Best sports & outdoors > outdoor recreation according to redditors

We found 42,737 Reddit comments discussing the best sports & outdoors > outdoor recreation. We ranked the 21,221 resulting products by number of redditors who mentioned them. Here are the top 20.

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Subcategories:

Camping & hiking equipment
Climbing equipment
Sports & Outdoors > Outdoor Recreation > Cycling
Winter sports equipment
Sports & Outdoors > Outdoor Recreation > Skates, Skateboards & Scooters
Water sports
Outdoor recreation accessories
Sports & Outdoors > Outdoor Recreation > Outdoor Clothing

Top Reddit comments about Outdoor Recreation:

u/uski · 78 pointsr/preppers

A few more ideas :

I would suggest having a battery-powered FM radio (and extra batteries if it's battery powered, or get one which charges via USB like the one I linked) to listen to the news and get vital information.

Also (if not too late), order a sawyer mini (best) or lifestraw (not as good). If you don't have access to clean water it can help you stay healthy (beware of chemical contamination which cannot be removed by these).

If you have the money, get a Garmin inReach satellite communicator (requires a (relatively cheap) subscription, down to $15ish a month). You can request SOS (much like 911), and send/receive SMS and e-mails, even without cell coverage. Excellent to keep in touch with relatives and in case of emergency. Can be used year-round when hiking, snow-mobile, skiing, ... Don't tell anyone you have this...

Download the offline map of your area on Google Maps on your phone beforehand. Can be priceless to navigate around and doesn't require internet access. Also get the Maps.Me app and download the map of your area too. Google Maps offline maps will expire and disappear from your phone after 30 days (I believe), Maps.Me maps will not.

If the cell service in your area is out of order, use your phone in airplane mode so that it doesn't continuously and desperately looks for a cell to connect to, which will drain the battery VERY quickly. Also use it on the lowest practical brightness setting to save battery power.

If not too late, get big USB power banks (>=10000mAh such as this one) and fully charge them beforehand. It's good as barter items and it can be nice to recharge your things when you have no access to a generator (on the go, or if you don't want to run the generator to avoid attracting attention). You can also get USB lights (this one for instance) and your powerbank doubles as a flashlight with a very long battery life.

Get a first aid kit, and not just one with bandaids... Get a CAT tourniquet, trauma dressing, Celox (preferred) or QuikClot bandage, triangular bandage, SAM splint, ... and know how to use them. Also get the basic medecines (stomach/diarrhea relief, basic painkillers, anti-allergy, and any prescription medecine if you require any). Remember 911 service may be unavailable for some time and you need to be able to take care of injuries. Tourniquets save lives, everyone should have one readily available.

​

I am a radio amateur and in these situations I like to have one or two portable radio for two-way communication but I realize it is not for everybody. Still, a pair of FRS/GMRS radio can be helpful. Please note that GMRS requires a (cheap) license in the USA. I would recommend this model which also allows to be used as a scanner and to program the NOAA weather frequencies (do it beforehand) and some local police/EMS/fire frequencies (if allowed in your juridiction).

Please DO NOT use a radio made for amateur radio use, where you can transmit on any frequency, such as the UV-5R; you may interfere with emergency communications, even if you can't hear them, miles away. Please stick to the FRS/GMRS frequencies. The radio above guarantees safe operation and still allows to be used as a scanner.

​

Take pictures of all your important documents (ID, properties, ...) and store them in a waterproof plastic bag. Try to keep at least your passport and driver license with you during the storm...

If you have a sump pump, try to arrange so that it can be battery powered and/or connected to your generator. If using battery power, get a battery charger and/or a generator connection, if the outage lasts and the battery runs down. Sometimes homes are not affected by the main storm but are flooded due to the lack of power around the storm and are still ruined, and that's totally preventable.

Also, beforehand, depending of the situation you might want to BLOCK your main sewage pipe. This way you might avoid sewage backflow into your home. There are normally valves already installed but in case of serious flooding (high backpressure) they sometimes are not up to the task.

​

Download a few offline movies on the Netflix app (if you have Netflix). I never lived though a hurricane but I assume after a few days/weeks, you might want some entertainment. You can also download e-books. Bonus if it's survival-related e-books.

​

Hope this helps... good luck to those affected


PS: oooo, thank you stranger for the gold, I think I never had one before ! Happy prepping :)

u/timmy_the_large · 65 pointsr/preppers

Life straw is not a great product. Spend a little extra and get the Sawyer. It is a better, more useful product. It just doesn't have as cool of a name.

u/Tyler9400 · 60 pointsr/Bushcraft

Steel is steel mate. You can go with the expensive stuff, or with the cheap stuff - We're talking expensive at several hundred and cheap as under 20-50. I've seen 20 dollars knives made just as well as the 600 dollar knives, they just dont have the name brand. It's a chunk of steel, treated so it stands up to specific conditions and holds an edge better. It looks to be full tang - not sure what is up with the holes in the blade, or the design near the MT-5 logo. I found pictures online, looks like the steel comes out a bunch there? No idea what this design is or what purpose it could have - looks sketchy. And the holes in the blade...I mean I've seen the 5 dollar walmart knives with holes so you can create a makeshift spear but..Other then that, no idea why they are on this knife, and they cause more harm then good. You can use it for basic bushcrafting tasks but I'd be careful batoning, I've personally never heard of the brand - it could be name brand and be great, but it has some weird designs.

​

Really, steel is steel - all the fancy features cause more harm than good.

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-4-1-Inch-Military/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&sr=1-4

That is a 12 dollar knife, and you really won't ever need more, but there are better options. The 12 dollar knife has a thinner blade and isn't suitable to as heavy duty work, but is a great beater knife for doing anything.

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Survival-Starter-4-3-Inch/dp/B00BFI8TOA/ref=sr_1_7?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&sr=1-7

And their top of the line knives are

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Garberg-Carbon-Leather-Sheath/dp/B07B8SP4G9/ref=sr_1_10?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-10

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-M-12642-Stainless-Compatible-4-3-inch/dp/B01I1GITMA/ref=sr_1_12?dchild=1&keywords=morakniv&qid=1571462370&s=sporting-goods&sr=1-12

There's a carbon version and stainless steel version. I'm gonna be honest...for the most part, they all do the same thing, but people want different things and fancier things - the garberg is the only full tang out of the bunch, but even their half tang knives are bulletproof, they hold up incredibly well and I've batoned with him countless times without issue. Mora, IMO makes the best knives - I have several other brands, and there are some I like better for ergonomics - but that's not the point, the point is any knife will work, steel is steel. Just find what you think looks and feels good, learn how to sharpen it and what you like, it depends on the what materials/types of trees you are working with, and what type of work you do. I prefer convex and Scandinavian grind (V Grind) knives, the Cudeman MT-5 looks to be a full flat grind - which I mean..AFIAK is mostly used in like chef knives and stuff, it's incredibly sharp but it's not durable, hitting hard objects is gonna cause knicks and it's gonna be brittle. This is all from experience, it's not like im an expert - but to be fair, I'd just keep trying different ones and see how you like it, but I wouldn't go spending crazy money, the $300 knives you see all the fancy bushcrafters use...these are what I call wall knives..They use them in the videos cause they look good but most people would just keep them at home and keep using their beater knives, because we are hard on our equipment and honestly, they work just as wall, all the fancy scalings and what not make them expensive, but they don't make them better.

TL;DR: Steel is steel. Get a cheap knife, in a better grind suited for the work your doing. All depends on what work you do, and what tress you have, soft woods, hard woods ETC.

​

Edit: Definately don't have to go with Mora, I've just always used them and they've done me well.

u/mrvile · 55 pointsr/bicycling

Yup, see: Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit lock, the thing costs $100 and the opening is like 6" x 3.5".

But if you live in NYC, no matter what kind of lock you use, if you leave a nice bike locked up outside overnight, there's a 50% chance it won't be there the next day.

u/lordnikkon · 37 pointsr/sanfrancisco

because Xiaomi just flooded the market with these new scooters and 3 different companies started buying them up and slapping their logo on them. You can buy those scooters on amazon for $500 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC

This scooter only came out at the beginning of the year and it is the first electric scooter to be imported to the US in mass numbers

u/jason22internet · 34 pointsr/backpacking

Those are not designed to purify water.

You want these guys: http://www.amazon.com/Potable-Aqua-Water-Purification-Tablets/dp/B0009I3T3S/

Or these: http://www.amazon.com/McNett-Aquamira-Water-Treatment-Drops/dp/B00CHRFQPI

filter? check out the Sawyer Mini: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

if you're in a pinch, do a little homework with using ordinary bleach ... or prepare to boil

u/CARTERsauce · 33 pointsr/malefashionadvice

Let's try again. Hot day in Fort Lauderdale, getting as much free beer and food as possible at an art event. Whatever.

u/scrubadub · 30 pointsr/Roadcam

An 'airzound' the button / horn mounts on your handlebars and you can pump it back up with a bike pump

u/Burned_it_down · 27 pointsr/bicycling
u/NDoilworker · 26 pointsr/sanfrancisco

I'm a fan. You can buy one yourself for 500$ apparently the company was trying to keep the manufacturer a secret but here it is:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_AIy0AbAF7YV96

u/ETMoose1987 · 25 pointsr/preppers

Get a sawyer mini instead, about the same price and you don't have to bend down and stick your face in the water.

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_1FJXCbNV7FQ2S

u/jnish · 25 pointsr/sanfrancisco

May I recommend getting an airhorn? http://amzn.com/B000ACAMJC

As a motorcyclist that has been hit twice by motorists not paying attention, I feel like I've got some hard earned wisdom on this topic. You really have to let the pride of right-of-way go, get out of their way and let them know of your presence. Right-of-way doesn't matter anymore when you're in the hospital.

u/eclipse75 · 22 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Usually there are always debates about a Seiko and the Citizen Eco Drive watch. You can get a Seiko automatic mechanical watch for under $150 that uses the popular and reliable 7s26 movement. Another popular watch would be one of the Orient Mako dive watches. I already own a Seiko SNK807 watch and just ordered a Seiko Orange Monster online (both of which use the 7s26 movement).

The reason why I chose the Seiko over the Citizen is because I wanted mechanical watch with the sweeping second hand rather than a quartz jumping second hand. But, with the Citizen, it'll never stop (unless you live in a cave or the sun blows up). Automatic watches will stop after about 40 hours of no movement.

Orient Mako is a very popular dive watch. It comes in a wide variety of colors (with black and blue being most popular). http://www.amazon.com/Orient-CEM65001B-Black-Automatic-Watch/dp/B001EWEQ3A/ref=sr_1_22?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1325124897&sr=1-22


Here is the one I own. The SNK80* comes in various ways also. Black, blue, nylon strap, metal bracelet, green, rubber strap, etc
http://www.amazon.com/Seiko-SNK807K2-Automatic-Cloth-Weave/dp/B000HGDWXE/ref=sr_1_32?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1325124945&sr=1-32

The odd looking orange monster I just ordered and can't wait to get it :D Comes in orange or black with a rubber strap or metal bracelet http://www.amazon.com/Seiko-SKX781-Orange-Monster-Automatic/dp/B000EPLR2G/ref=sr_1_1?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1325125001&sr=1-1

Here is a simple filtered search I done on Amazon for mechanical watches: http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_nr_p_36_0?bbn=377110011&qid=1325124882&rh=n%3A377110011%2Cp_n_target_audience_browse-bin%3A379281011%2Cp_36%3A10000-19900%2Cp_n_feature_three_browse-bin%3A2205662011%2Cp_n_feature_browse-bin%3A379300011&rnid=386698011&low-price=50&high-price=199&x=0&y=0#/ref=sr_pg_1?rh=n%3A377110011%2Cp_n_target_audience_browse-bin%3A379281011%2Cp_36%3A5000-19900%2Cp_n_feature_three_browse-bin%3A2205662011%2Cp_n_feature_browse-bin%3A379300011&bbn=377110011&ie=UTF8&qid=1325124945

Here is a filtered search for quartz watches: http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_nr_p_36_0?bbn=377110011&qid=1325124882&rh=n%3A377110011%2Cp_n_target_audience_browse-bin%3A379281011%2Cp_36%3A10000-19900%2Cp_n_feature_three_browse-bin%3A2205662011%2Cp_n_feature_browse-bin%3A379300011&rnid=386698011&low-price=50&high-price=199&x=0&y=0#/ref=sr_nr_p_n_feature_browse-b_2?rh=n%3A377110011%2Cp_n_target_audience_browse-bin%3A379281011%2Cp_36%3A5000-19900%2Cp_n_feature_three_browse-bin%3A2205662011%2Cp_n_feature_browse-bin%3A379305011&bbn=377110011&ie=UTF8&qid=1325125299&rnid=379279011

Quartz is more accurate I believe, though mechanical watches are usually accurate to +/- 5 to 10 seconds a week (or was it day?). If the watch isn't solar powered then you'll need to replace the battery on the watch every so often. Also with the non-stop Invicta watches you see on Amazon, I've heard some people say some bad things. For sure brands though are Citizen, Orient, and Seiko in your price range. I don't know how BI4L they'll be though. Don't solar panels lose their effieciency over time? Also the 7s26 movement uses a few plastic gears. I don't know much about the insides of the Mako. They should all last 30 years easily though with some maintenance (taking for a tune up every 5-10 years).

u/[deleted] · 22 pointsr/mildlyinteresting
u/armypantsnflipflops · 22 pointsr/Frugal_Jerk

Right here, but it's unavailable. Too many people were taking advantage of the savings :(

u/Bolinas99 · 21 pointsr/Seahawks

Was at Green Bay two seasons ago when we were last in the playoffs.

It's likely to get insanely cold there, so don't just layer up get hand warmers, foot warmers (you can buy both at any local Walmart in Minny), wear at least 4-5 layers with several being fleece, including thermal socks, long thermal underwear, and waterproof shoes. It was -30 and we barely survived it in GB; not sure if it'll be as bad in MN for you.

Doubt you'll have any problem beating them btw.

Wish I could buy the tix from you man; how much do you want for them?

u/o0DrWurm0o · 21 pointsr/malefashionadvice

http://i.imgur.com/hNP6Mhe.jpg

Casio Edifice EF503D

You can get them in black as well. They really capture the speedmaster look well at an order of magnitude less cost.

Black

White

u/SilfenPath · 20 pointsr/Atlanta
u/txgsync · 19 pointsr/bicycling

https://amzn.com/B000ACAMJC

I don't care what earbuds/earphones you're wearing, when this goes off ten feet behind you while rollerblading you'll jump right the ($&*#% out of your skin...

u/chrono13 · 18 pointsr/CampingGear

Get the Sawyer mini instead for $19: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

Anyone looking at this should look at the Sawyer as a (better) alternative.

Lifestraw:

  • 264 gallons total filtration per straw.
  • Shelf Life: 5 years when stored at room temperature (package may say 3 years).
  • .2 micron filtration

    Sawyer filter:

  • 100,000 gallons (actually more, but this is the guarantee)
  • Shelf life: no limit on shelf life. Only temperature constraint is it should not be allowed to freeze.
  • .1 micron filtration

    Lifestraw is $20. Sawyer is $20. I own the Sawyer and the flow through it is easy. It comes with a squeeze bag, but also attaches to regular bottles. Fill an empty Pepsi/Coke/Water bottle with nasty water, screw on the Sawyer and you are good to go. It works with Platypus bags, and as an inline or end filter for any hydration bladder.


    If there is something special about the Lifestraw that I am missing, please let me know. I see tons of news, charaties buying them for 3rd world countries, and outdoor enthusiast recommending it. I do not see any advantage it has over a Sawyer filter.

    Edit: One comparison: http://prepforshtf.com/sawyer-mini-water-filter-vs-lifestraw/

    For me, the multiple ways of using the Sawyer have been the biggest benefit. I've used my Squeeze in a bucket gravity system, attached to bottles (ultralight backpacking) and with a straw (like a Lifestraw). I will often squeeze enough water to fill a Gatorade bottle or two before moving away from the water source. Now I have the mini and the flow rate is even better - best of any filter I've ever used, and it is still incredibly versatile.
u/smile-bot · 17 pointsr/frugalmalefashion

Use the link below to donate .5% of your purchase to charity.
Amazon Smile URL: https://smile.amazon.com/Casio-EF503D-1AV-Edifice-Stainless-Steel/dp/B003URWNOG

This bot is still in test phase. Please PM me for suggestions, complaints or questions.

u/psychedelicgulch · 16 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

Packs- Your pack is usually recommended to be one of the last things you pick up. That being said the Osprey Exos is a great pack and one of the staple packs you'll see. Wait until you get all of your gear and then go to REI or another outfitter and see how big of one you think you'll need.

Sleeping Bags- It generally won't get too cold so you can get away with a 30 or 40 degree bag. Right at the start of your trip it may be a little brisk so just have an extra fleece on hand. A lot of people like the Enlightened Equipment Revelation quilts. They're great and lightweight, but expensive and some side sleepers don't like them.

Tents- There's millions of options, Big Agnes, Six Moon Designs, HMD, and tons more I can think of. The Big Agnes Fly Creek UL 2 is popular and lightweight, its going for $265 online right now. If that's too expensive I'd say go for the Six Moon Designs Skyscape Scout for $125.

Trekking Poles- These aren't super important unless your tent requires them. Best ones I've seen for a decent price: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XM0YGW8/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Cooking- You can go the alcohol stove route, I don't like it because you'll end up carrying more weight in alcohol than with a regular stove. The BRS 3000t is probably the lightest and cheapest stove you can find. For pots just a simple titanium pot will work.

Good luck on your hike!

u/rxmxsh · 16 pointsr/bicycling

I went this route from day 1 of my commuter purchase. I love them: http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO

I reduced the tension nearly all the way, and it's super easy to clip in and out. You will fall. Know that right now. You'll forget and you will fall.

The nice thing is having the platform pedal on one side so you can wear street shoes when you so desire.

u/roseflower81 · 15 pointsr/UlcerativeColitis

Many states have passed the Restroom Access Act (Ally's Law) for people with specific medical conditions to have access to bathroom. You can also request for a card here.

In any case, I too have a similar set up, but in my car in case of an emergency in the middle of a drive. It's a bucket but with a toilet seat that you can get on Amazon

u/poidogs · 15 pointsr/preppers

What is your plan for going to the bathroom if there is no running water/toilets/privacy? At the least get a bucket toilet so that you have some place to put it all.

If you plan on doing some clean up, get face masks/respirators and protective eyewear appropriate for that. If you are wearing work gloves, put latex/nitrile gloves under that. There are gloves that are a bit longer than the usual wrist length. Any cut/wound becomes an opportunity for infection. Make sure you have enough first aid supplies to both thoroughly clean and bandage any cut/wound.

Have good "hand awareness" -that is be mindful of not touching your face. All the gloves and ppe in the world won't do any good if you rub your gloved hand over your eyes/nose/mouth and directly administer cooties to yourself. That is another reason for some sort of mask/eyewear -so that you don't rub gunk in places you don't want gunk.

Be careful! Stay safe! I hope your house is ok.
edit: formatting fail

u/edheler · 15 pointsr/preppers

Drop the Life Straw and use a Sawyer Mini.

u/Bobbafettlives1983 · 15 pointsr/preppers

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_MzGzDbKTT58GD

I have an in-line attachment for hydration pack.

There’s a little pump too.

Water Purifier Pump with Replaceable Carbon 0.01 Micron Water Filter, 4 Filter Stages, Portable Outdoor Emergency and Survival Gear - Camping, Hiking, Backpacking https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07NVCBWVV/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_MBGzDbY1W35D3

u/zNNS · 13 pointsr/ElectricForest

There are showers there. I think they cost $10 and they're usually not the warmest.

I don't think I've ever taken a shower at fest (gross I know). What a lot of people do is buy solar showers and use those. Yeah, they're not quite as thorough but they do the trick.

I'm basically married at this point so I have nobody to impress.

u/CruiseBiscuits · 13 pointsr/PKA

MVMT watches are well known for being low quality "fashion" watches. These fashion brands are usually aimed at a younger audience so it makes sense they advertise on podcasts. In my eyes they aren't even worth the ~$100 price point. Sure they'll last a while, but so has my 10 year old Timex I got for 20 bucks, or some dollar store one I got as a kid.

 


If you are actually looking for a quality ~$100 watch, look at Seiko, Citizen or Orient. /r/watches is a very good place to learn, and you might find, like countless other beginners, that the Seiko SNK-809 is for you (my first "good" watch was the SNK-807), which is $50-$70 and a real mechanical automatic ("perpetual" for those of you across the pond) movement. Anything from Seiko 5 range is an incredible starter automatic watch.

 

Do some research if an automatic movement vs quartz movement is right for you (quartz is the basic battery operated watch that the "guts" can be found in watches ranging from $500 Movados to dollar store watches). I REALLY like seeing how things work so I really appreciate the mechanics behind an automatic watch. The downside to them is that they aren't as accurate as quartz (a normal range of inaccuracy is like +-10 seconds a day). But you'll never have to change a battery if that is any consolation. If that puts you off, keep in mind that a $10,000 Rolex has an automatic movement good for +- 5 seconds per day. And as a final PSA, stay away from Invicta. Their automatic movements, cheap pricing, and flashy looks may look enticing, but quality control is horrendous. Just as with any potential purchase, do some research on a watch you think looks promising. Give the model name a search on google or /r/watches and try to find a consensus.

 

For those of you who have been thinking they want a watch but haven't started exploring styles (which is the demographic companies like MVMT pander to with their styles) here is the classic "diver" style watch with the Rolex Submariner. A cheaper automatic dive watch I've been wanting for a LONG time is the Seiko SKX007, which obviously pays homage to the Sub, but is about $5800 cheaper. I'd replace the bracelet with something better than what is there though. Maybe I'll get it after college...

Another well loved cheap diver is from Orient, the Mako, though I prefer its big brother, the Ray, even though that is even closer looking to the Submariner.

The absolute best in budget vs quality in a dive watch is the ~$40 Casio MDV-106. You can get a decent 22 mm steel bracelet for almost the price of the watch and it will look fantastic if that is your preference. I've borrowed my brother's a few times and the thing feels like quality and has been put to the test plenty of times to prove itself as a real dive watch. He goes swimming, hiking, plays sports with it, drops it on concrete, etc. Rugged yet elegant looking. Good size too. Highly recommended first diver or first watch!

If you are looking for a real dress watch with "minimalist design" that doesn't look tacky like MVMT's (sorry, just my opinion), there are plenty in the Seiko 5 line like I said, or the lovely Orient Bambino.

 

Came back to say that if you don't really know if you want a watch, don't think you need to spend $100 on your first. Who knows, you might not like how it feels or looks on you or whatever. For the absolute cheapest of cheap, get yourself a Timex or Casio quartz watch. These brands are well renowned for their reliability. This way you'll end up spending only $15-20 on a watch that will last and work forever (obviously with battery changes along the way).


Edit: Some links

Edit: Also, they are purportedly just rebranded cheap Chinese watches. http://www.aliexpress.com/cheap/cheap-mvmt-watches.html

u/toucher_of_sheepv8 · 13 pointsr/knives

Honestly? You're going to want to just go to a knife forum- this is a good example of one, or BladeForums.com is another- and just immerse yourself in it. Read posts, ask questions, salivate over knives, etc.

Here's a guide on knife grinds and the differences between them. Here's another.

Some good, popular companies for folding knives are Spyderco, Benchmade, Kershaw, and Cold Steel. All of these also make fixed blades, but only Cold Steel has anywhere near as many fixed blade designs available as they have folders.

Some popular companies for fixed blade knives are Ka-Bar, Morakniv, Ontario Knife Company, ESEE knives, BlackJack Knives and Fallkniven.

Any knives by any of those companies will likely be good, solid knives for whatever their intended purpose is- which brings us to another point, the intended purpose of a knife.

Different knives are obviously intended for different things, and a good knife for bushcraft might make an incredibly shitty one for cooking, with the While the Becker BK2 might happily slash apart a log or firewood, it's so fucking thick that it'll take a lot more work to push it through food, for example. Alternatively, while the Benchmade 530 is a great EDC knife that will happily cut food or cardboard all day, if you try its super-thing blade against wood or rope you'll be in for a bad time and might even need a new knife. Basically, there isn't really any knife that's "good" for everything. There are knives that are BAD for everything, but that's a different story entirely.

If you have any questions about anything I said, feel free to ask. Like I said- that's a good way to learn about knives.

u/carloscarloseduardo · 13 pointsr/Watches

That's their sale tactic. They're always on sale, nobody has bought one of those at retail price. You kind of get what you pay for, if not less. Personally wouldn't go for those models, since they are blatant copies of a Rolex Daytona. If you want a good watch at those prices, check Seiko and Casio Edifice. Check this one http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B003URWNOG/ref=pd_aw_sims_5?pi=SY115&simLd=1

u/Teerlys · 12 pointsr/preppers

I wrote this up earlier today for someone who wanted to start getting prepped on ~$75/Month but also wanted to not have to cook the foods. I did include some long term storage as the first step anyway because it's so cheap and easy, but so far as consumables go, this is a good start for you.

--------------------------------------------

A lot of this is a shelf life and storage space issue. If you have plenty of room for storage, I'd start like this:

  • Month 1: This doesn't meet your doesn't-need-to-be-cooked guideline, but it's a really solid start to bulk up on available calories and requires minimal cash and effort, so it's going in anyway. Ignore it if it's not for you.

    Buy two 50lb bags of white rice from a place like Costco or Sam's Club. Find 3 food safe 5 gallon buckets with lids. Get Mylar Bags and O2 Absorbers. Then hit Youtube for instructions on what to do with them. If the Mylar bags bit will hold you back from doing this, then skip them and just clean the buckets then dump rice in them straight. Seal, date, set aside. That's 160,000 calories in month 1. Given normal pantry supplies that stretches things out quite a ways. Plan on rotating out at 7ish years if put straight into the bucket and 20 years if you use the Mylar. Realistically, with Mylar, white rice may be good for much longer than 20 years (most people say 30, but for the minimal investment I'd rotate earlier to be safe).

  • Month 2:

    Grab a Water Bob (not right now though, hurricane season has prices high and stocks low for them). Also, a Sawyer Water Filter or two. That gives you an opportunity to grab an extra hundred gallons of water in your bathtub initially given enough warning, and some water purification options later on.

  • Month 3:

    Assuming you have storage capacity, start looking at #10 cans of food. Those are the cans that are around a foot tall and very wide. Look for things that you would eat and would be usuable in your daily lives, but also ones that would be calorie dense. For example, refried beans, nacho cheese, baked beans, white potatoes, chick peas, chili with beans, etc. Those are things you can use in recipes at home, but can pick them up and store them for a couple of years first. Getting them in the larger can is a better return on investment/dollar than buying smaller ones.

  • Month 4: This is probably more what you were looking for.

    If your pantry isn't topped up with the things your family normally eats, drop that money to get a little deeper on those things. Velveeta cheese, crackers, cans of soup, noodles, peanut butter/jelly, canned vegetables/fruit, pasta/sauce, salsa, dried/canned beans, seasonings, canned meat, canned chili, etc. Date them and make sure to work through the oldest first. Having the normal foods you eat in bulk will likely end up being what gets you through most things (like the current hurricane season, job loss, winter blizzard, etc). Spending on these things can be used to fill out whatever is left of your budget when it gets partially used up on other things. I'd also maybe consider having some flats of bottled water at home as well. I usually keep 4-7 Costco sized ones on hand for my SO and I.

  • Month 5:

    Start looking at longer term bulk water storage. I like 5 gallon stackable water cubes as they're easier to move and use and you buy them as you have a little extra cash here and there, but if you want to bump the budget up a bit for a month and your wife won't look at you like you're crazy, a 55 gallon barrel is a better price per gallon than the individual cubes. Sometimes there's just no replacing having your own clean water source ready to go. Barring all of that, if your family will use them just grab a bunch of flats of bottled water and rotate them. Stacked high they don't take up a ton of floor space.

  • Month 6 and Beyond:

    At this point you're pretty well set initially for both water and food. Keep the pantry stocked and rotating. Add on for long term stored water as you see fit and maybe invest in something like a Big Berkey if you really want to drop some money into it. At that point I'd probably begin considering longer term food storage. More rice, add in some dry beans (roughly 5 year shelf life in Mylar/Buckets), and if you're feeling really into it you can get unground wheat and that will last 30 years or better in Mylar/Buckets. You'll just need to have a hand crank grinder or two to use it.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I get wanting ready to eat foods, and that's pretty easy to do and a great place to start, but as one last recommendation... grab yourself a Propane Burner and a high pressure hose for it so that you can use regular propane tanks. You may be able to eat cold soup out of the can, but it's a lot more comforting when it's warm, and you can pretty easily have the ability to add more of your foods into your diet (like spaghetti or mac and cheese) when you can still have a burner to work with.
u/Limeslice4r64 · 12 pointsr/nottheonion

Here's an Amazon link. Probably mobile sorry fellas.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_wzHADbT7E0XNC

u/Amator · 12 pointsr/preppers

Maybe.

I'd set up somewhere in a National Forest in my general area (NC/SC/TN) with plenty of water sources, some fish and game, and an escape route if wildfires get too close.

I have enough Boy Scouts and armchair bushcraft experience to work with an axe and cordage to put together a decent enough shelter--it probably wouldn't take more than a month--and I'd try to setup a decent camp latrine away from water sources.

In addition to my BOB gear*, I'd spend some of the money on a used wheelbarrow, shovel, axe, splitting wedge, $50 worth of cheap cordage/bungee cords/carabiners/tarps/duct tape from Harbor Freight, $10 worth of BIC lighters (can still be used as firestarters once the fuel is gone to supplement the fire gear in my BOB), a gallon of bleach (santize the latrine, backup water purification), a decent cheap WalMart fishing rod/tackle (plus the license). Let's estimate $200 for all that.

Can I scrounge? I'd get a dozen or so free 5-gallon buckets from food service operations and several Arizona tea jugs out of recycling bins. I'd hit up the bulk Goodwill office to grab extra clothes/blankets/bandanas/towel for $.80/lb. I could probably even score a decent pot/pan and plate/flatware/coffee mug to go with the minimal cooking gear in my BOB, maybe even a grate from an old rusted grill. If you're going to be there a year, it's probably worth the couple of bucks.

I don't know much about trapping, but a handful of connibears and steel wire snares aren't too expensive and I'll be there a while so it might be worthwhile to spend $25 on those and a cheap bottle of musk. While I'm at it, let's get a couple of spring-loaded rat traps while we're at Harbor Freight to nail to trees and try get some tree-rats for dinner. At this point, I'm probably going to have to get a hunting license so let's upgrade to the annual premium fishing + hunting license for $50 as it has more privileges.

Let's add some speed-fishing hooks for $11 as well, assuming they're legal in the area.

Oh, I'd better total up what we have so far - $200 for misc tools, $75 for licenses/trapping stuff, and let's drop $25 on a basic cheap slingbow, $5 for an extra band, and $25 for a few cheap arrows from Walmart. Let's guesstimate we're at $300 at this point on tools and food procurement.

I don't plan on catching a lot of meals this way, but I need something to do with the time and if I can catch one critter a month it'll be great for the fresh food to supplement the beans and rice. Another guy in this thread did a cost analysis for a year's supply of rice/beans/oil for $227.88. Let's add a few iodized salt containers and cheap multivitamins from Dollar Tree and then go hit the salvage grocery store for cheap spices/teas. Say $250 for my food supply.

That leaves around $450 left. At this point, I feel like I have some of the basics covered and can start spending money/effort on a few things to make that year go by easier. I love coffee, but it's an expensive habit on a tight budget. Since I'll have an abundance of time, I'll get my coffee fix by buying green unroasted coffee beans - the cheapest bulk bag of green beans from Sweet Maria's is $5.50/lb but is $87.70 for a 20 lb sack and they have a 15% coupon code so let's estimate $90 shipped for 20 lbs. That gives me just under an ounce a day so it's a splurge but I'm willing to spend $100 to get the beans and a $10 french press from Ikea and I'm pretty sure it won't take me too long to find a couple of river rocks that would work as an impromptu mortar/pestle.

I also like to smoke a pipe maybe once a day which is maybe an ounce a week. I already have a spare pipe and tobacco in my EDC bag so this would go with me, but I'll make do with the cheap drugstore pipe tobacco marketed for RYO cigs at $14/lb shipped. We'll grab 3 of those 1 lb packs for $42 to keep me in my daily smoke.

I have a handcrank radio in my BOB and I could kinda cheat and say I already have that folding solar charger I plan on buying someday, but let's not and I'll cough up the $38 for this one. I'll have my battery bank and flashlight that's in my BOB plus my iPhone in my pocket and my Kindle I keep in my EDC backpack. The plan will be that I'll find a nice sunny spot to permanently mount the charger and I can go plug in the battery bank each day to keep my phone topped off. That way I have a radio for news and I can load a lot of music/audiobooks/ebooks/games to help keep me sane. I'm also going to buy an extra pair of earbuds from DollarTree as well as a few bars of Ivory soap a $9 Solar Shower from Amazon. Gotta stay clean and having a shower is a huge morale boost.

Speaking of books, I'm probably going to hit the library on my way out of town and check out a few survival/homesteading books. I'll have plenty of money to pay the late fines after I win the boatload of money from my uncle.

At this point, I've spent:

$350 on Tools/Food Procurement
$250 for boring basic calories food supply
$100 on coffee (important)
$50 in tobacco (likewise important)
$50 for electronics

So $700 total. Do the rules state I have stay in the woods, or can I walk into town from time to time? If so, I'll keep the rest of the money for a weekly walk into town to spend my $3.85 allowance and visit the library. If I can't, I'm going to probably spend the rest on a cheap used rifle and as many rounds as I can buy. I'll have my 9mm Glock and a few clips of ammo from my BOB, but that's no fun to hunt with. I'd also try to figure out a way to get a cheap guitar from somewhere if possible - I could probably figure out a song or two in a year.

Let's say the above plan is approved, and I'm going to the woods for a year. Hoo-rah! That's a lot of sacks of beans and rice - I'm glad I bought a used wheelbarrow! Once I get to a campsite I like, I'll start divying out enough rice/beans/salt into empty 5-gallon bucks and dig a pit to bury them in--probably two or three to make sure it's not all in one place if I didn't bury it deep enough and a bear smells it. The next order of business would be setting up a semi-permanent lean-to glamping shelter, cooking pit, latrine, a sand filter for pre-filtering water before adding into my Sawyer and storing it away in the Arizona tea containers.

I'd spend my days playing around with the hunting/trapping/fishing gear, reading, playing guitar badly, and writing in my journal. Once a week or so, I'd shower, put on my best shirt, and hike to town for a visit to the library and to buy a beer or some other treat. If could access Wi-Fi it'd be great to set up a blog--I could take pictures and write on my phone and upload to a free WordPress site whenever I'm in town. I'm pretty sure I could get a book deal out of this as well.

u/unreqistered · 12 pointsr/bikecommuting

Perhaps a loud noise maker (air horn) would have sufficed as a next step. Pepper-spray is more of a last-resort deterrent, something that should only be used when one is in peril (but only you can be the judge of that).

A loud, sudden noise will both startle the harasser and attract attention from others to your plight.

u/kolbecheese16670 · 12 pointsr/pics

On my bike, the angle from my handlebars to 2 feet in front of the tire is different from my eyeballs to 2 feet in front of the tire.

Seriously, think about it this way; do you just barely peek over the top of your handlebars when you ride? Unless your seat is all the way down, and you have "ape hanger" handlebars...

Shameless recommendation for excellent bicycle air horn. Loud enough for cars to hear. If you bike commute, give it a look.

u/sea_of_clouds · 12 pointsr/hulaween

I've tried those, but have had...less-than desirable results. Apparently I lack the sort of coordination needed to use one without peeing all over myself. 😆

So I did the next best thing and created my very own Whiz Palace! It's essentially a large bucket with a toilet seat on top; I secure a small trash bag inside and fill with cedar shavings (like you'd put in a small pet cage), to mitigate any noise or smell. The toilet is then placed inside a pop-up shower tent and voila! I also include toilet paper and other accouterments. I change the bag and cedar daily. It's not pretty, but it beats the heck out of stumbling to a porta-potty at 5am.

u/r_syzygy · 12 pointsr/CampingGear

Jetboils boil water better than almost anything. If you're eating freeze-dried mountain house meals or something, you can't really beat it. Otherwise, they're just like any other canister stove.

If you want something simple/light/cheap, you could get something like:

This BRS Stove and

This Ti pot or a bigger one for more people/larger meals

and a canister

u/tkari · 12 pointsr/UCDavis

I recommend getting a U-Lock along with an extension cable. You want to put the U-Lock somewhere through the rear triangle like this.
This locks the rear wheel and the frame. Then you want to loop the extension cable through the U-Lock and put it through your front tire so it is also secure. Kryptonite, Abus, and On Guard are all good lock brands. Something like this lock would work fine, but there are more expensive options if you want to be more secure. I personally use this lock. All locks are about buying time because an angle grinder can cut through any lock in a few minutes. I suggest parking it to something secure, something public, and well-lit. Also, make sure to register your bike through TAPS because if someone steals your bike or puts a lock on it, they won't be able to help you. Good luck!

u/Almostcomatose · 11 pointsr/Ultralight
u/LetsjustbefriendsOK · 11 pointsr/Seattle

Just a heads up for any other city riders - this bike horn has saved my ass several times when traffic suddenly starts to come into the bike lane. It's very loud, so don't use it on pedestrians, but it'll definitely get the attention of motorists.

u/DirteDeeds · 11 pointsr/funny

If your gonna carry a knife make it one that can be used for more than one thing. I keep a Becker Kabar in my glovebox. Its a pound of razor sharp steel that will work as anything you need in a survival situation and lop off any part of someone you swing it at if you have too.

I regularly travel deep outdoors so I keep a Flint steel, lifestraw, crank powered flashlight, Becker Kabar, along with cordage and wire for snares. All in a neat little kit I sling over my shoulder if I get out of my car on a hike or in case I breakdown deep woods.

Ok that was longer than needed but point being if you need a knife buy a damn knife

u/grendel_x86 · 11 pointsr/chibike

I have a Ulock and looped flex-cable. Chains are heavy, and easier to break.

For ulocks, you want to get the smallest one possible that will still let you lock to a pole. That extra space is what lets thiefs get a jack in there to pop it.

My ususal three links I give out to people on theft prevention:

Chicago Bike Blog article

CDOT

Chicago Ambasador's PDF

Also, remember to keep you bike locked someplace safe overnight like in your apartment, or in your buildings storage unit, especially until you have a good feel about how safe your area is at night for your bike.

u/baby_kitty_go_meow · 11 pointsr/UWMadison

Just lock it properly. Sturdy u-lock and a cable. The goal is to make it not worth a thief's time. So a more expensive bike requires more sophisticated deterrents.

Priorities when locking:

  1. U-lock through frame, one wheel, and rack; cable through other wheel
  2. U-lock through frame and rack; cable through wheels
  3. Worst case scenario: cable through frame and wheels; u-lock to rack

    ---

    An example of the lock/cable setup can be found here: amazon

    Personally, I use a slim u-lock like this because it's lighter, but it has the draw back of being more difficult to find the right fit for some racks.

    If you would like to know more on the topic this video is a great resource.
u/ehmuidifici · 10 pointsr/brasilivre

> rapando todos os patinetes estacionados

Em local irregular (de acordo com a lei).

Só que a maneira que eles estão recolhendo é bizarra: frequentemente eles pegam o patinete e arremessam para dentro de uma caçamba de caminhão, de qualquer jeito. Porque o patinete só destrava via aplicativo.

Imagine um veículo como este sendo arremessado como se fosse um saco de areia.

No Twitter tem alguns vídeos mostrando essas remoções. Muito diferente das mostradas nos telejornais, diga-se de passagem.

Com isso, o patinete acaba sofrendo avarias severas, ficando quase que inutilizado.

A empresa responsável pelos patinetes estima uma perda de 400 patinetes. Supondo que eles custaram cerca de R$ 1800 talqueis...

u/LanMarkx · 10 pointsr/bicycling

I consider a bell pretty much 'standard equipment' on my bikes now due to this. For whatever reason the bell seems to be get better results overall verses yelling out.

Perhaps part of it is just instinctual, the bell sound is very specific to bikes so the individual really doesn't have to think about what was just said.

Just don't be the guy using an Air Zound on the multi-use trail...

u/pointblankjustice · 10 pointsr/bugout

There is a lot wrong with this list, so I'm just going to work down it one by one with my thoughts on the matter.

USB flameless lighter? Why? That is going to be unreliable, at best. Throw a few BIC lighters and some stormproof matches in there and be done with it. IF you want to be fancy, get something built to be rugged, that will stand up to use in the field:

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Floating-Lighter/dp/B00C85NBA6/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173178&sr=1-2&keywords=camping+lighter

Speaking of, I didn't see any sort of firestarting material. Warmth is going to be important, and you need as few steps as possible between you and fire. Get some quality firestarters. I am trying to keep all my links relevant from amazon.ca, so some of the brands I'm most familiar with aren't there. But these work well (though there are options from Wetfire and other brands that take up less space):

https://www.amazon.ca/Ultimate-Survival-Technologies-Fire-Stix/dp/B00C6SHODK/ref=sr_1_20?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173338&sr=1-20&keywords=emergency+fire+starter

What is with the mall-ninja "tactical" hatchet? That is a lot of weight and not a lot of utility. You'd be better served with a reliable and lightweight folding saw, and a good full-tang fixed-blade knife. Something like a 7 inch Corona saw:

https://www.amazon.ca/Corona-Cutting-Tools-RS-7041/dp/B00004R9YN/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173467&sr=1-1&keywords=corona+folding+saw

If you insist on carrying a hatchet (and their function in a bugout situation is debatable, especially for the weight) get something quality like an Estwing:

https://www.amazon.ca/Estwing-E24A-14-Inch-Sportmans-Sheath/dp/B00BNQR4SG/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173510&sr=1-1&keywords=estwing+hatchet

Nothing wrong with duct tape, but you'd do well to wrap just maybe 3-4 meters of it around a small core (like from doggy waste bags, or even just around itself).

