.amazon.com/Rain-Bird-P2A-Pressure-Female/dp/B00004RACK

It's a pretty good chance the city is over 80 in any city of even moderate age. As more houses are added to the water line, they turn up the pressure more and more to serve everyone. Many cities now require a PRV on new construction because city water is getting too high and homes are designed for 80psi tops.

Also fyi spray sprinklers are designed for optimal performance at 30psi and rotors for 45psi, so 80+ is way outside their operating zone too.

u/Josh_Your_IT_Guy · 2 pointsr/HomeImprovement

Rain Bird P2A Water Pressure Test Gauge, 3/4" Female Hose Thread, 0-200 psi https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00004RACK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_OofnDb6T4E1H6

u/ChefJoe98136 · 2 pointsr/Seattle

FWIW, I used one of these water pressure meters to confirm my pressure reducing valve isn't functioning. Wherever you attach it, also realize there's a drop as you increase elevation (2nd floor pipes will measure less than the basement). I have 105 psi and it's not supposed to exceed 80, which makes one shower that has a "short feed" for the cold line and a longer feed for the hot water line very difficult to get a warm shower out of.

edit: As someone raised in a house with a septic system... it sounds like yours could need to be redone. Most of your drainage issues are from the leechfield not draining well. You can try to get it pumped out, and see if something was just plugged up, but the widespread backups on seemingly all your sewer lines suggest you're not flushing into "empty pipe" but a system that just isn't draining fast enough to keep up.

u/hipsterdufus · 2 pointsr/Libertarian

Terrific. Link for others interested

Thanks

u/MrCalvinHobbes · 2 pointsr/Hydroponics

Watched a few youtube videos to get a high level knowledge. Checked amazon to get a rough idea of costs, Went to a local hydroponic store, asked for help and they helped me pick out the nutrient solution, ph balancer, stakes, tube etc. Bought the rest off of amazon. Read the instructions on the bottle. I'm sure there are better ways of doing things but this worked for me.

Light : https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002JQBQZQ/

Shelf: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CL9204C/

Tray: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06XFZHF93/

Automation: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075GWQSYH/

Ph Control: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000BNKWZY/

Pump (overkill): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012UZYMG/

Reservoir: Ikea storage box I had already.

White Basket (Not needed): From Target that I had already.

Rest I got from local hydroponics store.

u/britjh22 · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

Using some copper tubing from home depot coiled into the correct shape by coiling it around something. Added a few feet of braided vinyl tubing and hose clamps, and hook it up to this immersion pump. That goes in a big cooler with cold water and ice, plug in the pump and let it go to town, with the output going back into the cooler. Sometimes I'll do a run of just cold water for an initial temp drop, and then drain the cooler and replace with freshly cold water and ice to get it down to pitching temps. If I did it again, I would probably go with a more powerful pump, maybe the 396 gph model.

Here is a good visual/guide of what it more or less looks like. A good how to video on building the coil itself is [here}(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K8xRGYnwEt8), and the way I did it I save a lot of hassle and cost by just using tubing with clamps instead of plumbing connections. It's definitely good to make your in/out tubes to up, out, and then angle down like this so if it leaks it won't get in your wort.

u/mtux96 · 2 pointsr/Aquariums

One I use.

https://www.amazon.com/EcoPlus-Submersible-Aquarium-Fountain-Hydroponics/dp/B0018X2XT4/ref=redir_mobile_desktop?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&ref=yo_pop_d_pd_t2

One I use in my tank as part of my filter:

https://www.amazon.com/Active-Aqua-Submersible-Water-Pump/dp/B002JPGE6S/ref=redir_mobile_desktop?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&ref=yo_pop_d_pd_t2

As long as it's strong enough to pump water to your tank it should be fine. Stronger will of course be better for speed and getting water there. I happened to have first one because I had to replace it with second as it was too strong to use as part of my filter.

u/foxydogman · 2 pointsr/ChineseLaserCutters

Another thread suggested this 20w pump with this fitting and I've been happy with it for the 6 months I've had it. I run my pump 24/7 to keep the water circulating and so far still working fine

u/chino_brews · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

This is the one I use: Ecoplus 396-gph. It's a classic that a lot of homebrewers use, and was recommended by /u/homebrewfinds.

u/Optimoprimo · 2 pointsr/aquaponics

>Does hydroton need to be soaked for a long time to not float in your grow bed?

No. But you want to rinse it extremely well. It always arrives dusty. So it will soak up initial water that way. Typically if your pebbles start to float, it means your water level is too high. The weight of the media above the water line should be enough to keep the entire bed from floating.

>What volume should I assume for my system when buying a pump

Don't think too hard about this. You will have around 25-30 gallons of water that will be circulating. You're going to need a ball valve regardless of your pump size, because with a flood and drain system you need to be able to regulate the duration of your cycle. This is my favorite cheap pump.

My warning to you: You are really pushing the lower limit of what a system can be. The less water available to the system, the more tiny imbalances can completely throw off the water chemistry. You're going to be dealing with very abrupt swings in your pH, dKH, and nitrate and will probably need to monitor them daily. Consider adding an overflow to the fish tank and a 20 gallon sump, with the pump in the sump.

u/ExplodingLemur · 2 pointsr/ChineseLaserCutters
u/kds1398 · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

If you have an IC already you can do the first part using a pond pump fairly cheap, here is one for $28. Can't speak to how good that one is, but I'm just saying there are cheap options out there.

u/dng25 · 2 pointsr/watercooling

A bit overkill but I flush the rads with a pond pump + filter using distilled water for 6 hours.

u/AmHumanNotBear · 2 pointsr/SpaceBuckets

> Regarding the snipping of the ends... i'm not snipping all of the leaves... just the ends and I immediately dip my cuts in aloe vera.