The self-crank radio/flashlight/phone charger is shit. You also don't need four lights, especially if all of them are crap. Buy one good flashlight, and maybe one good headlamp.

A flashlight like a Nitecore P12 or something that runs on an 18650 and offers long runtime would be ideal. If you buy a diffuser cap for it, you can replace the lantern. Pick up some spare, high quality 18650 cells, as well. The P12 has SOS and beacon modes, which will run for days at a time, in addition to a nice throw and excellent brightness on Medium and High.

https://www.amazon.ca/Nitecore-Flashlight-Lumens-Meters-Distance/dp/B00PQE1D2E/ref=sr_1_2?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173859&sr=1-2&keywords=nitecore+P12

As for headlamps, those don't need to be super bright. You want something with enough brightness and floodiness to work around camp. But ideally you also want a red-light or low-light mode for night time, when you don't need to destroy your night vision just because you need to take a piss or something.

https://www.amazon.ca/TACTIKKA-CONSTANT-LIGHTING-HEADLAMP-DESERT/dp/B00GCGIGHK/ref=sr_1_14?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482173989&sr=1-14&keywords=petzl+headlamp

The powerbank thing in the crank radio is crap, only 1000mah. Not enough to charge most modern smart phones even 25%. Figure that of that 1000mah, ~25% will be lost just due to inefficiency in the charging process. Get a 10,000mah or bigger high quality battery, with 2.1A ports, and be done with it:

https://www.amazon.ca/Anker-PowerCore-Portable-Ultra-Compact-High-speed-Charging-Technology/dp/B0194WDVHI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482173708&sr=8-1&keywords=anker+usb+power+bank

Combine the money you'd spend on the shitty folding knife and the shitty Gerber multitool, and buy a proper multi-tool. You don't need two folding knives.

The Leatherman Wingman is a good value, though I prefer a nicer quality one like the Charge TTi, but at four times the price it may not be worth it just for an S30V blade.

https://www.amazon.ca/Leatherman-2996-831426-Wingman-Multi-Tool/dp/B005DI0XM4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482174264&sr=8-1&keywords=leatherman+wave

Ditch the camp toilet paper, that stuff is like wiping your ass with cardboard. Get some biodegradable camp wipes from an outdoor store. You can now use these to clean your ass, and they also are useful for wiping your hands, or taking whore baths.

Same with the camp soap. Are you bugging out or camping for a week? Nothing you are going to do in a bugout situation is going to necessitate body soap. Toothbrush, floss, deodorant.

Ditch the giant first aid kit full of crap you don't need. Those things are heavy and 80 of the 85 pieces are just different sized bitch stickers. Build your own first aid kit tailored around the likely injuries you would face: sprains, cuts, burns. Maybe throw some Quik Clot Z-pack gauze or a tourniquet (CAT or similar) in there for larger trauma, if that is a concern to you. Limit the bitch stickers to 5-10. All gauze, tape, trauma pads, alcohol wipes, tincture of iodine, moleskin for blisters, tweezers, surgical shears, gloves, maybe burn cream. Small containers of medications you might need: aspirin, antihistamines like Diphenhydramine, anti-diarrheals, etc.

That survival paracord bracelet thing is garbage. You already have 100ft of paracord in your list (which you could probably cut down to 50ft). You don't need some shitty firestarter, whistle, and compass thing. Buy a real lensatic sighting compass. Not going to do you much good without a map and the ability to understand it, anyway.

https://www.amazon.ca/UST-Survival-Essentials-Lensatic-Compass/dp/B005X1YI3Q/ref=sr_1_5?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174799&sr=1-5&keywords=compass

You have both a cookset AND a mug/pot. This is extra redundant and not needed in a bugout situation. Stick to food you don't have to prepare. Caloric density is your friend. Jerky, EPIC bars, Clif bars, etc.

If you need to boil water, use a single-wall metal canteen (NOT a thermos). Remove the plastic lid, fill with water, set in your fire. Widemouth canteens like those by Klean Kanteen are multi-purpose (multipurpose is your friend). You can sterilize water, you can cook and eat food out of it (because of the large opening), and you can fill with hot water, wrap in a sock, and warm your sleep system.

https://www.amazon.ca/Klean-Kanteen-Stainless-Bottle-27-Ounce/dp/B0027W6WHE/ref=sr_1_sc_4?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482174908&sr=1-4-spell&keywords=klean+kanteen+widemouth

You don't need a can opener if you have a good multitool.

Lifestraws suck ass. They only work as a straw, and I am going to guess you don't want to get your water by drinking out of puddles exclusively. Get a Sawyer Squeeze mini filter. This can be used in-line with a hydration bladder, can be used like a Lifestraw, or can be used to filter an fill your water storage containers/bladder:

https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175065&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

One seriously lacking area for you is your sleep system. A tarp and a space blanket are not going to keep you functionally warm. You might survive a night, but you won't be useful the next day.

At the BARE minimum, you should get a good, reflective, breathable bivvy sack, like this one from SOL, AND a sleeping pad. A bivvy will reflect heat back onto you, helping with heat lost through convection, but no sleeping bag will help with heat lost through conduction (you touching the cold ground). That is why a sleeping pad is mandatory. I have used the Escape bivvy and the Klymit pad linked here together, and both kept me comfortably warm to about 50 degrees F. Below that, I've had to augment with base layers or jackets, and that still sucked. If you are hoping to sleep in below freezing temperatures, you'll need a properly sorted ultralight sleeping bag.

https://www.amazon.ca/Adventure-Medical-Kits-Escape-Bivvy/dp/B00EVGD0FQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175280&sr=1-1&keywords=SOL+escape

https://www.amazon.ca/Klymit-06SVGR01C-Camping-Mattress-Green-Grey/dp/B007RFG0NM/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1482175199&sr=1-1&keywords=sleep+pad

Other recommendations of mine would be to take survival, medical and foraging guides and put them on a smartphone, along with a GPS mapping software and pre-downloaded offline topographical maps at 1:24k resolution of your main bugout areas and 1:100k resolution elsewhere. Something like Gaia GPS for iOS or Backcountry Navigator Pro for Android:

u/Spongi · 10 pointsr/AskReddit

Unless he's got some kind of weird complex about girls and poop just forget about it.

If you need to go to the bathroom, then just go. Don't worry about it. Spray a little air freshener if it makes you feel better.

Reminds me of the time I was at my grandmother's and took a massive shit then sprayed some pine-sol scented air freshener. My grandmother walks in a few minutes later and starts sniffing the air then say's "Smells like someone shit on a pine tree."

If it makes you feel any better. I don't even have a bathroom. I just have this and a bag of pine shavings.

I even had a lady friend come stay for a bit. Whenever she needed to use the bathroom I just left for a few minutes while she did her business.

u/jaweeks · 10 pointsr/news

Not even with this?

u/Projectile_Setback · 10 pointsr/philadelphia

The Evolution mini U from Krypto just aren't that strong. I've seen people leverage them off, once with a hockey stick and once with a piece of rebar. They're really meant as a delaying action for messengers that aren't leaving their bike unsupervised for 8+ hours.

The one I specified is a big, burly bastard of a lock. Som'bitch weighs like 5 pounds. 18mm diameter hasp, forget leveraging it off, pain in the ass to cut through with a torch or grinder and too big to get bolt cutters on. Hasp is too small to get a scissor jack into. Simply too thick to leverage. Double-roll tumbler lock with negative pinning so you can't bump it. Boron Steel that's doped with cutting-wheel fouling polymers. Independent locking bars on the hasps so you need to make two cuts to get it through.

It can be cut, but you're going to need a acetylene rig or a lot of time with a serious battery powered angle grinder to get through it. If anything, it's just a big, TPB style "Fuck Off" to people looking opportunistically. Nothing is going to save you from a complex attack if you're one of those idiots that locks up your $4,500 carbon frame outside overnight.

If you're locking someplace as visible as the MF Station for extended periods of time with a bike that has a value over $1,500, I recommend both the Chain and ULock versions of this line at the same time, as that necessitates two sets of tools for each job. Run that U through the rear triangle and wheel, the chain through the front wheel and main portion of the frame.

u/mship · 10 pointsr/bicycling

Im going to agree with everyone else. Get a U-lock. I When I first got my Trek 7.3 in 2008 I the bike cost me $600, I got a lock that cost me $95 because I was using it as a commuter and I was in New York. I am of the mind that the cost of your locks should be able 10% of the cost of you bike. This works out well because the locks will last just about forever. The look that I bought 6 years ago is still in use, it was a heavy duty chain lock and I leave it locked in the gargae at my job so I dont have to carry it with me everyday.
I recently bought a new bike and I got the New York fahgettaboudit it lock, it a small ulock that isnt heavy but provides good locking.

I dont know where you live, but your bike looks new enough, especially being chainless, to catch some eyes and not just people who will give you complaints.
http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-997986-Black-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock/dp/B000OZ9VLU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1367721175&sr=8-1&keywords=new+york+fahgettaboudit+mini

u/taonzen · 10 pointsr/bicycling

If you want an inexpensive alternative, you could try putting some different bar ends on your handlebars to give you some different riding positions.

Here's some that mimic the drop-bar style, and would probably give you a good idea if that style would be right for you.

u/thegreatoutdoors44 · 10 pointsr/prepping

The Sawyer Mini is an great all around filter that can be purchased for $20. tablets aren't a bad idea either. Do not waste your money on a lifestraw though. the sawyers are good for like 10-100x the lifespan(in gallons of course)

u/fratdaddyZC · 10 pointsr/nashville

You can get the Chinese Spyware version on amazon for cheaper. I've considered doing the same thing, but I worry about all of the dumbasses who will vandalize it either accidentally or intentionally

u/minusfive · 9 pointsr/Ultralight

At that point you're probably paying the same or only saving a couple of bucks from a direct Amazon order, so probably not worth it.

https://smile.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Carbon-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

u/lavransson · 9 pointsr/bikecommuting

Awesome, congrats!

As a bike commuter of almost five years, I'll let you in on a little secret: sometimes my fellow bikers are worse that the drivers.

Case in point, I bought this cool airhorn ([Delta Cycle Airzound Bike Horn](https://www.amazon.com/Delta-Cycle-Airzound-Bike-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC "Amazon.com : Delta Cycle Delta Airzound Bike Horn")) to attach to my bike. I remember being a little eager to use it, like a kid wanting to try out a toy. It took me a few weeks before I actually had an opportunity. Sadly, and ironically, I had to blow the horn on a cyclist who darted across a crosswalk when he had a red and I had a green. I actually had to dodge out of his way. What a jerk. I remember laughing/crying about how I got this air horn to defend myself from motor vehicles, yet the first time I used it was for a cyclist :-(

u/silentbuttmedley · 9 pointsr/bikecommuting

I can't stress enough how useful the Airzound has been for these types of sotuations. People move when you sound like a boat.

http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound-Bike-Horn-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC

u/maximusthered · 9 pointsr/washingtondc

99% sure they’re the same model, which was also available on Amazon for $500 a while back before they sold out

Edit: looks like they’re back on Amazon for $600 now:

Xiaomi Mi Electric Scooter, 18.6 Miles Long-range Battery, Up to 15.5 MPH, Easy Fold-n-Carry Design, Ultra-Lightweight Adult Electric Scooter (US Version with Warranty) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_LroYBb3A01TBS

u/wrongwayseppuku · 9 pointsr/Watches

unpopular opinion to follow:

Personally, I don't understand the G shock for every day wear. For going to the gym or sporting activities, sure - but i'd prefer something less...gaudy? for edw.

For a proper adults watch and a really reasonable price point look to Orient, specifically the bambino or mako to get you started.

I've seen men at nicer events wearing g-shocks and it always strikes me as what happens when you tell a child to 'wear whatever you want', you shouldn't be too surprised when they come out of their room wearing a spider man costume.

/2cents.

If you're into a 'chunkier' design, I would reccomend the Suunto Core It's a bit higher than your price range but it's got a more streamlined look, I have one and it's tremendously useful if you're active / outdoorsy.

u/LinkWithCoffee · 9 pointsr/ufl

I purchased my electric scooter (first paycheck) at the start of Summer 2018, and before that, was that guy on a kick scooter. The climate for electric scooters on campus went from what I could tell was me and another dude I saw once every month, to now seeing at least 3 every day.

I fear that what was once mild amusement to people now will become hatred when millions are everywhere and half the people scooting around purchased one have no idea what common courtesy is and attempt scootihicular pedestrianslaughter on the sidewalks, souring public opinion. Worrying premonitions aside, I can not say enough about how much I love my scooter to get around. It's the perfect combination of vehicle, where you don't have to worry about storing it like a bike, or if you never gained the magical skills to not die on a longboard/skateboard, a pretty easy to use ride. I use mine everyday and it does a good job. If you can use a longboard/skateboard those are very good options for pretty cheap human propelled transportation that are very popular, although I'll always have a soft spot for the A5 Lux Kick Scooter I used to roll around with. Brakes are neat, yo!

As for which scooter to get, I'm not up with the scooter times, but I use the Segway ES1 I purchased at Sam's Club for $350. Judging by the fact I've never actually seen another one of those out on campus (If you see a dude on one of these, probably wearing flip-flops, feel free to wave hello, say hi, and not hate me, I try to be as courteous as possible to other pedestrians/cyclists!), gonna go out on a limb and say they are no longer for sale at Sam's Club. However what I have seen on campus are the Xiaomi Mi or maybe this go trax thing. Can't speak for those at all, but they sure are popular.

The electric scooter market is pretty cheap, with the prices being low, but with the quality being low as well. There was literally like two options when I got mine, with the one I did get being sold off on clearance, but now with the explosion in this segment, the skies the limit, maybe.

Overall, the utility of an electric scooter is a great value for what they cost, and I'd happily answer any questions you've got. Also, yes I am a bit of a electric scooter nut/loser, if this thesis of a post is anything to go by.

u/JoeIsHereBSU · 8 pointsr/preppers

Although I think 6+ months is unlikely, but here is what I would do.

  • Cook
    • Over the fire
    • Make a fire over
    • Buy one for the house beforehand, currently in the worlds smallest house but want to build in the next couple years
  • Shower
    • Camp Shower
    • You can also make something like the camp shower using a 2L bottle or 2.
    • Good old boil water and add it to a tub
  • Wash Cloths
  • go to the toilet
    • This is a whole subject on its own. Hard to say just dig a hole because where does that hole go? How do you get your water? Will disposing of waste contaminate your water? Will it contaminate your neighbors? Making a septic tank is hard, but you might have to do it by hand.
u/SgtBaxter · 8 pointsr/cycling
u/adamscottama · 8 pointsr/Watches

Assuming you want a mechanical watch, here are my suggestions.

Desk Diver (a dive watch that looks a little more fashionable than utilitarian):

  • Orient Blue Ray

  • Orient Mako

    Utilitarian Divers:

  • Seiko Black Monster or Orange Monster

  • Seiko SKX007

  • Citizen Promaster

    These watches will have a lot of the same basic features: water resistant to 200m, screw down crown, time lapse bezel, mineral crystal etc. The Seiko's will arguably have the best lume and they also use their "Hardlex Mineral Cyrstal" which may have an advantage over the crystals of the Orients or Citizen. All of these use workhorse movements. The Citizen uses a Miyota movement that can also be hand wound.
u/cyclefreaksix · 8 pointsr/knives

http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK2-Campanion-Fixed/dp/B001N1DPDE/ref=pd_sbs_sg_37

The BK2 is a better all purpose knife. It can baton wood or aide in meal prep. Also has a kydex sheath which won't hold moisture like a leather sheath will.

u/Rehd · 8 pointsr/bicycling

Enjoy the FX! I'm rocking the 7.5 and I am completely in love with cycling. Here's a few words of advice:

Ditch that cable lock. I can walk up to a bike with a cable with a five dollar tool and have it for myself in 10-20 seconds. Get a U-Lock and rope. The correct answer for how many locks or what kind of locks to use is how many you are willing to carry. This will depend on your location as well. U-Locks + ropes typically require an individual to have a hacksaw, grinder, etc. I live in a smaller college town and mostly just have to worry about drunk assholes so that works perfect. In other areas more heavy duty and smaller U-Locks are more necessary. This will probably work fine and is cheap unless you're in Detroit or something.

Fenders. I feel like that should be your next investment unless you bike a lot at night. I bike a ton at night and decided to invest in great lights after almost being hit by both cars and bikes several times. The first time you have somewhere to be and go through a puddle, the fenders pay for themselves. These are what I rock and I go through puddles / lakes which I probably shouldn't. I stay nice and dry while my friends breeze through them and get completely soaked.

Racks and bungies are great for the FX series. Like others mentioned, this is just a fun bike. I use it for recreation, commuting, bar hopping, exercise, you name it! A rack and a bungie net makes it awesome and Ortlieb panniers are an even better addition.

Besides fenders however... the seat and pedals (maybe) are the next things I'd recommend to look at. The pedals look metal in that picture, but if there's plastic, toss them. Well, I guess you can use them. It depends on the rider, but there's a pretty good track record of the FX series stock pedals only lasting roughly 500 miles before they completely break. Obviously this will vary by user. These are my favorite commuter pedals because I can go clipless later or I can commute at the same time without switching out. These are cheaper and better for commuting just because of the pricing.

As for the seat, your ass will never get more comfy than sitting on a brooks.

Enjoy the FX, it's a wonderful machine and I cherish mine. I was biking to work for the first time in a month (been on vacation) and I forgot I had to go to work. I accidentally biked a few extra miles down the bike path before I remembered I was commuting and not going for an enjoyable bike ride. Careful, it becomes an addiction.

And here's a shameless plug for my pride and joy. It still had the old pedals, saddle, fenders and needs an updated snapshot.

u/fullhornet · 8 pointsr/bikewrench

zero complaints with this one, and collapses pretty small

https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Mechanic-Bicycle-Repair-Stand/dp/B00D9B7OKQ

u/0x18 · 7 pointsr/CampingGear

Snowboard clothing is overkill unless you plan on staying through a winter storm. Just remember: cotton kills and wool is your friend. If nothing else get yourself a pack of wool socks and some wool underwear and then wear your normal clothes over those. The coldest I've seen Yosemite get to (in the last ~7 years of visiting every winter) was about 30F in the day and ~0-10F at night (really easy to manage). A good wool hat also helps for staying warm at night.

I'm jealous; I just moved from SLO to Oregon and won't be able to do my normal yearly winter Yosemite trip :( I'll miss wandering around in a kilt and tshirt when it's 30F and making everybody think I'm insane, but I can give some misc advice on Yosemite winter camping:

  • Bring snow chains appropriate for your car. Even if the road is clear up into the park it's not guaranteed to be de-iced the entire stretch into the valley, and for most of winter the park rangers will deny you entry if you say you don't have chains even if the road is clear. There's stores not far out of the park that sell them but they're far more expensive than your local car parts store.
  • Use the bear boxes for all food, deodorant, hair spray, tooth paste, and anything with a scent you could imagine a pet animal trying to consume against all logic because the bears, coyotes, and racoons will try and are much larger and smarter (and I have watched them all try).
  • Last time I was there sleeping in your vehicle was verboten. I'm not sure on the exact reason why, but I think it's because bears are known to break into (and ruin in the process) cars while looking for food. You're safer outside the car than in it.
  • Good sleeping bags are great but don't forget to put an insulating layer between yourself and the ground. Air mattresses are okay but suck for temperature control; one of those thin roll-out insulating pads are seemingly worthless but great for staying warm through the night.
  • For $25 you can get 40 chemical handwarmers -- activate two or three (or four if you're cold) at night and toss them into the bottom of your sleeping bag to stay warm at night. Wear a shirt with chest pockets and put another two there, then get a wool beanie and slip another one between it and your head (if there's a blizzard...)
  • Don't go to bed wearing wet (including sweat) clothes! It will cool through the night and wisk away your body heat. Before going to bed change into a fresh suit of dry clothing.
u/OriginalSyn · 7 pointsr/Calgary

Just be aware when you're shopping, if you ask a Canadian for recommendations you're going to get stuff that is much lighter than you will probably want to get. Up to -10C many of us consider this light winter wear weather, but you will probably be wanting full on baselayer, gloves, boots and heavy jacket.

Calgary winters are fairly mild (averaging lows of -10 to -15C), but they come with wild swings due to our proximity to the mountains, you might go to work and it's -20C and when you leave its +10C so be prepared with layers as other have mentioned.

In the middle of Jan/Feb it's going to get real cold, often reaching -30C to -40C for a few days and a couple weeks below -20C. Be prepared for these days, if you have a vehicle make sure to plug it in (all vehicles sold in Canada have a block heater installed) if you take transit make sure to get some hand and feet warmers (like this). Wind chill is no joke it's not usually is listed as a "feels like" when looking at forecasts, if you're outside a lot pay attention to that number.

Also if you have a vehicle and street park at home or work make sure pay attention if you're in a snow route, they will ticket you if you're parked there during/after heavy snow fall.

u/cathredal · 7 pointsr/Tucson

I do long runs up there and camp nearly every weekend... I just bring a solar shower and put it on my dashboard or hood of my car, hose off afterwards... It's one of these, you can get them at Miller Surplus for 10 bucks or something: http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20

Edit: forgot to mention, there's also an ice cold spring just down the way from the Mt. Lemmon fire lookout. Take the Mt. Lemmon trail west from summit, stay R/straight at fork for Lookout trail, you'll see a metal building on your right, pipe sticking out of the hillside offtrail to the left -- flows hard year around. Maybe .2 miles total from parking area.

u/CitizenBacon · 7 pointsr/FireflyFestival

Elevated camping is just a hilarious concept to me. As if one person in a planning committee was like "I want to do everything identical to regular camping, but sleep 2 feet higher", and since they were a generally nice person, everyone else politely nodded their head.

Like I'm legitimately confused as to its merits over an air mattress in a regular tent. Feel like it just dramatically increases the probability of accidentally falling onto the ground during a groggy morning or drunk night.

That being said, I'm confident that whatever camping option you have, you're going to have a BLAST! Firefly is an awesome experience- great people, great music, and great vibes all around. In addition to what other people have suggested, I'd highly recommend a reusable water bottle to bring into the festival, as well as a handkerchief in case it's dry and dusty. Also a cheap camp shower works wonders if you don't want to wait on line for a shower!

u/broserotops · 7 pointsr/ElectricScooters

I noticed that too on Amazon. I checked the price history using camelcamelcamel and you can see that they periodically jack the price way up for a short amount of time and then slam it back down. I've noticed some price creep like this before on amz but nothing with such huge changes.

I think if you wait a short while it'll go back down.

u/JB1549 · 7 pointsr/ThingsIWishIKnew

Biking in the rain isn't very fun. It's not too bad, but your tires can slip on some surfaces (usually metal). I had to cross some railroad tracks on my route and the tires could easily slip on the metal surfaces.

Also, in the winter, you'll want to wear gloves, otherwise your hands will get pretty cold from the cold air.

Develop a system to make sure you packed your clothes. I've left a few times for work without packing a shirt.

You may want to invest in a bike horn. I have one like this. It helps to alert cars to your presence, but will probably scare pedestrians, so be careful.

Also, you'll probably want to wear sunglasses, otherwise debris can get into your eyes.

I'd invest in a decent quality road bike. Mine was a $1000 Trek, but that's maybe a slight step above entry level. A good quality bike will cost you over $500. Road bikes are so nice. I was able to consistently go around 20 MPH. with bursts up to 25-30. I actually used to take a lane in rush hour traffic when I lived in my downtown area. I could keep up with the stop and go traffic and it was a great workout.

Wear a helmet!

Get lights, especially for winter when it gets dark earlier.

Visibility is key when riding near traffic, get reflective tape for your bike and reflective ankle bands so cars can see you.

Bike defensively. Worse accident I got in was when I was going by an alley and a car came out of the alley and didn't see me. Luckily I saw them so was able to avoid too much damage.

Either learn to do the maintenance yourself or take your bike into a shop to get maintenance every year or so.

Anyway, good luck! I enjoyed biking into work. I need to get back into it, but it takes good self discipline to wake up early enough to bike into work. I was lucky enough to have a locker room and showers at my workplace, and a bike locker. I really have no excuses other than the fact that driving is so much easier.

u/MeatPiston · 7 pointsr/bicycling

These are an effective jogger alert system, even for ones that are using headphones.

http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound-Bike-Horn-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC

u/atetuna · 7 pointsr/Survival

$19.99 with shipping on Woot for 1,000 liters of filtering capacity or $19.06 with shipping on Amazon, which is strange because Woot is owned by Amazon.

Or you can get a Sawyer Mini for $19.97 with shipping for 100,000 gallons (378,541 liters) of filtering capacity, while filtering at 0.1 microns instead of 0.2 microns for the Lifestraw. It comes with a straw so you can use it the same way as the Lifestraw, plus has the greater flexibility of being able to be used with a hydration bladder or set up as a gravity filter systems, and also comes with a small water pouch.

u/minuteman_d · 7 pointsr/Lightbulb

https://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO

Get one of these and a "privacy poncho" and the entire road system is your outhouse.

u/FeedMeCletus · 7 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I find the flick locks to be easier to use.

I bought these a while ago, and really like them for the price. Andrew Skurka recommends them as his value pick, if that matters to you

u/sigismond0 · 7 pointsr/bicycling

http://www.amazon.com/Origin-Bicycle-Drop-Ends-Black/dp/B0013G6PB8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1370531491&sr=8-1&keywords=drop+bar+ends

I used these while I was trying to put drops on flats. I eventually just ended up putting actual drop bars on, but these work rather well and are very comfortable.

u/llort_tsoper · 7 pointsr/bicycling

I agree with all of that.

I would just add that bar ends are an economical option for adding more hand placement options to an MTB, without having to swap handlebars/shifters/brake levers.

Most people would opt for a standard bar ends to give you that on-the-hoods/bullhorn hand position. Add a cheap set of foam grips, and install these angled up so that your wrist is straight when riding.

If you want the feel of riding down in the drops, then there are also drop bar ends available. These will require grip tape, and should be installed flat or angled very slightly up.

u/whatthefuckguys · 7 pointsr/guns

You were looking for this one.

Also see the $87,639.09 Zenith and this hideous $85,750.00 monstrosity that I would totally buy a knock-off of.

Also, today my coworker showed me his watch collection, which includes a whole bunch of high-end Seikos, his grandfather's real Omega, and his two fake Omegas.

I asked him about the fakes and he was very open about them: "I want something that I can wear to the bar, but that reminds me of what I'm saving up for."

u/trifonpapahronis · 7 pointsr/camping

I have also heard great things about the $18 stove on Amazon from BRS

u/JoshPastnerIsMyDad · 7 pointsr/Atlanta

I think scooter skill and etiquette will improve with time. You still have a lot of people riding them for the first time to try them out.

Side note, does anyone have one of these and know how to lock them to bike racks? I'm passively interested in one but the inability to lock them seems devastating.

u/anthonyooiszewen · 7 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

To quote one of my recent comments about silencing stabilizers:

---
---

I've spent tons of time researching and modding stabilizers and here's the method I use to make them as silent as possible:

---

Let's Build: KBD75 + Zealios 65g (YouTube)
[stabilizer modding starts at 12:11]

---

What you'll need:

  • Genuine Cherry stabilizers
    • This is the most important component of a silent build. Don't waste your time with the cheap Chinese replicas.
    • Zeal stabilizers are fairly quiet out of the box but not everyone wants to spend that kind of money

  • Finish Line Extreme Fluoro 100% DuPont Teflon Grease

    • Use this for plastic-on-plastic contact areas (i.e.: stabilizer housing inner walls)

  • Permatex Dielectric Tune-Up Grease
    • Use this for metal-on-platic contact areas (i.e.: stabilizer wire tips and long side of bends)
    • Some use this for plastic-on-plastic but I hate how it gums and slows everything down; I use this grease mainly to fill up any gaps between the wire and plastic parts of the stabilizer - the primary source of stabilizer rattle.

  • Fabric/cloth bandages
    • This serves two purposes:
      • Fills the gap between the stabilizer housing and the PCB to minimize wobble and thus, rattle (not a problem with screw-in stabs)
      • Cushions the bottoming out of stabilizer inserts. The inserts extend beyond the stabilizer housings when pushed all the way down and strike the surface of the PCB, leading to a loud "clack" and additional vibrations/movement that might cause the metal bits to rattle.

    • We use fabric instead of the water-resistant stuff (or tape) so that it absorbs and holds the dielectric grease.

      ---
      ---

      This is what they should sound like:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMIC1ZQ8Grw
u/CJOttawa · 7 pointsr/Ultralight

Or don't?

https://www.reddit.com/r/Ultralight/comments/58nlkz/what_gear_or_technique_did_you_buy_or_try_only_to/d91tmmf/

TL;DR: with a BRS-3000T, 25-gram, canister-top stove and a light-weight pot for boiling water, alcohol doesn't save you much weight on short trips, and on longer, un-resupplied trips, LPG wins.

See also: https://www.reddit.com/r/Ultralight/comments/5akas5/nifty_but_possibly_dangerous_refill_transfer_fuel/

EDIT - never have to check for "fire bans" with LPG either - the stoves have a shut-off valve and are typically exempt.

u/A1000Birds · 7 pointsr/bikewrench

Not sure what your budget is exactly, but I went with this:

Bikehand Pro Mechanic Bicycle/Bike Repair Rack Stand
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_tDCNAbDC2DC6Z

It’s been solid, I’ve had it for over a year and have worked on all our bikes on the rack. It’s light but doesn’t feel flimsy. In the future I’d love to own something more heavy duty like a park tools one, but for now this is a gem.

Note: I’m not in any way affiliated with Bikehand, just a customer who would def vouch for the repair stand!

u/InvalidUserAccount · 7 pointsr/preppers

Why would you not just buy the Sawyer Mini for $18.97 on Amazon?

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_qhWfub0018FS9

u/resamay · 7 pointsr/shutupandtakemymoney

What do you think of the http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1406720934&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini It has a 0.1 Micron Filter. I believe that still won't remove Viruses in water though. And do you know what are the chances of North American Streams, or Lakes etc containing viruses in the water?

u/GIS-Rockstar · 6 pointsr/duluth

Duluth is an absolute mecca for outdoor winter sports. Gear up properly and you'll love your life in the 8 months of the Northland's winter!

If you're getting outside a lot in Eau Claire, you'll do fine in Duluth. If you plan on spending significantly more time outdoors in Duluth, then that's another story. Depending on where you live in town, you'll have different levels of need for snow tires; either way I'd strongly recommend them. PM me - I'm selling a set of snow tires in great condition over on the Online Rummage Sale for Duluth/Superior facebook group.

  • Thermal regulation is the name of the game. Not enough protection and you're cold. Once you're cold, you're done. Too many layers and you start to sweat. If you can't wick the sweat away or stop overheating, you're done

  • Cotton kills. You need 100% wool/poly/synthetic layers. Cotton absorbs moisture from your sweat, then freezes or just becomes a frigid sopping sponge against your skin

  • Layer selection is important. Something like a North Face Thermoball is great as a mid-layer under a parka for those insanely cold days. I have a SmartWool Marino wool base layer that was expensive but it was essential for keeping me warm and dry. Otherwise, synthetic long sleeve Under Armor kinds of shirts are perfect base layers.

  • Jeans are great at breaking wind and worked pretty well for me as a mid-layer. I usually just used synthetic long-johns to take care of wicking water from my skin. Roll both legs of the jeans up your shin to make room for boots and to keep the bottoms away from the snow or they will just get sopping wet. It's added warmth for your shins too. I'd finish off with a pair of snow pants that can go on and off easily

  • I used solid boots that were comfortable and insulated, with 1-2 pairs of various smartwool/puffy wool socks. Don't over-do it with socks. If your boot is too tight, it'll cut circulation to your toes and then you'll be cold. That's a delicate balance between "it's literally too damn cold out" and "I don't have circulation and I feel like it's too damn cold out."

  • A solid parka that goes below your butt is ideal. I got my North Face parka for around $300 and it was an excellent investment

  • Consider a shell that can break the wind. If you're hiking in Lester/Chester/Munger/etc. it won't be too windy; and if you're geared up properly those super cold temps are really a cake walk

  • Ice chains were important for my wife and myself. ICEtrekkers' Diamond Grip were my favorite. They really bite into glare ice where as coiled wire like basic Yak Trax were more slippery

  • I have a stack of the cheapest bandannas I could find in every color and pattern available. They're usually on sale for a buck each. The problem is that they're cotton, so my breath would condense on them quickly and they would freeze solid within 10-15 minutes, but the point is to keep the wind off of your mouth and cheeks. Even when frozen, they worked very well, and at 32° it was easily 30-50° warmer than the ambient air temps! I usually had 2-3 on me at all times for face protection and to wipe my nose/forehead (in case I started sweating) and I was very happy with them considering how cheap they were. Wash them once or twice before you use them to soften them up. I'd be interested in seeing other options for face covering.

  • Nothing beats a nice long wool knit scarf. Wrap it straight around your face and lay the tails flat against your chest or back for another insulating layer, or tie it in various ways for style and function around town

  • Sunglasses are a must to keep sleet and ice out of my eyes. Consider a set of very lightly tinted shades for evening/dark walking. There was nothing worse than hiking at night when it was sleeting. I've been told snowboarding goggles were lame, but ya know, Lake Superior is fierce before it freezes over. Ha. I would snowbaord all the time with amber tinted wrap-around shades that were snug to my head, and I'd hike with light Wayfarer-style frames

  • Finally, gloves are a real mystery to me. I'm not down with leather/animal skin, but it may be the only option to cut wind, and insulate the most efficiently. I usually used a thin woven wool base layer to wick sweat, a medium sized glove liner that usually comes with a decent set of gloves, and the thickest, heartiest, most beefy damn glove you can find. Pro tip: Make sure ALL gloves work with smartphones (capacitive touch). Never take a glove off to do something because you will never regain that heat without going inside

  • Just get a case of hand warmers. They're good in your gloves; next to your Achilles tendon in your boots; and against your camera or smartphone to keep those batteries running longer

    FIY: I spent 3 years in Duluth as a Floridian with no experience with real winter. Gear up properly and you'll be outside all winter long! It's expensive, but it's TOTALLY worth the investment. Otherwise you'll be cold and miserable; and that is one hella long-ass winter.
u/noreallyitsme · 6 pointsr/wayhome

[Coleman 5-Gallon Solar Shower] (https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_OGwBzbR7ZV7AV) is currently on sale for $9.97

u/NNYPhillipJFry · 6 pointsr/bicycling
u/titfarmer · 6 pointsr/bicycling
u/sur_surly · 6 pointsr/bicycling

I agree. The air horns are so loud (maybe louder than a puny car horn?), and a LOT less weight. http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound-Bike-Horn-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC

u/Radio_Flyer · 6 pointsr/bikecommuting
u/5-4-3-2-1-bang · 6 pointsr/BikeCammers

That's an airzound. (Or a knockoff... Does anyone make a knockoff?) I have one but the can is starting to rust out, and I'm genuinely unsure if I'm going to replace it or not. (Don't like the idea of a rusty pressure vessel!)

Here's the thing... when you need one, it's great to have. But the problem I have is that the actual trigger mechanism is so fucking huge that there's nowhere to place it on my bike that's within easy reach. As a result it's wayyy off-line for my thumbs so that I have to deliberately take my hand off my bars, search for the mech, and then push it. The upshot is that I'm only able to do that when I have a few seconds warning that I'm going to need to use it (this video would be a good example); it's definitely not something that you can place to reflexively hit in an emergency.

I guess if you had a cruiser with a coaster brake or a fixie that wouldn't be a problem. But I have a gear shifters and brake levers on both sides; there's absolutely no place to fit this giant butt fucking monstrosity on my bars within easy reach.

u/hal1300-1 · 6 pointsr/bicycling

Not sure if this would scare them or make them worse, but you could try an airhorn or the airzound - http://amzn.com/B000ACAMJC . Its pretty loud and it may work with the other dogs of the road. ;)

u/Wytch78 · 6 pointsr/hulaween

You can still do GA and have flushable toilets, but it depends where you camp. There’s a “Jon condo” between the amp and meadow stages at the heart of the venue, for when you’re enjoying the shows. If you (arrive early enough to) camp near the bath house by Spirit Lake or the Grand Hall you can have access to flushing toilets, but there will be lines at peak times.

I fest and camp with my 8 year old daughter and we have one of these for just in case. Dudes piss innawoods but that’s not always possible for womenfolk, so we travel with one of these. #1 only.

u/F--K_the_mods · 6 pointsr/Truckers

Use a garbage bag before sitting down. Then take bag to dumpster.


Get a real seat. Much easier.


https://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO

u/EugeneLawyer · 6 pointsr/Eugene

I've got Kryptonite 997986 Black 18mm New York Fahgettaboudit U-Lock http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-997986-Black-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock/dp/B000OZ9VLU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396797497&sr=8-1&keywords=new+york+lock+kryptonite ( I bought it for $72 )

Tougher steel, thicker, stubby, and locks on both sides of the U. Because it locks on both sides the thief would need to cut the lock twice.
The lock still can be cut with a battery powered angle grinder, but it will take longer.

All u-locks are not equal. Cheaper u-locks can be cut with bolt cutters.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYUf4h0Lv_8

u/pinkpooj · 6 pointsr/bicycling

Origin 8 makes drop bar ends, kinda like traditional MTB bar ends.

u/SDPilot · 6 pointsr/Watches

I really can't stand reading your post. You sound like a pretentious/pompous ass.

This part especially makes me want to punch you in the throat:

> Outside of perhaps the Movado, non fit my idea of a watch a young professional should be wearing with his suit. Thus, I am in the market for my first $1,000 watch.

You should be more worried about deciding whether or not to get a masters degree rather than trying to determine which watch would impress your boss the most. Try to make him think you're not a trust fund baby and that hard work is more important than your watch style.

But if you really wanted to impress him, maybe you should just ask your parents to back your purchase of this watch and in exchange you can pay for your BMW's oil change this time around.

u/Yakdaddy · 6 pointsr/funny

THIS comes in a close second for me.

u/Zenigata · 6 pointsr/bikecommuting

>http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-M545-Downhill-Clipless-Pedal/dp/B000XNXUUG

I wouldn't recommend those for riding any distance in normal shoes as the clip mechanism is by necessity proud of the platform.

My brother used to have M545s on his hybrid but got rid of them for that reason he's much happier with the M324 pedals he switched to instead. Getting the wrong side some of the time when you set off is preferable to having no right side. The new [A530 looks even better](http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1397424911&sr=1-2&keywords=shimano+hybrid+pedals
) with a really nice big platform on the clip free side.

Personally I'd go for Time Allroad Grippers because I like the float atac pedals give you.

u/Mobius01010 · 6 pointsr/pics

Cutting things can be done in probably an infinite number of ways, so it's really about having the right tool for the job. You could thicken the blade, sure, but that makes cutting with the knife harder. This is why kitchen knives are thin in the first place. Buy a Becker BKII (a ~$100 knife) or some other glorified crowbar and you won't have this problem, you'll have others.

u/LoadSM5 · 6 pointsr/CampingGear

I've used pocket rockets and alcohol stoves for a good while. Lately I've been using the BSR Ulralight stove http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U. Really cheap and light if you go the canister stove route.
Any stove you use will need to kept steady and level. As long as the canister isn't rocking you shouldn't have an issue.

u/dmcnelly · 6 pointsr/Watches

Something about us Michiganders and Speedmasters.

I had to settle for a Casio Edifice which is about as close as I can get with what I can afford to spend on a watch right now.

I mean I could get a Speedmaster, but that's a significant chunk of scratch for a hobby I'm still fairly green to.

u/Woltz_Sandage · 6 pointsr/Bushcraft

So for shelter, I'd suggest this tarp. I also suggest checking out the forum that the tarp is from (www.bushcraftusa.com) because it's a forum all about bushcraft but has sub forums in ultralight and backpacking. The tarp is https://bushcraftoutfitters.com/coyote-tarp-10x10/ which is priced at $67. The reason I suggest this is because this tarp specifically, there's lots of way's to set it up. Check out this video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxtHJm51NPY&t=


So for cooking, it's pretty simple. This video will show you what most bushcrafters use and the links that follow are the two items. I use it myself and in fact have two sets because of how much I enjoy it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00gwQ4z_nQQ&t and the following links for the items. https://www.walmart.com/search/?query=Ozark%20Trail%2018-Ounce%20Stainless%20Steel%20Cup
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Stanley-Adventure-Camp-Cook-Set/16784406
https://www.walmart.com/ip/Ozark-Trail-9-5-Round-Frying-Pan/49332895


Hammocks are over rated, sleeping pads are a mess to figure out, get a cot. In fact, get this cot. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Outdoor-Super-Ultralight-Portable-Folding-Aluminium-alloy-Cot-Camping-Tent-Bed/112355265955?hash=item1a28e54da3:g:-PUAAOSwTM5Y365i:rk:2:pf:0


And now you need a knife, saw, and hatchet right? Well let's tackle all three.
https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-4-1-Inch-Military/dp/B004ZAIXSC?ref_=w_bl_hsx_s_sp_web_6501052011
https://www.amazon.com/Bahco-396-LAP-Laplander-Folding-Inch/dp/B0001IX7OW/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1540606867&sr=8-1&keywords=Bacho+Laplander
https://www.amazon.com/Fiskars-X7-Hatchet-Inch-378501-1002/dp/B0002YTO7E/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1540607032&sr=8-2&keywords=Fiskars+X7+Hatchet+14+Inch%2C+378501-1002
And as a added bonus here's a fire steel.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/4-x-2-5-Drilled-Ferrocerium-Ferro-Rod-Steel-Flint-Fire-Starter-w-Lanyard-Hole/131485475489?hash=item1e9d2522a1:rk:4:pf:0


And finally to end it all, we have a sleeping bag. This one is well known in the world. Kelty Cosmic 20 Degree. It's a dry down bag which means it's made of down that can handle some moisture but still keep you warm. It's rated for 20 degree's. I'll post the same bag as well but is rated for 0 degrees'. It'll be more expensive but it'll let you stay warm during the winter.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Kelty-Cosmic-20-Sleeping-Bag-20-Degree-Down/253894865275?epid=1152349824&hash=item3b1d50317b:m:mFpUvLXnvtZZETXdugDHwvw:rk:2:pf:0

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Kelty-Cosmic-0-Sleeping-Bag-0-Degree-Down/253375355468?epid=28012067594&hash=item3afe591a4c:m:mCrEnOYV72CJ257e08pGR4Q:rk:2:pf:0


Check the sizes of the sleeping bag before you buy.