I'm a little confused, all the videos on taking clones I saw had the grower cutting off 30%-50% of the tip of all the clones leaves. So 2 inch leaf ends up 1"-1.5 inch long. This is what I did and what I assume you did. I didn't mean to imply it doesn't work, I was trying to point out how/why it works (less transpiration vs encouraging root growth)

> What supplies did you purchase to get that setup? 2 buckets and what is that machine pump ?

[Water Pump]
(https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018X2XT4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1)

360 Spray Nozzle

(2) 5 gallon buckets from home depot

(1) 4" long 1/2" connector from pump to 'T' piece of PVC

(6) 2" black foam inserts for holding plant stems

long piece of PVC and more 90 degree and 'T' pieces of PVC

> So far it's worked tremendously fast. So it does work. Perhaps not the best method, but works!

Lots of cloning methods work great, I chose my method b/c being a total noob at it I figured I needed every advantage I could get.

u/dontspamjay · 2 pointsr/Homebrewing

I got this one:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018X2XT4/ref=oh_details_o07_s01_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

So I just run hose water until the wort gets down to about 110 or 100. Then I hook my IC up to this pump sitting in an ice bath and just recirculate the water until it gets down to pitching temp.

u/WorstWarriorNA · 2 pointsr/snakes

> Also, can anyone possibly point me to any cheaper alternatives to a thermometer/hygrometer? eg something more generic, not specific for reptiles.. my local pet store wants $35 a pop for them

this is the go to hygro/thermometer. As a note, the probe reads temp only, and the display reads both temp and humidity, most put the display on cool side and probe on warm

u/Deviou5 · 2 pointsr/ballpython

Hey! Thanks for all the great info you've posted in this thread and all others. One thing I've noticed however is that your resources recommend this therm/hygrometer, but the product description indicates that it measures indoor humidity at the unit itself, not at the probe location. Assuming you use a unit similar to this one, do you have the unit mounted inside the enclosure somehow? If not, how do you get an accurate humidity reading from inside?

EDIT this link you provided below shows the same thermo/hygro unit attached to the inside of the tub with adhesive velcro strips - something I've been very thoroughly warned against by your link to that poor injured corn that ended up dying.

u/truecreature · 2 pointsr/reptiles

Oh those little round plastic ones? If so, there are a couple different problems here I think -


Those plastic dial thermometer/hygrometers are pretty much just garbage. If you want to get a better reading of what ambient temps are, I would look into digital ones like Acurite. This is the one I use which comes with a probe that can stick on to the side of the tank. There's also one that's like $11-$12 but it just sits on the bottom.


Another problem is UTH are designed to only heat the direct surface above where they're positioned, so they don't have much of an impact on the ambient temp. The best way to measure a UTH's heat is with a temperature gun, which takes a reading directly from the surface. They're about $20 on Amazon. If you used a temp gun on that UTH's surface you'd likely be surprised by how hot it is; actually, a UTH unregulated by a thermostat can get dangerously hot for an animal to touch.


What you might want to look into is a ceramic heat emitter; it's an unlighted bulb that screws into a heat lamp and it'll heat the air temperatures below the lamp. You'd probably have to experiment with different wattages or get a dimmer for it to get temps around what you'd want




u/skittlekitteh · 2 pointsr/snakes

Here's u/ataraxia's classic link dump I found on a other post. Although the informstion is written for bps (most common snake people have trouble with it seems- mostly due to the humedity) but the suggestions could definitely help you for the humedity aspect needed for your boa.


You should definitely read it through.

i'm going to dump a bunch of helpful links on you. the first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions.

glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
  • http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding
  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. animal plastics, boamaster, and boaphile plastics, are some popular companies. many people will use a tub for a young snake and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter [CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as reptile basics and pro products.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.
u/ZMan941 · 2 pointsr/snakes

Great! That should also serve as an example too: if it was that easy for you to take off and expose the adhesive, imagine how easy it would have been for a snake!

This is the digital one that Ataraxia has in her link dump. I was concerned because of the reviews, but actually looking through them it seems to be a lot of people who don't know what they are doing/buying. I did an ice-bath test for the probe, a salt test for the hydrometer, and compared the "Inside" temp with a known source and it was fine. While that's a sample size of one unit, you can also return to Amazon for a fair period if something does go wrong.

The hardest part ill be fixing the main unit to the tank since you have glass walls instead of plastic (Plastic you can just pop a hole and slip a bolt through).

u/Treereme · 2 pointsr/snakes

Personally I use these generic branded CX201 - A units. (be aware the link I provided is shipping from China, and will take a while). I have half a dozen and while they are cheap they have been relatively uniform and accurate throughout all the examples I have.

[The AcuRite](AcuRite 00891A3 Indoor/Outdoor Digital Thermometer with Humidity https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001BO8CUE/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_LIiRAbCEG2W80) indoor outdoor plus humidity units are very popular and come highly recommended.

u/AwkwardMunchkin · 2 pointsr/ballpython

u/_ataraxia has a lot of good information. I've stolen their list of links and information for you to go through, but all the credit for this belongs to them. (Also I don't know how to embed links into the comments since I'm a reddit noob so please excuse the messiness)

the first three links are detailed care sheets, the rest are product recommendations in case you need to get any supplies yourself.

http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-the-basics-and-then-some
http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-common-problems
http://reptimes.com/ball-pythons-feeding

spyder robotics (http://www.spyderrobotics.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=1) makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. https://www.amazon.com/MTPRTC-ETL-Certified-Thermostat-Germination-Reptiles/dp/B000NZZG3S/ is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat.

heat tape (http://www.reptilebasics.com/heat-tape) or ultratherm heat pads (http://www.reptilebasics.com/ultratherm-heat-pads) are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options.

a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer (https://www.amazon.com/AcuRite-00891A3-Outdoor-Thermometer-Humidity/dp/B001BO8CUE/) allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].

an infrared thermometer (https://www.amazon.com/Etekcity-Lasergrip-774-Non-contact-Thermometer/dp/B00837ZGRY/) allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.

these hide boxes (http://www.reptilebasics.com/hide-boxes) are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

edit: Just fixed some formatting to make it easier to read.

u/abradolph · 2 pointsr/MurderedByWords
u/HenkPoley · 2 pointsr/wherecanibuythis

Not serious: Alien probes can probably found at Torchwood Institute.

Alien props... Maybe it's custom made?

Edit:

u/FearrMe · 2 pointsr/FilthyFrank
u/thkuntze · 2 pointsr/HelpMeFind

I didn't have luck with "Lil Mayo" either, but would one of these two work?

X TERRESTRIAL ROSWELL ALIEN UFO FLYING SAUCER PROP

Foam Filled Alien Halloween Prop

u/vareyable · 2 pointsr/funny

I loved mine as a kid, but I remember the plastic hardening and it being unable to remain attached to the sink after a couple of weeks. If anyone wants one for the utility and is willing to sacrifice the aesthetic :(, I found this https://www.amazon.com/Kwik-Brass-Faucet-Attachment-Fountain/dp/B00CH4TYXQ

u/dragonfly224 · 2 pointsr/gadgets
u/MaddBluntz420 · 2 pointsr/see
u/nijoli · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

This horse head shaped squirrel feeder is seriously one of the more amazing things I have ever seen for sale.

Seriously, look at that! Haw. Poor squirrels!

Wait! What am I saying. LUCKY squirrel. They get treats and we get a good laugh so I suppose everyone wins!

u/clonetek · 2 pointsr/HorseMask
u/bobrossofgrowing · 2 pointsr/microgrowery

It's actually a mister for a mini room fountain. Haven't seen something like this before. Definitely more convenient than 8 top feeds
Mini Mister

u/bad_as_the_dickens · 2 pointsr/tortoise
u/thesushipanda · 2 pointsr/AskMen

I have three posters in my room right now, they're basically House banners from Game of Thrones. House Stark is to the left of my computer desk, House Baratheon to the right, and House Lannister's hangs over my bed.

They look like one of these: Link

Over my computer is a square custom car plate that contains the Florida Gator's mascot and a Chinese word for "luck" that my dad got me when I got into UF.

I'm currently trying to find a small canvas painting of a major city like NYC to hang over my bed, and have a similar sized painting depicting a post-apocalyptic wasteland next to it.

Posters of my all time favorite movies would be nice too.

u/spazzams · 2 pointsr/nocturnalwonderland
u/nexaur · 2 pointsr/electricdaisycarnival

It has to be a lightweight, hollow metal like aluminum. Carbon fiber and fiberglass can pass too, but they’re a bit more costly. I recently got this flag pole and it seems sturdy enough to support extensive flag waving. It’s about 6.5ft. Long fully extended and about 1 foot collapsed. You’ll need to buy some flag clips for it though, it only has the loops to put the clips on, not both.

u/Mellyv123 · 2 pointsr/electricdaisycarnival

I bought this. Connected it and tried to wave it a bit. My flag is a little heavy cause it’s made a bit stronger so we’ll see how it holds up


Telescoping Flagpole

u/CBD_Sasquatch · 2 pointsr/microgrowery

Because I'm too lazy to walk down there to see for myself.

And definitely too lazy to set up a video camera to watch something as boring as plants growing.

Extra sensors are an extra $10 each. I have one in each of my 3 tents.

ThermoPro TP60 Digital Hygrometer Indoor Outdoor Thermometer Humidity Monitor with Temperature Gauge Humidity Meter, Wireless Outdoor Hygrometer, 200ft/60m Range https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XKH666P/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_iDHJAbRGGPEVV

u/omgblvd · 2 pointsr/homeowners

You'll want a humidity meter, something like this - one that has 2 sensors is nice because you can have the display on your main level as well as a sensor in your basement.

Generally, in the summer, you want to run your dehumidifier when the humidity is greater than about 50% inside - you'll likely want to run the dehumidifier in your basement, because it'll likely be most humid in that area.

In the winter, you'll want to run the humidifier that's hooked up to your HVAC system. The setting for humidity you should choose depends on how cold it is outside. If you set the humidity too high and it's really cold outside, you'll get condensation on your windows (and possibly inside your walls, which you really don't want). Here's a chart you can follow - I put a chart on my phone as well as right next to the humidity dial so I can check it easily. You'll have to adjust it up/down as the temperature outside changes over the winter.

u/hikerjamesb · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

I use this indoor/outdoor wireless thermometer/hygrometer. Records max/min temp and humidity (all time and over 24hr period) in memory. It's 3oz (without batteries), so not the lightest, but worth the weight for me. It's pretty fun being able to see the freezing temps outside your tent while wrapped up in a sleeping bag. If you want a similar thing which records only temperature then they are available at around 2oz.

There are some alternatives which connect to an iphone/android app which are much lighter, but more expensive.

u/blitzedrdt · 2 pointsr/homeowners

I recommend this. Cheap, seems accurate, and you can keep the main station upstairs. As a bonus get add on sensors and measure outside conditions as well.

ThermoPro TP65 Digital Wireless... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075QBRR6S?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

u/GardenXrookie · 2 pointsr/gardening

I was gifted this one from Amazon for Christmas a couple of years ago and have been very happy with it and have added additional sensors to monitor some cold frames and seed starting rack. It does display the temperature of the base station so that would not meet one of requirements but otherwise the range is decent and the sensors are cheap and easy to add on.

u/Rvckus · 2 pointsr/battlestations

It's no longer available from the Amazon seller I got it from, but there are several similar options available like this one: https://www.amazon.com/Aimto-Foot-Step-Snek-Flag/dp/B07G5YQ7Q5

The dimensions for mine were 3x5ft if you wanted to explore other options.

u/HarveyWalterOrion · 1 pointr/DIY

There is some good info here http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/gpm-psi-municipal-water-source/.