Also a pack, this one works as two in one. Really nice for a 60L https://outdoorvitals.com/products/rhyolite-60l-lightweight-internal-frame-backpack1
________________________________________

If you do plan on doing any winter camping, I'd edit a few things. One of them is I'd get the 0 Degree sleeping bag posted. Instead of the tarp I'd get this pup tent. https://www.ebay.com/itm/USGI-Military-Issue-2-Man-Canvas-PUP-TENT-w-Poles-Stakes-Complete-VGC/392111853275?hash=item5b4bb00edb:g:JEQAAOSw~jJarA5E:rk:1:pf:0 Which comes with poles and stakes. I normally toss the poles and get some branches outside. I get four branches and make a bipod that I tie off on either end. That gives me more room inside the tent and less weight I have to carry on my person.


I'd still get the cot but I'd also include Thermarest Z-Lite sleeping pad to put on top of it https://www.ebay.com/itm/Therm-a-Rest-Z-Lite-Sol-Ultralight-Foam-Backpacking-Mattress/132801349129?epid=1900010560&hash=item1eeb93c609:rk:1:pf:0 as well as one of those super heavy duty emergency blankets. It's a reflective blanket but it's also the same thickness as some of those heat reflectors you use for a car windshield. Not those flimsy things you see "survivalists" use. Those placed on the cot, with that zero degree bag, and that shelter works amazingly. Just don't throw a heavy blanket on the sleeping bag and don't wear a lot of clothes in it either. That'll make everything for naught.
______________________________________
So with everything listed, the pack, cooking stuff, tools, cot, sleeping bag, and either the canvas shelter or tap, you'd be looking at around $560 assuming you got the 0 Degree Sleeping Bag instead of the 20 Degree. Which you really should. A 0 Degree is much better in my case.


Also if you do get a down sleeping bag, NEVER STORE IT IN THE COMPRESSED STATE!!! Always store it someplace with it out of it's bag. If you keep it compressed 24/7 until you use it, you'll destroy the down.

u/Kromulent · 6 pointsr/knives

It depends entirely on what you expect to do with the knife.

Food prep is a common task, which is best done with a small, slender fixed blade knife (folding knives are harder to keep clean - very important with food prep! - and slender blades cut food better than thick blades do). If the food prep knife is carried with the cooking gear, it does not require a belt sheath. A $9 victorinox paring knife is light and strong and would work fine for all but the largest jobs.

A saw or hatchet is far superior to a knife for preparing firewood, if that's going to be necessary.

General woodworking tasks - such as forming tent stakes, or notching wood to build a shelter or something like that - is best done with a thicker, stronger knife. A $20 stainless mora is very hard to beat for these sorts of tasks. If the hatchet/saw are lost, they can help with firewood prep, too.

See /r/Bushcraft for lots of helpful advice and knowledge.

u/ItsToka · 6 pointsr/bicycling

So you're going to buy something regardless, isn't spending an extra $50 once, worth the headache of replacing a bike, trying to deal with insurance etc...

I literally just bought this one for $40.

u/Chawp · 6 pointsr/UCDavis

I'd suggest using a good U Lock like this: https://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1469132985&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+u+lock

Lock the frame/front wheel to the bike rack and loop the cable around your back tire. This should be enough deterrence to safely leave your bike outside.

That said, if the professional thieves want your bike, there's no lock you can get to stop them. I wouldn't lock up a $2000 road bike outside, but your bike should be fine I'd imagine.

u/ThunderousApache · 6 pointsr/Ultralight

I assume you and /u/fire_0 mean this one? Because it's $45 right now, and Camelcamelcamel tells me it's only been $40.47 at its lowest.

There's another one that was $30 but it's a twist-lock model.

This is on the .com version, the Canadian version is just....ridiculous.

u/Mikuro · 6 pointsr/astoria

A few bits of advice:

  1. Don't lock it outside overnight. Keep it in your apartment.
  2. Buy used. I don't know where the hell you can find a bike of any quality for $15, but you can get some for less than $100. Look on Craigslist, beware scammers, and please don't buy a bike from a bike thief.
  3. Get a decent U-lock. This one is pretty good. Use the included cable to loop around your front wheel. The cable is a bit short, but it's long enough to get the wheel. Unfortunately it is NOT long enough to get both the wheel and seatpost, at least not on my bike. If you're worried about that, get a 7' cable instead. All locks are breakable, of course, but a decent U-lock will thwart casual thieves and encourage the pros to move on to the next bike that's less secured.
  4. Don't ride drunk. Combined with #1, that means don't ride it anywhere if you plan on drinking.

    I've been riding an old mountain bike I got for $70 off Craigslist for a few years. It looks its age but it rides like a champ. Yes, it's silly that my locks cost nearly as much as my bike, but I don't care. I'm a little paranoid.
u/cwcoleman · 6 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I rarely have a campfire while backcountry backpacking. (I also live in the PNW)
Like you said - there are often full-time or seasonal restrictions on fires. Other times it just isn't worth the effort to start one.

I do LOVE fires when car camping. Especially in official campsites where there is wood for sale and a metal fire pit.

----
I use a canister stove for cooking when backpacking. It's quick and easy. They are pretty cheap and light too.

My setup:

u/IPlayTheInBedGame · 5 pointsr/okeechobeemusicfest

Replying to my own comment with some purchasing recommendations:


2. Next level folding chair. The locking feature is sick, most comfortable camp chair I've owned.

My goto folding table. I've got a bigger 8 foot one if I'm camping with a big group but this small one is perfect for 1-4 people.

3. Highly recommend this charger. Will charge a typical iPhone like 5 times and has QC 3.0 built in (quick charge, which is a nice feature at a festival). Currently on sale for $40 if you clip the coupon, I've seen it as low as $30, they'll probably go on sale for black Friday and Christmas too.

5. Bring a box of these babies and if it gets cold, you've suddenly made like 40 friends.

6. Something like this is a good choice for makeup. In case you have to go back to camp and freshen up, the light is a nice touch.

u/FroggattEdge · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I got the highly recommended Cascade Mountain Tech poles from Amazon here

u/mightychip · 5 pointsr/Shambhala

They're usually hot. Sometimes, the hot water runs out and they are... er... mountain fresh. Quite cold, but it's exhilarating. There are also times when the showers are shut down because the water table is low.


If you're one of those, "I must shower every day" people (I certainly am!) then you should invest in a solar shower. These bad boys are super cheap, hold about 10L of water and can... kind of substitute for a shower. You'll need a tree or something tall too strap it to.

u/jaredschaffer27 · 5 pointsr/Drama

>How much did you save up for this trip?

About 15k. Can theoretically go 18 months or longer on that.

>Is it safe?

I mostly hang out with friends who live rurally and camp in the woods, so yeah. Every now and again I have to park somewhere in a major city where I'm not 100% comfortable leaving all my shit, but I've only had one confrontation where I was in personal danger, and it was because I got "too close" to a homeless guy stacking things in a trash can in Portland.

>Where do you shower?

I usually get 2-3 showers a week, in between my solar shower, hot springs, friend's houses or (last resort) truck stops.

u/CyclingFlux · 5 pointsr/bicycling

I recently was asking myself this same question, and consensus seemed to be the Air Zound is the loudest horn.

Delta Airzound Bike Horn , colors may vary https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000ACAMJC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_l5xYxbDSGJVRP

But I don't like the idea of needing an air reservoir for my horn. I have been using this for a while:

Hornit dB140 Cycle Horn with Remote Trigger https://www.amazon.com/dp/B006TDEV20/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_l7xYxb01YQYW2

It's very loud but ruined by the sound it makes: it's a chirping noise and people look up in the trees on shared paths instead of looking back or moving over. I ordered and just yesterday received this:

ORP SmartHorn and Bike Light - BLUE https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00L3NK1O8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_K8xYxbH94B542

A light/horn combo, with two different sounds. It's loud, and if you get it off the Orp website they include the remote trigger for free. Haven't had a chance to try it out yet but my initial impression is very good.

u/defacedlawngnome · 5 pointsr/bicycling
u/JingJang · 5 pointsr/Denver

Get yourself an Azound bike horn: https://www.amazon.com/Delta-Cycle-Airzound-Bike-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC

That and a few loud "Coming through on the bike lane"!, usually clears it out.

u/seattlebikeman · 5 pointsr/seattlebike

I'd recommend a bike airhorn. Might seem absurd, but it's highly effective at:

  • Getting drivers to put down their cell long enough to proceed through the green light.
  • Clearing glassy-eyed, drooling homeless out of the bike lane (bells are often insufficient to overcome the drug stupor).
  • Setting it off in the I-90 bike tunnel for your amusement (the echo is awesome!).

    https://smile.amazon.com/Delta-Cycle-Airzound-Bike-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC
u/opaeoinadi · 5 pointsr/bicycling

Rechargeable (bike pump) Air Horn on Amazon.com for $24

It's something I've had on my bicycle touring bookmarks for a while, debating the purchase.

u/nept_r · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

This really depends on your gear. The biggest weight savers are firstly bringing less (such as getting rid of extra clothes, knives, tablets etc) but then getting a lighter tent, sleeping bag, and pack. If you're good on those or can't lose weight there, next up could definitely be the cookset. A cheap light titanium pot and a light stove can make a big difference. Far down the list is tent stakes, imho. If you have cheap heavy stakes, sure swap them out. But there are bigger fish to fry if you're a novice.

u/C20 · 5 pointsr/bicycling

The AirZound was designed for you

u/Mistacowman · 5 pointsr/BlackPeopleTwitter

My bad it was 3 hours I looked up the arrival about it. These are the buckets. They were filled with emergency packets of water and something else like a emergency blanket and we conveniently had gotten them like 2 months before it happened.

u/Copenhagen23 · 5 pointsr/battlefield_4

http://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO people buy this prodcut for "SHTF". It's the perfect shit bucket.

u/jimjoekelly33 · 5 pointsr/wallstreetbets
u/MrClahn · 5 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

I've spent over 2 months with one had no complaints, and plan to take it on my thru starting next week (Ahh!). Just have to be more careful when you're cooking and watch out for winds/make a good windscreen for it. The biggest downside to them is you can't use them in a tent vestibule in the rain.

If you just want a light/cheap stove aren't set on alcohol, there's the BRS 3000, sub 1oz canister stove http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/troyemcintosh · 5 pointsr/bugout

I like your organization on those shelves! I need to do something similar.

What's your sanitation plan? I see Lots of people with > 72hrs of food / water but no way to handle 72 hrs of human waste.

Can I recommend you throw a cheap 12-pack of toilet paper and some disinfecting wipes in there? maybe store a portable toilet & supplies or ensure you have a shovel & knowledge to dig a latrine ?

u/kd5vmo · 5 pointsr/Hawaii

If you like your bike, bring it inside. Locking your bike up outside is pretty much asking for it to get stolen.

I lent a friend a tri bike, told him very specifically to keep it inside. what does he do? locks it up out side and it gets stolen. That was $1000 down the drain.

Also, learn how to lock a bike properly and get a decent lock.

u/VanMulk · 5 pointsr/bikewrench

Origin 8 makes clip-on drop bar ends that might suit your needs without having to mess with your shifters or brakes.- and they're only $15.

u/Aun_vre · 5 pointsr/cycling

So /r/bikewrench and /r/bicycling are much more active sub-reddits that you may see more attention on, but I can try to help you out here.

Switching the bars could require a few things:


Stem Size and by extension handlebar size: the Escape has a stem made for 31.8mm diameter handlebars with pretty large bars actually. Most drop bars you find will be 25.4mm at the stem and 23.8mm everywhere else. Any discrepancy can be an easy fix with some shims (either bought or made). It is also possible (according to Sheldon Brown) that your current bars may have very similar sizing to standard drop bars. The stem may also need to be shortened or lengthened to comfortably accommodate for the new handlebars and riding positions.


Braking: As you may or may not have noticed most drop bars come with brake levers that allow you to access the levers while riding on the drops. This is important because it allows you more leverage at the moments when you are going the fastest. Check out this image stolen from 'Lovley Bike' that shows the typical 'breaking on the drops' position.

While it is not necessary to have these brakes and the 'hoods' that accompany them it is an excellent idea and gives more hand positions! Alternatively it is possible to use levers only on the flats of the drop bars (but not the ones you currently have may need the aforementioned shims).

Shifting!
I see the Escape has Shimano M310 trigger shifters. Those also may have to go. They, like the brakes, can be mounted on the flats of the bar but it is only very low end bikes that do this to their riders. There are an ungodly number of ways to incorporate shifting on a bike with drop bars. You can integrate them into the brakes with STI's, stick them on the end of the bars with Bar End Shifters, Get them onto the stem like many vintage bikes Stem Shifters or get them on the down-tube for a classic look Down Tube Shifters...

That aside the only real options up there that you have for a conversion are Bar-end or "Brifters" Brake/Shifters...reusing your old ones could work but it would be inelegant.

Geometry MOST IMPORTANTLY! Your bike was designed to be ridden upright, the stem, top tube, every inch of the bike assumes the rider is using flat bars. There is no telling really what the ride will 'feel' like after you start riding on the hoods/drops. Its not as bad as most hybrids with front suspension but I could not tell you anything about how it might feel once the swap is made.


For moving forward I see a few options

Option 1 Quick and Dirty Get some drop bars and some old cans. Strip your current bars of components and install the drops(don't forget shims), If sheldon is correct about the size of over-sized road bikes all your old components should slide onto the flat part of the drops and just fit. It would be a unique way to ride but mostly functional...Personally I would have concerns about how safe it would be.

Option 2 More hand positions!
If what you want is more hand positions don't overlook bar end attachments:
Bar end attachments
Orgin 8 might actually have the answer to your prayers: Bolt On Drops

Option 3 Dress her like a roadie
Trying to make your hybrid into a road bike is usually not the right way to go but...with $10-30 for bars, and $100 for Shifters and Brakes, plus $10-20 for complete re-cabling across the bike (MTB and Road bikes use different cable ends) and of course labor if you aren't that handy. Tack on $10 for bar-tape to make her pretty and comfortable and you aren't that far in the hole.
You don't get off any easier for Bar Ends once you get the appropriate brakes its about the same. All that and your former hybrid could pass any scrutinizing test of a lycra-clad cyclist, you'd have yourself a certified road-bike. No promises on comfort!


This is just a vague indication though! For a real in-depth price assessment and Q&A please visit your local bike store

For my $00.02...Don't bother trying to convert them. Ride the bike you have the way it was intended to be ridden. If after a while you still feel like its lacking, throw on some bar ends for more hand positions, Still feel like its lacking? Go test-ride some road bikes to see if riding on the drops is right for you. I'm not talking about a test ride around the parking lot either! No less then 3 miles on that sucker, get a real feel for it. Love it!? Sell the Escape and do a TON of research into inexpensive road bikes. They are out there waiting for ya.

u/SkepTiKalKloWn · 5 pointsr/Watches

Casio and Timex both have decent digital watches in that range. For an analog, Vostoks are great looking if you don't mind that they can gain/lose alot of time in a day otherwise Timex and Seiko has some good basic stuff that you could put a metal or rubber band on if it doesn't come with it already. Outside of that if all you can spend is $100 most of what you'll find either gonna find are cool looking but flimsy pieces or decently made but basic watches. If you can up your budget even to $150 your options from Orient, Bulova, and Citizen open up a little bit.

u/bayernownz1995 · 5 pointsr/malefashionadvice

Mid Pilot Watch

Or the Orient Mako in Black or Blue. If you choose either of these, I think it would be worth buying a leather watch strap. Here's a decent option (its $40 once you sign in)

Also try asking /r/Watches

Edit: Here's a good thread on /r/watches about watches around your budget.

u/tha_snazzle · 5 pointsr/malefashionadvice

It's actually on sale on Amazon right now.

It's supposed to be a good entry-level mechanical watch from a company that manufactures all their parts in-house. It's also a bit of a Submariner look-alike, but for a first watch, it's nice and affordable. Check out the reviews.

u/CervezaPorFavor · 5 pointsr/funny

I just love the awesome product image

u/PsylentStorm · 5 pointsr/bicycling

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the Shimano A530 Pedals. They're dual-purpose pedals meant for road bikes, with SPD pedals on one side, and a platform on the other. The catch is, obviously, that they're not dual side, so you may have to flip the pedal over to use the correct side of the pedal.

I just started going clipless, with these pedals as my first clipless pedals, and I have nothing but good things to say about them. The only catch is that I've been only cycling clipless for a week, so I have limited to experience to base my review on.

u/Devoured · 5 pointsr/bicycletouring

Ive been using these to great success: Shimano A530 Yet another half and half solution.

u/tehallie · 5 pointsr/RagenChastain

> She doesn't even use clipless pedals.

She does, based on pictures of her bike. She runs double-sided: flats on one side, Shimano SPD on the other. I run the same on my bike, but that's because it's not a dedicated racing bike.

u/crispyscone · 5 pointsr/knives

now If you actually want a functional knife that will cut off branches without breaking, get a bk2

u/admckillip · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I was reluctant to try trekking poles because I thought I didn't need them and I had been hiking for years. To try out poles I snagged some Cascade Mountain Tech and I now really like them. Life savers for elevation and spiderwebs, haha.

For a cheap, but decent pair to try you could grab [these] (https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Trekking-Climbing/dp/B01055BZDA/ref=pd_sbs_468_2?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B01055BZDA&pd_rd_r=AHB8XKJMJ4XVHCWDZ7TE&pd_rd_w=QLBlN&pd_rd_wg=UGPPr&psc=1&refRID=AHB8XKJMJ4XVHCWDZ7TE) ($20) and see if you like them. Cascade Mountaion Tech are generally considered the best cheap trekking poles, and you can upgrade if you do? I went middle of the road on those up above, and they're good enough to not upgrade, but saving 5-7 oz on mine with better poles would have been nice weight savings on something you pick up and put down constantly (way more than 5-7 oz in your pack). SO, my thought is, if you're not sure. By super cheap, and if you like trekking poles, buy nice and light YMMV.

I had the HV UL2 and ended up returning it. It was pretty darn nice, but I wanted something that was lighter, felt a bit more durable, and more flexible in terms of options for pitching so I grabbed the [Tarptent Saddle] (https://www.tarptent.com/saddle2.html). When I'm using the inner, on the saddle I feel ZERO need for a footprint, but I did with the Copper Spur, though you could always just repair... I also like that if there are no bugs I can pitch just the Saddle Outer Tarp with a ground sheet and total weight would be about 20 Oz. Either tent are pretty good options though.

EDIT: Added context.

u/_2_4_8 · 5 pointsr/india

Ka-Bar Becker BK2 short of the mythical 'valyrian steel', this is the knife you would pick up when you see the Night King proceeding. Failed torture test.

Morakniv Companion HD Think Sweden without the girl with the dragon tattoo but a dragon waiting to shave you on a budget. Bang for the buck, come razor sharp out of the box.

No, these aren't EDC, even though you could carry them around.

u/ohnovangogh · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

This is an option if you want to shave some weight replacing the pocket rocket.

u/Dorkamundo · 5 pointsr/flashlight

Never heard of the light, wouldn't trust it or the battery that comes with it. May not have low voltage protection.

Honestly, I fell in love with the Nitecore NU25 Plenty bright, lasts a long time, has the high CRI option and is very small so it doesn't hit things when you are sticking your head back behind a strut assembly.

u/shadowbanningsucks · 5 pointsr/Watches

Casio Duro

Citizen Eco Drive BM8180-03E

Timex Fairfield

Casio Edifice

Orient Bambino

Casio G Shock atomic solar

u/pdxcoug · 5 pointsr/EDC

I keep this bag in my truck in case I need to get home on foot and for day hikes. It's an REI Stoke 9, jam packed with the following (left to right):

 

GSI Outdoors Glacier Stainless Bottle Cup/Pot

Etekcity Ultralight Portable Outdoor Backpacking Camping Stove

Food - Cliff Bars and GU

Gorilla Tape To-Go

Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife

SecureLine 100-Feet 550 Nylon Paracord

Petzl Pro Am'D Screw-Lock Carabiner

LifeStraw Personal Water Filter

Coast 20266 HL46 Dual-Color LED Headlamp

Extra AAA batteries

Coast HP2 Universal Focusing 85 Lumen Penlight


Waterproof Windproof Matches

Nite Ize Gear Tie Reusable Rubber Twist Tie, 6-Inch, Blue, 2-pack

Small Flask

Headphones

Mophie Powerstation and cord

PackTowl Personal Towel

Nylon Tarp with Bungee Ties - think this came with my REI 2 person tent - awesome instashelter

Extra Underwear

SmartWool socks

Wool beanie

Vinyl poncho

Adventure Medical Kits Ultralight & Watertight .5 First Aid Kit

Also in the FAK pouch: Bic Lighter, Rubber gloves, Emergency Blanket

Coast BX310 Lock Back Folding Knife 2.63-Inch Blade

Coast LED145 LED Micro Pliers


REI Stoke 9 Pack

 

*Full disclosure, my wife used to work for Coast.

Edit 1: hella formatting errors

u/thomas533 · 5 pointsr/foraging

No pictures being as I am at work but:

u/luckynumber3 · 5 pointsr/unt

Basically what everyone else said, go to class. Yeah I get sometimes you're tired but really you'll do way better if you go. 9 times out of 10 you are not that person who can only show up for tests and get an A (or even a B). If you hate waking up in the morning either a: go to bed on time and/or b: avoid taking morning classes.

A bike is a good investment but you really don't need an expensive one (in fact I'd recommend against getting an expensive one, bike thefts are really high around the beginning of the school year). And if you do get a bike, and I can't stress this enough, get a U lock. They're super hard to cut and make a lot of noise in the process so most bike thieves won't bother with them but make sure to loop it through the front tire and frame. Worst case scenario, they'll steal your back tire but its better than your whole bike.

Someone mentioned that you should avoid apartments and go for housing. Honestly apartments are fine as long as they're not student living apartments. Avoid student living like the plague. They seem tempting at first, furniture and utilities included plus separate leases, but you're generally stuck with shitty cable/internet and the furniture is basically low end IKEA stuff. Yeah it'll be a bit more expensive getting furniture at first but you can find decent stuff for cheap on craigslist. And you'll save a lot more if you have people paying for single rent then individual leases.

I'd assume many of you will be looking for jobs. If you're trying to support yourself on a single fast food job you're going to have a bad time. They generally give you basic minimum wage and don't give you many hours to begin with. When I was working at TC I was making $70 per week max. My roommate who works at JJ makes about the same. Really the only way to get decent money doing fast food is delivery. Go for retail/grocery store jobs. They suck too but you'll get decent hours at least.

And last try to avoid spending too much time in your dorm/apartment/house/etc. It's okay to be introverted (but as cliche as this sounds) meeting new people is part of the college experience. If you live in a dorm, try hanging out in the lounge. If you're in the other living spaces, eat at the dorm cafeterias (terrible food but you'll meet people). And joining clubs is not a bad idea. There's generally something for everyone.

u/oO0-__-0Oo · 5 pointsr/CCW

Depending on your location and school, having a gun in your dorm may not be illegal, but merely against the university rules.

If you are going to leave the firearm in your car, I suggest you disassemble it and take the complete upper (slide, barrel and recoil spring assembly) with you. Those components are not considered a firearm, and it leaves the receiver in your vehicle much less valuable a target for theft.

As for securing it in your vehicle, cheapest and most effective option is running a quality U-lock through the mag well and attaching it to a car seat frame (leave it underneath the seat).

This is a good U-lock:

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1417384536&sr=8-2&keywords=u+lock

u/Sheol · 5 pointsr/bicycling

I biked through Wichita Falls this summer on a cross country trip! Biking from Wichita Falls to Lawton, OK was one of my favorite days of the entire trip. Might not be the prettiest city, but some of the countryside north of there is great. (Also you guys have the Hotter Than Hell 100!)

For accessories you definitely want to get a hefty U-lock (this is a good one) and learn how to lock it up correctly. If you are going to be biking at night, get a front and rear light. If you are sticking to roads with street lights you need a "be seen" front light, if you are going to be biking in the real dark you'll need a higher powered "seeing" front light.

u/OrganicRolledOats · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

I haven't hiked the JMT so I can't comment on your clothing system but here are some general thoughts:

Ditch the headlamp for a sub 1oz USB rechargeable flashlight $30

Ditch the Leatherman for a Victorinox Swiss Army Classic $15

Ditch the paper maps and use Guthook's since you already have it. $Free

Ditch the Sea to Summit X-Cup and I wouldn't bother with the hot lips either $Free

Replace the trash compactor bag with a Fumigation bag $2.49

Ditch the compass $Free

Replace the stove with the BRS Stove $15

All this should save you about ~11 ounces for ~$63.

If you are worried about fitting in the superior 35 I would take a look at the MLD Prophet $195. This should be plenty of room and will save you an additional 18+ ounces.





u/zerostyle · 5 pointsr/cycling

Here are the must-haves for anyone:

  1. A helmet that fits

  2. A portable pump like this Lezyne pump in case you get a flat

  3. Backup tire tubes / patch kit / tire levers for the same reason as above

  4. A good bike lock - I like this Kryptonie Series 2 kit

    Optional but nice to have:

  5. Water bottle cage & water bottle

  6. Bike shorts or bib

    Depending on riding conditions:

  7. Bike lights/reflectors

  8. Cold weather riding gear (pants/etc)

  9. For commuters, panniers/etc

  10. Or a small backpack
u/donkeyrocket · 5 pointsr/bicycling

I did bike "maintenance" for years using a clamp nailed to my back porch railing. I say maintenance because it was mostly cursing, bruising myself trying to leverage my bike, drinking beer and spending far too long on the simplest tasks.

I got this stand and it is solid as a rock. Has made any project from simple adjustments to overhauls so much easier. Now it is happy tinkering and drinking beer.

u/CafeRoaster · 5 pointsr/bicycling

Mine consists of moving the kitchen island cart and plopping down there. Hah!

Finally getting a collapsible repair stand.

u/MountainManGuy · 5 pointsr/bicycling

Gotcha. True, I can see that price with the unit being marketed towards pro teams' mechanics.

This is the stand I use, and it's been great. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=oh_aui_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/Whispertron · 5 pointsr/de

Nimm eine erweiterte Erste Hilfe Ausrüstung mit und sorg' dafür, daß deine Reisebegleiter davon wissen und im Notfall dafür sorgen, daß die verwendet wird. Diese Seite hat eine gute Liste von dem, was man einpacken sollte. Besonders die Einmal-Spritzen, Kanülen und Disinfektionsmittel sind notwendig. Bei der Abreise kannst du alles nicht verwendete an jemanden Spenden, der dort wohnt.

Medikamente gegen Durchfall und Verstopfung kann ich auch empfehlen. Wasserfilter wie diesen oder diesen, und zusätzlich noch Wasserreinigungstabletten, sollten auch nicht fehlen.

DR Kongo hat die zweit-höchste Malaria Infektionsrate der Welt, also sollte Malariaprofylaxe und Insektenabwehr hoch in deiner Prioritätsliste sein. Kleidung sollte wenn's geht leicht sein aber die Arme und Beine bedecken. Das hilft sowohl beim Sonnenschutz als auch gegen Insekten. Es gibt mit Permithrin imprägnierte Kleidung die sehr empfohlen ist. Ansonsten gutes Insektenabwehrspray mitnehmen und ausgiebig verwenden.

u/YogiIan · 5 pointsr/camping

You can buy a Sawyer Mini SP128 for not much more and get .1 micron filtration. Clean sip doesn't even list its filter specs on its website, most likely because it doesn't compare to more reputable manufacturers. Just because it's "the world's smallest", doesn't necessarily make it a smart purchase.

u/Zooshooter · 5 pointsr/camping

Do not get a Lifestraw! Get a Sawyer mini filter instead. They're back-flushable (you can unclog them if they get clogged) and they're guaranteed for more gallons of water than a Lifestraw. The mini filter will also screw on to a lot of plastic drink bottles, like the 12-20oz bottles you can get from vending machines.

u/SomeTwelveYearOld · 5 pointsr/raleigh

As a back up, you can buy one of these pretty cheap:

Sawyer Products SP128 Mini Water Filtration System, Single, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_8tgBDbGGF66B7

u/Sinjhin · 5 pointsr/Charlotte

Or just grab a couple sawyer filters for $20 a pop. Still good to have some backup bottled water I suppose and fill up the tub, but with a sawyer I can literally just go drink out of a puddle if I need to.

​

https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1536624885&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=sawyer+mini&psc=1

u/ib4student · 5 pointsr/EDC



| Lifestraw | Sawyer Mini
---|---|----
Membrane | 0.2 microns | 0.1 microns (2x better)
Capacity | 264 gallons | 100,000 gallons (378.8x better)
Bacteria | 6 LOG | 7 LOG (10x better)
Bacteria% | 99.9999% | 99.99999% (10x better)
Protozoa | 3 LOG | 6 LOG (1000x better)
Protozoa% | 99.9% | 99.9999% (1000x better)
Price | $19.89 | $19.41 or 4 for $67.51 ($16.88 each)

The mini is also smaller and comes with a 32 oz squeezable water pouch, 7" tube, syringe for cleaning (if it clogs)

>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable bottles (28 mm thread), hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source

http://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

u/dmoney247 · 4 pointsr/aves

Buy some hot hands they work miracles. I remember someone last year gave me one for my wife and I definitely made the cold bearable and they're pretty cheap for big pack maybe you can pass them out like I will be doing!!
HotHands Hand Warmers 40 Pair Value Pack https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_vq2hAb1GVX2GY

u/stairmast0r · 4 pointsr/ElectricScooters

I'm guessing you're in the US since you're referencing FFR. What's your current scooter? I don't normally join circlejerks, but the Xiaomi M365 is a pretty good value and it's below your budget at $379 right now on Amazon. Pneumatic tires will provide better grip and ride quality than solid tires, and if you keep the pressure up high enough (depends on your weight, but around 50 PSI), flats are not that big of an issue. The stem wobble is also better in recently produced units, and if it ever gets bad you can buy cheap rubber dampers to tighten it back up.

u/defygravty · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

OK, here is a brain dump of whatever comes into my mind. Just hoping to spark your memory so don't get mad if I say a bunch of stuff you already know...

Put all the pieces into a lighterpack.com account and checkout r/Ultralight before you buy (head over there and burn down the sidebar reading list and the incomplete-wiki, it's worth it).

Is that Osprey really 70 L? That's huge. Probably weighs a ton, what are you bringing that fills up 70 L on a 3-5 day summer trip? A 50 L beer keg? Maybe you have some sweet luxury items that take up a lot of space in the pack, but I'd drop the volume on the pack to at least 50 L. If you can manage it, Try a Ultimate Direction Fastpack 30. But if you just can't get your volume that small, get what works. Weight is an issue too, in frameless packs the straps are uncomfortable over 30 lbs, sometimes less. But if you make some smart choices right now, you shouldn't bust 30 lbs. (It's also smart to get the rest of the gear first to get an idea of how much volume you'll need in your pack and if you'll need a frame.)

Research quilt vs sleeping bag. Quilts are big these days unless you are a crazy sleeper. Enlightened Equipment is the shiz. I've bought 4 quilts and made 3 DIY and EE are the best I've tried. EE also sells a synthetic quilt called the prodigy which I use in the summers or as a layer in the winters. I hear that Katabatic quilts are truly the best if the price tag doesn't scare you away. And a super cheap, but quality option though on aliexpress, it's buy at your own risk. Worked for me last time, doesn't mean it will next time.

Massdrop is selling a skinny UL static V (and the insulated verion) right now for cheap. (I own the insulated option and bought it from massdrop.) But there's a lighter not-as-skinny pad called a Thermorest Neoair Xlite. Also the sea to shining sea ultralight pad gets high marks. So look at those, see what other pads are popping on r/ultralight, the balance the weight and costs to your preference. (Assuming you know about r-values and what your needs will be in Maine/Vermont. I'm guessing spring is a little cold so maybe r=~4 in the early spring or high altitude?)

Nemo tents are great. If you're only camping spring/summer I'd get a much lighter weight tarp tent. Like 3 lbs or less including stakes/cords (and footprint if your tent has a bathtub floor).

11-14 oz MSR Whisperlite is awesome. Stoves are pretty personal, it's best to go with one you trust. MSR is probably the right choice for you. I use a tiny 2oz stove and a homemade windscreen. My stove is finicky and too small if you're cooking for 2 or more. However, there's a whole mess of stoves between the 2oz and 14 oz which might still cover you and save you a few ounces or half a pound. Like the Kovea Spider which I also have, and use in the cold (gas liquefies and fuel can must be inverted, so I need a freestanding stove with a tube). I'm personally biased against the jetboil because of how much space it takes in my pack, but I own 2. They are fast, good for groups. Again the MSR is NOT a bad choice.

You also need a cook pot. Titanium is a waste of money, find a cheap Aluminum one for the same results. Like the olicamp ones, or if you want a real lid, you'll have to spend more (the metal lids cost way more for some odd reason).

Water filtration. Everybody ravs over the Sawyer Squeeze and I guess I'm out of the loop having never tried it. Fretting about making sure my filter doesn't freeze seems like a source of anxiety. I'll try it eventually though. I like the hand pump water filters. I rock an MSR hyperflow. And if I'm in a big group, I'll break out my Katadyn 6L Gravity Filter.

Get a down jacket from costco or sams for 20$, if you're camping in it, you'll wear it out so no use spending a ton there. (Down packs small and won't take up nearly any pack space)

Get a headlamp, I prefer blackdiamond or Fenix. For BD this image sums it up very nicely. For fenix there's a variety but I am currently using the HL55 (900 lumens). Again look at the weights, but also look at the battery requirements and the longevity/efficiency. Find what you like.

Ok my brain is dumped. Hopefully I hit on something worth your time. If I were you, I'd go as cheap as possible, then put the savings into funding your travel for hiking or buying a kayak. Random, I know, but having blown tons of money on gear I feel like there's quality for a good price if you look for it. And using the extra money to break into a new hobby opens the door to a potentially mind altering experience. Especially a related hobby like kayaking, fishing, snowshoeing, rock climbing, diving (though this one is lots of money), or whatever's clever.

u/SenorJoseDirte · 4 pointsr/ElectricForest

One of my best purchases ever. Limitless showers

Coleman 5-Gallon Solar Shower https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_jFJlxb3FDCW8T

u/dotchianni · 4 pointsr/vandwellers

Clothes: 5 gallon buckets and a laundry plunger wand.

Or, if you are going to be driving for a while, this will work well if your shocks aren't the best and the road is bumpy... 5 gallon bucket, add clothes/water/soap/spiky drier ball thingies. Put a lid on the bucket and tighten it, put it in the back. Drive.

When you are done driving, rinse, spot check, wring, and then hang dry.

I have a piece of rope going across the van that I used when doing laundry.

Or you can use a laundry mat but that kind of kills the adventure.

Showering and bathing.

Highly love the solar shower bag by Coleman. You might want to get a pop up shower stand but you can totally bath in your vehicle. A tarp on the floor is helpful.

I took a lot of bucket baths too. Fill a small bucket with soapy water (not tons of soap) and wash up. Then rinse in fresh water. I think that bucket was a gallon bucket.

Wipes are helpful also. When we traveled a lot, some days were crotch and pit wash days since we couldn't shower. It happens. These made that easier for us.

u/Ikit-Klaw · 4 pointsr/Roadcam

definitely was the truck, but super loud bike horns do exist.

https://www.amazon.com/Delta-Cycle-Airzound-Bike-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC

u/YourADumb · 4 pointsr/bicycling

What about one of those really loud airhorns? It could put someone off guard without directly causing injury.

u/20thMaine · 4 pointsr/motorcycles
u/elzibet · 4 pointsr/BikeCammers

This is the one that I have. I've been very happy with it!

u/peter_k · 4 pointsr/bikecommuting

You either ride on the sidewalk (which, IMHO, is totally fine if you judge the road to be extremely dangerous... don't ever risk your life... ) or gird your loins and take the fuck out of the lane. Light yourself up like a Christmas tree, get one of these, wear a reflective vest, and get ready for stressful nonsense and road rage. The ride MAY not be as bad as you think once a few additional factors are taken into account:

  1. Traffic. Heavy traffic is your friend on these roads. I would imagine the lanes are pretty wide, so splitting them through heavy traffic will be pretty easy.

  2. Pick your route. You may be able to whittle down the amount of REALLY fast road you have to ride on by taking some short detours.
u/MrMustachio · 4 pointsr/ucf

That's awesome! You're definitely free to come by shop hours and ask advice and use the tools there. We've got all the bike tools you'd need for sure.

I'm sure if you post the picture on our Facebook page you'd get lots of helpful suggestions. To start you off, I'll recommend an Airzound horn. They're ridiculously loud and refillable with your bike pump.

u/BlueJeans4LifeBro · 4 pointsr/camping

Biolite is like the heaviest, most complicated and expensive stove on the market and for all the reviews (search reddit for reviews) it is a very niche product. I could never see myself owning one. I think it's niche is if you're going to be sitting in 1 place for a long time, with no access to sunlight and needing to recharge your phone every 2 days.


What are your needs for a stove. What conditions will you be using it in? Very cold weather or just warmer weather?


Here is a very inexpensive and ultralight canister style stove to give you an idea of what is possible: https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/TheTreeMan · 4 pointsr/OSU

A 2,500 dollar bike is a bit much, but if you really want to bring an expensive bike on campus, get a nice U-Lock!

This is the best one I've ever used. I have a pretty nice bike, and somebody tried to cut through this lock to get to it once. They only got through the few mm thick outer rubber layer, and then gave up. It's a bitch to cut through this thing.

u/kubed_zero · 4 pointsr/sanfrancisco
u/packtips · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Try to get a pair with flip locks, instead of twist locks. Twist is the old tech, doesn't work well, and you'll wish you had flip if you put them side by side.

These cost more than the ones you link to, but are worth the price (still reasonable considering.) Have cork grips (better in sweaty hands), carbon fiber (lighter in weight but stronger than aluminum), flip locks (way easier to adjust and more trustworthy).

u/Gnascher · 4 pointsr/bicycling

Before you go "all in" and spend silly money to do this conversion, why don't you try something like "clamp on drops", or possibly some of the more radical "trekking bars"?

I think even after you spend all that money to convert this upright bike to drops, you'll ultimately be disappointed in the result. It just doesn't have the geometries that make your CX bike "fun".

u/travellingmonk · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Half a pound? I'm not UL and that's still way too heavy for backpacking.

I've got a Kovea Supalite Ti, just over 2oz. Works great, replaces my MSR Pocket Rocket.

I've also got a BRS 3000T which is about an ounce- it's a great tiny stove if you're just heating up water in a mug. Can't really cook anything on it though, if I want to actually cook food I'll bring along the Supalite.

u/jugglist · 4 pointsr/bicycling

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0013G6PB8

20 bucks, plus you'll want some bar tape.

If you want to brake and shift from the drops, at least 300 more and it'll still suck.

Edit: Also consider clip-on aero bars. You can't brake from those anyway. Otherwise if you want a road bike with drops, sell the one you have (or not - n+1 and all that) and get a caad10 ;)

u/huffalump1 · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

To clarify, the Nitecore NU25 (Amazon link).

I love it! Super light, rechargeable, very bright, decent battery life, redmode. Perfect for a weekend trip.

I'll recommend the Wowtac A2S NW as well - brighter and way longer battery. It's a little heavier, but that pays off with more battery life (and an interchangeable cell).

u/lavacahacemu · 4 pointsr/cycling

You don't really say where you are and what type of riding you'll be doing but here's my $0.02 on what I've done and would recommend to others.


Clipless Pedals + Shoes --> These are the newer version to what I use on my roadie, but if you want the versatility of the dual clipless or the single+flat on the other side, you can do that. Or you can go with full-road-cleated pedals, of course. For the shoes, try some out at a store, the internet hasn't replaced this step.

Saddle bag -- I err.. duct taped a tube to my seatpost and carry the rest of my crap in my jersey pockets.

Water bottle -- If you ride in extreme weather, consider an insulated bottle, it's sooo nice to fill with iced water and have cool water to dring on 100F+ days

Pump -- I have one that came with a bracket to bolt under the water cages, maybe look for one like it (can't remember the brand of mine)

??? (I have no idea what else I will need) -- you'll need/want:

  • a multitool to adjust or fix anything that can come up. I have the park multitool and I don't really recommend it as there's probably better tools out there for road bike use, just make sure that it has a chain tool included.
  • Tire levers, if they aren't included somehow in the multitool. I always carry one extra so I can have 3 leverage points if I get a flat.
  • With a new bike you might need bottle cages.
  • Get some chain lube if you don't have any.
  • Depending on chain brand, a power link or quick link
  • For patch kits, the park one is pretty much OK but do stay away from the self-adhering ones, they're garbage!
u/pokemeng · 4 pointsr/bicycling

your price is just about right for shoes + pedals. Most new bikes dont come with a pedal so unless you know otherwise about the bike you are getting you will probably need to purchase a pedal and if you are purchasing pedals you might as well purchase shoes :] right? if you give a cyclist a bike, hell want pedals, if you give him pedals, hell want shoes... :P Also im a big fan of just splurging on what you can and enjoying the full package. This is all dependent though on your budget.