I did the 5 gallon bucket test and measured my pressure with a simple gauge that attached to an unregulated spigot like this one http://www.amazon.com/Rain-Bird-P2A-Water-Pressure/dp/B00004RACK.

I was all about mapping out the system and creating a diagram, but I had some difficulty doing this as I couldn't diagram it properly. My dad used to be a professional landscaper and he simply walked the yard and laid out flags color coded to each zone. The sprinklers give you a range of how much water they use so as soon as you know your pressure and water flow you'll know how many sprinklers you can put on a single valve.

My dad did a better job simply walking out the spacing manually. The main thing I learned was that although a sprinkler may have a 15 foot range you'll want significant overlap to ensure proper watering.

u/mailerdeemon · 1 pointr/DIY

http://www.amazon.com/Rain-Bird-P2A-Water-Pressure/dp/B00004RACK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1312853183&sr=8-1

You could try this, should be able to pick it up from a box store. If the pressure is indeed higher than it should be, you would need to consult with the city. There may be ways to lower your household pressure, but that is beyond me.

u/Histrix · 1 pointr/HomeImprovement

My pressure washer doesn’t really care what the incoming pressure is as it is the type of pump that can suck water out of a bucket if need be. The pressure washer does need adequate flow to perform optimally.

As others have mentioned it seems all the power washing pros in my area all use their own trailer mounted tank so your house pressure may not even be an issue.

As to your problem, you don’t say where you live. I’ll just assume the US. From what you describe you seem to have a flow problem. Remember there is a difference between pressure and flow. The most likely cause is that your service line from the street to the house has narrowed due to mineral deposits/corrosion/biofilm building up over the years.

Are you saying that your meter is 8 feet below ground level? I find that hard to believe. It would be very difficult for the utility company to do their routine meter reading during their billing cycle.

Most water service lines generally aren’t more than a few feet deep. Replacing one is not a really big deal - just a lot of grunt work in digging the trench. Once that is done it is a lot cheaper to have a plumber do the line replacement.

As far as a PRV, your utility company should be able to tell you if those are commonly used on their system. Most sytems don’t require PRV’s at residential connections because the normal system pressure in the mains in the street aren’t high enough to warrant one. They should be able to tell you what the nomral pressures are in your area. You could also measure your line pressure yourself. You can get a gauge that you can screw onto the spigot you would connect your garden hoe to for less than $10 - https://smile.amazon.com/Rain-Bird-P2A-Pressure-Female/dp/B00004RACK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1497077267&sr=8-1&keywords=water+pressure+meter

That will tell you what pressure you have at your house. Note that pressure will likely vary somewhat at various times of day depending upon water usage/demand in your area.

In my state, water utilities are required by law to maintain a minimum system pressure of 20 psi. Normal system pressure is usually at least two or three times that.

You could have a plumber come out and cutout a section of the service line pipe in your crawlspace so the interior condition of the pipe can be inspected. The materials used for pipes will vary in various regions and over various years. In my area most house built in the 50’s had either copper service lines or galvanized steel. Galvanized pipes are notorious for buildup that narrows the pipe.

You say you have had the utility company out to your house before. One other thing you might ask them is how old your meter is. It could be that there is something clogging the meter somewhat. Most water utilities replace their meters every decade or two mainly because they do wear out and start to lose some accuracy as they wear down. They could disconnect the meter to see and make sure that adequate flow is getting to your property. Some utility companies are more helpful than others so they may not be willing to do that.

Good luck!

u/[deleted] · 1 pointr/DIY

What is your water pressure? What is the size of the feed line to your spigot?

All the sprinkler systems I've installed were on dedicated lines (not running through a hose spigot) and were sized appropriately for the pressure and system capacity.

It sounds like you either have very low water pressure, or an undersized line- and the backflow preventer is exerting just enough force to reduce the pressure sufficiently to prevent the sprinklers from running. A backflow preventer is a restriction- but it's usually minuscule.

Rainbird makes a pressure gauge that you can use to check the pressure at the spigot if you are not sure: https://www.amazon.com/Rain-Bird-Pressure-Female-Thread/dp/B00004RACK/

u/doggmapeete · 1 pointr/Coffee

Save yourself a bunch of money: (cheaper still at a hardware store)

https://www.amazon.com/Rain-Bird-P2A-Multi-Purpose-Pressure/dp/B00004RACK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1480607756&sr=8-1&keywords=water+gauge

https://www.amazon.com/MettleAir-110-ED-1PK-Reducing-Reducer-Bushing/dp/B00S8C0JBC/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1480608162&sr=8-5&keywords=3%2F4+male+to+3%2F8+female+adapter

I did this and it worked no problem. And yeah, what everyone else is saying. You just have to really go for it. Use a table vise or large pliers with something to protect the ridges from carving up your portafilter.

u/thatotherguy321 · 1 pointr/Plumbing

I'll agree with what others have already said. And also add the following comments:

Have you checked pressure upstream and downstream of the PRV? Use one of these. Also you can try adjusting the pressure by turning the bolt after loosening the nut. If no change, then time to replace.

Its not abnormal for the diaphram to wear out. If you can ID the model (or take to a plumbing supply to ID), you can buy a repair kit to replace the guts leaving the housing in place, which would be less labor. Just remove the bell and the guts are accessible.

If no luck with repair kit, you'll have to replace the whole thing. In which case, don't worry about finding the identical model. As someone mentioned, unless you have movement in the pipe, it won't be easy to get on, and would require soldering anyway. The critical dimension would have been the spacing between the in & out port, and pipe size. Yours look like 3/4".

Home depot does in fact carry PRVs, example. This one is a union on both sides which would make it easier to install. Still requires some sweating/soldering. But you don't need extra play in the pipes to squeeze the PRV in place.

Also, what's going on above the PRV? I see wire nuts. I hope that's for sprinklers and not line voltage. Make sure those are waterproof wire nuts, or packed with silicone.

u/plumbtree · 1 pointr/Plumbing

You probably do need a pressure regulating valve (PRV). Go to your local hardware store and pick up one of these. Put it on your hose faucet and turn the hose faucet on, and if it is over 80 psi, you should get a PRV installed. Your pipes also may not be properly supported in the new addition. Is this master bathroom above or near the water heater?

u/aranou · 1 pointr/Plumbing

I agree with those saying check water pressure. You may only see it at your dishwasher because the solenoid valve it has closes really fast. But if you turn on a sink and slam the faucet shut as quick as you can, you’ll hear it there too. You can get a relatively cheaply and check it at a spigot yourself to rule it out. You want to be 40-60 psi here’s a gauge for $6.37
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00004RACK/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1519230445&sr=8-3&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=water+pressure+gauge&dpPl=1&dpID=513tdz-hTQL&ref=plSrch

u/ThrowinStacks · 1 pointr/cider

No, I'm bottling one bottle into a plastic bottle with this pressure gauge. The rest will be in glass bottles. I will pasteurize them all once the gauge reaches near 30psi.

The pressure gauge will be an experiment. I've seen lots of people do it with hand-made versions successfully. I read that 3/4 hose thread is close enough to bottle threads, so I thought I'd try this pre-made one out.

More info on bottle carbing
http://www.howtomakehardcider.com/carb-oh.html

u/Pink7172 · 1 pointr/Plumbing

Municipal means you are looking for a Pressure reducing valve, probably very close to your shutoff. Often A cone shaped object.
A hose bib pressure guage would be helpful. Knowing the pressure when adjusting would be best.

u/TheEarsHaveWalls · 1 pointr/Bad_Cop_No_Donut
u/Fatburg · 1 pointr/funny

You can get one of these on Amazon

u/AG923 · 1 pointr/funny
u/Hyprocritopotamus · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I saw a review, and saw this one was recommended, but showing the amount of flow coming through the lines I was thinking faster flow might give it a better clean:
https://www.amazon.ca/EcoPlus-Submersible-Water-Pump-Power/dp/B0012UZYMG

u/dennishoppa · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

Right on, I found an alternate photo of it on Amazon as well. http://www.amazon.com/EcoPlus-Submersible-Pump-264/dp/B0012UZYMG

Thanks for following up, I'm buying it.

u/reddit_clint · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I use tap water till I hit about 100F, then a bucket of ice and a bit of water with this pump sitting on the bottom..

u/Maxwell_hau5_caffy · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I've got this one and it works great https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012UZYMG/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Works well for cleaning out beer lines on the keezer also. You'll need one of these to do that though. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B010P1WT8E/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/texmeth · 1 pointr/hydro

Here are some extra pics.
These are 4" pipes.
Used electrical outlets at the end and gorilla glued them in.
Three inlet tubes for circulation on the end, then the four on top are for air.
Overview
Crazy glue job
Pump
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0012UZYMG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002JPEVMC/ref=ox_ya_os_product_refresh_T1

Not sure how this setup is going to work yet, but I will post more with success or failure.

u/cpashia · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

Just a heads up, you can get a submersible water pump on Amazon with free shipping (if you have prime) for $15 that does 158 GPH. It has several hose adapters, including 3/8. Not sure what your water pressure is like, but this is way faster than my sink at home. You can also chill the water and recirculate it. Just a thought.

u/Spazmodo · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

Here's another idea which is a twist on what I do. I have one of these pumps. I put it in a sink full of water and ice and use that to feed my chiller. It works really well but you have to have lots of ice.

u/starkknives · 1 pointr/metalworking
u/LittleHelperRobot · 1 pointr/microgrowery

Non-mobile: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0018WVNXC/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1427527694&sr=8-1&keywords=eco+158gph

^That's ^why ^I'm ^here, ^I ^don't ^judge ^you. ^PM ^/u/xl0 ^if ^I'm ^causing ^any ^trouble. ^WUT?

u/SideSlapd · 1 pointr/microgrowery

Non-mobile: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0018WVNXC/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1427527694&sr=8-1&keywords=eco+158gph

^That's ^why ^I'm ^here, ^I ^don't ^judge ^you. ^PM ^/u/xl0 ^if ^I'm ^causing ^any ^trouble. ^WUT?

u/dakini_dream · 1 pointr/microgrowery

I just set up a really basic watering system so that they got watered while on vacation, using:

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B013JPIJG4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018WVNXC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&th=1 (I should have gotten larger, but this works)

https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00MVF16JG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I timed how long it took for the pump to go thru a 5 gallon bucket (my normal amount to water) 3 times, and set the timer to go off for a little longer than it took on average, on the day I wanted them to get watered.

I'm now using it to water since I'm in flower and it's easier to just let it water them while in darkness, since I'm only awake for a little time they are getting light.

u/mylastnug · 1 pointr/microgrowery

Sorry for not including info.

It's actually a 158gph submersible pump: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0018WVNXC/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1427527694&sr=8-1&keywords=eco+158gph

I bought a 1/2" hose, and an adapter that allows you to screw on garden hose size attachments. I just mix everything in a 5gal bucket (for now). So far, it's been totally worth the investment! It was about 50-60$ for everything at my local hydro store.

u/zip_000 · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

What kind of pump do you use? I set up something similar to this with a small fountain pump, and it sucks. The water moves through the coil, but only at a trickle.