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO

this is the pedal i ride on my commuter. its a good dual duty pedal and the platform feels solid. Its a bit bulky so i dont ride it on my nice bike but if your planning on clipping in only sometimes i would suggest this one. If you are planning on riding clipped a majority then i would suggest a pedal without the platform.

Here are the differences in clips. (i think they are called the cleat but i am going to continue calling them the clips)

road clip

road clip shoes notice these have 3 holes where you screw the clip into the shoe in a triangular pattern.

spd clip

spd clip on shoe

notice the spd clip is smaller and recessed. This makes the shoe feel more like a normal shoe and you dont notice the clip as much

road v spd, road on left

road v spd clips and pedals

As a late disclaimer, I have never used road clips but this is the information i gathered in the process of purchasing. Road clipped shoes also usually have a stiffer sole, i believe.

As far as your question goes. I cant imagine long rides anymore without being clipped into the bike. You feel and are more attached to your machine. Your pedaling will most likely be more fluid, you can pull the pedals on the upstroke, your feet wont pop off the pedals on hard shifts letting you pedal through the shifts (something i couldnt do so well without clipless), and you have to learn to trust your bike because your stuck in it :]

That said, I did ride without clipless shoes for quite a while and didnt have any problems but if you asked me to go back now i wouldnt do it. I think if you cant swing a set of shoes and pedals right now, you wouldnt die because of it, but i would suggest investing in them if you are looking to be more serious about riding.

I hope this helps your decision and doesnt make things even more confusing :P

heres my setup for reference.

shoes $100

pedals $70

if your not sure how to use them. You slide the front of the clip in and then start pedaling and push the back of the clip in and it will click in. To get out you twist your ankle away from the bike and the clip will pop out. After i get my pedals i always loosen the spring on the pedal to the loosest setting, then tighten to preference. Looser settings will allow you to still twist your foot side to side while clipped in. Also i think spd clips will give you more side to side play than a road clip.

EDIT: i changes the road clip picture, it was a bit confusing before

u/metarchaeon · 4 pointsr/Ultralight

Your stove is fairly heavy, you can save 9 oz with a BRS3000 (.9 oz) and a light aluminum or Ti pot. This is the cheapest way to lighten up if you want to stay with a cannister. A DIY ethanol stove is cheaper and lighter still.

Do you need such a heavy battery?

Are you bringing a phone?

u/Graybealz · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

Here is a great little stove. It's a Chinese whisperlight, but I've been using it quite a bit over the past 2 years and have no complaints whatsoever. Also super cheap, which gives you more money to play with.

The Sawyer mini squeeze is also a great item to have. You should have $20-25 left after these two items.

Here's a decent magnesium fire starter for cheap as well.

With these items, all essential/survival items, you should have about $15-20 to play with. Maybe some socks?

u/Brutally-Honest- · 4 pointsr/knifeclub

Ka-Bar Becker BK2

Ontario RAT-3

Becker BK-16

Depending how big of a knife you want

u/jassack04 · 4 pointsr/knifeclub

If you really want a monster sized knife, sure. But I'd definitely get the carbon steel version that some others have suggested as well. It sounds like their quality isn't too bad.

However, I don't know if I'd really want to take something that huge hiking. Maybe SHTF-type hiking I suppose.

A couple of knives that I'd think would be similar priced or less (and have proven reputations) and would slightly more practically fall into the "only 1" category:

u/brianw824 · 4 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Honestly Id go fixed blade and I'd get something decently sized, ive been looking at the Becker BK2 (you can find this for $50 a few other places)
http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK2-Campanion-Fixed/dp/B001N1DPDE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1302310192&sr=8-1

Reason why is that its alot easier to work with wood, fixed blades are going to be alot stronger then any folding knife, its just all around going to be better for most situations.

Things to look for in a knife, well to start with you have to think about what you may use it for, is it a survival knife are you going to have to use it to work with wood, make fires, or maybe pitch up a shelter? Maybe just for cutting bandages, moleskin? Prepping food?
Alot of people will argue about the type of steel, stainless is supposed to be harder to sharpen but honestly its a some metal with a sharp edge pretty much anything will do, just watch out for the $5 wall mart knives, reading a few reviews will help.

Don't buy a kbar or something like that, anything that comes to a very sharp point is used for stabbing people, not for cutting stuff and I hope you dont plan on doing alot of that.

How thick the knife is, thicker blades tend to be better for prying or hacking stuff, but they will be heavier too.
Watch out for how the blade attaches to the handle, alot of knives skimp out on the steel and the blade is kind of just glued on or lightly bolted on and it makes them really flimsy. I know with the kbar the steel for the blade goes all the way back and the handle is bolted on to the steel for the blade, most non-cheap knives should be like this.
Blade length, longer blades will be better for hacking/chopping think mechette, but it will be more difficult to use them to cut smaller things like moleskin, bandages, or doing food prep.
well that's a few things to look at someone else suggested a SOG seal pup that's a good knife as well something else to look at. I probably wouldn't spend more then maybe $60-70 and avoid anything super cheap.

u/Prosapiens · 4 pointsr/EDC

Gorruck 34L GR2 Coyote Tan - a good bag, heavy, uncomfortable, probably give it to my grandchildren in like 50 years

Flip Flops - generic things

Bigblue 28W solar charger - very good, can charge my battery up during the day if i leave it in the sun which I've never really done honestly

Jakemy hardware tools - seamed useful? i've never needed this

Army glove shells - i thought i used these a lot and were indistructable but now that i think of it, i don't use them that often and are probably pretty cheaply made.

Sharpie, pen, all weather notebook - probably should switch over to a fisher space pen...

Straws - these are probably already broken.

Whistle - really really really loud

Fire-striker, matches, lighter - i'm not sure i have enough ways to start a fire

Fresnel lens - ok, now i have enough

LED flashlight - i used to go running in the middle of the night with this flashlight, its tiny

LED flashlight - this isn't the one i have but looks kinda similar? i don't remember where i got mine

Earbuds - generic cheap earbuds

Leatherman Surge - given to me by my wife for passing the bar. thanks wife!

First Aide kit - i put mine together from stuff i've stolen from friends houses whenever i go over and use the bathroom

playing cards - these look very similar to the ones i have, they are plastic so they won't get rained on

glasses/ sunglasses - i have really bad vision

personal hygiene kit - aahhhh dry shaving

Sawyer Mini / syringe, collapsible canteen (dirty), heavy duty straw - i've never used this

collapsible canteen (clean) - i've never used this either

sewing kit - i've used this a lot

ID tags - i guess if i get blown up they'll know my blood type?

garbage bag - for when my pockets are full

elastic bands - i use these when packing to keep rolled socks and things from falling apart

Salt - i have nooooo idea why i have this

cooking grate - i'm not going to hold meat over a fire with a stick like some sort of caveman

heavy duty ziplock bag - in case my mapcase breaks and other reasons

rip-patch - leftover from when i needed a pack because i bought a crummy cheap inflatable sleeping pad.

Army Fleece Beanie - i always keep this at the top of my pack

4 Bungie Cords - not the one i use but similar. to make a field-expedient shelter

Trowel - for disposal of biological wastes

Lensatic compass - because GPS should only be a backup

Pocketboy 130 folding saw - i have a bigger one for yardwork, this small one is really great

Tent stakes - for tent staking

Ravpower 26800 Battery - use this all the time can fast chage my stuff

Battery Battery holder, cables, wall charger - all fits togehter like glove!

Army Poncho - wear it, make a tent out of it etc

Microfiber towel - not the one i use but similar. i mainly use this for when the kids accidentally fall in a lake like they tend to do for some reason

Down Jacket - cheap chinese knockoff... i feel bad for not buying american

Wet weather top - not sure this is worth the space/weight

Wet Weather bottom - not sure if this is worth the weight/space

Silkweights - PJs! and warmth

Jungle Blanket - this is a lot better than the army's woobie. lighter and warmer

Gransfors Bruks Wildlife Hatchet - again, gift from wife. she wanted me to chop things and be more manly, generally. now i come home with parts of wildlife for her to cook

Map of New England - or, how i stopped worrying and love dismounted land navigation

PT belt - keeps me safe in all situations

Compression straps - i don't like lashing things to the outside but i guess i can if i wanted to

Fork and Spoon - stole these from the kitchen. i'll probably be replacing this soon with something titanium.

​

EDIT: i just priced it out: $1,585.08 total

u/DarthKonquer · 4 pointsr/knifeclub

I've used this and could not tell the difference to CRK grease. No experience with anything Nano though.

u/thr3ddy · 4 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

Here's a video of me cleaning and putting the whole thing back together. And, yes, it still works.

The two plastic body pieces were soaked for 24 hours before scrubbing it down. The lube used in the video for the plastic contact points as well as the trackball rollers is Finish Line Extreme Fluoro.

A big thanks to my friend /u/jfgorski for the Alphagrip iGrip! Read his opinion on the device right here, he's been using these things for years and has much more insight than I could ever provide. Also, thanks to /u/ripster55 for letting me post this here.

u/MangyCanine · 4 pointsr/Watches

Maybe a Casio EF-503D? In your price range, it has to be quartz.

u/NotSure098475029 · 4 pointsr/camping

Here is what I think is the best stove for backpacking and it is $12.

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U


Add a fuel canister to that, a cheap pot, a mini bic lighter and a spoon and your kitchen is complete.


Rent the Big3 from REI (sleeping bag, tent, pack). Buy the Sawyer Mini water filter for $25 and use Smartwater bottles to store water. Take your existing clothes (no cotton) and use your existing shoes.

u/Mexicanpizza1 · 4 pointsr/preppers
u/hessmo · 4 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Mora knives have always served me very well as outdoors knives.

they might look cheap, but they have great steel, and have really held up (I typically buy the stainless version like this one)

https://smile.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1466474771&sr=8-1&keywords=stainless+mora

u/CreativeRealmsMC · 4 pointsr/Bushcraft

I had been making photo albums but just started a YouTube channel. My friend was nice enough to let me borrow his GoPro and mounts but most of the time I record with my phone (also have another camera but it's a bit broken and can only take pictures). Part of what I'm ordering from amazon is a new monopod/tripod/selfie stick which I'm very much in need of at the moment since my videos are a bit shaky.

Haven't gotten around to do any solo 2 day trips yet (most of the time I'd be with a group and there would be designated campsites to fill up water at) but if I was going out with no means to fill up I'd take anywhere from 4-6 liters of water. The climate here is very hot and there is no such thing as bringing too much water. If there was a water source I could potentially allow myself to bring less since I could boil any water I find.

Amazon list:
-5.11 Rush 72 55L backpack
-Mora Companion (stainless steel)
-Bahco Laplander
-Headlamp
-Jetboil 10in frying pan
-Whetstone

All together that weighs 7.9 pounds and at some point I'd like to get a sleeping pad and tarp bringing it up to ten pounds (not including food, water, and other supplies which might get me to around 15-20 pounds depending on the duration of my outings).

As for the grill it's just a makeshift one. Four tent pegs and a small grate.

u/PeevedGuy · 4 pointsr/EDC

I'm a big fan of Mora knives. Good knives at a very reasonable price. All of the ones linked come with hard plastic sheaths.

u/zedmartinez · 4 pointsr/bicycling

If you aren't in a city with notoriously high and advanced bike theft, and aren't leaving it out overnight, try this: http://www.amazon.com/OnGuard-Pitbull-Ls-11-5-4-5/dp/B005YPKBRI/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1463020335&sr=8-3&keywords=onguard+pitbull

The long shackle is technically less secure, because it's easier to leverage open, but in a place without a lot of racks it's a blessing to have, because you can fairly easily find /something/ in short walking distance that'll go around, unlike the smaller Ulocks that mostly only work with racks (or, I've found, bikes without big bags and wide upright handlebars). It's a good medium security lock, and both sides of the shackle lock. Downsides, it's heavy, because big, but not as heavy as a chain which is your next smart option (don't get cable locks, they can be cut soooo easily), and the mounting bracket is OK, but I've had two of them fail. I just carry mine in a bag now.

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1463020570&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+series+2 This is a little lower security lock, but still a mighty fine one in an area with mostly thefts of opportunity. The included cable is for passing through your wheels for a secondary bit of safety. It's the best selling option at the good local bike shop out where I am (Indianapolis).

As for using them, this is the classic guide: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html His method is routinely the best, but without racks it can be hard to lock through the wheel and not the frame. If you can't lock through the wheel, make sure the shackle goes through one of the triangles. And, no matter what, lock to something securely attached to the ground and don't lock to anything the bike can be lifted off and over. Be sure and try lifting any cheap racks you do come across, you'll be surprised how many aren't bolted down right... or at all.

u/Aperture_Kubi · 4 pointsr/AskReddit

> -If you ride a bike around your campus: get a u-lock and a u-lock only.

And use it right. Through at least the the frame and bike rack, front tire if you can, and if it came with an extra chain/cable, loop that through the back tire.

This kind of lock set is what I mean.

u/iamkenthomas · 4 pointsr/Sacramento
u/Inanimate-Sensation · 4 pointsr/indieheads

They look like this

https://www.amazon.com/Xiaomi-Electric-Long-range-Fold-n-Carry-Ultra-Lightweight/dp/B076KKX4BC

You download an app and it's like 15 cents mile or something. But they are everywhere downtown. Thousands littered all on sidewalks. It's crazy.

u/chopyourown · 4 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Sterno is a terrible fuel for backpacking. I'd use a canister fuel stove. A cheap option is the BRS 3000 - link here.

An alternative would be to build your own alcohol stove, which is easy but slightly more finicky. Follow the rough directions [here] (http://andrewskurka.com/2011/how-to-make-a-fancy-feast-alcohol-stove/)

u/YourBrainOnJazz · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

This is lighter then the micro rocket and much cheaper then both the pocket rocket and micro rocket.

http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

Others on the Ultralight subreddit have recommended this stove as well.

u/pto892 · 4 pointsr/CampingGear

The quality is all pretty similar. The real difference is in feature set and ability to control the flame-for example there's a world of difference in flame control between a Primus Omnilite and a MSR Whisperlite even though both are high quality products with a proven track record of reliability.

Some of the cheap canister stoves are also pretty good quality, since there just isn't too much engineering that's needed to make one. The BRS stove is a good example of such. These things are really just a screw on valve assembly and a burner, not much else is needed.

u/aggieotis · 4 pointsr/bicycling

Here is an excellent run-down of the topic:
http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-bike-lock/

Best take-away quote from the article:

>What does it mean that a “decent” lock takes 63 seconds to breach with an angle grinder whereas the “best” takes 117 seconds? Exactly what it sounds like: almost nothing.

Therefore get the Kryptonite Series 2 lock with a cable for attaching your wheel.

Also how you lock your bike, what you attach it to, how long you leave it there, and where you leave it have much more of an affect on your bikes overall safety than the difference between withstanding an angle grinder for 1 minute or 2 minutes.

u/username868 · 4 pointsr/vancouver

Not sure if this is the one you’re looking for but when it was in stock I think it was like $600?

Xiaomi Mi Electric Scooter, 18.6 Miles Long-Range Battery, Up to 15.5 MPH, Easy Fold-n-Carry Design, Ultra-Lightweight Adult Electric Scooter (US Version with Warranty) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_fssVCbX0HVC6V

u/psycho10011001 · 4 pointsr/cycling
u/kscannon · 4 pointsr/bicycling

I have used 2 stands. One is a cheap $50 amazon stand the other is a Park Tool stand I found on craigslist. The Cheap stand work, it is taller but less stable. I prefer grabbing the seat post than grabbing the top tube so the cheap stand will rotate to balance the bike. I cannot get the chain horizontal to run though a chain cleaner. It will always settle to an angle. If it doesnt bother you than a cheap stand works. bike hand has a stand that was $90 now $100 that the head is teethed to prevent rotation. I was going to get that one before I found the Park Tool Stand on Craigslist.

Any stand will be usable but some might be less stable than others or give you a headache. There is a point you pay for what you get before it turns into you pay for the name.

u/jburm · 4 pointsr/MTB

I got this one and its worked well for general maintenance, repair, and bike building.

u/trALErun · 4 pointsr/MTB

I only have two legs and I rarely fall over.

Seriously though, unless you're being careless they are plenty sturdy. I'd recommend this one:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=ya_aw_oh_bia_dp?ie=UTF8&psc=1

And I've heard good things about the Aldi stand if you want to go super cheap.

You should definitely get a torque wrench. I've been happy with the Nashbar branded one.

u/so_there_i_was · 4 pointsr/Bushcraft

Sawyer mini is the way to go for water filtering.

u/davidguydude · 3 pointsr/bengals

It will be cold as fuck, bundle up good and bring some of those hand warmers

he will likely catch a bit of harassment, but it shouldn't be all that bad.

parking will fill up early. it will be a lot of traffic, but imo its worse at the end of the game when leaving.

i dont know exactly where 333 is, but imo, this stadium has some of the best views from the upper levels compared to the old stadium especially.

who dey!

u/BonesIIX · 3 pointsr/boston

I have the same scooter that Bird uses and use it for daily commute. If you're not overweight (275+) you should be fine on slight hills and such.

I am above that weight limit and still have enough juice to do about 5 miles daily on a single charge.

I use it to get from Rosi village to Forest Hills and then the reverse commute is North Station to South Station and then Forest Hills to home.

It feels much safer and more comfortable riding in bike lanes than sidewalks, cars are not much of an issue I've found, traffic is usually slower than me eve ant 15-16.5mph


The biggest issue is fixing a patch if you pop a tire. Just take the wheel to a bike shop with a new inner tube (they sell thicker ones on amazon too) - costs about $15 to fix a flat. The reason I dont say DIY is cause it's a fucking PAIN to get the tire back on.


All in all, I love how it's modified my commute. I have done the full North Station to Roslindale commute (9mi in about 55min) went from full charge to 20%, but again, I'm a big guy so you have to think about that when considering distance. 3 miles you should be able to do in 20-25min no problem.

https://www.amazon.com/Xiaomi-Electric-Long-range-Fold-n-Carry-Ultra-Lightweight/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=sr_1_3?hvadid=214412971590&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=9001978&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=17202018431095415180&hvtargid=kwd-301887435343&keywords=xiaomi+m365&qid=1554410865&s=gateway&sr=8-3

u/Neeko6ix · 3 pointsr/Overwatch

They're heat packs. Commonly used by skiers and snowboarders on very cold days. I got a real kick out of seeing them used in OWL. Voila

u/crispychoc · 3 pointsr/CasualConversation

Do you have the regular planet fitness membership or the black one?
http://www.planetfitness.com/membership-types

If you have the black one you're golden ;)

Other than that, get a good portable stove so you can make some food and boil water for tea or coffee.

Buy a jerrycan for water with a little tap on it, fill it up regularly, it also means you can wash yourself even if you don't have access to showers etc.

A small camping spade is good for number 2s in the woods :)

Get a mosquito net hammock, and maybe a cheap tent it means you can sleep outside or on campsites on hot nights.

Your biggest expense will be gas for the car.

Planet fitness is a good idea, but it's urban areas, I would do some (wild) camping more often.

I have no idea what campsites cost in the US per night, but if you do that every other night, or even once in 3 nights, it beats sleeping in a car park, and is cheaper than a hotel.

Have a look at some of the national parks, some of them have basic (cheap) camp grounds too. Campgrounds are really cool places to meet people, much better than a Walmart car park ;)

Shopping list:

Solar shower

Water carrier

Folding spade

Hammock

Cookware

Camping canister stoves are cheap, between $10 and $50
Cheap tent is around $50

Total expenses before hand, around $150-200 max.

I just went for the first items I found on amazon, there are probably cheaper or better products out there.

Source, I did a 6 month trip by bicycle through Europe, so not the same, but the basics are the same. You have the advantage of not being restricted by weight or size of items, which makes it cheaper.

If you need more ideas, packing tips or anything else, I'll gladly help ;)

Have fun, explore and enjoy, it's fun!

u/thatsmytrunks · 3 pointsr/sanantonio

I ended up buying one of the models that Bird uses (M365 here) and have been in love with it. I use it as my main source of transportation now, and it gets me anywhere I need to go in the city.

I think with time the Public opinion on these will change as they're so much cheaper and energy efficient than cars for small trips.

u/mfanyafujo · 3 pointsr/peacecorps

It is a bag that you fill with water and leave out in the sun. It's designed to heat the water pretty quickly, and it has a little nozzle and can be hung so you can take a hot shower... or at least be dripped on with hot water, anyways. I just used mine to heat water for my bucket bath.

Example: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1481853223&sr=8-4&keywords=solar+shower

u/MotherofAllNoobs · 3 pointsr/GearTrade

These are pretty well recommended for their price if no one else offers a trade.

u/crisnavarro23 · 3 pointsr/okeechobeemusicfest

Unless you wanna pay whatever money it is for showers then i suggest you get one of these bad boys! http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1451936963&sr=8-3&keywords=camping+shower Partner it with some bio degradable soap or whatever and you can shower at your camp. While it wont be the best it'll definitely help get you clean and feeling fresh.

u/Glittrsweet · 3 pointsr/FireflyFestival

Bring rain boots just in case. Last year's mud fest turned into a shoe graveyard and I ruined several shoes that I brought.

Also Walmart /camping stores have solar powered shower bags for real cheap (like under $20) bring a big jug of water and dedicate that jug solely to shower water, its not the cleanest feeling (if you don't have a shower tent you can wear a bathing suit and wash up outside of your car) but i certainly hope youre not going to a camping festival thinking you're going to be clean anyway, its definitely better than waiting in a long line and paying for a shower

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0009PUT20/ref=mp_s_a_1_sc_1?qid=1452773074&sr=8-1-spell&pi=AC_SX110_SY165_QL70&keywords=solar+powerd+showe+bag

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B010GSU294/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?qid=1452773182&sr=8-3&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=shower+tent&dpPl=1&dpID=41VMyC7Bm0L&ref=plSrch

*sorry about the links I'm on mobile

u/lindymad · 3 pointsr/AskNOLA

One of the things I like most about living here is not needing a car. There are certainly some places I avoid biking to/through, especially at night, out of concern for my safety. If I need to go there, I just use lyft, or get a ride from a friend.

Someone else mentioned that there are no bike lanes - this is not true. There are bike lanes on some roads, but not as many as I personally would like. That said, there are a lot of pretty narrow streets, especially in the quarter/marigny/bywater that simply don't have room for bike lanes.

One recommendation I would make is to get a bike airhorn for the moments when drivers aren't paying attention/don't care about bicyclists/aren't exactly sober, which seems to happen a lot here. This has saved me on quite a few occassions.

u/GhostInTheSteam · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Wow... put a baby carrier on there... Just wow. That is so awesome. I want to get one and paint it black with yellow flames, and put a doll in it.

As for bells. You're doing it [wrong](http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound-Bike-Horn/dp/B000ACAMJC "This will put the fear of god into them.").

u/imjusthereforab · 3 pointsr/bicycling
u/ChariotOfFire · 3 pointsr/bicycling

This is the best option. If you really want to send the drivers a message, you could get an Airzound

u/FortunaExSanguine · 3 pointsr/nyc
u/TacticalBeast · 3 pointsr/Roadcam

Might I suggest this bike horn
I just bought one a couple weeks ago and it has already saved me multiple times. Super loud and makes people jam on their brakes.

u/benh509 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Great, super light, can hold in hand for better trail illumination or clip on to a hat for hands free.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LUO028U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_b2l2Cb31GDXSB

Awesome headlamp. Super light, lots of levels and a red light and lockable. Get it from Litesmith.com with the shock cord band for an even lighter option.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077Z3LNX9/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_Q3l2CbTEV8FDE

I have both and love both.

u/robthebudtender · 3 pointsr/Portland

https://www.amazon.com/Delta-Cycle-Airzound-Bike-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC


Yes, just recommended this elsewhere in the thread.

Excellent investment.

u/thisisGLADOS · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

you can still get those on amazon for $43 I have them and they are pretty nice

u/physhhgdd · 3 pointsr/bicyclehawaii

https://www.amazon.com/Delta-Cycle-Airzound-Bike-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC

Have to use the frame pump(or floor pump at home) to refill though!

u/awesometographer · 3 pointsr/bicycling
u/alaskaj1 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

Cascade mountain tech poles. The aluminum ones are $23.

They also have carbon fiber ones for $45 but they go on sale occasionally, I got them for $28 a while back.

These poles can often be found in store at costco I believe.

I have used these poles on both light hikes and multi day backpacking trips and they have held up well. Overall they seem to be the go to pole for an inexpensive option on here.

u/sanchopanza · 3 pointsr/ukbike
u/jcb272 · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Stove: BSR Ultralight stove

Spoon: Toaks Ti Long handle

Pot: Toaks Ti 750ml

Fire: Bic Mini

Seasoning: Tabasco in 30ml plastic dripper bottle

Water bottle: Smart Water 1L (x2)

Purification: Boil (winter) Sawyer Squeeze (other 3 seasons)

Meals: Mountain House, Packit Gourmet, SPAM singles, trail mix

I eat right out of the bag for the dehydrated meals

u/RetroTexan · 3 pointsr/3Dprinting
u/Clegko · 3 pointsr/Roadcam
u/7861279527412aN · 3 pointsr/Ultralight
u/darkstar999 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

My coworker has an air horn on his recumbent trike. It hooks up to a bottle and is refilled with a bike pump. It is loud. Something like this.

example video made me laugh :D

u/GarlandOutdoors · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

I know you wanted the rubberized handles, but that limits your options significantly. I'd say apply the rubber yourself with a tool handle dip.
BRS Stove - $16
Snow Peak Trek 900 - $45
Rustoleum Grip Dip $17.50

That leaves a solid $10. You can have them pick you up a canister or two!
I've been using both the BRS Stove and Snow Peak Trek 900 and they both work great. Now, if you have a windy situation, you may need to build a windscreen or get a MSR Pocket Rocket.

​

u/FartOutTheFire · 3 pointsr/Denver
u/Inigo93 · 3 pointsr/camping

Alternatively, for those who are more interested in a bit of comfort I recommend the Luggable Loo. Combine that bad boy with a trash bag and some kitty litter and you're set!

u/TheDragonzord · 3 pointsr/Battlefield

Well we PC guys sometimes have to just make do with what we have on hand while we save up money for what we need, but, if you really want to get efficient I'd suggest one of these maybe on some sort of custom wooden platform. Desk height and all that.

u/Yeti_or_Not · 3 pointsr/preppers

A five gallon bucket with a snap-on toilet seat is a good idea. Wag-Bags are a compostable liner for the bucket that comes with the neutralizing powder to treat about four uses before needing to be replaced.

u/SnapshillBot · 3 pointsr/MGTOW

Archived for your convenience

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u/Jacob_The_Duck · 3 pointsr/bicycling

There is nothing cheap or shitty about this lock and even the less intense locks are pretty damn solid and could easily be compared to locks twice their price.

u/captain_ramshackle · 3 pointsr/bicycling
u/Kazyole · 3 pointsr/bicycling

How big of a lock would you need?

I'm a fan of the Kryptonite New York series personally. They're super heavy duty...I can't imagine cutting through one...There's a 4x8 and a 4x10.25

I use the 4x8 to lock my frame and back wheel, and one of these bad boys to lock my front wheel to the frame.

It's overkill...I know...but I'm in New York.

Amazon is actually very reasonably priced on all of those by the way...if you're looking to order online.

u/phototheory · 3 pointsr/UTAustin

As someone who has gotten a bike stolen I cannot recommend this u-lock strong enough. I have a pretty expensive road bike, and using two of these has keep me safe ALL this semester. HIGHLY recommend. The only con is that these u locks are heavy--they're built like bricks though. Don't skimp out on the locks--you'll regret it. Also, remember to lock your wheel and frame to the bike stand, and to lock your back wheel to the frame. Sometimes they'll simply take your wheel so don't risk it!

u/jbcorny · 3 pointsr/bicycling

good questions. this mini u-lock combined with a cable [to secure front wheel, too] is what is now used by most who are serious about securing their ride.

and these two rack designs are typically preferred in the u.s.:

new york city rack - nyc is making this their "city approved" rack after a thorough design contest. bikes can lean against it to be stable; can lock the front, rear, and frame easily; and it looks very clean from a design standpoint

typical "u" tube: these are found a lot and function very similar to the nyc rack. aesthetically they're not as nice but a lot cheaper and good function. you can see how the yellow bike can secure both wheels and the frame.

btw - what country?

u/ikarios · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Look into the Kryptonite Evo Mini or Fahgettaboutit mini U-locks. They're about as small and light as they come without compromising security or getting a lock designed for a chain.

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Fahgettaboutit-Bicycle-U-Lock-6-Inch/dp/B000OZ9VLU/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1311793787&sr=8-2

u/walrus0 · 3 pointsr/vancouver

In that case, nothing less than this:

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Fahgettaboutit-Bicycle-U-Lock-6-Inch/dp/B000OZ9VLU/ref=sr_1_3?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1304026133&sr=1-3

If it's a really nice bike people -will- strip the parts off it, in five minutes with some hex keys your shifters, rear derailleur, etc can be gone. In a Shimano component world I wouldn't lock any new model bike with better than Deore (MTB) or 105 (Road) components in public. For SRAM, not better than X7...

u/150DudeandStillYoung · 3 pointsr/bicycling

Naiveté.

Moved from a suburb (where I could have left the bike unlocked in the back of a truck for 2 hours without a worry in the world) to a city for work. Brought the Giant Escape 2 my Dad had given to me, but only had a cheap cable lock and hadn't been given access to my work's bike cage yet.

3rd day of training, my start group and I were headed to happy hour. I walked outside and the bike was gone from the rack outside the office.

I was able to look at the security footage; some dude literally walked up, cut the lock discreetly, and walked away like it was his.

Filed a police report, and went to happy hour. Then I bought the Escape 3 and a Kryptonite U-lock and didn't bring the bike to work until I had bike cage access.

u/warpzero · 3 pointsr/toronto

I went all out and got the Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit:

http://www.amazon.ca/dp/B000OZ9VLU

This lock is small, but JUST the right size to lock your bike, with no room for anything to get in to pry it. It's a very solid lock.

u/AwkwardCow · 3 pointsr/Sacramento

Let's be real here....locks are only deterrents for honest people. If someone wants your bike, they'll find a way...


But to OP...if you want to make it a damn tough job to get your bike, invest in one of these...

http://smile.amazon.com/Kryptonite-997986-Black-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock/dp/B000OZ9VLU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1413005358&sr=8-3&keywords=kryptonite+new+york

Your lock is only as strong as the weakest link so don't skimp on anything else if you're going to get this..I've held it in person it is pretty heavy...I'd say a good 4 or 5 pounds even though Amazon says 1...it's definitely not only a pound. But there's no way you're going to cut that off with boltcutters, you'd need an angle grinder. Keep that in mind if you're going to get it.

u/mdzealot · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00XM0YGW8 if you're in Canada.

Or, check Costco for them. They're cheap, light, durable enough. If you really like poles, look to upgrade in the future. But give those a go first imo

u/yardboz · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

That's what I have and what I was going to suggest. I'm not convinced that I need to spend $100 on hiking poles.
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=twister_B00YHMJ6BQ?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

u/RacerX3888 · 3 pointsr/longisland

New York Fahgettaboudit, This is the bike lock I use, its expensive but its pretty much the only lock you'll ever need. Just the look of it alone is enough to make robbers look the other way.

u/redaroodle · 3 pointsr/CargoBike

Here's what I do for my Bullitt: One Kryptonite Fuhgeddaboudit (small as you can get), and a set of Pinhead lock set (locking skewers for wheels and locking seat post collar). A slim Tile under the cargo deck sealed with 3M Heavy Duty Packing tape.


With the pinhead lock set, you only need to lock the frame with the Fuhgeddaboudit U-lock (typically I lock at one of the lateral vertical braces parallel to the head tube, or if I have the big cargo box for the kids on the front, will lock around one of the rear seat stays).

Kryptonite Lock: https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B000OZ9VLU/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Pinhead lock set: https://smile.amazon.com/Pinhead-Bicycle-Locking-Skewer-Pack/dp/B000XHBKOU/ref=sr_1_6?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1525893173&sr=1-6&keywords=pinhead+lock

u/AAjax · 3 pointsr/ebikes

I have a kryptonite fagetaboutit mini for the primary and employ two folding locks on the front a rear to cover the wheels. Usually a multiple lock approach means that many more cuts and will make your bike that much more unattractive to pilfer.
Stay away from any cable solution, they are worthless.

u/archbox · 3 pointsr/preppers

Filters better and filters more:



| Lifestraw | Sawyer Mini
---|---|----
Membrane | 0.2 microns | 0.1 microns (2x better)
Capacity | 264 gallons | 100,000 gallons (378.8x better)
Bacteria | 6 LOG | 7 LOG (10x better)
Bacteria% | 99.9999% | 99.99999% (10x better)
Protozoa | 3 LOG | 6 LOG (1000x better)
Protozoa% | 99.9% | 99.9999% (1000x better)
Price | $19.20 | $19.97 or 4 for $67.51 ($16.88 each)

The mini is also smaller and comes with a 32 oz squeezable water pouch, 7" tube, syringe for cleaning (if it clogs)

>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable bottles (28 mm thread), hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source

http://sawyer.com/products/sawyer-mini-filter/

u/Kashino · 3 pointsr/bicycling

the thumb shifter won't work on drops. flat bar clamp section is 22.2mm, drop bar clamp section is 23.8

You can make it work with the sora STI shifter you listed, the cheaper alternative is the microshift stuff you can buy on ebay (I'd go with second hand shimano stuff though)

Then you'd need new cables

Of course the easier option is to just get bar ends, you can even get drop bar bar ends

u/NewYorkNickel · 3 pointsr/cycling

I have (nearly) the same bike as you (7.4 Firebrand) and ride mine for the same purposes. Lately I've been training for a charity ride and got a pair of these for cheap on Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-33617-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8

The only rub is that you have to also buy adapters for the IsoZone grips so the drop bar ends will fit (~$5). I also got some cork tape from the same company for relatively cheap, altogether making it much cheaper than buying whole new handlebars and shifters.

Also, if you're getting into more fitness riding/training, I couldn't recommend clipless pedals and MTB shoes enough. They've helped with my rides tremendously!

u/sporkfly · 3 pointsr/bicycling

You could get bar end drops instead of changing out your handlebars completely.

u/_CorkTree_ · 3 pointsr/bicycling

This is what I suggest to people when they ask this question. Doing a true drop bar conversion will likely be too expensive to be practical. You had might as well either get some bar-ends like these or just save up for a different bike.

u/amaROenuZ · 3 pointsr/bicycling
  • Mountain bikes tend to only have 1 way to hold the bike. Ditch the grips and get some bar tape, along with some bar ends. Normal bullhorn style ones are fine, but if you really want to step up your game, Origin8 makes some drop-bar attachments that are pretty sweet

  • Clipless pedals aren't for everyone. If they make your feet and knees hurt, don't use em. Simple as that.

  • This could be a matter of posture. If your core isn't supporting enough weight, it can mess up the curvature of your back. That will move strain up onto your upper back and shoulders...right where you're getting the pain.

  • Might be a loose headset. Could be worse a trip to the shop.

  • Knobbly tires are terrible for road riding. Swapping to a smooth road-tread or outright slick tire will improve your bike's grip and acceleration significantly.

  • Getting a fitbit or some other personal telemetry tracker would probably help.
u/King_Jeebus · 3 pointsr/PacificCrestTrail

I used my phone for Guthook/camera (and podcasts) so it was pretty much a necessity to be charged before I could leave town... so I made sure my wall-charger, powerbank, and phone were all quick-charge and it made a massive difference for me: I would hit town and put phone/powerbank on charge first thing, do my re-ration etc, then be able to hit the trail again within a few hours with full charge ... whereas I knew other folk who had to stay overnight when they didn't want to.

I got:

  • AUKEY USB Wall Charger with Quick Charge 3.0 & Dual Ports (surprisingly large, but worked great.)
  • Anker PowerCore II 10000 (great, quick charge both in and out. Only 1 port, but I 95% of the time just charged the phone.)
  • Nitecore NU25 (awesome torch. not quickcharge, but never really needed it)
  • 2 USB cables (came with the above stuff, I switched one out for a shorter one eventually)
  • Motorola G4+ (good for Guthook, meh camera but did the job well enough and it was kinda disposable as it only cost $100 unlocked)
  • iPod nano (I just like music so much while I walk I wanted a backup in case phone started getting low, and this thing is tiny. I actually used it a ton!)

    I think 2 ports is enough really, I would just charge the headtorch/ipod when I got the chance or a longer town stay. Ontrail I would kinda start running low if I used the phone a lot for 4 days, and have to be a bit conservy... there's likely better stuff now, but just fyi!
u/bpwnz · 3 pointsr/cyclocross

there's always this option too. $500 vs $20, can't hurt to try.

u/muchosandwiches · 3 pointsr/bicycling

You will need new brakes as well because the Tourney brifters won't pull V-Brakes enough for them to stop. I personally don't recommend that he go this route.

The better route might be:

  • Origin8 Drop Bar Attachments (http://www.amazon.com/Origin8-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8)
  • Keep existing shifters
  • Get Tektro RL520 V-brake drop levers
  • Get Tektro RL740 interrupter levers.
  • New brake cable and cable housing.

    You may not be able to shift from the hood or drops, but you'll have more hand positions.
u/fakedbatman · 3 pointsr/ElectricScooters
u/BioKhem · 3 pointsr/bikecommuting

These might be Origin8 Drop Ends from Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0013G6PB8/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_image_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1). I installed these on my raleigh cadent 1 hybrid and it's great! Offers similar feel to standard drop handlebars without the hassle of actually converting.

u/Uncle_Paul_Hargis · 3 pointsr/Watchexchange

Amazon Black Mako

I have a Blue Mako - beautiful sturdy watch. For the money, it doesn't get any better. I get lots of compliments on mine. Casual, or dressed up. Looks great.

u/csulildude · 3 pointsr/Watches

I don't think this is what you wanted exactly but… I would recommend all 4. Seiko and citizen are two great watch companies for the price point. My one other recommendation is for the orient mako Black, Blue, Amazon search for other colors. That said to help make a decision you should ask yourself a few questions.

Do you want an automatic or quartz?

What size watch do you want? (How big are your wrists?)

Which one do you like the best?

u/spmtr · 3 pointsr/Watches

It really depends on how dressy you want to go - unless you work in a super conservative industry, you can stray relatively far from the traditional "dress" watch. A few options that are more casual/versatile but would still easily work with a suit in most settings:

u/e39lemansm5 · 3 pointsr/Watches

I'd recommend one of Orient's divers:

Ray

Mako


There are several color options and they are great for the money. In house movements, decent bracelets and in my opinion, great looking. I have the ray raven and love it.

If you want to spend a little more, the Bernhardt Binnacle Diver is another great option. I also own one of these and I can tell you the biggest difference compared to the Orients is in the bracelet. It has to be one of the best ones on the market in that price range.

u/HectorTheOwl · 3 pointsr/Watches

The bezel is the (typically) metal or ceramic ring that surrounds the dial. On a lot of watches it is stationary, just part of the case. Most divers have a uni, or bidirectional rotating bezel that is historically used to time a dive. The bezels are usually pretty large on these so that they can be easily read, even underwater.

Orient makes some really affordable, automatic divers that are often recommended here. Is that the style you're looking for?

u/purebishop · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Incorrect. The twist lock version is $39.99. The quick lock version, which is what Costco has, is $44.99.

Green Graphics with Cork Handle https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_s8K4ybRHS6MNX

u/blackice7 · 3 pointsr/malefashionadvice

That's actually a good budget to get a decent entry-level watch.

If you're into a sporty, yet classy look, I would check out dive watches. They're versatile, indestructible, and will look good with most outfits.

I was in the same situation as you, and was deciding between the Orient Mako http://amzn.to/rivjad or the classic Seiko SKX007 http://amzn.to/qbWT5Z. I ended up with the SKX007 because it was unique, and a long time favorite within the watch community.

You can get either one of those <$150 on eBay from trusted sellers. Can't get much more bang for your buck.

u/twillstein · 3 pointsr/frugalmalefashion

Nearly all new watches go for significantly less than MSRP. For example you can easily find a 30% off coupon for buying from the Orient site.

A quick search of the Orient Mako (much loved by /r/watches) yields the following:

Orient website - $285 ($200 with 30% coupon)

Amazon - $145

Sky Watches - $120

u/mtd14 · 3 pointsr/Watches

Yeah, also right now the Black Orient Mako w/ bracelet is used on Amazon for $66 as an option. Quite a good watch, and this vendor cycles through which used watches are on super sale ~every 30 minutes. Just to consider.

link

u/kittehmew · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

Everyone needs a $78k dollar watch. Sadly, at that price, it isn't even prime! D: But no batteries needed, powered by movement. Plus, you're saving 46% if you buy it from Amazon. What a steal! This is not a palindrome, just a super expensive watch.

u/showurnuts · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon
u/phyzyzyzt · 3 pointsr/AskReddit

This watch is on sale. Read the reviews.

u/javin666 · 3 pointsr/pics

I didn't even know watches could cost this much, btw check out some of the reviews, they are hilarious: http://www.amazon.com/Zenith-96-0529-4035-Tourbillon-Titanium-Chronograph/dp/B001K3IXW8

u/bacon_boy_away · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

So is propane the best for weight right now besides alcohol? I love my white gas! Is this the stove you have for solo? https://www.amazon.ca/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

I'm leaving for my solo wct in two days, Tuesday May 7!

u/ComeAtMeFro · 3 pointsr/VeryExpensive

What about this watch

With a bonus review

u/blangaloor · 3 pointsr/Lal_Salaam

This thread reminded me of the Zenith watch reviews.

u/MrMaxPowers247 · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I thought you might like this a Mini Water Filter. Happy tax day

u/P-Tricky · 3 pointsr/whichbike

Sounds to me like you'll be after either a cyclocross/gravel grinder bike or a commuter. Both styles have clearance for wide 700c tires and (usually) mount points for racks and fenders, which are invaluable commuting accessories. The cyclocross/gravel bikes have drop (road style) bars, while the commuters have flat (mountain style) bars. Both are equally at home on pavement or gravel roads, but will struggle with true mountain biking.