This is the pump I used: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018WVNXC/

u/CynicalResearch · 1 pointr/turtles

http://imgur.com/a/eM0M2 I just made one of these. Works really really well for cheap. Get one of these pumps.

u/needsmorepepper · 1 pointr/gardening
u/TMaccius · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

The 396 gph version isn't much more expensive. To keep from using too much ice, you could start by letting the pot rest on its own for a few minutes (try a hop stand!), then switch to cold tap water through the pump, then switch that out for ice water. The key is just maintaining a high differential between the wort and whatever you're cooling with.

Another option -- and this is a little off the wall -- is to use your shower. You could switch to a handheld shower, get a diverter, or get a showerhead with a splitter that would let you easily swap in your wort chiller. Handheld showers use a pretty standard 1/2" thread.

u/boogiemanspud · 1 pointr/Aquariums

This one is supposed to fit on a Python hose. I forget who, but it was recommended by one of the bigger youtubers. I plan on getting one as it's faster than siphon power alone, and you don't need to leave your water running on your python to use it.

u/hukdizzle · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I actually just posted about this in another thread if you'd like to read about my process.

Thread

You need to look into an upgraded submersible pump and a tub/cooler for ice water. Being able to whirlpool would help as well.

Edit : This is the pump that I use and it does a great job.

u/BigBudZombie · 1 pointr/microgrowery

The setup you want is pretty quiet. With the airstones on 24/7, set the top feed drip pump to come on a couple times a day and it will still be quieter than a window A/C unit

Air Pump

Drip pump

u/jbabbz · 1 pointr/turtles

Very cool. I will warn you that this tank is long and heavy. It took two people to cary it into the house. Also water is heavy so this setup will weigh around a thousand pounds when filled with water. Our house is on a concrete slab so weight is not an issue for us.

My turtles are smaller than your slider so I have not tried to build my own basking area. I use large Zoo Med floating docs for my map and painted turtles.

These are what I use:
https://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-Turtle-Gallon-Tanks/dp/B00178LI50

They also make an extra large floating doc for larger turtles but I have not tried it out:
https://www.amazon.com/Zoo-Med-78098-Turtle-X-Large/dp/B01AYBRVN8

I do not have a sump on the tank. I just run the FX6 and a UV sterilizer. Also the FX6 and power strip barely fit in the center compartment of that stand.

I used to use a syphon kit that I bought from the pet store to drain the water but that was expensive and a bit slow so I bought a cheap pump on Amazon and purchased a pipe to hose adapter at the hardware store. I start up the pump and let it run for a few minutes and then detach the hose so I can get the hose into the hard to reach corners of the tank.

Pump I use (it has a lot of different adapters for various tubing but no hose adapter):
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018X2XT4/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The adapter I have looks similar to this one except the one I have is male hose thread to 3/4" female pipe adapter (you can find these adapters in the irrigation section at Lowes and Home Depot):
http://www.homedepot.com/p/DIG-3-4-in-Female-Hose-Thread-x-3-4-in-Male-Pipe-Thread-Swivel-Adapter-50007/100186564

I clean out the tank about once a month and clean reusable media and swap out filter floss and polishing pads. Even after a month my water is still clear and my ammonia and nitrites are at 0 but my nitrates are in the 40-60ppm range.

Older pics (pump I use with the adapter is in the second to last image in the gallery): https://imgur.com/a/2c4d0

Even older pics: https://imgur.com/a/xOieq

u/KappinSpaulding · 1 pointr/NoRagretsBeer

EcoPlus 396gph Submersible Pump - $23.95 $22.50

This pump would be great for a chilling water re-circulation system

^1/6/2017 ^10:56am ^EST

u/hoky315 · 1 pointr/Homebrewing

I've used this one to recirculate ice water in a cooler through my immersion chiler.

u/meshman2004 · 1 pointr/PlantedTank

I use this pump, and it's awesome for both draining and filling the tank - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0018X2XT4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1.

u/angry_krausen · 1 pointr/Hydroponics

ecoplus has worked great for me, and they are a great value

u/Oblivious_Rage · 1 pointr/Homebrewing
u/AutoModerator · 1 pointr/ballpython


I am a bot programmed to automatically provide the following content by /u/_Ataraxia when summoned. Link to the most recent version of this content here

The first three links are detailed care sheets, then a tub tutorial, and the rest are product recommendations. read everything thoroughly, come back with any questions. Let /u/_Ataraxia know if any of the links don't work.

Glass tanks can be very challenging for ball python husbandry due to the high amount of air flow with the screen top and the total lack of insulation with the glass walls. it's generally recommended to use tubs or pvc reptile cages instead. wood enclosures can also be suitable if they're designed well and sealed properly to protect the wood against moisture. glass tanks can work, but they require a lot of modification and maintenance, which you'll find tips for in the second link. i'll give you product recommendations to cover options for tanks, tubs, and pvc/wood enclosures.