Here are a bunch of new commuter bikes for ~$500:

u/viniciusah · 3 pointsr/whichbike

SHIMANO PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal

Almost 2 years ago, and not much wear and tear (except for some falls while learning to clip in and out LOL)

u/jjarmoc · 3 pointsr/cycling

For first clipless pedals, I like the Shimano PD-A530s. They’re SPD so you can walk in the shoes easily, and have clipless on one side with flats on the other so you can ride in sneakers occasionally.

I have them on my hybrid so I can go with whatever shoes I’m wearing for commutes, rides with the kiddo, etc. I still have the option to go clipless on that bike if I want using the same shoes as my road bike and its PD-M520L pedals.

Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_7S41Ab03R9VC1

For shoes I have Shimano SH-CT71 which I like just fine.

Shimano 2015 Men's Recreational Cycling Shoes - SH-CT71L (Black - 41) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LWGSQ7A/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_DW41AbV539CR4

This kind of setup is about $100, so it’s within your budget. I’m not sure what more you’d get for the extra money really..

u/mfryan · 3 pointsr/bicycling

i have some hybrid pedals. they are shimano spd and are flat on one side. my daily commute is about 1 mile, so it is really not worth putting the bike shoes on, but when i ride for pleasure i like to go 10-20 miles. then it is worth it.

My pedal setup.

pedals

shoes

u/benben555 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I have a set of Shimano PD-A530 on my Salsa Vaya that I use daily for commuting (platform) and longer rides on the weekend (SPD).

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376967521&sr=8-1&keywords=shimano+pd-a530

I really like them, they have not failed me after 2000 miles and are a solid feeling pedal. Even though they do not have the more 'spikey' surface on the platform side I have yet to have my feet slide off even in the wet. It may be a smidge out of your price range, but honestly it was for me as well, but I do not regret it one bit!

The big thing to keep in mind with dual pedals is will you be able to easily flip them to the side you need. With the A530s the SPD side is always on top in it's equilibrium position which means I don't have to look down to find the side I want. I just reach for the pedal with my foot and either clip in, or flip the back of it forward to get to the platform side.

Personally I think the design of the pedals you are looking at would make it really hard to determine which side of the pedal you are on. But, just like everything if you get used to it I'm sure it will work great. It all comes down to personal preference I guess!

u/jeremiahs_bullfrog · 3 pointsr/bikecommuting

Is this the one you're talking about, or do you mean the A530 or the M324? It looks to me like the M530 is dual sided clipless, but there's only one picture in Amazon, so I can't be sure.

I'm considering getting clipless pedals, but I also like riding to the grocery store or park and it doesn't make sense to change shoes.

u/Dogwithrabiez · 3 pointsr/mallninjashit

Let's see...

http://www.fedtacticaldirect.com/Kershaw-Camp-10-1077_p_49809.html

Kershaw Camp. Great kukri style blade on a budget that performs excellently.

http://www.bladehq.com/item--Kershaw-Cryo-Spring-Assisted--11101

Kershaw Cryo. Hinderer design for a cheap price! Small blade, but feels big in the hand. The Cryo 2, the larger version, will be coming out soon.

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Made-in-Sweden-511/dp/B004GAVOUU/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1372063610&sr=1-2&keywords=mora

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Companion-Heavy-Duty-Knife/dp/B009NZVZ3E/ref=sr_1_3?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1372063610&sr=1-3&keywords=mora

Moras. 1095 carbon steel, strong and used to do a lot of good things in the woods. Very tough, very sharp, very cheap.

At higher prices, the BK2

http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK7-Combat-Utility/dp/B001IPMG8K/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1372063915&sr=8-2&keywords=bk2

http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK2-Campanion-Fixed/dp/B001N1DPDE


And of course, the tried and true classic Kabar

http://www.bladehq.com/item--Ka-Bar-Short-USA-FightingUtility--16358

A few to get you started, though, with knives, you generally get what you pay for. Generally, you'll want to figure out exactly what you want in knives, especially in how you use them to find the best deals and blades.


Collecting knives is an expensive habit that ends up going into 500 dollars knives and 1k customs. ;) Budget and collecting don't mix!

u/TOUCHER_OF_SHEEP · 3 pointsr/EDC

It's definitely enough for a nice knife, though you might want to go a bit higher for a great knife. The KaBar BK2 is actually designed with things like batoning (hammering the knife through wood as a kind of faux hatchet using another piece of wood against the blade of the knife as the hammer itself) or chopping. It's a bit over $60, currently available for $69 to be precise, but as long as you don't flat out abuse it (prying heavy things, for example) it'll serve you well and quite possibly for the rest of your natural life.

At a lower price, you can get the Condor Bushlore, which at $35 is a perfectly valid choice that will serve you well indeed.

For an even lower price yet, the Mora Heavy Companion is from one of those few cheaper knife companies that does incredible work. I wouldn't baton with it, honestly, but even if you did it'd probably hold up just fine.

At a more expensive range, the Ontario Rat-5 is an amazing bushcraft knife. The Fallkniven Pilot Survival Knife is also an amazing knife. The Benchmade Bone Collector is spectacular knife made in D2 tool steel, one of the better steels available at that price. Another amazing knife is the Spyderco Bushcraft made in O1 tool steel. Finally, the Benchmade 162 is a pretty amazing knife.

One thing you'll notice about all of these knives with the exception of the Pilot Survival knife and the BM 162 is that they're all carbon steel knives. Carbon steel is a lot tougher than stainless (with a few very, very rare exceptions I'd never trust a long knife to be stainless steel) with the trade off of being a lot more of a hassle to take care of, since it needs to be regularly cleaned and oiled.

If you want a fire starter, carry a magnesium fire starter. With the carbon steel knives, you can probably strike it against the back of the blade to create the sparks you'll want and if not (like with some of the coated ones) you'll be carrying the striker anyway.

For sharpening, you'll want to get a decent sharpening setup and start stropping. A couple of easy sharpening systems would be the superior Spyderco Sharpermaker (usually available on Amazon around the $50 mark) or the Lansky Sharpening system which while cheaper isn't as good. You could take the time to learn how to free hand it, but most casual users don't care that much because it takes a long time to get proficient at freehand sharpening. Stropping is running the blade against something like smooth leather (usually smooth leather, actually) to remove burrs along the blade of a knife made by use and sharpening and the restore a blade to a better edge without removing metal. Stropping allows for a level of sharpness unachievable by sharpening alone and extends a knife's lifetime by allowing sharpness to be achieved for longer without removing metal from the blade. To learn how to strop, watch videos on YouTube or check out guides from the sidebar of /r/knives.

Finally, if you want a whistle, just carry a whistle. If you want a mirror for signaling, carry a small signaling mirror or mirror polish the knife you buy (a process where you sand the blade with increasing grit level sandpaper until it shines like the sun and you can see yourself in the blade).

If you have any more questions, feel free to ask.

u/baron32191 · 3 pointsr/knives

It really depends on what you want, size/price/use. Are you using it for wood processing or just general light use? Are you looking to spend under say $100? If you want something that can take anything you throw at it for a decent price check out this http://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Becker-BK2-Campanion-Fixed/dp/B001N1DPDE/ref=wl_it_dp_o_npd?ie=UTF8&coliid=IR4DJ93EW5I7A&colid=3DVWN7LG1J27P

u/merkon · 3 pointsr/knives

Here's a few:

Becker BK-2 carbon steel, decently sized though maybe big by your definition. This knife will take anything you throw at it, comes with a sheath.

The ESEE Izula is also pretty popular around here, definitely a lot smaller.

Can we get specifics on:

Carbon/Stainless?

Approx length?

Price range?

These will help us figure out what would be ideal.

EDIT: clarity

u/genericdude999 · 3 pointsr/camping

BK2 is a similar size and use, but with a better reputation for quality.

u/EUmd · 3 pointsr/UMD

Why not just buy an electric scooter at that cost?

https://www.amazon.com/Xiaomi-Electric-Long-range-Fold-n-Carry-Ultra-Lightweight/dp/B076KKX4BC $420 for the same model.

u/emmber · 3 pointsr/knives

For $50, you can get a good knife from Glock, and that would leave you with enough money to get another one if you wanted.
YOu could also go with the Becker BK2
I also have good experiences with this

Though this may be a little smaller than what you're looking for, my favorite fixed blade right now is the Dajo Survivor

u/ddickson83 · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

These are pretty popular over at /r/ultralight

u/WillPhillips · 3 pointsr/knives

If I was facing the end of the world and had to have an absolutely bomb-proof knife for under $70, I'd choose the Becker BK-2 and never, ever look back. Thing's a dang tank.

u/phig · 3 pointsr/knives

so BK2 or BK7?

Anyone have experience between the two? For camping I want a big ass knife that can take a beating, and both look like they can do that. I have a kabar USMC. Do I need to buy another knife?

u/stevewmn · 3 pointsr/airsoft

It's not an awful idea. I use a Teflon lube that I think works better. But lithium grease is better than nothing.

u/fiftypoints · 3 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

Mmm... you brush some krytox on those switch parts, then you rub some extreme fluoro on those stabilizers, you naughty typist.

u/lpmarshall · 3 pointsr/JMT
  • For around $50 you could get a Toaks 700ml pot ($40, 2.3 oz) and a BRS stove ($15, 1oz) and drop about 1lb.

  • For around $200 you could get a 20 degree HG Econ Burrow quilt and save 2.5lb (wide for ground sleeper).

  • Your big 3 are heavy in general but as you stated you aren't really to invest heavily in that.

  • I'd personally drop the solar panel and kindle and save another pound.

  • I'd add bug spray if you do not have it. And I assume you are probably taking a phone.

  • There are a few others areas like clothing that could be lighter, but if took the above suggestions you could drop 4.5 lbs for about $250
u/iskosalminen · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

As a tip, just don't bring alcohol stove on the PCT. Fire bans are everywhere and you don't want to be that guy who sets the trail on fire.

Get the BRS-3000t and ~650ml titanium pot, like Toaks 650ml pot or Evernew Ultralight Deep pot.

More than likely you'll go stoveless at some point.

u/sargon2 · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

You could consider the BRS-3000T stove instead of the MicroRocket -- it's cheaper and lighter.

For the pot consider the SnowPeak Trek 700 -- I have one and it fits a canister well.

u/dolichoblond · 3 pointsr/Watches

ProTip: Google "Best [Classic Watch Name] Homage" and you're sure to find a thread or ten on PMWF or Watchuseek. Sometimes there are a bit old and the stock is gone, but here's a few I pulled out of a WUS thread.

u/klausfu · 3 pointsr/Watchexchange

For sale is this discontinued Casio EF-503D-1AV. Great little speedmastard. $75 shipped within USA.

u/mfein123 · 3 pointsr/Watches

I am new to the watch & reddit game. Read posts on reddit and went out and got the Casio EF503D-1AV for $39.99 (Super deal somehow, thanks camelcamelcamel) + Croc strap $12.71 & the MDV106-1AV for $40.99 with the NATO strap for $5.95. Two watches and two straps for $99.64. I love them both. The straps are from Clockwork Synergy straps using a 15% coupon. Thanks for the help.
Amazon links:
Diver: https://www.amazon.com/Casio-MDV106-1AV-Stainless-Steel-Watch/dp/B009KYJAJY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1467421208&sr=8-1&keywords=mdv106
Chrono: https://www.amazon.com/Casio-EF503D-1AV-Edifice-Stainless-Steel/dp/B003URWNOG/ref=sr_1_1?s=apparel&ie=UTF8&qid=1467421297&sr=1-1&nodeID=7141123011&keywords=ef503

u/Weenie · 3 pointsr/Watches

Well, if it's a bracelet you're looking for...

Speedmaster inspired Casio Edifice.

u/Cool_Cherry_Cream · 3 pointsr/Watches
u/nephros · 3 pointsr/Watches

What you want is called a chronograph, which at least in the world of analog watches means a stopwatch right on the main dial, with a dedicated button to start and stop. Such a watch should fill your "quick access" requirement just fine.

Cheapest would probably be the Casio Edifice (example one two three) line of quartz chronos, but there are others, e.g. Timex Fly-Back (another [in white] (http://www.amazon.com/Timex-Intelligent-Fly-Back-Chronograph-Leather/dp/B0053EXKVE/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1368595494&sr=8-13&keywords=quartz+chrono) ) There are may other brands like Pulsar, Citizen, Festina or Bulova who offer cheap quartz chronos; even some Seikos go for under $150.

Now of course if you need more features from your stop watch, like multiple timers or lap-times you'll have to look into digital sports watches, there are also plenty of them around (g-Shock is recommended most of the time). Here I's recommend trying them out in a store because usually you won't find the description on how to access the timers on the web easily.

u/shittygrammer · 3 pointsr/frugalmalefashion

Check warehouse deals. It's 37.99 there ([http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/ol/B003URWNOG?shipPromoFilter=1])

u/Strom500 · 3 pointsr/Watches
u/tunafresh · 3 pointsr/Watches

Nice watch! I found the black dial version too if anyone is interested.

u/HeyRememberThatTime · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Direct link to the single blue filter that's $18.69 w/ Prime shipping: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/?psc=1

Woot's still a better deal if you're ordering more than one, like OP said, since you only pay the extra $5 once.

u/MrMakeveli · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I like that these gifts are quality items and "general purpose", and by that I just mean that they are accessible to most people. Let's face it: those who want niche high end gear will be purchasing that themselves because they'll know exactly what they are looking for. This is the sort of stuff that almost anyone would be pleased with.

Here are a few random things off the top of my head I might add:
Mora Knife - $15.
Casio Pathfinder watch - $40
Light Tripod and phone mount $22 + $15 (added these because a lot of people use their phones as cameras out there
[Constellation Playing cards]( Night Sky Playing Cards https://www.amazon.com/dp/1591932424/) - $6
Anker 10,000 mah battery pack - $26
Chill-Its Cooling Towel - $8
Nite Ize S-Biner - $4

u/super_swell · 3 pointsr/gundeals

You're better off buying a Mora knife for that purpose.

u/Gullex · 3 pointsr/Survival

$150 is plenty of budget for a good knife. This one is just slightly over that budget but will last you the rest of your life. It's kind of my dream survival knife.

The Fallkniven F1 is very popular as well and right in your price range.

Currently I use this knife which is also very good.

If you want to go a little less expensive still, Becker makes some good ones such as the Bk16. I know the Becker doesn't look anything like "hand made", but I have the BK2- I used paint remover to take the black coating off the blade, replaced the plastic handles with micarta and stained it to look more like wood, and built a leather sheath for it. It's a beautiful knife now. Too bad it's so goddamn heavy.

You could also go with something like the Mora bushcraft. I have that one also, very decent knife.

You could even just get a regular Mora or a Condor bushlore which are even more economical options.

u/vikramdesh1 · 3 pointsr/washingtondc
u/bcgulfhike · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

I second the Fizans! I've had a pair since '09 and they've been everywhere with me with never a problem. They look pretty battered but they work as new!

My girlfriend has the Cascade Mountain Tech carbon poles and they are OK. Although they are not exactly heavy, they seem so after using the Fizans! They are also not as well made and I'll be surprised if they last 10 years without replacing the flick locks (Andrew Skurka has an article on his blog about this issue and how to fix it)

u/Patrick_Spens · 3 pointsr/bugout

A hatchet and a small knife are ideal, in my experience. A Mora Companion and a Fiskar's X7 will do darn near anything you need to do. Less than $50 together.

u/BadHumanGoodGnome · 3 pointsr/knives

I prefer two different types of knives.
My EDC is a Kershaw Leek
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0009VC9YA?pc_redir=1412830846&robot_redir=1

And my camp knife is a Mora.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004ZAIXSC?cache=4ddea882c23be704873c7e83fe4a9622&pi=SX200_QL40&qid=1413465404&sr=8-1#ref=mp_s_a_1_1

They're both solid and the pair should still come in under budget.

u/AGingham · 3 pointsr/Bushcraft

Depends a lot on what your vision and current understanding of what "Bushcraft" is.

TL;DR: Start basic, check it's for you, be comfortable in a new learning journey.

The craft part of the word is important - it's about actually doing something, not just knowing and understanding the what and why. And certainly not about just possessing things and displaying them.

So - there are two aspects of this - you need to be comfortable "in the woods", and there's the creative aspect of doing and making "stuff" in that environment.

Being comfortable: It's important to be comfortable - otherwise the learning experience aspect is jeopardised. You'll see that some Bushcraft course providers have really minimal kit requirements on their courses, because they provide shelter, food and drink in order to get on with the particular skills they're teaching.

There's a really big marketing led "Leisure Camping" industry in the UK, with a lot of gear aimed at festival goers. If you're starting out on this journey, use all that to your advantage - get a basic tent (but one with a porch so you can sit outside, under cover, to make things and talk with others if you're at a communal event/course), sleeping bag, gas stove.

Pretty much everything else can - and I would suggest should - come from your normal, regular home kit. Perhaps the second-rate things that have been replaced, but not yet scrapped. If you lived with them once - you can do so again. This enables you to maintain home comforts and the security of being able to provide for particular personal necessities - diet, health, cultural etc. as a starting point, and then modify things as you learn more.


You'll find after a couple of outings why some things work "outside" and others just fail: Too heavy, too complicated, too dependent on other infrastructure after time (the gas stove for example).

Just make sure the basic Survival needs are met of:

// Protection / Water / Food / Fire / Navigation / Communication / First Aid, Medical, and Self Care / Illumination / Documentation and Information / Repair, Construction and Maintenance / Entertainment / Cash //

and you can support a good camping experience at the very least.

Turning to the craft - there's so much to observe, learn, understand and practice.

The activities you choose initially will reflect your existing abilities and interests, but some basic skills involve fire starting with just a spark or two - or an ember, careful precision woodworking with knife and small saw, and structure construction, that will likely require cordage and knowledge of knots.

So - a small starter kit specifically for the Craft:

  • ferro-rod and scraper
  • folding saw
  • small fixed-blade knife - and the usual one suggested isn't too bad at all ... Be wary of UK knife law, especially if you are essentially "urban".
  • big hank of paracord. At the beginning you don't need the more exotic types, and natural fiber alternatives may be something you come to appreciate later.


    EDIT: s/hunk/hank - the mind boggles as to a paracord "hunk". Perhaps best not to go there ...
u/Call_Me_Salamander · 3 pointsr/UCDavis

When it comes to books, you should always wait until the first day of class so the professor goes over what you will need for the course. For some classes you might not even need a book at all! You will not be using the book very much if at all the first week of the quarter so you will be perfectly fine waiting until the first day or two to order your books! I recommend avoiding the bookstore because it tends to be overpriced. Amazon has much better deals if you want a new book. For used books, join the Textbooks for Sale Facebook page, which is part of the UC Davis groups on Facebook. Also, many people obtain their books in PDF format online or through others who have taken the course. While this is not legal, it does provide for a very cheap alternative to buying your books (but again, it is illegal in most cases unless the publisher has explicitly released the book online in PDF format free of charge!)

I live in West Village as well actually! If you are in a furnished apartment you will get a bed, desk, nightstand and dresser to yourself. You also get a TV stand, living room table, dining table, and a sofa included that you will share. I recommend coordinating with your housemates on what to bring. That is what I did and it is way better than bringing 4 sets of silverware, plates, etc. Is there anything specific you'd like to know about that you should bring? The bare minimum (computer, clothes, kitchen utensils) is what I brought and I am doing just fine!

As for bikes, I recommend a single speed or standard road bike for commuting. The commute from West Village to the middle of campus on bike is 5-7 minutes depending on how fast you biking.

If you are looking to spend under $300 then buy a nice, used road bike when you get to Davis. There is a Bikes for Sale page for UC Davis on Facebook that is regularly updated! Craigslist works fine too. If you are looking to spend $300 or more, ($300 to $500 can get you a good quality bike that will last you throughout college) I recommend checking out this website: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/road_bikes.htm

I personally ride a Single Speed and I love it! It has no gears so you don't need to worry about shifting. It is lightweight, fast, and reliable. I have the Windsor The Hour from BikesDirect (it was $300 when I got it). I recommend the Mercier Kilo TT if they have it in stock (it is extremely popular so it is hard to find in stock). Otherwise the Dawes SST AL and Windsor TheHour/Clockwork are great too!

Let me know if you have any other questions!

Edit: I almost forgot! Thanks for reminding me /u/nTranced. A good U-lock is a must in Davis. Bike theft isn't extremely common but it does happen from time to time. If you have a nice bike make sure it is locked up with a U-lock. I personally recommend this lock as it is a good combination of price and effectiveness: http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1405012899&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+bike+lock

u/littlep2000 · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I bought this set as good decent lights, not the brightest, but enough to see in city/town conditions in the dead of night, probably okay if you are very rural;

http://www.amazon.com/Metro-360-Hotshot-2W-Light/dp/B00E1NQ696

As for helmets, more cost generally means lighter/more ventilation, depending on how much either of these means to you.

On locks, I'd suggest a set like this;

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_4?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1396539131&sr=1-4&keywords=kryptonite+lock+combo

it will allow you to lock the frame/rear wheel with the U, and the front wheel with the cable. It terms of safeguarding your bike, it's more like defensive driving; how, where, time of day, amount of people around, prevalence of bike theft, are bigger factors than the size of the lock.

u/PointsIsHere · 3 pointsr/cycling

I have a Monster cable lock now and just read the reviews on the brand for the first time. Definitely need to upgrade. I am thinking about something like this. U-locks are supposed to be great, and the cable would help keep the wheels safe.

u/alc6379 · 3 pointsr/chicago

Speaking of limited means, people will steal a bike that's only worth $100. $100 can be a lot to someone with limited means. If they lose their bike and have trouble getting into work, they're out even more.

That sounds obvious, but I'm getting somewhere with it. The argument of "they should protect their stuff better" falls flat when you start talking about people of limited means. A "decent" lock runs about $35-40. That's a lock you're going to be able to break quickly if you have an angle grinder, or even just a long enough pry bar. To get really good (note: not impenetrable) security, you're looking at about $100. And that lock doesn't even include a cable like the $40 one did, so you're spending even more to make sure you don't get a wheel stolen.

So suddenly the person on the $100 used bike has to spend somewhere between an additional $40-100 to have a hope that their means of transportation won't get stolen. That puts an even greater burden on people with limited means.

u/Uvula_Fetish · 3 pointsr/milwaukee

Anything mid-range is fine. Ultimately, unless you want to lug a 20lb chain around, any sort of U-Lock or mid-range chain lock is sufficient for temporary lock-ups.

https://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1496868581&sr=8-3&keywords=kryptonite+u-lock

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PUCSV7C/ref=s9u_simh_gw_i1?ie=UTF8&fpl=fresh&pd_rd_i=B00PUCSV7C&pd_rd_r=FZPWAHQ8MTTBST4PJ2P0&pd_rd_w=ngc6h&pd_rd_wg=RU5PQ&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=&pf_rd_r=C0QCXJ2M8NZ33CV8HY47&pf_rd_t=36701&pf_rd_p=781f4767-b4d4-466b-8c26-2639359664eb&pf_rd_i=desktop

I've used both of the above at places like Bradford Beach, restaurants downtown, and Bay View on pretty nice bikes without ever having a problem. Make sure you lock up your front wheel as well, I see a ton of pretty average bikes sitting there without front wheels cuz somebody just used the quick-release and walked off with it.

u/PM_ME_FURRY_PICS · 3 pointsr/mildlyinteresting

Hence why you by a U-lock. Expensive as locks go, but cheaper than a new bike.

u/Just_AnotherRobot · 3 pointsr/UCI

I'll keep my eye out. That being said, might as well brush up on the bare minimums for keeping a bike safe.

Register your bikes. Multiple online services offer free registration and stickers. UCIPD and IPD both offer registration services. When bike thieves are busted, they could be in possession of your bike. If your bike isn't registered, then the cops aren't going to be able to contact you. Your bike will then be auctioned off by the cops. I think the proceeds go right back into the department. so i guess if you really like cops.. don't register your bike.

Keep your bike indoors whenever possible. Even hundred dollar U-locks can be sawed through eventually. A lock is ONLY a deterrent.

When it is not possible to put your bike inside, opt for a heavy chain lock OR a U-lock (Even better: a combination of the 2). Most cable locks are sold as accessory locks. If your lock was bought for less than 20 bucks, it's only for show. ex. 35 bucks. Onguard is also a pretty okay brand.

even though irvine is a low crime area, because of uci, irvine's going to always be a target for bike thieves. Combine life inexperience with laziness, and you'll get sitting ducks like 200+ dollar bikes being locked up with what functionally amounts to pieces of string.

u/prototofu · 3 pointsr/Ultralight

Honestly, if weight is priority, I would just grab a BRS stove. Test it a couple of times, and if there are issues, buy another.


I'm not keen on the waste of doing this, but I've got one and it has been working perfectly over the course of half a year or so. Just keep in mind that it won't perform as well in wind relative to your candidates. But boy is it tiny.

u/Katapesh_Express · 3 pointsr/bicycling

I would return what you bought and buy this instead.

It's the same price for a better lock combo.

u/KittyKatB99 · 3 pointsr/oxforduni

Tbh I got a set of cheap silicone lights from China off Amazon. If you forget to take them off and they get nicked, it’s not the end of the world. I got three pairs IIRC. Something like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B00FXO6MUA/ref=mp_s_a_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1524043742&sr=8-7&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=bike+lights&dpPl=1&dpID=41db7Haaa5L&ref=plSrch

For a lock, I bought this because it comes with a cable so you can also secure the front wheel of the bike (seen so many bikes with quick release wheels have had the front one nicked): https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B005YPK8G2/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1524043790&sr=8-3&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=bike+d+lock&dpPl=1&dpID=41mBBM7BkYL&ref=plSrch

u/gizram84 · 3 pointsr/preppers

I remember reading that the Sawyer Filter is a much better product than the LifeStraw.

LifeStraw claims it can filter 1,000 liters. The Sawyer claims 100,000 gallons. Also the Sawyer filters protozoa much better (99.9999% vs 99.9%)

u/Ksrugi · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I grew up in Louisiana and always had these at the ready in case another Katrina came by. Barebones and lightweight in case you need to get up and move.


Multitool - Something that's sturdy, offers plenty of options, but also is lightweight. If I got washed out, this would be one of the top things I'd want coming with me.

First Aid Kit - You just never know. Water can hide a lot of nasty stuff like sharp metal edges, broken glass, etc. The kit I've linked to also comes with a multitool.
Water Filtration System - Dehydration will get you before anything else. Southern heat combined with physical exertion takes a lot out of anyone and tiny filtration systems like this will take care of you without adding bulk.

Meal Replacement Bars - You'll ideally want a few days emergency food. I recommend meal replacement bars that are high in protein and fiber and no less than 500 calories. They'll provide decent nutrition and should make you feel satiated for at least 2-4 hours. I don't have a recommendation on this one because there are so many brands and flavors.
Hand Crank Lantern - A reliable source of light that you can crank on your own. Generally, I avoid using generators and the like. I'm paranoid about electricity after flooding occurs.

Whistle - Great for alerting people without tearing up your vocal chords. It's also very, very, very good to have in case animals that shouldn't come by are nearby.
Dust Mask - If your city floods, there's going to be a lot of crud that comes up from the sewers and a lot of things accumulating inside buildings. Save your lungs and your noses.
Portable Battery - I love this age of technology we're in. Charge this a few days before the storm hits and you'll be able to keep your phone charged for days if the power goes out.
Insect Repellant - The ample amount of still water after a hurricane is prime bug nesting. A little repellant goes a long way.
Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick Offerman - Or any book really to help pass the time. This is a fantastic read though. :)

u/LMMontalbano · 3 pointsr/NYCbike

Thanks! Any tips for where to sit/how to hold the bike on mass transit? I was successfully able to hold it out a little bit so that 2 people could sit on either side of me and nobody licked the flood trying to walk around the bike.

I read how to correctly lock up a bike, and bought this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005YPK8G2/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 It has good reviews so hopefully it'll work out.

u/CarbonAvatar · 3 pointsr/bikewrench

I just ordered http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=pe_385040_30332200_pe_309540_26725410_item
due to the good reviews. Will let you know how it goes.

u/FuckinWalkinParadox · 3 pointsr/bikewrench

i borrowed my uncle's Bikehand stand this weekend and I think I need to buy my own now. it's amazing.

Bikehand Bike Repair Stand - Home Portable Bicycle Mechanics Workstand - for Mountain Bikes and Road Bikes Maintenance https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_08PBDbXP44YEG

u/Unusual_Steak · 3 pointsr/MTB

I transitioned into working on my bikes almost entirely by myself (Wheel building/suspension service/bearings excluded) and this is the exact path I went down as well. Here is everything I bought from Amazon:

The same $50 tool kit

Torque wrench

Cable/housing/wire cutter

Chain/quick link pliers


Wet/Dry Chain lubes

Park Tool grease

Degreaser

Blue Loctite

Carbon grip paste

And some additional small things like cables, cable end caps, ferrules, zip ties, etc. A set of needle nose pliers can be handy to help push/pull stubborn cables/housings as well.

Also, to make working on the bike 10x easier, I recommend getting a stand. I use this one because I am space constrained and it folds up nice and small, but there are probably better ones out there.

It seems like a lot of $$ to lay out at first, but it pays for itself pretty quickly compared to taking the bike to a shop every time you need to do something to it. Basically everything you need to do can be found on YouTube as well.

u/_photogeek_ · 3 pointsr/MTB

I made one of the pipe-clamp style ones a few years back. Not sure what plans I used, but this guy's youtube video shows more or less how I did it.

​

It was....okay. i mean, it worked. But to be honest, for the ~$30-40 I spent on the pipe clamp, pipe, fittings, etc and the time I put into it, I'd have been better off buying a cheap Amazon/ebay stand for $50-100. Which is what I eventually bought. But, that said, the DIY one did work.

u/flamingnet · 3 pointsr/triathlon

Bikehand Pro Mechanic Bicycle Repair Rack Stand https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apip_nNB8kaNDX5Ewy

u/Oktavius82 · 3 pointsr/MTB

I bought this one from Amazon.
Venzo Pro Mechanic Bicycle/Bike Repair Rack Stand
Wanted something with a small footprint when setup. So far it has been working great for me but most of the time I've been clamping it on the top tube of my hard tail which is also the balance point. So haven't tested it out clamping other things, like the the seat post.

u/bacon_and_eggs · 3 pointsr/bikewrench
u/ben_gardner · 3 pointsr/camping

I have a bunch of them - MSR pocket rocket, Kovea Titanium stove, 2 cheap ones off Amazon. Only difference is the name brand ones feel more solid. If I could buy and try another, it would be the BRS stove, http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U


I also use the Kovea LPG adaptor so I can use propane cans with these stoves when car camping: http://www.amazon.com/Kovea-LPG-Adaptor-Small-Silver/dp/B00CFPISZW


Get one without an igniter, as they all go bad sooner or later. Just bring a lighter to light the gas.

u/phirebug · 3 pointsr/camping

As others have mentioned, it will depend on what kind of camping he likes to do and what he already owns, but here are some of my favorite pieces of gear I've picked up over the years:
This little guy is a pretty good rechargeable lantern/flashlight with magnets so you can stick it to stuff and a usb output so you can charge other things with it.

I've had one of these for YEARS and I just lost it the other day. There was $200 worth of gear in the pannier that fell off my bike and I'm more pissed about that cup than the rest of the gear combined. It looks like they made it a little taller, which I do not like, but he may. There are several other brands that make something similar in both steel or titanium. It's not just a cup though...it will slip perfectly over the bottom of a nalgene, you can cook directly on a stove or fire with it, and you can pair it with the smaller jetboil coffee press or the guts of a standard bodum press and turn it into a french press. It's the exact same diameter.
A Sawyer can be an AMAZING if you're going to be anywhere long enough to pack water in. The squeeze bag it comes with sucks, but it has standard bottle threads, so you can screw it into a 2-liter bottle with the bottom cut off and it turns it into a gravity filter. Just pour more river/lake water into the 2 liter every minute or so and it will keep pouring clean water into your bottles. Also, you notice the weird skinny part in the middle? It's exactly the width of duct tape. You can wrap several yards of it around there.
EDIT: forgot some words

u/parametrek · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Replace the $70 Katadyn filter with a $20 Sawyer filter.

Replace the $60 Petzl with a $20 Wowtac A2.

> I am also looking for a set of hiking poles.

The $30 Monoprice CF poles are considered the best/lightest for the money. You really don't want heavy poles.

> Do I need any other cookware?

Are you planning to actually cook or are you eating trail mix the entire time?

u/arrbos · 3 pointsr/vancouver

Get a Sawyer filter over the lifestraw. https://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/


You don't have to suck water through, and it's rated for way more water.

u/innoutberger · 3 pointsr/Flagstaff

Forgot to mention above, I do have a water filter, and was planning on filtering on-the-go as I was camping. Does that change anything?

u/holganaut · 3 pointsr/camping

Uhh.. Since nobody else is helping, I will give it my best shot. On a normal day, the average reccomended amount of water per person will be 64 oz., or .5 gallons. This is a rough estimate for an average person. If you are larger, pack more. If you are smaller, pack less. Depending on the heat, you may end up sweating alot of the water out.

I would reccomend no less than .75 Gallons per person per day.

As far as containers go, something like this would probably be best. I think that stores like walmart have a similar option....

To purify lake water you have several options. There are a multitude of water filters that backpackers use to make drinking water safe. /r/ backpacking raves about this one in particular for its low price, easy use, and low weight. It should filter out bacteria and other nasty things in water.

Alternatively, water purification tablets can be bought to do the same thing. These will not filter out sediment though. They only kill bacteria.

Since this is car camping and the weight/size of gear is not as big of a concern, simply overpacking on water will do no harm. Just keep track of how much you drink as a gauge for next time!

u/dasponge · 3 pointsr/hiking

Are you dead set on a Geigerrig filter? They seem awfully expensive for something that will only last 50-100 gallons.

I'd get a sawyer mini - http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

u/WhiskeyandKittens · 3 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I'm going deep in to the woods. We are going to stay in awesome hammocks and we will be wrapped in fleece sleeping bags. We will also bring a water filtration system so we can drink from the spring rather than lugging water with us. After all, lugging a cooler or four full of beer and whiskey will be enough of a task for us.

I'm so excited that the weather is getting better that I have super duper camping on my mind. :)

u/AngeloPappas · 3 pointsr/preppers

For anyone thinking this is a good buy, please check out the Sawyer Mini. It may cost more, but the Lifestraw filters up to 1,000L. The Sawyer does 360,000L and also filters out more than the Lifestraw. The Sawyer also works with fittings and attachments for hydration bags meaning you can set it up to work as a gravity filter in addition to using it as a straw.

It's better than the the Lifestraw in every single way. I have used both and have no affiliation with either company.

u/hi_in_fiber · 3 pointsr/CampingandHiking

You're welcome!

>Is there a good compass or gps you would reccomend?

I'm afraid I'm not a good authority on GPS. I use a DeLorme InReach which is a two-way communicator with GPS ability if tethered to a phone. It's overkill for someone starting out, I wouldn't recommend it unless you've got piles of money burning a hole in your pocket.

As for compasses, I carry a cheap Brunton baseplate compass. Similar to this Silva, but I don't go off trail or crosscountry. More importantly is that you know how to use one. Watch some youtube videos first, figure out if you need a compass that has sights, or if you live in a higher/lower latitude and need something to match your magnetic zone.

Hold off on the GPS and learn how to use a compass and map first. Then if you think it's necessary (or more convenient) step up to a GPS. Remember that maps and compasses don't need batteries.

>How much water is enough water?

General rule is 1 gallon/day, but it varies from person to person, terrain, temperature, etc. If you're in an area with decent water sources, get yourself a Sawyer Mini.

>When deciding where to go in back country do most people just choose a thing and then travel there and back and around or are there trails that people take and camp along?

Choosing a thing and traveling there is called "cross-country hiking" which means hiking off-trail and making your own path. This is allowed in some places and frowned upon at others, depends on how fragile/protected the terrain is. If you're going cross-country, you better be proficient at orienteering.

I'd wager the majority of people hike on trails and camp along the way at established camp sites.

u/soproductive · 2 pointsr/videos

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007ZF4OA/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_D-TtDbHKSV25B

If you live somewhere where this is a risk, why not stock these in your car? Probably a safer alternative to a space heater that you could sleep soundly with.

u/KjoeLjan · 2 pointsr/leagueoflegends

> Like can they go on facebook in picks and bans or draw in paint?

I think I've seen some players play OSU! as a warm-up once or twice, but I'm not sure if it was during LCS. I assume they have limited access to internet and the computer's software though.

> Also what is that squishy thing in their hands all the time?

They use it to keep their hands warm. As /u/CFThirty mentions, they are called "HotHands".

> And are those face cameras always on? or just when broadcasting?

It's another assumption I make, but I think they're always on. The LCS producer will probably tell what images are showed on stream.

> Can they hear the crowd or announcers?

Sometimes, because it is very hard to cancel out all sounds. The huge black things on their ears are meant to keep out the noise though.

> Is it illegal to remove their headsets?

Yep, unless the game is on pause and the referee needs to ask the player something. In that case communication is just easier by removing the headset ;-)

More information about all the LCS rules can be found here.

u/not_a_throw_awya · 2 pointsr/GlobalOffensive
u/stevegcook · 2 pointsr/hockeyplayers

These! Boot-specific versions exist and they stick onto your socks, but the hand ones work just as well and are easier to find. Plus they're usually bigger. Quality varies brand to brand.

u/ThePinkPanther2 · 2 pointsr/AskWomen

I don't think it is necessary to give a gift card for a lowkey care package, but if you know they are struggling financially or they have a favorite grocery store or clothing shop then it sounds like a great idea. You can utilize things like Groupon, Amazon home services for cleaning and home repairs, BlueApron or equivalent food prep boxes. I have heard that many people like those type of subscription boxes.

My personal favorite care package goodies are shared below. I would wrap a pretty scarf around a small bundle of goodies. And to make it all pretty, I would pin artificial flowers and a thoughtful card to the front.

HotHands Hand Warmers

[Nature's Approach Aromatherapy Neck Wrap Herbal Pack, Celestial Indigo] (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0027VH7GK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_VuuYBbQY3GTYH)

Handcrafted Goat's Milk and Olive Oil Soap Bar with Attached Natural Organic Sea Sponge - Sweet Strawberry Scent

Tervis Sunflowers Tumbler

Power Thought Cards

But in terms of "adulting" you could give them Groupon vouchers for cooking classes or yoga/meditation. But if they are strapped for cash, I would definitely include a gift card to their local grocery store.

u/SkinII · 2 pointsr/cycling

They're expensive but I absolutely love my Lake winter boots. Got them used on eBay about 5 years ago for $180 in excellent condition. For gloves I use Pearl Izumi lobster gloves.

I've always had cold hands and feet and sometimes even the above isn't enough. When it's really cold I put Hot Hand hand warmers in my gloves, against the palm/base of fingers, and in my boots on top of my toes. They are very toasty.

Tip: The Hot Hands last quite a while and are still useable after a ride. They heat up with air contact so when I finish my ride I put the Hot Hands in a plastic bag and squeeze out as much air as possible. They can't stay in the bag forever but will stay in limbo for a few days. I've used one pair on three different rides. Another trick is that they get hotter the more you shake the package so the first time I only shake it a bit. That way I can be sure they'll be good for another ride.

u/jrwreno · 2 pointsr/preppers

Write yourself a reminder of how to start a fire with the items within your car:

How to start a fire with your car battery

You know, in case you do not have a cigarette lighter working in your car.


It is REALLY. IMPORTANT. To stay dry. Get a slicker for each member of your family, as well as sturdy, water proof foot gear. If you can get a combo snow coat/water proof whatchmacallit, that is perfect. I personally take all items, and vacuum seal them in ziplock Space bags (including first aid, flashlights, flares, everything, to ensure they are protected from moisture before being placed into the duffle bag)

Handwarmers. A buttload of handwarmers. The can last up to 10 hours!


first aid kits, -40 degree sleeping bags, solar rechargeable/hand cranking latterns/flashlights, a simple manual on field survival (scavenging for food, simple traps, signaling for help, a small sum of money in case you need to purchase gas/towing/food, flares, freeze dried, high calorie foods (nuts work amazing))

Water. I am a bit miffed at the person that said he does not store water, but carries a water filter. ALWAYS. CARRY. WATER. A 24 pack of water bottles in the trunk with the tire is good, or a few liter bottles with some air space for expansion. Having a water filter does nothing if you do not have a source for water, or the means to melt snow/ice. Get a water filter as something supplementary. Pack a cheap multi tool and a good knife as well.

A fire starter (flint) and some simple kindling(a sandwich baggie of cotton balls) added tip--coat your cotton balls partially in vaseline, it will increase the flammability of the cotton, and help repel water.


Something I also include, is a pair of foot long 2x4 pieces. I name them the 'clackers'. Smacking 2x4's together is akin to a gun shot, and will get the attention of someone if you do the typical SOS morse code pattern. They also scare away wildlife. Although I always travel armed.

A typical portable jump starting battery
You can often find these little systems with ports which can charge your phone.

A tarp or tent in case your car is compromised and cannot provide adequate shelter

Maps, both local and national (in case you travel) and a compass.

A simple dig out kit for getting your car free (shovel, kitty litter, or a tin can and candle trick, ropes, tire chains, etc)

u/CobaltyDan · 2 pointsr/myog

Why not just get a set of Cascade Mountain Tech poles and have a decent set of inexpensive poles?

u/Offthepoint · 2 pointsr/Advice
u/kingofpluto · 2 pointsr/AskReddit

Doesn't matter - get some of these - they are cheap and they last for 10 hours. I have a pair in my socks right now.


http://www.amazon.com/HeatMax-Hot-Hands-Handwarmer-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/dgxshiny · 2 pointsr/discgolf

I always make sure to pop 4 hand warmers in my pockets.

cheap on amazon - http://www.amazon.com/HeatMax-Hot-Hands-Handwarmer-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/KenBalbari · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

For shelter, you really have a choice, tent, tarp and hammock, or tarp and net tent. If you want to hang around camp, you might want a bigger tent. If you plan to do hiking, many people only use the shelter to sleep in, and go with something small and lightweight, like a small solo tent, or even bivy.

I would point you towards some lightweight hiking gear here. That gives you the option to hike off to primative sites, carrying your shelter and supplies on your back. You don't necessarily need to go to the ultralight extremes that serious distance hikers go though.

You could start with a tent like this or this. If you wanted to get more serious into distance hiking, you would maybe spend more on something even lighter in weight (like maybe 2 lbs).

In Florida, I like the combination of a bug bivy (like this ) and a good tarp (like this). Though you would need poles as well. Hikers tend to use their trekking poles (like these). You would also need paracord (550 cord works well) to pitch a tarp.

For a stove, I mean something like this. Those are inexpensive and work fine.

For clothes, you can probably use mostly things you already own. Avoid cotton and linen. Synthetics like nylon and polyester will dry much more easily and do a better job in the heat and humidity in FL. And if you are going to go out there now, in hunting season, make sure you have some things that are bright orange. The hunters can be more dangerous than the bears.

As for bears, you don't really need any special container. Just learn to hang a stuff sack with any food or toiletries which have any scent. Using an odor barrier bag as a liner isn't a bad idea though. They'll generally leave you alone unless they smell what they think is food (and their sense of smell is very strong).

For shoes, again existing walking shoes are probably fine for now. Especially if you stick to sites off existing hiking trails to start.

For now, I'd start with a less primative site in a campground in someplace like Ocala. You can explore from there (there are sites near to trails), and have an idea next time you go out where you might want to try more primative camping. For now, focus on developing skills like how to use a compass, how to pitch a tent or tart, learning usefull knots for pitching tarps or hangning bear bags, etc.

It probably is a good idea to have a sleeping pad right off. A RidgeRest Classic might do the job for about $20. You can spend more on an inflatable pad if you think you will be more comfortable.

u/ShockaJesus · 2 pointsr/cannabis

You're in luck!

tight underwear or the boxer briefs that run down your legs 6-8 inches preventing anything from falling out. buy an extra pack of hand warmers read the instructions on how to get them to warm reliably. Either preheat the urineluck in a microwave with the cap off in ten second increments (two should be max needed) or set it in a ziplock bag in a cup under hot water for five minutes to raise it up to temp. I let mine stay above temp and then drop it down to the right temp just outside the test clinic (two heaters will do this well) remove one heat pad and head in. Before I drop it in their cup I make sure its below 100 (some can measure initial too hotness) but above 90. Having it not be warm enough is the big risk.

If you get screwed like that a last ditch effort is to rub your thumb on your jeans until its real hot and then touch the temp strip till it hits 96 or so (risky)

Fuck Ronald Regan he was a B movie president and his workplace drug laws are a joke. A MAJORITY or near majority of people here in WA actually smoke pot regularly and fake it like this or in a similar fashion.

u/zed_brah · 2 pointsr/sydney

Awesome, I'd like to see it in action. I am looking at getting a Sawyer Mini for my trip.

u/akaganyaku · 2 pointsr/aves

Something not much people do, but handwarmers really help and give me a sense of warmth in the cold!

u/Electrogypsy1234 · 2 pointsr/cigars

Who need a hose when you can get one of these ?

u/kmung · 2 pointsr/Coachella

We buy one of these $9 portable showers fill them up and throw them on top of our cars. It gets so hot the water is plenty warm and you don't have to wait in lines.

u/GenericUserLogon · 2 pointsr/DIY_tech

You could get (or build) something like this - https://smile.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1509528443&sr=8-8&keywords=shower+bag

Use the hot water from your dispenser to fill up the bag and then use the bag to shower with.

u/plastrd · 2 pointsr/HomeImprovement

If you still have cold water you could heat it on the stove and hang a camp shower in the shower stall. It's basically a water bag with a shower head under it, fill it with warm water and you have enough time for a very brief shower.

u/starkraver · 2 pointsr/BurningMan

Right. The shower is the killer. Showers make the burn soooo much more tolerable, but logistically it doesn't scale well. Evaporator systems clearly have limited effectiveness. They can evaporate enough water for a small camp, but there's no system that effectively evaporates the shower water for 50 people. (if somebody else has a different experience, I'm always happy to be contradicted). But with 50 people the need to evaporate is greater.

Here are my two solutions to the problem:

  1. Conserve on shower grey water. Instead of using a traditional gravity fed solar shower bag use a pump pressurized garden sprayer set on coarse mist. You will be amazed at how clean you can get with just a liter of water when its under pressure, and pumping it up tends to last half of the shower. Just re-pump and finish.

  2. Make camp members responsible for hauling out their own grey water. If everybody takes out a few gallons of shower grey water with them, its really no burden at all. Many hands make something something. This has the double effect of encouraging conservation and engages your whole came in resource management and planning.
u/TripAndFly · 2 pointsr/ElectricForest

something like this


paired with this

and you're set for like 30 bucks

or you could just bring a black 5 gal bucket, fill it up in the morning and let it sit in the sun to warm up and just dunk a washcloth in there to wipe down and use wet wipes on the naughty bits. that would cost you like 4 dollars.

or, you could skip the tent part all together and just plop that bag on the roof of your car and spray yourself down in your underwear/swimsuit or naked if that's your thing...

edit: never tried the shower trailers, heard they aren't too bad though.

u/ssirish21 · 2 pointsr/ElectricForest

They're a little pricey, but a solar shower always did me well. They're like $15-$20 at dicks or target. It's a black vinyl bag with a hose that you fill with water and leave in the sun. It's not a perfect replacement, but for rinsing off the grungy bits, it beats 10 bucks a day


https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awdb_t1_bmwZDbPWFTDW8

u/kyuss80 · 2 pointsr/Ultralight
u/voodoodollbaby · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

You look pretty solid, honestly.

How much night hiking do you do? Are you sure you need the headlamp? You could probably get away with something like this. It's the one I use, weighs like 9g

Also, how attached are you to your jetboil? Have you tried the BSR? Only weighs 25g, uses the same fuel. Your pot should fit as well.

u/trippy-vibes · 2 pointsr/ElectricForest

this one has worked well for us. it's a pain to dry out, but for $9, it does the trick. it's easy to fill up, put on top of your car, and wash from there. I don't know about the tent set up though.

https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000014865-5-Gallon-Solar-Shower/dp/B0009PUT20/ref=sr_1_3?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1526669441&sr=1-3&keywords=solar+shower

u/mysickfix · 2 pointsr/vandwellers

or one of these for under 10 bucks...... solarshower




hold 5 gallons, need no running vehicle (promise that thing will kill the battery after 2-3 uses, if not one with a weak batt, without the engine running)


feel free to church it up with a sponge or something like that.

u/nootay · 2 pointsr/camping

These Solar Showers work fairly well and small enough to pack.

u/MrMagicpants · 2 pointsr/Design

Every few weeks a post emerges somewhere on Reddit talking about this amazing innovation called the LifeStraw, and inevitably someone chimes in saying the Sawyer Mini is objectively better for the same amount of money.

This time, I'll be that guy.

http://www.amazon.ca/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sports&ie=UTF8&qid=1417660764&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

u/RuffsVegas · 2 pointsr/bikecommuting

It's probably an Airzound.

u/Blakwulf · 2 pointsr/montreal

Ya, i don't understand the "get off the road" mentality that people have. But if you want to have some fun with them (and also probably get your ass kicked in the process) bring one of these with you.

u/DaemonXI · 2 pointsr/bicycling
u/pacman2k00 · 2 pointsr/CyclistsWithCameras
  1. Airzound. It mounts to your bars, a bottle holds the compressed air and goes in your wsterbottle cage. 115db horn. Can be purchased many places, but here is where I got it: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000ACAMJC/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_awdo_wfksDb98VW2V7

  2. Yes, often the framerates, passing speeds, angle, water drops on the lense, etc can render the few frames of the plate being visible as unreadable. Letters can be harder to define after the fact. Usually in all the whole plate, but ibwas trying to read the trucks plate before the trailer passed. I was also gassed as I had just been sprinting. Note the speedometer... this is added afterwards using GPS data.
    Learn your phonetic alphabet as well. I'll typically call it out quick then phonetically "A, B, C; 1, 2, 3, 4... Alpha - Bravo - Charlie".

  3. Yes, rear camera tells more of the story. How close was the car, how fast did they come up on you, how close were they, how long were they behind you?
    By mounting it rear facing off of your bars at an angle like mine is, it also shows perspective of close passes. It captures the rider (me), my bike, road position and the overtaking vehicles pisiton. Sometimes it can also capture the drivers face, but usually angle/glare dont yield good results on this.
    I like to have my 7 on my helmet so that if I look at someone, it looks where I do (like when I stopped to try to educate this gentleman.)

  4. You didn't ask, but hey... I always try to control my temper and be respectful. My purpose is to attempt to educate the driver as to why I was riding like I was, and give some insight. Usually that fails, but ocassionslly I get through to someone. That makes it worth it.
u/veganatheist · 2 pointsr/bikecommuting
u/ngroot · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Ugh. For as crappy as a lot of our cycling infrastructure is, I'm glad that bike lanes here in most U.S. cities are in the street. Cars don't randomly run into your lane or decide that the bike lane is the appropriate place to do qi gong exercises (WTF is wrong with you folks in Chinatown?!).

For dealing with people who are inappropriately in the bike lane, I have found this to be invaluable. Scares the hell out of people.

u/Sakriv · 2 pointsr/bicycling

And an Airzound horn when a bell isn't loud enough. I started off with just an Airzound, but it scares the shit out of pedestrians and isn't really appropriate if you only want to announce your presence, so I bought this bell for $9 and save my horn for people with headphones, people blocking the path who don't react to the bell, and cars. The bell is very elegant, and most people seem to recognize two quick bell rings as a bicycle approaching. Yelling is still better than risking an accident by silently zooming by a pedestrian or cyclist who has no idea you're coming, but my rides are more pleasant with the bell.

u/Smaskifa · 2 pointsr/Seattle

> Like the "protected" bike lanes on 2ndor Roosevelt.

I haven't been on Roosevelt, but that 2nd Ave bike lane is a disaster. I only ride on 2nd for about 3 blocks, but have nearly been run over at least 10 times in the last 2 years by people turning left through the lane to enter a parking garage. They simply don't expect there to be a cyclist on their left so they don't even look. Then there's also people who ignore the red arrow at lights and try to turn left anyway when cyclists have the green light to go straight. This is what the Airzound was invented for.

For the last few months, I can't even use the bike lane anyway, since it's closed for construction at 2nd and Pine. So I usually ride in either the right lane or bus lane.

u/lilfunky1 · 2 pointsr/askTO

> Same here LOL I was like, did they mean the bikers ringing the bell? That can’t be too loud can it?

https://www.amazon.ca/Delta-Cycle-AH1000-Airzound-Bike/dp/B000ACAMJC/

^^^^^bike ^^^^^airhorns ^^^^^actually ^^^^^exist, ^^^^^just ^^^^^sayin' ^^^^^;-)

u/tokyohoon · 2 pointsr/japanlife

> Buy a loud cycle horn.

Airzound!!!

u/yakkafoobmog · 2 pointsr/bikecommuting

Try an AirZound. They're refillable too.

Though they don't fit on all handlebars so that may be a factor.

u/theblindtiger · 2 pointsr/cycling

Went a whole year of being car-free since the car was broken and didn't get around to getting it fixed. Got it fixed and now it's broken again. This time going car free until I can afford to buy a new one.

Must have equipment:
Fenders
Lights (front and rear), especially with winter and early dark coming in.
A trailer. I use a schwinn 2-kid trailer with the kid part pulled down off the cross-bar.
Rain Gear. Here in the Pacific Northwest, this can make or break your car-free experiment. It's much easier to get on the bike in a rainy day when you have it.
My Delta Airzound air horn. Nothing makes cars look faster than when you honk back!

Other than those, i switch panniers and backpacks depending on what I need at the time. I have foldable baskets, small bags, big bags, waterproof bags, trunk bags, handlebar bags, front rack, rear rack... You kind of end up collecting gear after a while of just being a bike commuter.

u/BikeDoctor137 · 2 pointsr/ebikes

>zoom past you and cut you off taking a right

Yep. The infamous "right-hook".

>Get a loud horn

Air Zound, yo.

u/bobmoron · 2 pointsr/newzealand
u/Ruleryak · 2 pointsr/BurningMan

"tag=slicinc-20" in the link you posted means someone gets a commission every time someone follows that link and purchases that product. Using a link in that format is a bannable offense here. Assuming this was an honest mistake - bear in mind that in the future you want to chop off everything from the question mark onward in the URL to be allowed to share it here. In this case it would just be:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC

u/meg_c · 2 pointsr/hammockcamping

If you go for trekking poles, I can recommend this set: Cascade Mountain Tech Carbon Fiber Quick Lock Trekking Poles. They're great, especially for the price :) I've got a set with the foam handles, and they're still going strong after a couple of years :)

u/tdotohdot · 2 pointsr/askTO

I've had some close calls. You can see in the stats that isn't particularly safe but I enjoy it and do my best. I got one of these for my bike and it helps to blast cabs and j walkers. much more effective than a bell, which I still use for passing etc

u/ProdigalSonReturned · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Surely this is a better option, given that it doesn't require batteries.

u/djlemma · 2 pointsr/NYCbike

> 80db at 50cm. That's loud!!!

I don't think that the person writing that sentence has any idea how loudness is measured... because that's not loud. Usually dB is measured at 1m for a start, so that horn is only 74dB at 1m. A bit louder than a vacuum cleaner, but not necessarily as loud as normal traffic, if you believe this scale.

For comparison, this one is 115dB-

https://www.amazon.com/Delta-Cycle-Airzound-Hooter-Rechargeable/dp/B000ACAMJC


That's loud!!! But the sounds are not as cheeky, I'll admit. :)

u/chemworldx · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Keep fighting the good fight. It might be a bit dickish if the lane wasn't so clearly marked.

For other crusaders, How about an Airzound? I've got one, and it is shit your pants loud.

u/franklin_stubbs · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring
u/izlib · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

I've had good luck with Toaks products. You can hold the handle without it being too hot, even with boiling water. This should fill your requirements:

https://www.toaksoutdoor.com/collections/pot95/products/pot-550-l

For a stove I use this popular item:

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U

Super light, heats water up just fine.

u/PonyThug · 2 pointsr/flashlight

Thanks for being you. Annnnd Need a decent head light soNitecore NU25

u/MrNewking · 2 pointsr/NYCbike

Can't believe no one mentioned the airzound. $30 bucks. Basically a metal container that you fill with air (using a bike pump) and you have a air horn attached to the other end. Its the size of a water bottle and comes with mounts so its easy to install on a bike.Saved my ass many times and I've had it for years. On the horn itself, there's a pressure modulator so you can adjust how loud you want it to be. It's much louder than a car horn so if you're using it around people I suggest lowering it a bit, but it's perfect for places like the Brooklyn Bridge where people get in the path and biking up 8th Ave.

Edit: it's actually on sale so I would jump on this offer if I didn't have one already.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000ACAMJC/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1483767526&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=airzound&dpPl=1&dpID=4142OBsQHPL&ref=plSrch


I can post pics of my setup if anyone's interested.

u/xxxm310ion · 2 pointsr/bugout

So I want to think you’re going for “grey man” due to your backpack, but carrying around an AK might make you stand out a bit. You could try storing your rifle in one of those bags that come with folding chairs. It would help a little at least.

You have a lot of heavy stuff like people have already said. That backpack won’t hold up to much weight over distance. You shouldn’t ever cheap out on the one thing that holds all of your gear. I understand backpacks can get quite expensive, but it really is a must.

You should pack more cordage. That can be used for a million things.

Get you a smaller bottle of water and a water filter. (Sawyer Mini )

I’m sure everyone is talking about weight, so I won’t say much about that other than cans, pots, and pans are heavy.

I’d like to see what changes you make, so feel free to post again once you have updated it a bit! Good luck! Welcome to the club!

u/catsasss · 2 pointsr/legaladvice
u/jarenmorris · 2 pointsr/overlanding

Pooping in the woods tho is so liberating! There are some portable toilet options and they make little pop up tent style bathrooms that you can also use to shower in.

Tent - WolfWise Pop-up Shower Tent Green https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AT3T0GC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_5WXmDbGHCSTYH

Toilet - Reliance Products Luggable Loo Portable 5 Gallon Toilet https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000FIAPXO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_aYXmDbGPG18AJ

While trailer might be super comfy, you might end up limited in exploring back roads while you are out.

u/BootyTrain716 · 2 pointsr/bonnaroo

They make seats for buckets too btw. Or you can buy the full kit.

Reliance Products Luggable Loo Portable 5 Gallon Toilet https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000FIAPXO/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_9Sw8CbA26Q8J0

u/NoNotTheBeeeees · 2 pointsr/preppers

A very important thing people forget about when prepping. Especially if you are hunkered down/bugging in, you're going to need a place to do your business. Multiply that if you have family.

I got this, although I'm sure there are plenty others just as good. A rigged up 5 gallon bucket could probably do the trick, as well.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000FIAPXO?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

u/StarvingIsVerboten · 2 pointsr/CrohnsDisease

Terrible idea, unless your idea of a good idea is getting diarrhea spatters all over your tires, legs and shoes.

A 5 gallon bucket with a toilet seat lid and a biodegradable plastic liner would be a much better idea for a road trip.

u/peeholestinger · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

I bought some of these for my first set of poles. Andrew Skurka has a pretty good write up and for $45 I figured it would be worth giving them a shot. So far they have been great. Right at about 16oz for the pair.

u/ShoegazingStardust · 2 pointsr/bonnaroo

I always bring my own toilet. I have this one: http://www.amazon.com/Reliance-Products-Luggable-Portable-Gallon/dp/B000FIAPXO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368218018&sr=8-1&keywords=luggable+loo

Nothing is nicer than to use the bathroom at your own camp. We have a huge tent, so we can set up the bathroom in there. We've also brought a pop-up shower and used it to set up a bathroom, kinda like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Portable-Changing-Camping-Privacy-Outdoor/dp/B007ZJ99HE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368218091&sr=8-1&keywords=pop+up+camping+shower

u/ood_lambda · 2 pointsr/AskEngineers

The chain...maybe.

> Hexagon shaped, triple heat treated chain withstands 11 tons of cutting force.

That's a meaningless description without knowing the alloy and link diameter, but it looks fairly beefy in the picture.

The weak point is the small U-lock that it also uses. It's 1/2" (12-13mm), which is the same as regular Bike U-locks. At that point I'd rather have the one designed for bikes, is significantly lighter, and can be frame mounted easily.

The only potential upside I see is "security through obscurity". It may be different enough from other bike locks that thieves skip it because they don't know how to attack it quickly.

The absolute best thing you can do is just get renter's insurance. Mine is $10 a month and covers everything I own, including my bike.

You can also upgrade to the "New York" Strength Kryptonite lock, which is far stronger, at the cost of being massive and hard to carry. Just ignore the Kryptonite warranty, it's pretty useless. It costs quite a bit for a low level of coverage and requires sending back the broken lock which usually gets taken with the bike.

u/jeffpluspinatas · 2 pointsr/toronto

Kryptonite locks. The prices on Amazon are cheaper but $134 is the price you would pay in a bike shop.

u/soil_nerd · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring

Maybe call the local police station and describe your situation to them and see if they can help? Or find a local hardware store and buy the tools to get your bike back. OR, buy a higher end bike lock. After having my bike stolen I got a Kryptonite Fahgettaboudit (2 years ago) and use it everyday in all sorts of weather conditions, it hasn't given me any problems yet. I think carrying bolt cutters is a little overkill, but I haven't done much bike touring, so really don't know.

u/yourenotmydad · 2 pointsr/Frugal

that is a little better than using a giant u-lock but i'd hate to ride all over town with a giant chain. ideally a smaller u lock for normal use, and then carry a chain for when you think you might have issues locking it up or leave that somewhere you will be locking it frequently. the onguard beast chain seems to be the go to and comes with a lock as well, and as far as i know the kryponite NYFU is still the best lock on the market though it is expensive.

honestly just get as good of a u-lock you can afford if you have reasonable access to bike racks, or get the chain setup if you are wrapping around posts or trees. anything is defeatable, your best bet is to make yours harder than someone else's lock and hope for the best.
http://forums.roadbikereview.com/commuting-touring-ride-reports/boltcutter-proof-locks-276407.html
http://www.lfgss.com/thread17938.html

u/GretaX · 2 pointsr/Eugene

You're welcome! They send you a bright blue non-removable sticker to put on your bike, identifying it as registered with the police. Could be an additional deterrent, who knows.

Locking: Sturdy U-Lock (like the New York Fahgettaboudit) through the frame & rack, sturdy cable lock (I have this one) through the wheels and secured to your U-lock. Locks are still only a deterrent, but that and locking in a highly visible location could be enough. At least, I've had luck with it. Knocks on wood

u/stolenbikesdc · 2 pointsr/Rochester

Cable locks keep honest people honest. Consider something like this or this.

u/CindyMcHinklehanky · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I had a bike that was 8 years old and in perfect condition. After a bad biking accident, I had stored it away for several years. It held a lot of memories of times that I had spent with my father; we rode bikes together almost every day for years before my parents divorced.

I finally got it back out, thinking riding to and from campus would be a great way to ease back into cycling. I got a cable lock and parked it in a patrolled deck. I rode it 3 times to campus, and on the 3rd time, it was stolen. I was totally, completely heartbroken. The cops who were supposed to be patrolling the deck were all huddled up BSing with each other. One came to take a report from me. He scoffed at me when I told him I had a cable lock, not a U-lock and told me I'd never see my bike again.

It's a shitty lesson, and it still bums me out pretty fucking badly that someone stole something so special to me. I know it was my own fault for not securing my bike properly, but I didn't realize how rampant bike theft is, especially in the city.

So, I feel your pain. It sucks to have something stolen and I'm sorry that you had to experience this. I immediately went out and bought this lock and am looking into some other locks for my wheels and seat.

If your landlord agrees to you storing your bike inside, I'd recommend this for storage. It's a real space saver in an apartment.

Good luck!

u/runningQ · 2 pointsr/longbeach

https://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-997986-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock-Black/dp/B000OZ9VLU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1481948659&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite+new+york+u+lock

Can only be broke for the hacksaw in a very long time or an angle grinder. We could save it leaves never have angle grinders, but really only professionals do. And they are you really going after cheap bikes.

u/kylorhall · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

They may not be at Costco though, they really come and go. This is my recommendation as well, but I had to buy mine off Amazon (link). They did well when weighed ~250lbs and a far heavier pack than I have now; they lock really well and did great with a lot of elevation. Saved my butt on one trip and I definitely used them thoroughly.

u/kheltar · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I'd recommend 2 locks. That way a thief has to have a way to beat both.

I have the New York Fahgettaboudit Mini u-lock and abus granit steel-o-flex.

For when my bike is at home I have this bastard. I'm aware it's overkill (10kg for chain and lock) the links are as big as my hand...

u/echoawesome · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

These are the costco ones, a bit cheaper and well regarded.

u/dfsw · 2 pointsr/AppalachianTrail

This ultralight canister stove has been making the rounds lately, I've been pretty impressed with it. http://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

u/Lieutenant_Crunch · 2 pointsr/FixedGearBicycle

I wouldn't get a brooks. They are pricey because they become super comfortable after some use, but the downside is that they are theft magnets. If you get one, lock your saddle with a cable, or take it in with you, but these things go missing on my campus all the time. I'd just ride the stock for a while, when you want to upgrade, go into your LBS and nab one from them.




As for locks, U-lock+Cable in conjunction will be best. If you pick one, do a u-lock. Kryptonite is well-recommended. They have a few models:

The New York is the big boy, nigh indestructible lock. But probably not necessary for a windsor the hour.

Here's what I use, but I sort of regret it. It feels cheaper (because it was cheaper) than other kryptonite locks I've used. The lock itself is fine, but I have trouble with my key after a few months of use (have to jiggle it around for a bit for it to disengage). If you're on a campus or in a smaller town, it'd be fine.

Just ordered this. My buddy has one and it's brilliant. Super light and small (smallness is actually a benefit as far as security). Can fit in your back pocket.

Also: http://sheldonbrown.com/lock-strategy.html

u/kelsoATX · 2 pointsr/Austin

Man that sucks.

I use this heavy ass lock. A hacksaw can still cut through it, but it takes more time.

I also use this cable to secure my quick-release front wheel.

There's no sure way to secure your bike, all you can do is use good locking stratagy. Lock it to something solid in a well lit place where people are more likely to notice a theif with a saw or bolt cutters.

u/thisismycle · 2 pointsr/Cleveland

I have two bikes, one I bought from Century Cycles, and another I got off craigslist for super cheap. The one from craigslist is my favorite, and there were a ton more on there that I loved. The one I got on craigslist goes for around $700 brand new, but I got it from the guy for I think around $280ish.

I also live in an apartment, and I bought one of these: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000UUEF7E/ref=oh_details_o06_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 holds both bikes just fine, and they are both large sizes (for someone around my height - 6' 2")

EDIT: also get yourself a nice bike lock: http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-997986-Black-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock/dp/B000OZ9VLU/ref=sr_1_4?s=cycling&ie=UTF8&qid=1374593601&sr=1-4&keywords=bike+lock

u/Logan_Chicago · 2 pointsr/chicago

I use these for front and rear lights.

This is the most common u-lock that is about as good as it gets. I use this, but the weight is pretty intense.

u/electricheat · 2 pointsr/Roadcam

Yeah, even better together. Though I see a slightly different combo used by the truly maniacal riders:

http://www.mec.ca/product/4013-597/samui-air-zound-cycling-horn/

and

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-997986-Black-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock/dp/B000OZ9VLU/

u/GrandmaBogus · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Titanium mug and a mini gas burner? Then buy your own butane in Reykjavik.

The smallest 100g canister will be good for 15-20 cups of smoking hot coffee.

u/echodeltabravo · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

Someone here in r/ultralight said the BRS 3000 simmers well. I have one but have not tried it. However, for $16 it might be worth buying and trying out yourself.

u/AnotherProject · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Good inexpensive water filter http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2?pc_redir=1395985123&robot_redir=1

For a first aid kit just build your own; a few band aids, bandage, neosporin, ibprofin, anti diarrhea

u/soundman1024 · 2 pointsr/Denver

That's why I have one of these guys.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000OZ9VLU/

u/scriggities · 2 pointsr/chicago

Not all uLocks are created equal. You should definitely make sure to be using one that is highly rated.

For exmaple, the New York Fahgettaboudit U-Lock

u/2bluesc · 2 pointsr/motorcycles

This morning my Kryptonite New York Fahgettaboudit U-Lock that secures my motorcycle decided to not unlock. The key enters the lock cylinder smoothly, and turns very lightly (too lightly?).

Pics of the setup

YT video of attempt to unlock

Any ideas? This is the heaviest U-lock I could find (18 mm hardened shackle). I'm at a loss for how to defeat it short of an angle grinder and I fear it'll just eat grinding wheels.

I've emailed Kryptonite after reading their support site but don't expect a response. It appears that this is a fairly common occurrence after Googling around.

Anyone stolen their own bike before and have ideas of how to liberate mine?

u/cassinonorth · 2 pointsr/bikecommuting

This get's brought up all the time and I've done extensive research on the topic when I had a Sirrus that wasn't getting the job done anymore. Yeah...don't do this. It's physically feasible but not advised for a bunch of reasons. In terms of your hands going numb, you need a fit. I'm guessing your arms are totally locked out when you're riding leading to the numbness. You'll get more out of the bike from a proper fit than you would trying to convert it to drop bars.

If you really want to keep your bike and not go full drop bars, grab bar ends like these and retape your bars. You won't have access to your brakes from the drops which is obviously a very huge downside of this plan so be careful if you do.

u/alphabennettatwork · 2 pointsr/flashlight

Nitecore NU25 Please and thank you, this is awesome!

u/PrimeEvilBeaver · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring

If you can slip something on the existing bars these might work for you:

Origin8 Drop Ends https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0013G6PB8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_KvgSDbG502Q1F

u/Bearduardo · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring
u/ninja_snail · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I found these! But they have been noted to be uncomfortable and small on a 7.3 fx.

u/weil_futbol · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Because your shifters won't likely be compatible. I've asked the same thing before.

These are in my wish list but I don't know how good they are, https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0013G6PB8/ref=aw_wl_ov_dp_1_2?colid=39RF70MNEX2EY&coliid=I3G3NKESNEV642

Butt you might want to look into buying a road bike. You can get a low end bike starting at 600.

u/veeswayrp · 2 pointsr/Watches

I'm not super into watches/horology so my opinion is gonna be a lot different than most. For $80, get what you like. Yah it is basically a Rolex rip off but honestly no one is gonna give a shit. I would personally save a little more and get a Orient Ray and swap bracelets. Looks very similar but distinguishes its self as its own. They usually go on sale for under $150. I picked up the Orient Mako back in Dec for $65 but they rarely go that low.

u/akkyle23 · 2 pointsr/Watchexchange

I have an Orient Mako black as pictured on the link below I'll sell for 100$ plus shipping. It's on their rubber band. I can provide time stamped photos. It's a great watch, near mint but my SKX gets more wear now a days.

https://www.amazon.com/Orient-CEM65001B-Black-Automatic-Watch/dp/B001EWEQ3A

u/BossTortuga · 2 pointsr/Watches

The price points are not comparable...the ocean one costs more than twice as much as a mako or a ray.

u/Chiefesoteric · 2 pointsr/Watches
u/NOSWAGIN2006 · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice

Orient Mako, i'm still sad that mine broke. It is one of the best affordable watches that I have ever had.

http://www.amazon.com/Orient-CEM65001B-Black-Automatic-Watch/dp/B001EWEQ3A

u/safebrowseatwork · 2 pointsr/LosAngeles

Grab a jump bike.

Although given that you’d have a bike lanes the whole way, the scooter can work and the Xiaomi M365 that bird used in gen 1 scooters is only $350 on Amazon.

https://www.amazon.com/Xiaomi-Electric-Long-range-Fold-n-Carry-Ultra-Lightweight/dp/B076KKX4BC/

u/thumpas · 2 pointsr/Watches

Sorry if I'm hijacking this thread but I have a question for an orient diver owner. I want to get this and I was wondering if it would look good on a nato leather strap. Also how big is the case, I have slightly smaller than average wrists and I was wondering if a 40mm watch would look too big.

u/nautimike · 2 pointsr/Watches

Invicta 'resurrected' an old Swiss brand name(they have nothing to do with the original company), they tend to copy other companies designs or style cues, often using stock Japanese or Swiss movements with Chinese made cases & assembly, and the have insanely high MSRP but the watches are perpetually on sale for 70~80% off. If the Invicta MSRP is $315, but, the watch is always 'marked down' 73% to $85...then the watch is only worth about $85.

This lack of legitimate heritage, questionable marketing practices, along with quality issues and poor customer service have given the brand a bad reputation.

That said, I used to own the Invicta 8926. It was my daily/work watch for about a decade before I gave it to my brother. It got beat to hell and was worn nonstop for about 12 years, without any service, before it started keeping poor time. Not bad for $79.

If you like the watch and don't spend to much on it, it should will probably be fine. On the plus side, it likely has a Citizen/Miyota auto movement and may even be all stainless steel, so, it would be hard to beat for under $100.

Good, entry level brands to look at are Seiko, Citizen, & Orient. Possible alternatives;

The Seiko Monster is one of the best made watches out there under $200.

The Orient Mako is really well regarded.

Or the Seiko SNZH55 is a nice, affordable Blancpain Fifty Fathom inspired watch.

u/HALF-turtles-SHELL · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice

I'm not a fan of either. Budget watches that I would consider:

u/Arcs_Of_A_Jar · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice

There's a disconnect in overall style to have a rotating bezel and thin watch hands.

The Orient Mako is the closest watch I can think of that has all of your characteristics, including a price that only slightly exceeds your $100 limit.

u/ehsu · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice

For about the same price, I'd rather have a Seiko or Orient. I don't know much about watches, but I get the sense that Invicta has a somewhat negative reputation among those who do (i.e., the folks on /r/watches).

u/scouser916 · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice
u/rystansberry · 2 pointsr/Watches
u/iinT3nT21 · 2 pointsr/Watches

Seiko looks a lot classier IMO. I'm not a huge fan of the Citizen diver design. Have you checked out the Orient Mako? Definitely worth a look.

Amazon

Image

u/edddyyy21 · 2 pointsr/Watchexchange
u/Ffaattccaatt2 · 2 pointsr/flashlight

I recently purchased the Nitecore NU25 for camping/hiking and think it would work for your needs.

u/WahFuDrumSong · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Ever heard of the BRS 3000T?

u/Neon_Orange_ · 2 pointsr/Watches

I have returned watches before, there is no reason they shouldn't take it back. The sellers switch off on what they have in stock so just try to find a different seller on there. Here's one

u/II12yanII · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

For a water purifier I would go with the sawyer water filter. You can filter water into any bottle you want or use it like a straw. http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1457621423&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=sawyer

u/brendanvista · 2 pointsr/EDC

You should do a bit of reading to find out more about what you might want/need in a watch. Mechanical or quartz? Date window? Alarms? Waterproof?

That Invicta has treated me very well, and thus far has given me no reason to doubt it. It keeps great time too for a mechanical (look at the bonus album I posted; you can see into the back). However, I bought it against the recommendation of a lot of the watch community. Invicta has a hit and miss reputation, though the 8926ob is one of their best regarded models. If you're looking for a "Rolex Sub clone" there are some other options out there in a slightly higher price range that are from more respected brands. /r/watches might have some recommendations for you. I would personally look at this watch: http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001EWEQ3A/ref=pd_aw_sim_241_1?ie=UTF8&dpID=51zhHeruIeL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL100_SR100%2C100_&refRID=164BC614FP2Z13EXSNE9


That all being said, the reviews for the 8926ob model are pretty positive, and Invictas may have just done it all right this time. Look at my other reply about the watch too. The movement (gears and springs) are made by a very reputable Japanese manufacturer, Seiko. Just be warned that it might not be a watch that will last long enough to be passed down to your grandkids like a real Rolex or something.

u/Fionro · 2 pointsr/funny

You guys might like

[Zenith Men's 96.0529.4035/51.M Defy Xtreme Tourbillon Titanium Chronograph Watch](http://www.amazon.com/Zenith-96-0529-4035-Tourbillon-Titanium-Chronograph/dp/B001K3IXW8/ref=sr_1_1?s=watches&ie=UTF8&qid=1394910679&sr=1-
1&keywords=zenith+defy+xtreme)


and the Hutzler-571-Banana-Slicer's reviews.

u/Afro_Samurai · 2 pointsr/WTF
u/MMAPhreak21 · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon
u/Tenchiro · 2 pointsr/motorcycles

With the money I saved on my new watch I ordered three, they go nice together.

u/wulfgar_beornegar · 2 pointsr/buildapcsales
u/KeyboardDog · 2 pointsr/AskReddit

This is my wrist piece. I bought it from Amazon and LQQK how much I SAVED!! The reviews are pretty funny too.
http://www.amazon.com/Zenith-Tourbillon-Titanium-Chronograph-96-0529-4035/dp/B001K3IXW8/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=watches&qid=1260053524&sr=1-3

u/bunnylebowski1 · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

Ooh, you fancy, huh?

Huh? NOT fancy

Fancy for under $10

Over 10k? Fancy!

Thanks for the contest!

u/renernavilez · 2 pointsr/funny
u/LarvaeOP · 2 pointsr/Watches
u/desktop_version_bot · 2 pointsr/preppers
u/rudman · 2 pointsr/AskReddit

A PP? What an amateur. What you need is a Zenith-96-0529-4035-Tourbillon-Titanium-Chronograph. Just check out the reviews....

http://www.amazon.com/Zenith-96-0529-4035-Tourbillon-Titanium-Chronograph/product-reviews/B001K3IXW8/ref=dp_top_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1

u/rfrick · 2 pointsr/cycling

I've got Shimano M324 on my Giant Defy Disc. Running them with Gito Treble II 2014's. They aren't the most racey, but whatever. I can clip in when I want and ride around the hood in some tenni's. I dig them. You may want to check out Shimano A530. I've heard the A530's can be slick.

u/Ogroat · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Here are a couple to get you started.

If you want to ride the same bike clipless and then with street shoes, something like that is the way to go.

u/leadnpotatoes · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Maybe something like these so you don't have to swap the pedals.

u/FlagBattery · 2 pointsr/FixedGearBicycle

no, those are MTB pedals, not road pedals. see my list in this thread for some compatible shoes. these are good pedals if you intend on sometimes riding with shoes that don't have cleats in them. Since they are flat on one side and clipless on the other side. And the flat side is wide enough to be comfortable and keep your feet secure as well.

u/chuyskywalker · 2 pointsr/ElectricScooters

What the fuck? An m365 for $1,000? Get outta here with that shit.

Here's a REAL offer, damn. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC

u/reidburial · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I'd recommend the Shimano A530 pedals, they're pretty great imo and got plenty of good reviews, you got SPD on one side and platform on the other when you don't feel like using your cycling shoes.

u/kaceFile · 2 pointsr/bicycling

> The ideal scenario is to have a big club where you can find a group that goes at the pace you want, but in most places your options will be limited. Perhaps start by practicing your group riding skills with a slow group, then go with a fast group and accept that you might get dropped.
The average guy on a Saturday or Sunday morning doesn't care about the gender makeup of the group but does want to get a good workout. They won't mind if they have to wait for you for a few minutes after designated sprints, but if you can't keep up at a normal cruising pace then it's better to wave goodbye.

Oh, totally! I completely understand that. There are some bike shops that have group rides of various levels, but that's about it. Not too many clubs (other than casual ones) around here that I've been able to scope out. But, maybe I'll check out the casual ones to learn some etiquette-- that sounds like a good idea!

>Consider getting started on clipless soon, since clipping in and out quickly is a key group riding skill. Other than that, all you really need is the equipment to repair a puncture (bring a spare tube, not just glue and patches) and the right clothes, including gloves and glasses.

Rodger that! I'll probably get clipless in a month or so. Do you have an opinion on THESE? I want to have the option of using my bike to commute-- so I don't want to commit solely to clipless.

>Sounds like you're on the right track. See if you can bump up to 3 days per week training as this will really help. And if you're only doing short workouts make them count. Towards the end of winter you should be doing some tough interval sessions.
When you have an opportunity to race in the spring, just dive in. Crits are great fun if you can keep your cool when people are riding very close to you. Don't worry about poor results at the beginning.
Women's racing often has small fields or mixed fields, so a lot of races break up. Just keep hammering away.
And if you get a chance, have a go at individual time trialling. It's either the most boring form of racing or the truest, depending on your philosophy on life.

Yeah! I think they have open studio time, so I'm hoping to get in a 3rd training session during the week by myself (I just don't have the cash at the moment to pay for the 3x/week program ;( And biking outside isn't an option here in the winter-- though if the weather holds up like how its been: We might skip winter entirely!)

Re: Racing-- Oh I plan to! The first one is in April, so I'm planning on doing one per weekend (if possible), before the BIG tour comes in June. Provided I finish all of the races I participate in, I think I'd be able to compete in those as a Cat 4!

u/dubbl_bubbl · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Last year I got my first "real" bike and decided to take the plunge and get some clipless pedals, after about 2k miles I will never look back. A friend in the cycling industry recommended Shimano SPD pedals, they are cheap and easy to exit, (road specific pedals and shoes tend to be more expensive) and also tend to have a recessed cleat. I have Shimano shoes they are comfortable, and relatively inexpensive (as far as bike shoes go) you might be able to find some better deals on nashbar or other sites like that though.

I am about to order some Shimano PD-A520 which is more of a touring pedal, it has a bigger platform which will reduce hotspots on long rides (which wasn't a problem until recently, probably due to shoe wear.) You may also want to check out these which give you the choice to use clipless shoes or just regular shoes.

*sp

u/gwarster · 2 pointsr/bikecommuting

Use what I got they give you the best of both worlds.. You can either click-in or use platforms.

u/I_Met_Bubb-Rubb · 2 pointsr/running

I run with a Nitecore NU25 on the medium setting and this reflective thing. The NU25 is the best headlamp I've ever used. It's USB recharable and it's really lightweight and doesn't protrude far so it doesn't bounce around while running.

u/SupportingKansasCity · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Out of convenience, I usually use an artisan instant coffee like Voila.