Ball Python Care Guides

  • the basics and then some
  • common problems
  • feeding problems

    Set-up Recommendations

  • here is a tutorial to give you an example of how to set up a tub. this is what i would recommend for an immediate setup, and you could upgrade to a pvc cage upgrade later. note: this tutorial shows adhesive velcro to attach the thermo/hygro to the tub wall, but you should not do that. tape and other sticky adhesives should never be used inside the enclosure, your snake can get stuck on it and suffer serious injuries. hot glue is the easiest reptile-safe adhesive option. screws or bolts can also be used to mount things on plastic/wood walls.
  • pvc reptile cages are ideal. they have the husbandry benefits of a tub with the aesthetics/visibility of a tank, they're much lighter than wood or glass, and they will remain unaffected by decades of constant high humidity. some popular brands include animal plastics [most recommended], boaphile plastics [i personally have these and like them], reptile basics, and vision cages, though you'll find many more with a quick google search. many people will use a tub at first and upgrade to pvc later.
  • spyder robotics makes high quality thermostats to regulate your heat sources with pulse/proportional temperature control and various safety features. this is a popular cheap thermostat with simple on/off style with zero safety features. inkbird thermostats are also low-cost but overall higher quality than the hydrofarm type. any heat source should be regulated by a thermostat to ensure safe and appropriate temperatures.
  • heat tape or ultratherm heat pads are high quality and affordable under tank heater [UTH] options. this is a suitable heat source for most enclosure types. remember that a UTH will not provide ambient heat, it will only affect the temperature of the surface to which it is attached.
  • a porcelain base lamp and ceramic heat emitter[CHE] is the best ambient heat source for a tank, and it will also work for some pvc/wood enclosures. any heat lamp that emits light, even red or blue, should not be used at night.
  • a radiant heat panel [RHP] is the best ambient heat source in a pvc/wood enclosure. there are a few options, such as pro products [most recommended] or reptile basics.
  • a digital dual sensor thermometer/hygrometer allows you to easily monitor the warm side floor temperature [with the probe] as well as the ambient temperature and humidity [with the main unit].
  • an infrared thermometer allows you to spot-check surface temperatures anywhere in the enclosure.
  • these hide boxes are a cheap simple hide with a design that offers the best sense of security for your snake. cave style hides, cardboard boxes, plastic food containers, etc, can also be used. half logs are not appropriate hides.

    Copypasta version 7/24/2018 (c) /u/_Ataraxia

    I am a bot, and this action was performed automatically. Please contact the moderators of this subreddit if you have any questions or concerns.
u/MidRorschach · 1 pointr/snakes

That makes sense! I'm using this thermometer in the corner of the cold side to measure the cold temp: https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001BO8CUE/ref=ox_sc_act_image_1?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1
Is that good to measure the cold temps?

I have the UTH on a jumpstart thermostat, with the probe between the UTH and the bottom of the tank. I don't have the lamp on a thermostat, but I'll get another one to put it on. Where should the probe for that thermostat be?

u/SydneyRubbert · 1 pointr/reptiles

I use this guy: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001BO8CUE/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I did the salt test and it's only 4% too high. I thought it was busted at first when I put it into my humid enclosure, but it turns out the humidity was just 96% or higher (it was just displaying "HIGH"). It does update pretty well though. I let the enclosure dry out a little bit over a few days due to oversaturating the substrate and the percentage dropped to display an actual number.

u/pugnaciously · 1 pointr/funny
u/mohavewolfpup · 1 pointr/HelpMeFind

Here's one Amazon Link

Not quite the same as this one, but maybe it works for you?

here's a unboxing video

Searching for "Alien Prop" or "foam filled alien prop" via google brings up results

u/FooFatFighters · 1 pointr/functionalprint

I got this spigot for when I brush my teeth but this works well for the too close to sink problem I have too. Kwik Sip Brass In Home Faucet Attachment Water Fountain https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CH4TYXQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_EqOrDbA59NNYF

u/glanmiregirl · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I'm going to try and relate this because it's funny.

Ok, this is related to Krys because, squirrels like peanuts, peanuts are grown in the ground, it's dark underground, secrets can be dark, and Krys is of course our secret keeper. (I'm pretty sure she also thinks we're all nuts, so you can go off in that direction too!)

u/MizzElsaMizzElsa · 1 pointr/SavageGarden

I would go with something like this. Check around elsewhere for higher quality or cheaper ones. These work really well and a couple people on here use a few of these in a container to create a really effective large humidifier. That said I don't personally use them because I've had lots of them die quickly. I believe /u/cruzzfish1 has a pretty solid source for them.

u/16cantom · 1 pointr/Hydroponics

Always happy to talk about it! So I've used a 5 gallon bucket, generally some sort of cheap riser (I use plastic gardening pots normally), and a fogger. The bucket is filled to where the water level is about 1-2 mm above the fogger diagphram and then I mix in nutrient solutions directly to the water (this is how you get maximum fog). After that it's just maintaining water level. I put a small hole in the lid next to the plant and if I open it and no fog comes out it's time for more water. Everything I use is on Amazon for ease of replacement, here's what I've used:
Fogger https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00P91ZFPA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_vUL4AbM8YCMX2
Bucket https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A1LUFEY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_XVL4AbGA6P7F2
Plant pots https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XJ5PBH6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_yWL4AbHBY4RWC

As a note, make sure you either buy a black bucket or paint it black (what I did). Either way it's important to not allow algae to form in the nutrient rich water.

u/socraticd · 1 pointr/MushroomGrowers

If you have a little space, meaning a little less than a square meter, you could assemble a fruiting tent with a humidity bucket pretty inexpensively.

Something like this is pretty simple, consisting of a cheap 4 tier "greenhouse", a 5 gallon bucket, pond fogger, and a reasonably sized computer case fan or two.

Basically, just throw the pond fogger into the bucket, and attach the fan to the lid blowing down into the bucket, and have a short length of hose coming out of the lid as well to carry the fog/air into the top of the tent. Fresh air and humidity in one shot. It's worked very well for me for a few years now.

u/Y_I_AM_CHEEZE · 1 pointr/Vaping

You could use this With a small 6 cell lipo battery.