If I really want actual coffee grounds, I’ll bring the grounds in a plastic bag and use a tea strainer. It works well. Just get water near boil, drop in tea strainer with grounds, lightly stir. This is the exact one I use: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075K57B73/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_UUA6BbJCMDBJN

As for a stove, I use this ridiculously light and cheap Chinese stove. Quantity is not great but it’s dirt cheap and I’ve never had one show up not functional. Some will leak gas for an instant when you screw the stove on (more than you’d expect), some don’t. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_2VA6BbGGSBA02

u/PM_ME_YOUR_LADY_BITS · 2 pointsr/bicycletouring

Cool shoes! As far as pedals go, I'd get a combo pedal with one clipless side and one flat side. That way, if you decide to use normal shoes it still works. Or if your legs/feet start hurting after hours of keeping them in the exact same position on a clipless, you simply flip the pedal and enjoy some freedom of movement on the flat side.

I have one pair of these pedals on a MTB, and I don't really like them. They weigh the same on each side, so they never flip to one side by themselves. When you start pedaling you never know which side will be up.

I'd much rather get something like this, because they will always orient themselves with the right side up. I don't have experience with those pedals in particular, but I've got some almost identical ones made by Exustar and I like them a lot (couldn't find them on amazon though).

u/mrandyclark · 2 pointsr/pelotoncycle

The R530s are on sale for $39.99 on Performance:
http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product2_10052_10551_1108401_-1

Pretty sure these are the pedals I have on my Peloton, $29.99 on Performance:
http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product2_10052_10551_1167364_-1

And these are the pedals I have on my cross/town bike. They have a platform on the flip side, $42.45:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001MZ2AGO/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The clip for the SPD style cleats is smaller - much smaller and harder to clip into than the LOOK style. But once you get used to it, they are really easy. Overall, I'm glad I made the switch.

u/og_boyscout · 2 pointsr/preppers

The life straw and aquamira are both good choices. However I found that the life straw was overly bulky and large for the job it completes. Also I had two of the aquamira carbon elements break on me. My suggestion is to go with the sawyer mini - http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00FA2RLX2/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1417445721&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX200_QL40

Or the sawyer squeeze- http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B005EHPVQW/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1417445858&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SY200_QL40

(Sorry I don't know how to condense these links.)

If you look at their weight vs. Filtering capacity it's almost unbelievable. They weigh just ounces and it's something like 100,000 gallons for the mini and 1,000,000 gallons for the squeeze. Plus walmart sells these so they are never to far away. Best $20 I ever spent!

u/Brettc286 · 2 pointsr/camping

Do you want to cook with filtered water? If so, these systems are not great. I really like this Sawyer filter, it's very versatile.

u/andthebatman · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Well there's a different kind of knife for every job. It's hard to do a one-size-fits-all. But, if you're specifically looking at a general purpose camping knife, look no farther than the
Becker Campanion
Also, /r/knives is a good place to ask. I'm recommending the Becker because it's tough and you'll never break it. Can't speak to the Buck, never owned their stuff.

u/Sung-gil · 2 pointsr/knives

Cheaper side go with the SOG Seal Pup.

For something of better quality go with the ESEE 4, or the Ka-Bar BK2.

u/Hammerhil · 2 pointsr/Survival

Here are some recommendations. If you are doing batoning and splitting, I would recommend something with a thick spine (and learning how to do it correctly). I wouldn't open cans with my knife because it's a poor tool choice for that and there are plenty of dirt cheap can openers.

Here are a few options:

KA Bar Becker companion in 1095 steel

Ontario Rat 3 in 1095

Morakniv Companion Heavy Duty carbon blade

cheap US army can openers so you don't damage your knife or hands opening cans

​

These are some good high carbon blades in a variety of prices. I do recommend buying one you can feel to get a good idea if the grip is right, but this should give you some variety of makes and what they offer. These are all black anodized coatings which will help keep rust away. My preference is for a knife in the 7 inch length range for chopping, no serrations (pain to upkeep and don't cut, they rip) and a neutral finish because black knives are hard to find if you drop it in the dark. NEVER buy a knife that isn't full tang.

Go out and get a feel for handles, blade shapes and lengths and try what you can borrow before making a decision.

u/stylus2vinyl · 2 pointsr/knives

I'm currently eyeing the BK10 or the BK2

The BK2 seems better suited to heavier tasks, some light chopping and batoning whereas the BK10 seems like a nicer all around knife that can handle batoning and the abuse but is also thinner so it can carve and feather stuff.

u/vdek · 2 pointsr/bayarea

Get an electric bike or scooter.

Go from your apartment to Caltrain(5 minutes).

Get off at Sunnyvale (10-15 minutes depending on which train you catch).

Scoot to Moffett (10 minutes).

Grab one of these or an ebike
https://www.amazon.com/Electric-long-range-Fold-n-Carry-Ultra-Lightweight-electric/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1524570561&sr=8-1&keywords=xiaomi+scooter

u/requiem_mn · 2 pointsr/electricvehicles

Finally, something I can contribute to here. I recently bought Xiami M365 e-scooter (cost me 425€, here is Amazon link, not how I bought it). I think I have it for a month or two. I logged around 270 km so far. I use it from home to train station, then I use train to city I work in, and then from train station to work. Its something like 2.5 km in each city in each direction. Advantage is that it is relatively light and compact (12.5 kg and the handle folds). It goes up to 25 kmh, battery is specified as making 30 km if you are 75 kg person. It can only carry one person of up to 100 kg, but I believe that even heavier person can use it, especially if you change type of tires.

Now, my impressions, it is perfect for me. I can bring it both to my office, and to my apartment (elevator not working, still not too much hustle). I can bring charger with me anywhere to add some extra mileage from it. It can be stored in car trunk (I was able to put it in trunk of Opel Corsa D, rather small car), thou I would avoid this if it is too hot and sunny outside. It is on a cheaper side, so it does have some problems, but nothing too serious, especially if you are familiar with bikes (changing of tire and staff like that).

Also, now, my whole daily is electrified in a country that usually has 55% electricity generation from renewables, which is nice.

Video that I found to be fair review is this one.

Since I'm guessing you are from states, here are some conversions:

12.5 kg = 27.5 lbs

75 kg = 165 lbs

100 kg = 220 lbs

2.5 km = 1.5 mile

25 kmh = 15.5 mph

30 km = 18.5 miles

425 € = 480 $

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.

u/TheEnterprise · 2 pointsr/funny

Sorry bout that I thought I had a link:

Becker

u/RunsWithSporks · 2 pointsr/AskWomen

My wife has to bring a go-girl when we go camping. She swears by it. As a man, I would have to advise bringing some type of blade. I would suggest a fixed one not a folder in case you need to split wood etc. An affordable but capable option is the KaBar Becker. It should last you a long time and is very versatile. Have fun!

u/malecky · 2 pointsr/knives

The Becker BK-2 is a fine beater of knife for your first decent quality fixed-blade. Great size, great price.

Edit: If you really want something "cool-looking" but still functional, the new Becker BK-5 could fit the bill.

u/flyingmx5 · 2 pointsr/knives
u/homrqt · 2 pointsr/Survival

Pros: classic design with a lot of history behind it, fairly rugged, easy to sharpen, holds an edge, not too heavy, inexpensive, good for batoning wood, I've opened plenty of cans with mine

Cons: if you spend more money you can get a slightly better steel in some knives

This is the one I have.

Ka-Bar 2-1212-3 Black Fighting Knife https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000BSY9D0/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_c2wNzbZPACSBG

A good alternative could be the Becker BK2 variant of the KABAR which is a little newer and more heavy duty. Better at batoning and holds up a little better. But to me it has more of a kitchen knife appearance instead of the traditional KABAR military/survival appearance.

Ka-Bar Becker BK2 Campanion Fixed Blade Knife https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001N1DPDE/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_dgrNzbTY2SGCD

Both are solid outdoors knives though.

u/jimmyd1911 · 2 pointsr/preppers
u/Geodyssey · 2 pointsr/knives

Others have mentioned it but the Ka-Bar Becker BK2 is widely loved as a survival/do everything knife.

If the BK2's blade is too big and heavy for you, you might consider its little brother the BK16.

Also consider one of the Scrapyard Knives like the 311, 411, or 511.

Good luck!

u/unrealtrip · 2 pointsr/knives

That was also my worry as well. I got mine off amazon and it is the second generation in spite of the product photo which shows a first gen.

edit: Price was $52.40, free shipping, no tax of course. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001N1DPDE/ref=ox_ya_os_product

u/diversionmary · 2 pointsr/knifeclub

Idk I'd prefer less than 5" for bushcraft. I generally like 3 or 4.

OP, check out the Becker BK2 for 62

u/ZombieKingKong · 2 pointsr/knives
u/stu556 · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

I highly recommend Hako Clears.

The tactile bump is very clear and high, giving a topre-like feel and a nice meaty cushion at the bottom.

I upgraded from cherry browns and it's like night and day, especially after I lubed both the stems (with [finish line extreme flouro teflon grease](Finish Line Extreme Fluoro 100% DuPont Teflon Grease, 20g Syringe https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002L5UL92/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_0TYtDb4EZ5ED3)) and the springs (with [dupont silicone lubricant](DuPont Teflon Silicone Lubricant Squeeze Bottle, 4 Oz. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BCVXUVM/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_ESYtDbT85X5A5)).

The extra work is 100% recommended for the smoothest tactile action I've ever felt.

u/strictlyfocused02 · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

Definitely just need to lube your stabilizers. Apply some of this to both the key inserts and the wire clip and you should be squeak free.

u/PlataBear · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

Finish Line Extreme Flouro is what most people (including me) use. You can find it here on Amazon for around $12. Also, with the whole car part grease thing, I would suggest wiping that off. Some greases can eat away at plastics. /u/ripster55 did a whole lube guide and put it on the Wiki, I would suggest taking a look at it.

u/Venasaura · 2 pointsr/ElectricScooters

Xiaomi Mi Electric Scooter, 18.6 Miles Long-range Battery, Up to 15.5 MPH, Easy Fold-n-Carry Design, Ultra-Lightweight Adult Electric Scooter (US Version with Warranty) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_KKrXBbFV93XVM

u/ponchofreedo · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

sure...here you go. finish line comes in the syringe, which makes it easy to apply some to the stabilizer housing so you can brush it. taeha types does a good video using this grease combo.


finish line - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002L5UL92/
permatex - https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000AL8VD2/

u/GenerallyQuiteUpset · 2 pointsr/knives

Just got one the other day! I found some grease on Amazon that works great if you run out/don't want to use the included stuff

u/makinbacon42 · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Cooking over a stove is much easier than on a fire, you have a lot more control over what and how hot you can cook, saying that I'm often known to bring steaks on the first night of a trip and cook them on the fire.

Assuming you're talking about hiking trips, if you're after something thats cheap and will do the trick there's this $9 stove on Amazon there's also the BRS3000T which IMO is a better stove.

Cookware is going to depend on what you're wanting to cook

Currently my setup is the BRS-3000T, TOAKS Ti Light 650mL titanium pot, Sea to Summit Long Spoon and a little foil windshield. I also have a Jetboil Minimo, MSR Whisperlite International too, but for just starting out I wouldn't go with either of those.

u/sorijealut · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

They're excellent. I'm loving the MX reds. All the keys are boobs except maybe stabilizer keys, but using ripster's guide to lubing and this, the pinging and movement did seem to improve.

u/ThirstyOne · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

High-Vis version of this kit.

I'm not a fan of the Knife+Ferrocerium rod combos. The Mora Survival one specifically is more expensive than the counterparts purchased separately. I prefer purpose built strikers because trying to exercise mechanical force using something other than the business end of something sharp and pointy sounds like a recipe for injury. Plus, if you lose your knife you're fucked because now you don't have a striker.

Get some:

u/newtmitch · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

Nice looking! What lube did you end up using on the stabs? I think I tried the lube I had lying around on my last build: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002L5UL92/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and not sure that was the right call...

u/pxlnght · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards
u/shawnnrro · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards
u/warm_gravy · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

If that is this, then no - don't use it for switches.

However this is a good lube for stabs where plastic and plastic touch.

u/N3rdProbl3ms · 2 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

I picked this up off a recommendation on this forum and it has worked for my pok3r: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002L5UL92/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o08_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

u/COLONCOMPANION · 2 pointsr/Watches

Casio EF503D. Stainless case and bracelet, chronograph and date, and not too chunky. Inspired by the Omega Speedmaster. As a fellow college student, this is by far my most worn piece.

u/MyNameIsntGerald · 2 pointsr/Watches

can you link me the amazon page? I tried to find it but there always seems to be different names for it and I can never find it.

Edit: found it, the nomenclature for this watch seems to change slightly every time someone posts one, but now I have found it

u/mxfi · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice
u/ryayy · 2 pointsr/Watches

I have been thinking of getting this watch, but am concerned with the build quality. Also I was considering buying the Casio Chronograph instead. What is your opinion? (I would put a nato strap on either)

u/younevermo41 · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

probably the same exact product with different branding and they get great reviews https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8?th=1

u/Aevum1 · 2 pointsr/Watches

Maybe you can still find some swatch automatic chronographs based on the C01.211 but they are basicly disposable.

Also the chinese airforce with the ST19 allows a mechanical chronograph for quite cheap, (not automatic) but reliability is an issue, sizzle watches also has this http://www.sizzlinwatches.com/proddetail.php?prod=ticino-military-aquachrono-watch which is Panerai inspired and uses a chinese 7750, dont expect reliability or accuracy,

Unless you want to buy a 2nd hand Seiko 6138, i dont think you should go for anything mechanical under 700-900 bucks which is what entry level swiss 7750´s cost.

Now quartz wise, you were right to look Casio, Seiko and Citizen. The japanese still make some of the best quartz movements around, Casio makes bottom bargin watches which are amazing.

If you want something sporty, Omega speedmaster Inspired
http://www.amazon.com/Casio-EF503D-1AV-Edifice-Stainless-Steel/dp/B003URWNOG/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425228660&sr=8-1&keywords=casio+edifice+chronograph

Something Millitary Inspired ?
http://www.amazon.com/Seiko-SSC231-Analog-Display-Japanese/dp/B00I1M0FZ4/ref=sr_1_39?ie=UTF8&qid=1425228771&sr=8-39&keywords=Seiko+chronograph

Or maybe something with a bit of class to it
http://www.amazon.com/Seiko-Black-Chronograph-Leather-SPC083P2/dp/B00BQL3XAQ/ref=sr_1_45?ie=UTF8&qid=1425228771&sr=8-45&keywords=Seiko+chronograph

u/Nixtrix · 2 pointsr/Watches

Assuming your Casio is similar to the EF503D-1AV (for comparison's sake here is yours, the EF503D-7A, on Amazon. Funny note, Amazon lists yours as having a band width of 7 mm.) the listed band length is 20 mm which corroborates with what mirite had found. This means your 19 mm band you've picked out to replace the metal one with would fit but it may be a tad small for the actual area but it is a safe bet so i'd say go for it!

u/gooberlx · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Last year I picked up this stove. Light as all getout and works well.

I also purchased zelph's fancee feast stove, but have yet to try it out at high elevation. This guy swears by his custom one though.

u/BecauseSometimesY · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

Olicamp mug/pot $12, 4oz weight, 20oz capacity

BRS 3000T Burner $15, 25g. It really is an amazing little micro stove.

Jetboil Flash LID This lid fits the Olicamp mug/pot perfectly! $6, plus shipping. About 1oz

A 100g canister fits perfectly inside, plus the BRS and a bic. The jetboil lid fits securely and keeps everything together.

Ditch the canteen.. carry your water in 1L and/or 750ml smartwater/lifewater bottles. Seriously. It’s durable, and weighs significantly less.

u/Rawrsomesausage · 2 pointsr/Watches

Haha, yeah the Stargazer is nice.
This is the Casio. I've seen it talked about in the sub before and people seem to like it. For the price, I doubt you can go wrong. It also comes with a white face.
It's more similar to the automatic Speedy and most Valjioux 7750 chronos because of the sub-dial placement.

Edit: This one is also similar.

u/cdougyfresh · 2 pointsr/financialindependence

I have a straw filter in my bug out bag, but for home I keep this one around.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FA2RLX2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I also have some water purification tablets.

I honestly haven't tried any of the freeze dried food yet, need to do that! Canned food rotation is good, but we don't really eat much canned food regularly, so doesn't work too great for us. We try to eat as much fresh / local produce & meats as possible.

u/ariffinsha · 2 pointsr/Watches
u/Robinsta5967 · 2 pointsr/Watches

There's always the Casio Edifice.

u/Kevin_M310 · 2 pointsr/malefashionadvice

I vote neither. If you want a solid chrono, go for this casio and swap out the bracelet for a band in dark brown or black leather.

u/OneMoreNewYorker · 2 pointsr/frugalmalefashion
u/TheStuffle · 2 pointsr/EDC

Can't go wrong with a Mora. Good size, good sheath, good steel, cheap as dirt.

u/fromkentucky · 2 pointsr/Survival

I had an Ontario RAT-5 for a while. About the same size as an ESEE 5, but with a thinner blade and full-flat grind. The handle was uncomfortably bulky and although it held up to my abuse, I just didn't like it. The blade was thin enough to do finer carving tasks, but it was too wide and the edge profile was terrible. I ended up using my Mora knife and Fiskars hatchet more and the RAT-5 was relegated to batoning duty and even in that I preferred the hatchet. In fact, I carved my first bow drill kit with that Fiskars.

I was considering stepping up to an Ontario RAT-7, but instead I traded the RAT-5 for a KaBar Becker BK7, which is a BEAST of a knife. Longer than an ESEE 5, but just as thick and with a similar profile. It really impressed me with the amount of work it could do and how easy it was to use, but it was heavy and just too fat to do anything but chop and split, so again, I was using my Mora and hatchet for most stuff.

I finally decided to try a different direction and traded the BK7 for a much smaller ESEE 4. Around the same time I bought a Bahco Laplander, and I am in love with this combo. The Bahco eats through 1-2" branches with ease (while generating plenty of sawdust for tinder) and the ESEE is just long enough to baton them into kindling and carve up some feather sticks. The best part is, the ESEE 4 and Bahco together weigh about as much as the BK7 in its sheath, and take up about as much space, but they are FAR more versatile.

I realize the ESEE 4 may be just out of your price range, but Kabar makes a similar knife called the BK16. However, the ESEE comes with a lifetime warranty.

I still take my Fiskars with me occasionally, but for weekend camping, I can process plenty of firewood with the ESEE and Bahco faster than I ever could with any of the bigger knives. If I needed to build a shelter or was venturing into unfamiliar territory, I'd want the hatchet because it's such a capable tool.

The ESEE 5 was designed for downed pilots who can't fit a hatchet or folding saw into their kit but may need to build a shelter, so they made it big and heavy. I understand first hand that big knives are appealing and certainly have their strong points, but their size, weight and thickness can make them difficult to use in a lot of ways and in reality, a big knife will never chop as well as a decent hatchet, because the knife's weight is centered just above the handle, not directly behind a huge wedge that drives into the wood. What you really want in a survival knife is versatility and I've spent a lot of time, money and energy figuring out that size doesn't add versatility.

u/Loki3050 · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

I'm new to Bushcraft in this past last year myself. I posted the link to the first and so far only knife I have purchased below. Its a Mora Companion and runs under $15. I've cut rope and cloth with it, carved wood, batoned wood and generaly tried to abuse it within reason and thus far I'm impressed.

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396450010&sr=8-1&keywords=mora+companion

When I finally do upgrade I think I will go with the Mora Bushcraft Black.

From one beginner to another.
Theres my two cents.

u/eyesontheskydotcom · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I'm newer to this, but have done a bunch of research and searched for deals, plus gone on several trips now, so I'll just throw out some options on a few things that have worked for me. Just my $0.02; take it for what it's worth.

Knife: I've have several Mora's. They get tons of recommendations. Plus they're small, light and capable. I've used them to split wood. The one with the firestarter in it is nice.

Water bottles: I use store-bought bottled-water ones. My Sawyer Mini water filter screws right onto them. Granted, that's not a useful option to put hot water in your Nalgene to warm your feet in your sleeping bag, so for cold weather that may not be a good option for you.

Light: Use a headlamp. Much lighter-weight and allows for hands-free.

Clothing: No cotton as others have said. Search for deals on Sierra Trading Post. Sign up for their emails. They'll send you 2-4 every day, but I've gotten a lot of nice stuff for low cost going that route. I put stuff in my cart I think I want, and STP will send you deals regularly. I click through the flyers and then look at the prices in my cart. When the stuff in my cart is a price I like, I buy the stuff then.

u/Vanq86 · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

First I'd make sure you both have all the clothing and footwear you need to be comfortable and the things you'd need for an urban day out (pack, water bottle, some snacks, etc.). Nothing ruins a day like an unexpected blister / rain shower that causes a chill / burned hand from a fire.

After that I'd consider basic survival needs and comforts that might be different in the woods. A small survival kit (and the knowledge required to use it), toilet paper, bug spray, gloves to protect your hands from heat and thorns, a tarp (which you already say you have) to escape the sun or rain, etc.. One suggestion I have that I don't see mentioned often is a lightweight foam kneeling pad. You can get them at the dollar stores in the gardening section usually and for the negligible weight and space they're worth having in my opinion. They are great for kneeling on (obviously), which you'll be doing a lot when practicing bushcraft skills like fire making, and they make a huge difference for the backside when sitting on ground / logs / rocks that are hard / wet / dirty.

With comfort and survival covered you can look at the real 'tools' of bushcraft. The most important thing, in my opinion, is a good knife for each of you. Soooo many projects / skills that are considered 'bushcraft' require / are made easier when you have a decent knife. You don't need to spend a lot (a Mora Companion is a great choice for under 10 dollars), just be sure to do your homework before spending money so you don't end up with something that looks cool but isn't practical for your bushcraft needs.

Beyond the knife I won't go into details about the rest of my suggestions but I think you'll find reasoning behind them fairly self-evident. I've been bushcrafting / camping / hunting for the better part of 2 decades now and all items I list below are all ones that I've personally used many, many times and wouldn't recommend if I didn't find them awesome and reliable. If you look into them further I think you'll find most / all are considered the best 'bang for your buck' option in their given class.


Mora Companion fixed blade knife - carbon or stainless doesn't matter, both are great: ~$12-15

Nalgene leak-proof water bottle - The cheaper HDPE bottle is actually better believe it or not: ~$5-8

Bahco Laplander folding saw - Silky saws are worth the upgrade price in my opinion but are definitely just a 'nice to have', considering Bahcos can't be beat for the price / function / reliability: ~$20-25

Sawyer Mini water filter - filters twice as good as the LifeStraw (0.1 vs 0.2 microns), lasts 10 times longer (100k vs 1k gallons), is much more versatile (you can screw the Sawyer onto a 2 litre coke bottle), and costs less to boot: ~$19

Fiskars X7 hatchet - I know you already have one bust I figured I'd mention it. For a bombproof, light weight, made in Finland hatchet it can't be beat for the price: ~$20-25

Tramontina 18" machete - great balance and blade, just sand or wrap the handle in some tape if yours isn't finished perfectly to avoid potential blisters (this is also where good gloves come in) - ~$15-18

u/DAEFlair · 2 pointsr/VEDC

Hah, funny you linked the EAB Pocket Knife - I actually found one of those (Or something comparable?) in my things from when I was in boyscouts and I laughed at how small it was and almost threw it out.

I am very tempted to just go rambo and buy a Ka-bar but I probably won't. Lower price will make it disposable and hopefully I won't ever have to use it anyway. Thinking the same way as you, quality...but functionally a waste of money

What are your thoughts on this one? https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZAIXSC/?coliid=I2WSGFIH1CDNP4&colid=ZZRP77UIJCYE&psc=0&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it I Found it in another thread highly recommended and it's cheap. If not, will probably get one of the first two you linked.

u/freeshavocadew · 2 pointsr/knives

Morakniv makes some great budget fixed blades, some are quite small and most have a general utilitarian use. Here's a model for less than $17 and these have built a really good reputation for value and hard use.

However, maybe that isn't quite what you're looking for. Maybe you want something thicker, more substantial? Continuing with fixed blades is the ESEE 4P which before shipping is $99. Another option would be the Ontario Knife Company's RAT-7 for currently $63. Being an avid knife collector, I have maybe 150 total knives total. That said, I think if I had only 1 knife to take out with me and feel secure in doing so, the Kabar/Becker BK7 would be it. For ~$78 new on Amazon, it's just a big hunk of steel (1095 steel specifically) that can tear through almost anything you put in front of it from wood to meat to a car door panel lol. I would recommend looking into some customization for it for a couple for reasons. The black plastic handle scales that it comes with are not so great. This can be resolved by using a bike tire inner tube mod OR just grabbing those ~$40 micarta scales that the link suggests below the photos of the knife itself. The sheath is definitely serviceable for your needs, but you may eventually want to upgrade it to a kydex sheath, or even a leather one if you really like leather. Finally, the coating that's on all of the Becker knives has the benefit of protecting the blade very well but the cost is a lot of friction and eventually that coating will wear off and it'll look different. Many modders just strip that coating off and blue or force patina it and frequently oil after use. Or go the other route and spend hours up front polishing it to a mirror polish and now you have a knife that will look really Bowie-ish.

u/dnietz · 2 pointsr/Survival

I have two Leatherman tools. I have used them for over a decade and have never had any trouble with them. They are easy to sharpen and they don't have a single dot of rust on them. Every tool is going to have its limits. I wouldn't use the knife on a Leatherman as a crow bar. I have never heard anyone complain about their Leatherman.

I have seen many people complain about the Sven Saw. It seems to be high quality and the design is very convenient. However, because of its triangular design, it actually can only cut smaller branches. Perhaps you aren't intending to cut a 6 inch limb. Just know that anything thicker than probably 3 inches is probably a big pain to cut with the Sven. Also, from what I understand, the Sven Saw only takes Sven Saw Blades, which is an added inconvenience and expense.

I have a basic cheap bow saw (one piece, non foldable) that I think works great. Bonus is that you can, if needed, use it with standard hack saw blades.

I don't currently own a Mora knife, but they do seem to be universally loved. Please note however that there are several Mora knives that range from $8 to $18 (both stainless and non-stainless). They don't seem to be substantially different from the one you mentioned that is $65.

This is the Mora Bushcraft Survival knife you mentioned ($65):

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Bushcraft-Survival-Stainless-Steel/dp/B005CAPU80


Different Mora knives are either non-stainless carbon steel or stainless. Also, the thickness of the blade varies. You can get the thicker stainless steel knife in the cheaper model ($14):

http://www.amazon.com/Lime-Green-Mora-Companion-Knife/dp/B00BU9ATS8/ref=pd_sim_sg_12

I'm sure you can find one without a lime green handle. There seem to be a thousand models of Mora knives.

Another example, slightly thinner but still stainless ($11):

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Stainless-Steel-Camo-Knife/dp/B005K994QM/ref=pd_sim_sg_11

This one is not stainless but the steel is even thicker than the one you mentioned ($40) if durability is your priority:

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Sandvik-Stainless-4-3-Inch/dp/B009O01H0Y/ref=pd_sim_sg_9

This last one is almost exactly the same as the knife you mentioned, except that it is $17 instead of $65:

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Stainless-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004ZAIXSC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1376873143&sr=8-1&keywords=mora+knife+stainless+steel

Perhaps the price of the one you mentioned is inflated because of the sheath, but the reviews rate that sheath badly. They mention the clip disconnecting unexpectedly and also it does seem like the sharpening stone and the fire steel to be a bit of a gimmick. Fire steels are like $3 at Walmart and maybe $5 if you want the bigger military style model. The sharpening stone attached to the sheath seems to be toy like and not really functional.


Another one that seems to be the same as yours without the gimmicky sheath ($38):

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Outdoor-Stainless-4-3-Inch/dp/B003FYJU9A/ref=sr_1_12?ie=UTF8&qid=1376873143&sr=8-12&keywords=mora+knife+stainless+steel

There seems to be a huge variation of prices on Mora knives. The best ones seem to be the ones that are Stainless Steel and the thickness is around 0.1 or 0.098 inches.

I already own several high quality expensive knives, so I don't have a need to purchase the $65 range Mora knife. But the ones that are around $11 seem to be a great deal to use in situations where I might want to avoid damaging my expensive knife.

My favorite to purchase cheaply right now is:

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Stainless-Steel-Camo-Knife/dp/B005K994QM/ref=pd_sim_sg_11

Because it has the hook at the front of the grip, which will help prevent your hands from slipping on to the cutting edge if you have to push into something. I think in survival situations, you hands may be tired, shaky, wet and dirty, which might make them prone to slipping. And of course, a survival situation is the absolute worst time to cut your hand.

Those are my 8 cents worth of contribution.

u/CedarWolf · 2 pointsr/Shoestring

Hey, you can also make quite a bit of your own gear if you're feeling up to the challenge. Check out /r/myog for more information about that.

Fancy, fold up cook kits can run you $20 to $70 or more, plus fuel, but you can also make your own cook kits real easily from soda cans, cat food cans, and grease pots. You can get one from Walmart for $7, and an aluminum pot handle from any outdoors store for a couple of bucks. Here's a basic one for $4, but you can find them for $2, too. You can also use a folded bit of aluminum foil as a wind break around your stove.

The best part about those is not only are they light and cheap to replace, but your can stove and your aluminum handle should fit neatly inside your grease pot. Depending on how tall you made your windbreak, you might be able to fit it inside your pot, too. If not, it's just aluminum foil; it'll fold up.

It really depends on what your budget and your conditions are. You can grab a cheap, fairly light tent for $50 or $60. (If you want to go crazy cheap, there are $20 tents that you can set up between two trees or support with trekking poles.)

I wouldn't suggest depending on a cheap tent for the long term, but use them as something you can test out, beat up, and not be too heartbroken over. They're just the basics.

Woot.com often has sales on camping gear, including backpacks, light blankets, sleeping bags, and hammocks. Decent backpacking hammocks usually run about $15 to $25 online, don't stress about getting one that's really expensive and has a lot of features. They're pretty much all parachute hammocks. Worry about investing in the expensive stuff later.

My advice, though? Don't stress about your gear at first. Get some cheap starter gear, read about it, test it, make a plan. Drop on by /r/trailmeals and find some simple recipes that you like. Find a nice state park nearby and look at their maps. Find a camp site and see what's there: Do you have trees available for hammocks? Is there a fire pit already set up? Do you have wood available for fuel? (You probably won't need much more than your cook pot and utensils if your campsite has a firepit with a grill, for example.)

Make your plan and execute it. Let people know where you're going, and what you're up to. Invite a friend if you can. Put your comfy shoes on, toss your crap in a backpack, go out for a weekend, and test your gear. Get some experience with your new stuff, see what works for you and what doesn't. Learn where you want to focus if you want to shed weight, and check your reviews. Go to places like REI: they'll often let you see or set up any tent you're interested in, in advance, so you can check out how easy or how difficult it might be on the trail, in the dark. That last part's important. You can have the fanciest tent in the world, but it doesn't mean a hill of beans if you can't set it up in the dark. (Because at some point, you will be setting up your tent in the dark, in the rain, in some sort of adverse conditions. It happens. Be prepared.)

Practice with your gear, learn your gear. Learn your limits and your preferences.
Knowledge is easy to acquire, useful to have, and doesn't weigh anything, so pack a lot of it.

You're gonna want to get that experience on your cheap stuff, so you can learn and make mistakes without ruining some high-end piece of kit that's really gonna cost you. Get your experience in and add the expensive, fancier stuff as you go. I like to focus on pack, shelter, and shoes. They're going to be your main sources of weight and your big comfort items. Bad shoes and ill-fitting packs hurt. Insufficient shelters suck. Upgrading those early on, or starting with some mid-tier gear if you can afford it, is handy.

And if you decide that maybe this isn't for you, that's okay, too. You can back out without having dropped several thousand dollars on all the latest gear. It's easy to spend hundreds on fancy gear. Try to avoid falling into that trap.

It's probably ultralight heresy, but I often bring a cheap paperback book with me. Sure, it's sort of heavy for a luxury item that I don't need, and if it falls in a creek then my book is destroyed; I get that. However, for me, you can't beat hanging out in a comfy hammock under the trees with a good book. That serenity is why I go hiking and backpacking in the first place.

I also tell myself that if things ever go incredibly sour, a cheap book or a trail journal is also a good source of tinder and toilet paper. Not that I would do such things, but if I was ever stranded somewhere and I had to, the option is there. Similarly, you can signal other hikers or other people in your party if you have a trail journal - just pull out a page and leave a note for them.

Oh, and it's also wise to bring a couple of trash bags along with you. Get the big, kitchen sized ones.

They're great for:

| | | |
|:--:|:--:|:--:|
| holding trash | separating wet clothes | good laundry bags |
| dirty shoe mat | tent hole repair | emergency ponchos |
| emergency pack covers | food bag | extra warmth |

------

Oh, and remember the simple principles:

Pack it in, pack it out. - Any gear (or people) you bring, you're responsible for getting it (or them) back out.

Leave no trace. - You have a responsibility to leave your campsite as you found it, or better than you found it. Any trash you bring, you pack it right back out with you. If someone before you has been an asshole and has left a bunch of trash all over the campsite, try to clean it up, even if you can't pack it all out.

Hike your own hike. - This means that you can have all the excellent advice in the world, but how you do your hike is up to you. No one else can tell you how to live your life, and if you want to carry a little extra weight for a luxury item, or if you prefer a bit of kit that isn't quite in vogue this season, or if you can't afford the high-end, cuben fiber this or that, don't stress about it. You're out there to enjoy yourself, focus on that.

Be prepared. - This is the Boy Scout motto. Things will happen that you're not going to expect. Don't go overboard and don't get too crazy about it, but have a plan and know how to execute it. Learn the area you'll be at and know what sorts of conditions to expect. If you get hurt, know who you can call. If you're in a state or national park, those phone numbers are always on the freebie trail maps they provide - grab one at the ranger station or the trail head and keep it with you or keep a photo of it on your phone. Are you going to need extra batteries? Is your phone going to have service? If you can, sign up for a first aid course or a trail-specific first aid course. That's information you'll want to know if you ever need it.

u/projectself · 2 pointsr/BBQ

they are. when i divorced I did not want to buy "steak knives", so I bought the two knives I had used for years in the past and knife blocks for them.

6 of these kershaw pocket knives..
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009VC9YA/

6 of these mora knives..
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004ZAIXSC

and two knife blocks..
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004X6M97O

u/gandothesly · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

I'll have to disagree here. The Mora Bushcraft Triflex is one of the finest blades I've used. It is light weight, yet, is extremely durable. It sharpens easily, holds and edge, and is about the right size for bushcraft in my hands.

I've used them to prep meat and vegetables, carve wood needles, baton firewood, cut cordage, fell tiny trees, and most other tasks one needs in the woods or at home. It is a joy to use.

I've used other brands at 20 times the price and have been left not nearly as satisfied.

Don't take for granted that you won't feel bad about really using this blade. At less than $30 you won't worry about replacing it (but you might never need to).

I've held and used the Mora Companion and the Mora HighQ Robust, I give them to folks that go into the woods with me as gifts. They are fine knives as well, with the same qualities as the Triflex.

If you are cheapo, grab one of these knives and try it. I'd bet most people like them.

As for the knife is not an axe part, we'll disagree there too. The Parang type machete, and other long knives of similar design is a type of tool used in many parts of the world. It can be used very skillfully for rather delicate tasks, such as food preparation, or it can be used to cut down a tree. In some areas that's all a person carries.

Firesteel, I'm with stupid_guy, hit Amazon: Light My Fire Scout has been working for me. I like that when it feels like you are holding it right, you are. Works good in the dark that way.

Guyot Stainless Steel Bottle, 32-Ounce

And one more thing you didn't ask for, but I love. And I like to spread the love:

GSI Halulite Ketalist

I've got a compass that I've used for 30 some years, but can't find it anywhere.

Let us know what you get and how much you like it after using it a bit! :-)


u/beard-maketh-the-man · 2 pointsr/Leeds

Hope you manage to find it.

Keep an eye out on gumtree / ebay. But there's local markets too, although it'll probably be sold to a mate for a few quid :(

Was it locked up with just the cable lock seen in the photo? If it was, sadly you've learnt the hard way about how poor they are (you can cut them quickly with a simple hand tool).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXXB8MqTNsU

This is a good enough combo for £20:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Kryptonite-Bike-Lock-Flex-Cable/dp/B005YPK8G2

u/flalak · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I got this from my lbs for about 50 and I would recommend something similar. A u lock to go through the frame, front wheel and bike rack and a cable to go through the rear wheel. Maybe something like this from amazon. The keys are nice too cause I can just keep one on my keyring.

u/powerpants · 2 pointsr/MTB

The shape of the frame seems like it could be a complication, not just for locking it up with a u-lock, but also with attaching a bracket to carry the lock while riding. For example, this lock comes with a mounting bracket that seems designed for road bikes.

u/albertogonzalex · 2 pointsr/bikecommuting

Buy a U-lock for around $50 (Krypotnite or Abus)

http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1463060715&sr=8-2&keywords=kryptonite+lock+combination

http://www.amazon.com/Abus-Ultimate-Combopack-Cable-Diameter/dp/B009VUBH0C/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1463060745&sr=8-5&keywords=u+lock+abus

The most importan thing when locking - make sure one wheel and the frame (not the fork) of the bike are inside the U-lock. Ideally, whatever you're locking to is also inside the U-lock. However, sometimes this is not possible. The cable is used to attach the other wheel to the u-lock as well. In the situation where your frame, wheel, and object you're locking to cannot fit inside the U-lock - use the cable to lock around the tree/pole, etc. and keep the u-lock on your bike/wheel.

u/Attunement · 2 pointsr/EDC

I purchased this one from Amazon, I've only needed to use it a couple of times but it has some really solid reviews.

u/MurderJunkie · 2 pointsr/riddeit

To answer your first question in terms of areas where bike theft happens more, I'd just say avoid areas that are hidden or away from every day pedestrian traffic. Don't lock it up in an alleyway that people never go down.

I have a bike that is about the same price as yours. I've been commuting all over Columbus for five years now and I've never had my bicycle stolen.

I would HIGHLY suggest that you get a good u-lock. That's all you really need. If you're concerned about someone running off with your wheels you can also get one of the u-locks that also have the cable for your wheels. Here is the U-Lock that I bought I've had that lock the entire time and I've had no issues with it.

Also, make sure you lock it to something sturdy. Preferably a good bike rack that you can get your bike lock through the frame of your bike. I prefer to lock it through the back wheel and the and the top bar that goes from the seat post to the back wheel.

Also final word of advice is definitely do not leave your bicycle out over night.

Additional stuff. If you have any stuff on your bicycle, like a light (you should probably get one if you plan on riding at night, and get a nice 550 lumen one), make sure you take them off when you've locked your bike up.

u/benryves · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I'd opt for a combination of a D-lock and a cable lock, such as this Kryptonite set. The D-lock is passed through the frame, rear wheel and bike rack, and the cable is looped through the front wheel and connected to the D-lock.

u/gnopgnip · 2 pointsr/cycling

You can get a good u lock and cable for about $40 in the US. If you are not in a high theft area like New York City I would go with this lock and cable. https://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2 Or this one. https://www.amazon.com/OnGuard-Double-Team-PITBULL-U-Lock-Cable/dp/B005YPKBWI Lock the back wheel and frame with the u lock and the front wheel with the cable. The onguard locks are also a good deal. The higher security ones are relatively cheap compared to abus and kyrptonite, but they are heavy and probably overkill unless you are in a high theft area.

If you are in NY, SF, DC and you plan on locking it up unattended I would get two onguard brute locks, or two other locks that have to be cut twice. The locks are thick enough that an angle grinder or very large boltcutters are needed to break the lock. It would require a thief to use an angle grinder and cut at least 4 times to steal the bike. It is hard to get the right positioning to cut that many times and no one is going to that much trouble for a cheap hybrid bike when there are much easier and more valuable targets.

u/smartfon · 2 pointsr/sanfrancisco

>Ask me how I know.

>/u/ I_AM_AN_FBI_AGENT

Must be an intern if they gave you the shitty job?

I use a Kryptonite U-lock for the frame/backwheel and a ~10mm cable that runs inside both wheels and the seat column. I'll look into buying one of those heavyass chains to add it to the u-lock. Thanks for the tips.

cc: /u/matt_the_hat

u/Ghetto_Ghepetto · 2 pointsr/cycling
u/artsrc · 2 pointsr/australia

Impressive answer, thank you. I agree that nothing is a forgone conclusion and the existing players have some advantages.

My understanding of the Kodak story is not as positive. More like this:

https://www.economist.com/node/21542796


In some ways I like other answers to the electric world with different form factors like this:

https://www.amazon.com/Electric-long-range-Fold-n-Carry-Ultra-Lightweight-electric/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=lp_13280951_1_2_sspa?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1521006162&sr=1-2-spons&psc=1

or this:

https://www.gocartours.com/

u/JiForce · 2 pointsr/berkeley
  1. Lights yes. Drivers here suck. Pedestrians here suck. Hell, most of the other cyclists on campus and around Berkeley suck too if I'm going to be honest... You want everyone to see you, and you also want to be able to see, especially the potholes and pedestrians.

    It's winter so lights are a super worthy investment, especially because they last a long time and you'll be able to use them for years before you run into battery/durability issues.

    You don't really need the lock posted in the comment you replied to. I mean I have one myself and all, but I don't carry it normally because the value of my campus commuter isn't worth the weight of the lock (that bitch is heavy.) I only use it if I happen to want to ride one of my nicer bikes around, or if I'm going to be parking my bike at the BART station or downtown for a whole day- that kind of thing.