AGPtek® Aluminum Mini Mist Maker Fogger Water Fountain Pond Fog Machine Atomizer https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00P91ZFPA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_s-9NBbB2JQ442

Edit: The problem with using a vape is the vapor will pretty much just sit there in the tank or the atomizer and not go anywhere because there's nothing forcing air through it so you would still need some type of air pump hooked up to the atomizer And then you have another problem of their only made to run for 2 or 3 seconds at a time while you take a hit off of it running for longer than 10 seconds you're risking overheating and burning parts up.

u/Bleumunkie · 1 pointr/SelfSufficiency

I am using the arduino to control everything that is controlled, including to monitor temp and control the turner timer.

Humidity is definitely controllable as long as I can find/build something that can put out enough moisture to raise the humidity - but also be turned off equally as effectively. Currently I'm planning on using a ultrasonic mister. (https://www.amazon.com/AGPtek-Aluminum-Fountain-Machine-Atomizer/dp/B00P91ZFPA) I'll post again to show the results of that.

u/NewGuy41410 · 1 pointr/microgrowery

I'm using these $10 foggers as humidifiers. Been told they work just as well but cheaper

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00P91ZFPA/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1491177709&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=ultrasonic+fogger&dpPl=1&dpID=412wzE0GKOL&ref=plSrch


Can u recommended a humidifier that works well for less than $30 - $40?

u/John7oliver · 1 pointr/microgrowery

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00P91ZFPA/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1499811809&sr=8-3&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=ultrasonic+mist+maker&dpPl=1&dpID=412wzE0GKOL&ref=plSrch thats the exact fogger i used. Then a 10 gallon rubbermaid container. Then 3" net pots and 3" neoprene inserts. I used an extra net pot and zip tied some neoprene scraps to make the ultrasonic fogger float at its ideal height.

u/j3wxx · 1 pointr/bonnaroo

Telescoping Flag Pole

Think they'll let this in Centeroo?

u/ibjhb · 1 pointr/gardening

Thanks for all the info!

Regarding the soil, I bought this soil and this perlite for my new plants but I haven't repotted the peppers (only have used it for new plants). I did a 50/50 mix. I was concerned about including vermiculite because, in reading about it, it seemed it would retain moisture, and that doesn't seem to be an issue...

For reference, here's the greenhouse: https://imgur.com/3yWhKW8 I'm mostly growing hot peppers but also some other herbs.

How do I go about repotting the large pepper plants? I've never done it with plants this big. Do I just pull them out, knock off all the dirt and move them to new pots? I imagine the root system takes up most of the pot and I don't really want to go to bigger pots (I'm limited on space in the greenhouse).

For fertilizer, I bought this and the plants seem to love it.

For the hygrometer, would something like this work?

u/zorbtrauts · 1 pointr/Tegu

I use something like this, but I can't vouch for any particular brand.

u/CoreAffinity · 1 pointr/ballpython

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B075QBRR6S/ref=ya_aw_od_pi?ie=UTF8&psc=1

This is one I've decided to try. I feel the issue with the Acurites is water getting inside them from spraying the tank. Which for a humidity sensor shouldn't be going out since. So I feel having a waterproof sensor inside the enclosure and the display outside is going to be a better solution.

u/kman418 · 1 pointr/microgrowery

Awesome thank you! i figured i would need them at some point just didn't know if i needed them off the bat. Anything you recommend or use? i went with the FoxFarm Ocean forest soil aswell.

I did get one of these Hygrometers that i saw in the FAQ's.

u/nu1lx · 1 pointr/DryAgedBeef

Going for 21 day on my first. I have some aged already from a local butcher, so I have a taste to compare it to.

​

For temp / humidity I am using this thermometer, so far its been working well.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075QBRR6S/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

​

As far as the fridge setup, I didn't do anything special. I let it sit for about 2 weeks to make sure the temp holds and what setting it needs to be at. There isn't a fan to cycle in it, so I bought a small desk fan. I didn't have to cut a notch out of the side, it locks closed well enough. I back that up with using a strap around it just to be sure.

​

Hoping it turns out well! Aldi's had this bone in ribeye on sale.. So I figured it would be best to try it on something cheaper before moving to a bigger cut.

u/gpuyy · 1 pointr/Charcuterie
u/rift_in_the_warp · 1 pointr/news

Good news, you can buy these as flags!

u/Walnettos · 1 pointr/vexillology

Source Bonus pics

*Edit wrong link

Custom made from Anley

Anley Single Sided Custom Flag 3x5 Foot
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07CVDH92V/

u/chriscurry0404 · 1 pointr/micronations

Anley Single Sided Custom Flag... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07CVDH92V?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share
I used this and it’s pretty good quality though the back side is slightly less bright but not too noticeable when flying it

u/oasis_zer0 · 1 pointr/Kaiserreich

No step on snek and it’s already has a flag!

u/supercerealthrowaway · 1 pointr/TennesseeForSanders

Yeah it could have been worse.. But I'm setting a camera up to watch it when my next one gets here.

I'm also considering putting my No Step On Snek flag up on my front porch instead of it being in my garage.

u/notquite20characters · 1 pointr/SquaredCircle
u/RemyTeague · 1 pointr/politics

Aimto 3x5 Foot No Step On Snek Flag - Nicely Stitched and Vivid Bright Color - Tea Party Flags Banner Indoor & Outdoor https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07G5YQ7Q5/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_ZQ01BbYETSXF3

u/AMY_bot · 0 pointsr/snakes

For less messy amazon links you can extract the part after "/dp/" in

https://www.amazon.com/AcuRite-00891A3-Outdoor-Thermometer-Humidity/dp/B001BO8CUE/]

and make it:

https://amzn.com/B001BO8CUE

Or via smile link:

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B001BO8CUE

BEEP BOP

Plz send any recommendations via PM

u/itty53 · 0 pointsr/Damnthatsinteresting

With one of these built into it. That's the little device that makes these work.

u/zackogenic · -1 pointsr/chicago
u/Sirens_go_wee_woo · -1 pointsr/CalamariRaceTeam