    IMO the Evolution Series 2 U-lock plus the cable is going to be fine for most on campus usage as long as you're not leaving the bike unattended for a whole day, or overnight. Biggest thing when locking up is doing it properly. Make sure the u-lock gets the frame and your rear wheel both, and use your cable for the front.

  2. It's a pretty meh choice. A popular bikesdirect road bike is the Windsor Wellington, but I wouldn't recommend it either. The money you save on the bike itself is not worth the frustration from riding a poorly assembled and adjusted bike. You'd pay $100 at any of the local shops to have them assemble and adjust it anyway, and riding an improperly adjusted bike is an un-fun PITA. Doing the assembling and adjusting yourself is "easy" but doing it right takes some tools you may not have, and some finesse that takes a while to learn. That being said, the cheapest road bike from one of the LBSs (Local Bike Shops) here will run you at least upper 600s IIRC, so take your pick.

    If you think you'll be riding regularly though, as transportation and recommendation, I highly recommend you go with an LBS option because people who know what they're talking about will guide you through your choices.
u/kelny · 2 pointsr/cycling

IIRC Target does not sell any good locks. Buy one online or at your LBS. I have a Kryptonite 2 and it has saved my bike at least a couple times. Maybe later I will post the picture of someones failed attempt to hacksaw through it.

With proper locking technique you shouldn't have to worry during a 30 minute errand, especially if you locked the bike in a place that is well traffic'd and well lit, though I never leave my bike outside overnight if I can help it.

u/zzx4n · 2 pointsr/cycling

i think im gonna follow ur suggestions, ty.

u think this is a fine lock for a relatively cheap bike ?

https://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1482028755&sr=8-1&keywords=kryptonite
tyvm

also, i have a bike right now, i bought it for like $50 a few years back, but it seems too small. like, the frame is too small and the seat is too low down, so its really difficult for me to ride. the times ive ridden it to the gym it was the worst leg day of my life because i get so sore riding it, and i'm pretty sure it shouldn't be like that. i need a bigger frame and higher seat, no?

tyvmvmvmvm

u/shmrg · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I agree with /u/kidsafe on almost all counts. Abus is also a solid brand, I just have more personal experience with Kryptonite. [Here](http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-Kryptolok-Standard-Bicycle-FlexFrame/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1452236815&sr=1-1& keywords=kryptonite+bike+lock) is my recommendation, and what I personally use

u/_OldBay · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I'm going to post a link to my gear that I have. Everything in the picture is about $800 total

https://www.reddit.com/r/CampingGear/comments/arck5m/2019_gear/

Definitely shop around for sales. The Gregory backpack in my post, I was able to find it for $130 online and then they had a first time 20% discount that I applied, ended up getting it for $106 after S&H. That was with Campmor.com.

You definitely don't need to spend a lot on a water filter system. Most people here and in r/ultralight will swear by the Sawyer Squeeze. It's about $30, not really going to find it cheaper elsewhere unfortunately, trust me I tried. Tablets would probably work just fine to be honest, especially in the Smokey's. I did an Outward Bound 14 day backpacking trip in Pisgah which is next door to it and we only used iodine.

My sleeping bag in my post, normal MSRP was $340. I got it for $170 at an REI garage sale in Dacemeber. Saved a lot of money there.

For a sleeping pad, really depends on if you're a side sleeper or not. If you sleep on your side, you do not want to get a closed cell foam pad, which is that one's you mentioned earlier about people using them down to their butts. Personally I have the REI Flash insulated and it's comfortable and not too expensive. Another popular pad here and on r/ultralight is the Klymit Static-V insulated which is about $90.

For trekking poles, personally I would absolutely invest in a pair. Especially in the Smokey's, the terrain isn't always forgiving when you're carrying a larger backpack and they'll help with any stream crossings. The one's I have are these. Very cheap, but very durable. Definitely no need to buy $100+ poles.

Definitely keep shopping around though if you find something you like.

u/pixel_nut · 2 pointsr/MTB

Personally, I'd say stick with a reputable u-lock and pair it with a cable lock for the wheels. A good u-lock oughta require electric rotary tools to get through, and make a ton of noise and take some time. Remember with security locks, it's not a matter of can it be broken but how long it takes.

I like this set: Kryptonite Kryptolok Series 2 Standard Bicycle U-Lock with Transit FlexFrame Bracket (4-inch x 9-inch) with 4-Foot Flex Cable https://www.amazon.com/dp/B005YPK8G2/ref=cm_sw_r_other_awd_sMdAwb63BQ9BD

u/SilverSeven · 2 pointsr/ottawa

Just an FYI, I spend a LOT of time in the woods and put a lot of research into which leatherman to buy. Im so very happy I let a guy at Le Baron talk me into buying the Victorinox SwissTool RS. Its locking mechanism is way better IMO, the selection of tools is a little better, its got a much higher quality feel...all around just a way better product.

Does he spend time in the backcountry? Id highly recommend a Sawyer Mini. Pretty much the best filter you can buy. Can throw it right in line on a camel pack too. Super cool.

u/ummmbacon · 2 pointsr/bicycling

Here are some links:

http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-bike-lock/

http://www.streetfilms.org/hal-and-kerri-grade-your-bike-locking/

The sweethome recommends the Kryptonite Series 2 package deal which you can get for $32+S&H (also note students can get Amazon prime free for six months).

The second video is a guy from NYC rating people's locking of their bikes. Which is really worth watching, a lot of the time it is more that people don't lock their bikes properly than having a bad lock.

But as Sweethome says if your bike is less than $1K then just use the Kryptonite Series 2.

If it is >$1K then they reccomend the NYC Kryptonite Series. Which is $75 at amazon.

u/BeeVoltage · 2 pointsr/Portland

I ride fulltime and find that so long as it's a stable bar to lock to (shake it to make sure it's connected at the base on both ends), and you have a cable and u-lock (don't skimp, get a Kryptonite) then you should be in great shape in most parts of the city. The only times I've been nervous, I've been able to find a lock spot within eyeshot of the place I'm going to. I do not lock up my bike for more than about 3-4 hrs in one spot.

When in doubt, ask the business if there's better options for your bike. I once went to lock up outside of Cooper's Hall, and a business owner neighbor let me know Cooper's had bike parking inside because that area is especially prone people stealing things.

DO make sure your bike serial number and pictures are on your phone and with the registry in the horrible case that it does walk off!
Edit: commas, added advice

u/RoyGilbertBiv · 2 pointsr/bicycling

This method is probably the best all-round:
http://www.802bikeguy.com/2011/07/the-modified-sheldon-brown-bike-locking-strategy/

I don't live in a particularly high crime area so I don't carry my cable usually, just a long shackle U-lock since I also don't live in an area with particularly great bike racks.

u/thelastboyscout007 · 2 pointsr/preppers

Becker BK22 - This knife is a freakin beast. I've batoned 4in thick hardwood logs with this badboy with no problems and it still held its edge. And at 1/4 thick you could pry open a car door with it if needed.


Sawer Mini Water Filter


Mountain House Meals - Lightweight long storage and taste great.

Laplander Folding Saw

u/cupcakegiraffe · 2 pointsr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

For quasi-anonymity, would it be possible to not state where I go to school?

If so, I'm on my second year as a transfer student in animal science. I love animals and I love caring for and spending time with them, so this degree will allow me to be paid for doing what I love. Some possible career options would allow me to be able to work with animals and people, helping them to have a mutually beneficial relationship.

I walk every day to school because my bike lock rusted out and I don't trust that my lockless bike on campus would be there when I returned. I would enter for a lock for my bike so I can have either a few more minutes of study or sleep, depending on the day. Thank you for the contest. =)

u/FindYourFemaCamp · 2 pointsr/camping

Iodine is blegh. Takes a while to purify the water and leaves a taste.

instead get a
sawyer mini from amazon for 20 bucks.

Removes 99.99999% of all bacteria, up to 100,000 gallons.

u/Aeacus- · 2 pointsr/bicycling

It's a not very good ulock but I'd take the first one over the cable lock. This is the basic entry level lock I recommend. The problem with cable locks is small wire cutters (pliers sized) can nibble through them in a short time frame. Or bolt cutters can instantly cut them. I wouldn't bet that the ulock you posted above would stand up to small to medium bolt cutters either.

The kryptonite ulock I linked will stand up to most bolt cutters (I think I've seen a video of some one getting through one with a pair of 4 foot bolt cutters). Thats big enough to be obvious and uncommon in my area.

u/tuckermacleod · 2 pointsr/cycling

my hub dyno lights are integrated, so I'll skip past those

u/peitsad · 2 pointsr/cigars

I got a stand for my birthday recently that was fairly inexpensive as far as I remember. It's not exactly "professional grade" but it's sturdy enough to hold a bike and do some work on it. Little light so it moves around a bit, but like I said it gets the job done. Found it, it's this guy.

u/ArcticCat · 2 pointsr/triathlon

Bikehand Pro Mechanic Bicycle/Bike Repair Rack Stand :
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_RPJeAb27Z8MB0

It has really worked great for me, I highly recommend it. Can fold down to store away too.

u/NotSoUltralight · 2 pointsr/Ultralight

Cascade Tech Carbon Trekking Poles

Check these out. Have em and love em. Great budget option. Recently switched out the tips for some BD tips and couldn’t be happier!

u/toboggan_hooligan · 2 pointsr/MTB

I got one off Amazon it really surpassed my expectations. Ive had two different bikes on it and it did not fall over. Works for me. It appears youre not in US but nobody replied so figured i would.
https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Mechanic-Bicycle-Repair-Stand/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1517619329&sr=8-4&keywords=bike+stand

u/mtimber1 · 2 pointsr/MTB

I have this bike stand,

Venzo Bikehand Pro Mechanic Bicycle/Bike Repair Rack Stand https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_LMfKBb6584VV5

I dig it.

I don't use a torque wrench. I know I should but everything on the bike is such low torques (speaking from the perspective of someone who works on cars and industrial equipment) that I just make sure everything feels "right" to me... Haven't broken anything or had anything fail on me out on a ride yet... But that doesn't mean you shouldn't get a torque wrench if you want to do it right. As far as torque wrench set go even the expensive ones are cheap compared to the torque wrenches I'm used to using... So cheap/expensive are relative terms. I'd probably buy something mid range with good reviews on Amazon, personally.

u/bigtime_porgrammer · 2 pointsr/bikewrench

$89 stand I bought on Amazon has served me well, including working on a rather heavy e-bike on the regular.

Bikehand Pro Mechanic Bicycle/Bike Repair Rack Stand https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/

u/hahhwhat · 2 pointsr/financialindependence
u/GermanNewToCA · 2 pointsr/ebikes

For me, this: https://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-PH-1-2-P-Handled-Wrench/dp/B003FPONCI/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1541802830&sr=8-2&keywords=park+tool+allen+key&dpID=419-T8tUMxL&preST=_SY300_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

​

I was too stingy to buy good allen keys for a very long time because I had a ton of really cheap ones, and the cheap ones did work. But every time I use the ones above, I think: "These were so worth it". I say that to myself every single time.

​

Not a tool, but since someone else mentioned a tire: 200 miles ago I put on some Maxis Hookworms - best commuting tires I ever had. Wow. I had Vee Chinane and then Vee Speedster before - I got flats every other week, none on the hookworms and the hookworms are much more stable on less grippy surfaces either. Every time I reach a place I think: Wow, those are the best tires I ever had.

​

Other tools I use constantly:

- my bike repair stand, i use this one: https://www.amazon.com/Bikehand-Mechanic-Bicycle-Repair-Stand/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1541802939&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=bikehand+bike+stand&psc=1

- my chain link tool: https://www.amazon.com/d/Bike-Shop-Tools/Park-Tool-Master-Pliers-MLP-1-2/B00D9NW32I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1541803019&sr=8-1&keywords=park+tool+chain+link+tool

- A good portable multitool with chainbreaker: https://www.amazon.com/d/Bike-Multifunction-Tools/Topeak-Alien-31-Function-Bicycle-Tool/B000FIE4AE/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1541803074&sr=8-2&keywords=alien+tool

​

​

u/eccentricfather · 2 pointsr/bicycling

A decent repair stand. One with quick release clamp and a solid tool tray. Something like this stand would be awesome. It makes doing bike maintenance SO much easier if you have a good stand. I bought a cheap one and I regret it every time I use it.

u/Statuethisisme · 2 pointsr/bikewrench

I mean the same stand that u/singlejeff and u/A1000Birds are talking about. This one.

I only use it for cleaning and lubing as I have a PCS-10 for working on bikes, but since I seem to be looking after and ever growing number of bikes, I decided to buy another stand. I didn't need two solid stands as I'm only physically working on one at a time, so I'll lube a chain on the cheap stand while I'm doing a repair on the quality stand.

u/forrey · 2 pointsr/Israel

In that case, I'd recommend going as light-weight as you can. A set like the one in the photo will be fine for car camping, but too heavy for backpacking, especially multi-day. Here's what I take when backpacking:

Toaks titanium 700ml pot

BRS ultralight gas stove

Toaks titanium folding spork

And a 4 or 8oz gas canister like this one, depending on how long I'll be going for. Don't get the gas canisters online though, get them at a camping or outdoors store, they'll be cheaper.

Honestly, that's all I need for solo backpacking. If you're backpacking with other people, you would maybe need a bigger pot (like 800 or 900ml), but I prefer to use the smaller one and make batches of food if need be. If I'm going car camping, I can bring more stuff as needed (cups, mugs, bowls, etc).

You don't need to get the exact items I have, but basically just ask for a simple, ideally ultralight gas canister stove, cooking pot (ideally titanium, not stainless steel), and a lightweight spork.

I also don't think you need tupperware unless you're car camping. When I backpack, I bring primarily dried foods that require not much cooking (asian style noodles, oatmeal, couscous, etc), and augment with some packaged tuna or chicken (in a bag, not a can) and spices. You can browse through /r/trailmeals for inspiration on cooking while camping.

u/Waremonger · 2 pointsr/MTB

I have the Bikehand stand as well and overall I'm very happy with it and it's surprising high quality, except for the clamp itself. Mine has not broken yet but if you look on both the Bikehand and the RAD Cycle bike stands you'll see that both of them have plastic (sawtooth) teeth which allow the clamp to rotate when loosened. The clamp itself has no issues but when you're working on the bike and have to put even a slight amount of force on something - even just turning the cranks to get the rear wheel to spin - those teeth will make stress noises. Sooner or later those teeth are going to break. It's a pretty bad design, honestly. Bikehand makes a "pro" version of the stand that has metal teeth instead of plastic teeth but unless the entire clamp area was made of metal instead of plastic I feel that sooner or later something will give. I'm just really careful with my stand. The Park Tool stand must not have that same issue as I've seen videos of people working on their bike in a Park Tool stand and putting all kinds of force on it and the stand seems to take it without any issues.

u/run_throw_bike_climb · 2 pointsr/bicycling

I bought this one on Amazon and I'm pretty happy with it. I've definitely used better stands than this one, but you can't beat the price. I use it at home for quick jobs like you mentioned and also for cleaning my bikes.

u/middlefingur · 2 pointsr/MTB

Yup, get the one mentioned above from the seller linked here for $80:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I use it once a week to clean and tune my bike with no failures.

u/fidelitypdx · 2 pointsr/Portland

I also like the Sawyer, it's ~$22.00 on Amazon. It's not the fastest filter, but it works pretty well.

u/docb30tn · 2 pointsr/preppers

Your pack is going to have weight or you're going to suffer. In the Army, as a Medic I carried standard load: Body armor, helmet, 240 rounds of 5.56, M4, 9mm with 4 mags of ammo, and a 30 lb Aid Bag.
I know you won't be using all that stuff, but a 30lb pack isn't that heavy. You should be wearing some of the stuff you need.
Water: I strongly invest in two items. A Camelbak with at least a 3 liter bladder and a Sawyer Mini Filtration kit:
https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1466464554&sr=1-1&keywords=sawyer+mini+water+filter
6 within a mile? It's short sighted if you're going to stay in the area, but bugging out has the goal of getting to a further away safe location where you have your permanent setup. If you have no place to go, it's pointless in leaving unless where you live/are is more dangerous if you stay.
You'll need to learn many various ways to filter water you find. Some water cannot be cleaned, like stagnant water in ponds have higher amounts of germs in them. Moving water doesn't go bad; rivers and fast moving streams. However this water must still be purified, but has less chance of being infected. Any prepper needs to master water purification.
I suggest getting a map of the area you live; larger if your BoL can be found on the map. From there you can mark any water sources you find as well as paths from your house (Point A) to your BoL (Point B)

u/aminalbackwards · 2 pointsr/WildernessBackpacking

I stole the whole setup design from a friend, just a bladder and a filter.

https://www.amazon.com/Geigerrig-G2-070-0Z-p4-Hydration/dp/B00870DGDS

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2?psc=1

The pump adds air to a separate compartment to pressurize the water reservoir and lets you fill cups/pots with water straight from the mouthpiece, without it you would have to carry the extra Sawyer squeeze bag. Only thing I would change is using a bigger sawyer filter, this one flows pretty slow (maybe buy the geigerrig filter instead). The geigerrig is a really awesome piece of equipment though; super easy to fill and really durable.

u/jcrot · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Water Filter
http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1395805266&sr=8-3&keywords=sawyer+squeeze

this would be an easy, cheap upgrade and would save some ounces.

70.4 ounces for the half dome? REI Specs it at 92. I have the same tent, but am looking at upgrading to the quarter dome 1 person. When someone else is with, I can split up the weight for the half dome.

As some one else recommended, lose one of your knifes. For how much they're used, I don't find multi tools worth while and just carry a small folding blade.

u/memento22mori · 2 pointsr/todayilearned

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=2CXXD1Y7Z7KMA&coliid=I3S0PSH4ATHBEB&psc=1

This isn't an Amazon affiliate link or anything, I used to work for them and I never figured that out, this is the best portable filter money can buy and it's $21. It removes almost all of the bacteria and protozoa from water- though it doesn't removes viruses or pharmaceuticals.

>High performance filter fits in the palm of your hand, weighs 2 ounces and filters up to 100,000 gallons (30 times more than comparable filters)
>Attaches to included drinking pouch, standard disposable water bottles, hydration packs, or use the straw to drink directly from your water source
>Removes 7 log (99.99999%) of all bacteria and 6 log (99.9999%) of all protozoa (Each filter is certified for absolute microns; that means there is no pore size larger than 0.1 in size. This makes it nearly impossible for harmful bacteria, protozoa, or cysts like E. coli, Giardia, Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella typhi (which cause Cholera and Typhoid) to pass through the Sawyer Mini filter.)

u/launch201 · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

I don't know too much about that backpack, so I can't comment, but you should be able to pickup a pack in that price range if you're just getting started.

water

A lifestraw will work, but essencially you need to go source to mouth, so if you need water for anything but drinking (i.e. for cooking) I don't know if the lifestraw will be best. Sure you can suck in, spit out, but there is a better solution: the sawyer mini is about the same price point: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890779&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini

meals

and that brings me to water for cooking. MREs are heavy, and while you won't be hiking far carrying that weight even for a short distance might not be the most fun (especially if you are saving money on your pack) - there a many commercially available freeze dried meals which are very light and you simply add boiling water to. Mountain house is the most common - http://www.amazon.com/MOUNTAIN-HOUSE-Beef-Stroganoff-4-80oz/dp/B0002YRNJK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398890892&sr=8-1&keywords=mountain+house

besides mountain house there is backpackers pantry (better IMO):
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=backpackers%20pantry&sprefix=backpacke%2Caps

and finally if you want to try some of the best I recommend packit gourmet:
http://www.packitgourmet.com/CookInBagMeals.html

clothes

wool is good because it keeps it's insulation warmth when wet. wool can be expensive though. If the weather is going to be good I'd recommend a couple quick drying shirts (which are pretty affordable)
http://www.amazon.com/Russell-Athletic-Sleeve-Dri-Power-3X-Large/dp/B00719Y8HO/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891200&sr=8-3&keywords=quick+dry+shirt

and be prepared to own the worlds best pair of underwear - buy two pair wear one, wash one in a river:
http://www.amazon.com/ExOfficio-Give-N-Go-Boxer-Brief-Medium/dp/B001M0MN02/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891283&sr=8-1&keywords=exofficio+boxer+briefs

tools

this is probably one of the first things that gets "over packed" what to you anticipate needing a tool for? On the hand saw if you will be collecting fire wood there is a very nice lightweight handsaw that is perfect for backpacking, the Sven Saw:
http://www.amazon.com/SVEN-SAW-Sven-Saw-21/dp/B002J900EQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891413&sr=8-1&keywords=sven+saw

cookware

on cookware it all depends on what you'll be cooking. on a budget I'd recommend this cup:
http://www.amazon.com/GSI-Outdoors-Glacier-Stainless-Bottle/dp/B001LF3IB6/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891523&sr=8-1&keywords=GSI+cup

and this stove:
http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1398891563&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove

with that you'll be able to boil water for your freeze dried meals, make ramen, and you can also make hot drinks like tea.

u/Bizzaroworld725 · 2 pointsr/bugout

this site has some good bags for the cheap.
Your priorities sound like they should be shelter, water,food.
Pick a bug out location. Go out into the woods you mentioned and maybe set up a campsite for the weekend. Maybe go back to the same site next weekend and practice some bushcraft skills and make your site better, practice building fire, hunting, things you'll be doing in a SHTF situation.
You'll need a means to treat water. I think I'm gonna be ordering a sawyer mini in the near future after reading some good reviews. But boiling water should be fine as long as it hasn't been tainted by chemicals.
Food kind of depends on how long you plan on bugging out for.

These are just a few quick ideas to help get the brain storm going and just to kinda throwing them out there. Pick up a few survival books, maybe hook up with someone that knows wild edibles in your area.

u/standardalias · 2 pointsr/camping

how do you define pure water?

don't water bottles become reusable bottles after yo drink them down?

why cant my tap water be filtered?

question 8, what type of water filter? the ones from question 7 where i had to decide which of two styles i like?

i use one of these. make something better and cheaper and i'll use that. http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_2?s=outdoor-recreation&ie=UTF8&qid=1412024242&sr=1-2&keywords=water+filter

u/gunshyjohnny · 2 pointsr/socalhiking

I have the katadyn Vario and i've used the MSR Sweetwater EX. They are both good. My favorite now is the cheap ($20) Sawyer squeeze filter. I use it with a Platypus bag as a gravity filter. The Vario and MSR weigh too much and there is much more maintenance. The sawyer squeeze is very popular. You don't need the Platypus bag, you can use the sawyer squeeze by itself.

sawyer squeeze

platypus big zip

u/ForrestSmith151 · 2 pointsr/hiking

First Aid Kit - you might not need it ever, but you should always have it. All kits are different but there are fundamental items that should be carried, you can check out the NOLS Kits
and either buy one or for less, make your own that is custom to your needs and desires.

Tools - First, carry a knife that can cut decent size branches, again, you might not need it but its good to have. Second, I recommend getting a water filter such as a Sawyer mini or Katadyn Be Free as they are both lightweight and will probably decrease your pack weight if you hike near water. Third, Fire can be helpful in many situations but must be used carefully and with respect. If you live somewhere that allows it, a wood burning camp stove will be worth some warmth and also allow you to cook if you bring along a mess set. I personally use an MSR Pocket Rocket. As a day hiker, you might not use a stove often but it's not bad to have if you do longer hikes or are far from civilization so if that's the case, look into tablet stoves. generally, you should have a lighter or two just in case. You may also consider carrying a survival blanket just in case (as goes for most these objects).

The Front Pouch - So the idea behind having this pouch is to have things that you want quick access too on the trail, the most important of which is your map. Navigation is important when hiking so if you're not familiar with an area buy a map and bring a compass. I personally don't use a compass but I've learned how to navigate without one, however you should always have a map. You may also need to have a permit for some hiking areas and it's nice to have within reach, usually with your map. you may also like to have TP and a camp trowel in there so that it is not hard to find at the wrong moment. along with that, a trash bag of any kind should be carried. Finally, carry snacks in there so that you don't have to dig around to find them.

Summary - This is all advice from a Backpacker so there will be many things you don't need on every hike but could save your life if you get caught in a bad situation, many of the objects I recommend are the same. If I'm close to home or not going out too far on a day hike, I usually carry a Knife, Be Free Filter, Lighter/Stove (depending on mileage) an extra coat, and extra food, but each hike and hiker are different. You will eventually find a system that works well for you, but it's always good to carry things that make life on the trail easier and can get you through a night in the wild. With thought on my comment, you should also check out the Ten Essentials as they will almost always be worth their weight.

If you have any other questions feel free to ask!

u/Cool_Bastard · 2 pointsr/preppers

I skimmed through your list, but am short on time. Some of my stuff overlaps with yours, but I'm a firm believer in redundancy. Shit gets lost or you loan it out or it gets up and walks away and then you have none. You'll notice it happens to us even when we're NOT in a natural disaster emergency situation.

I'm assuming your bug out bag is for more than 3 days. I hate the 3 day scenario.

I did CTRL-F. What I did not find was:

  • tourniquet - I suggest two
  • The blue tarps are big and bulky. One would be great on the ground under a tent, but I'd suggest a large poncho or thin nylon sheet with grommets for a "roof" under trees to keep the rain out, or snow. Maybe something fireproof?
  • knife - specifically survival knife & pocket knife. Yeah, I saw your multi-tool...it's not a survival knife.
  • Is your TP in a ziplock baggie? Is it separated into separate sections so it won't get lost. I suggest two rolls, just in case.
  • Duct tape.
  • 100' parachute cord - I saw you had 30', Personally, I like to have a lot more. You'll need a knife to cut and a lighter to burn the ends
  • Lighters - You have one unopened set of Bic lighters, so if you lose it, you lose all of them. Maybe consider opening it and putting the in different locations so when you lose two, you still have three backup.
  • Backup flashlight & extra Batteries - I suggest rechargeables and a solar rechargeable pack. I like to standardize all my electronics with the same type, like AA.
  • Pen/paper - Yeah I saw you have it, but are they waterproof? I got some off Amazon (pads were in a pack of 5) where the paper pads were waterproof and tear proof. Pen was sposed to be waterproof as well.
  • Boots - with appropriate socks (3 pair)
  • Water purifier that's a little more robust than laying down in a creek bed and drinking through a straw. Maybe this one or this one along with your life straw. Do you have a collapsable container to hold water in? So you won't always have to go to the creek bed?
  • Solar shower? You don't know how long your disaster might be and a shower does wonders for the body & mind.
  • Towel, wash cloths. You always need to wash and dry your mess kit along with yourself and tools.
  • Soap for washing mess kit and for yourself. Shampoo or bar shampoo, extra ziplock bags, larger nylon bags (like shopping bags) to carry shit that you come across, like firewood or other cans of food or rocks.
  • Something for self defense or to chase wild dogs/coyotes away or even predators. Even if it's a high power sling shot with steel ball bearings, or a high power, full auto CO2 BB gun, anything to tell an aggressor that you're not just a sitting duck. Personally, I would NOT want to be hit with a full auto BB gun or even a steel ball from a sling shot. Don't make yourself an easy target, hence your knife.
  • A back up boot knife. Always have two. One they can see, and one that's hidden.
u/BarbarianNerd · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

If you want to get by cheap, pare the list down to essentials.
You need water, food, good shoes/boots, and shelter and to keep it light. Everything else is periphery.

The cheapest and lightest way to carry water is to use an empty quart milk jug or two with a rope on it. It's not as good as a camel back style bladder, but it's more reliable in my experience for fractions of pennies on the dollar.

I recommend a Lifestraw or a Sawyer filter for water purification. They cost about 20 bucks and they're really effective. Not necessarily essential for short trips, but it does a lot for peace of mind and you never know when bad stuff will happen. They don't filter out heavy metals or dissolved materials (ie anything <.1 microns).

REI has a really good info primer on sleeping bags

I wouldn't worry about poles for overnight stuff at all. That's for like weeks of constant hiking or alpine stuff. They can be useful and are helpful, but they can be passed by most of the time.

I get by with a rubberized army poncho and a blanket instead of a tent and bag. It's good enough to keep the rain off and a bit of body heat in, but it's not ideal and it's time consuming. I got it at a yard sale for two bucks. But for one night, it's good enough. A rain fly or tent foot print, or plain tarp is also effective. There are some pretty legit one person backpacking tents out there for about 70-100 bucks, I'll probably get one next. Not sure which brands are good though.

For food, I'd do the mountain house meals and hoist my garbage high and away from camp after wards, preferably in an air tight bag of some kind when you haul it out.

Normally I prefer to do something like pilot bread, PB, dried fruit, a big bag of spinach for the first day or two, green beans, nuts, and maybe some quality sausages and cucumbers, but the convenience of the MRE style foods is often appealing. army steel canteen cups are good for boiling stuff in, but the canteens are kinda useless.

A lighter, some matches, and wet fire packets are great.

Get a mid grade belt knife, like a buck or a k-bar or similar. It's a whole nother can of worms to discuss however. Just be careful as some buck knives are made in china, the ones made in idaho are always marked american made on the packaging.

Silva makes a good compass, a good topographic map, a small 10ths scale ruler (or any cheap one) are a good idea. Know your pace count and hwo to use these tools effectively. Compasses are pretty useful in foul weather or unfamiliar places, but navigational things aren't really essential.

I'd get some biodegradable toilet paper and read this.

That's about all I can think of right now, there's probably more to say and think about. Good luck! Park jobs are a ton of fun! Wish I was going with.

u/brainbacteria · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Lifestraw is good, but for the same amount of money you can get a Sawyer mini filter. http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1412635189&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini
It seems to be the go-to backpacking filter, has 100,000 gallon guarantee on it, and a smaller micron filter at .01. I agree with 12pieces though, a filter is a good way to go.

u/jhulbe · 2 pointsr/BWCA

I've rarely had people stop in at my campsite, we usually hang a clothes line out front so they know the site is taken.

We've swung by on our boats if we saw people at a site we wanted and asked when they planned on leaving.


For water, i usually go with big groups. Boiling would be a paint.

We bring two of these: https://www.amazon.com/Coleman-5-Gallon-Collapsible-Water-Carrier/dp/B000088O9Y/

picked up a hose to filter it through: https://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2

Then I just take the dirty 5 gallon bucket down to the water, fill it up, and then hang it from a tree and drain it into a clean water tote. The clean tote is used for filling nalgenes and such. Then if you just need a little water to brush your teeth grab it from the dirty bucket hose.


I dug through some photos and found a picture of my setup in the background.

http://imgur.com/a/jjFD2


as for the wind... Paddle slow, tie your gear into your canoe. We use Gear Ties by nite ize to secure most things.

I've paddled in some sketchy stuff.

u/cast_away_wilson · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Sawyer Mini water filter. 1 for $15.46, 2 for $29.47
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=twister_B06XVV54DF

u/mjern · 2 pointsr/trailrunning

I carry a Sawyer Mini Filter. Haven't had to use it, though.

u/pomod · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Stock up on these

u/jstricks87 · 1 pointr/AirForce

What about when I toss one of these to you?

u/guinnevere · 1 pointr/infertility

PS- I love these for thick injections. Wrap 'em in a washcloth and apply. Also, w the PIO, letting it run under hot sink water can thin it out a bit before injecting.

http://www.amazon.com/HotHands-Hand-Warmers-40-pairs/dp/B0007ZF4OA

u/MacabreChaos · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

I'm a college student, so I totally understand buying cheap stuff. Here are some of my personal finds.

I bought these cute rain boots for myself about a year ago, and they've held up well! They come in a lot of patterns; I have the argyle plaid just because I like plaid, but the polka dots are cute too. :)

I have this scarf in red. It's super warm and comes in multiple colors. :)

I'm pretty attached to my phone, so I have these gloves. I love the knitted pattern, and it's a must for me to still be able to do stuff on my phone while I have gloves on.

I have some heated purple slippers (battery operated) from Sears, and they're really nice since my floor is wood. I have my eye on these adorable slippers though because they're just so cute. I love food with cute faces on them. :D They're kinda pricy though.

Also, Hot Hands are a savior. I would buy them from Walmart or Target; it's cheaper, and you can get however many you want. These kept my hands warm when I was outside in freezing temperatures from midnight to 10 am!

u/jeifurie · 1 pointr/teslamotors

I bought a pack of handwarmers off amazon (~$25 for 40 pairs, but you can cut in half so its actually 80) and will keep them in the trunk. Hasn't gotten cold enough in Boston to need to use yet though. But, I think they would get warm enough to unfreeze the handles & trim areas w/o damaging anything.

u/dahlberg123 · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/JMTaco · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/cheezypooofz · 1 pointr/FireflyFestival

Buy one of these. Fill it up stick it on the roof of your car and you should be good to go. We bought two and filled them once and it was enough for 4 guys to make it through the festival washing every morning.

u/improbablydrunknlw · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/JustAnotherStranger- · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/lightscarred · 1 pointr/preppers

NITECORE NU25 360 Lumen Triple Output - White, Red, High CRI - Lightweight USB Rechargeable Headlamp (Black) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B077Z3LNX9/

Thanks and good luck to everyone!

u/meaning_of_haste · 1 pointr/chicago
u/lowbiker · 1 pointr/recumbent

A loud horn has saved my butt a few times when drivers aren't watching. http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound-Bike-Horn-colors/dp/B000ACAMJC

u/belandil · 1 pointr/bikecommuting
u/gringopicaro · 1 pointr/bicycling

Maybe a horn would meet your needs. Schwinn Bugle Horn

Or if you really want to annoy people, an air horn.

u/Synaesthesiaaa · 1 pointr/bicycling

It's an AirZound. The wire is a tube that connects to the horn mounted on the hoods.

u/Purp · 1 pointr/nyc


>How do you mount an airhorn?

The one I have was made for bikes. You can recharge it it using your tire pump.

And one thing I forgot, get fenders, even if it's a racing bike, because it's probably urine.

Oh, and in case you didn't know, google maps will show you all the bike lanes and bike-friendly streets (example), you can even get directions for bikes.

u/antarcticgecko · 1 pointr/nononono

Something like this probably

u/cobramaster · 1 pointr/bicycling

Maybe a couple blasts on this whilst approaching would solve your problematic encounters. I haven't used one personally but I know a guy who has. Let me know how it works in case you go with it. They are relatively cheap, loud and durable apparently.

u/benjiman · 1 pointr/bicycling
u/jjshanks · 1 pointr/bicycling

Here is my setup

2010 Crosscheck with 2011 front fork (for the eyelets)

2x Panaracer T-Serv Protex 700 x 28 http://bicycling.about.com/od/bikemaintenance/ss/tire_photos_3.htm

Brooks Flyer http://www.brooksengland.com/en/Shop_ProductPage.aspx?cat=saddles+-+touring+%26+trekking&prod=Flyer

Cateye cadence computer http://www.cateye.com/en/product_detail/407

Cascadia fenders http://ecom1.planetbike.com/7056.html

Air horn http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Airzound-Bike-Horn/dp/B000ACAMJC

Bell http://www.rei.com/product/801939 (returned several other bells that didn't fit)


If you are going to ride at night please get lights. I personally use this as my front light http://www.bikelights.com/stella200.html
I can't find a reference online to the taillight I have but those little blinkies just don't really do the trick for me.

I've been thinking about getting this computer http://www.cateye.com/en/product_detail/600

u/wrigarth · 1 pointr/vancouver

Another idea is an air horn:

Delta Cycle AH1000 Airzound Bike Horn https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B000ACAMJC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_JLLyzb4XPQ729.

It gets drivers to pay attention right away.

u/open_it_up · 1 pointr/DaveAndBusters

Compare it to the commercially available version of the Scooter that Bird uses.

https://www.amazon.com/Xiaomi-Electric-Long-range-Fold-n-Carry-Ultra-Lightweight/dp/B076KKX4BC

​

Statement based on this: https://qz.com/1257198/xiaomi-makes-the-bird-and-spin-scooters-taking-over-san-francisco/

​

They both have the same wattage motor and similar battery capacity (I think).

​

Bird does have larger wheels (8 inches, pneumatic, compared to 6 inch solid), so in ideal conditions, it's top speed is theoretically going to be slightly higher, but in practical use, they are going to operate similarly.

​

The Bird version is heavier. It has some functionality to reclaim some lost energy, so battery will likely last longer. It also has app functionality.

​

The Mi is $649, and the Voyager Ion is $200+.

​

​

​

u/mlchrist · 1 pointr/GhostAdventures
u/AbsolutelyPink · 1 pointr/DIY

One of these. You can get the bags with the bio gel in them or buy bio gel on the cheap and potty bags.

u/GrandioseAnus · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/ragnarthesweet · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/onewasbored · 1 pointr/flashlight

Nitecore NU25

Thank you!

u/FailFastandDieYoung · 1 pointr/cycling

It depends how far you're willing to go. I have a beater bike I ride to run errands that I've designed to be unappealing to thieves.

-Fixed gear (high gearing)

-Frame wrapped in Skittles duct tape

-Pink handlebars

-Rainbow colored chain

-Rips in saddle

-Kyptonite Fuhgettaboutit New York U-Lock

All the components are as cheap as possible. 99% of the time I lock it next to a nicer bike that has a crappier lock.

u/jack_porter · 1 pointr/edmontoncycling

This is the lock that I have and it's considered the most robust. It's quite heavy though.

u/SuicidalCheezIt · 1 pointr/Ultralight

The same trekking poles are sold on Amazon for $45 if you can't find any in stores. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00XM0YGW8/

u/gingeryid · 1 pointr/chibike

Also, why is this lock so cheap?

u/XL-ent · 1 pointr/AskSF

> I probably won't buy a bike until I have the spare cash to get a nice one

Bike theft (and parts stripping) is a huge problem. "nice" bikes are at greater risk too.

As a bare minimum figure on a solid thick "U-lock" about $100 and a full set of antitheft skewers/seatpost/headset bolts for about $80.

u/justaquickaccount1 · 1 pointr/bicycling

If weight is not an issue, you should get the Kryptonite New York Lock. I have it and have never had an issue with it. It's pretty much as secure as you'll get with a bike lock, without resorting to incredibly huge, heavy, unwieldy solutions. I live in Philly too, which has a ton of bike theft.

This looks to be even thicker and more secure, but I can't tell from the picture how large it actually is.

For the most security, the lock should be small, but big enough to put through the frame and back wheel, while still having room to accommodate the front wheel (which you should take off and lock with the back wheel and frame, provided it's a quick-release wheel- if it's not a quick release, then get one of the cables or an extra, tiny u-lock to lock the front wheel to the frame).

Take some time to look up the most secure ways to lock a bike. It doesn't matter how long you've been riding for- if you're unfamiliar with how to securely lock up a bike, having a better lock won't mean much. How you lock it up, where you lock it up, and what you lock it to are all important considerations.

And just know that there's no perfect solution. If somebody comes along with an angle-grinder, your bike is getting stolen no matter how many locks you have on it. Exercise good judgement in how long you keep it locked up in one place (as in, don't just leave it out overnight in a high-theft area if you can avoid it). And even having a great lock won't prevent somebody from taking your seat, handlebars, headlight, reflectors, fender/mud guard, water bottle, or anything else that might be on your bike but not chained down.

u/percypersimmon · 1 pointr/FixedGearBicycle

I use the Kryptonite Fahgettaboutit through my front wheel and frame, then loop this cable into itself through my saddle and back wheel and lock the end up in the U-Lock.

~$70 for a bigger piece of mind.

u/chef_baboon · 1 pointr/cycling

I was considering this one like you mentioned, but the bike has front and rear quick wheel connects. I want to prevent someone from stealing the rear wheel+hub motor for example without needing 2 locks (like you have).

u/Aww_Shucks · 1 pointr/bicycling

I'm having a hard time deciding between the Evolution Mini and the New York Fahgettaboutit Mini (need to carry the lock in my backpack on my way to classes)...

Thoughts?

u/aldraek · 1 pointr/WTF

I've heard this one in particular is pretty fantastic.

u/vaporizor · 1 pointr/bicycling
u/GoatBased · 1 pointr/funny

The Fahgettaboudit U-Lock is pretty damn good. You can't use a scissor jack because it's too small and it would take forever to saw it off. It can be removed, but not without considerable effort and time.

u/nomnomno · 1 pointr/Seattle

Definitely get some sort of U-lock and preferably don't have quick release skewers on your wheels. Personally I use this lock, but you don't have to spend that much. One thing to note about U-locks is that smaller is better because it makes it harder to use leverage to pop the thing open.

u/Fake_Reddit_Username · 1 pointr/regina

When my bikes have been stolen the U-lock was cut with good bolt cutters. I have had them stolen from the university in the middle of the day even (granted in summer when there's less traffic). But they came and stole my and everyone elses bikes, there was a line of chains and locks on the ground.

Either you get a bike only worth 100$ and get a 25$ lock and accept it will get stolen at some point. Or if you have a 500$ bike you need to get something like:

https://www.amazon.ca/Kryptonite-997986-Black-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock/dp/B000OZ9VLU


Honestly my last bike that was stolen, the back tire was dented, the brakes were shot, and honestly the lock I had was worth more than the bike was when it got taken.

u/the_brizzler · 1 pointr/cycling

Just get the New York fahgettaboutit lock (should work for Boston!). They tested it by locking a bike up for 30 days and nights in one of the worst parts of New York City...the bike was eventually stripped all the way down but thieves were unable to cut through the lock and steal the frame. So tell thieves, "forget about it" (fahgettaboutit) with this lock, http://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-997986-Black-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock/dp/B000OZ9VLU

u/ZotFietser · 1 pointr/cycling

Just remember that the best lock is one that looks better than the one next to it - it's a deterrent first and foremost (though the fuhgeddaboudit lock has a good track record).
And of course, if you can, try to keep your bike indoors or in a lockup if you're not on it!

If you know of any cycling clubs (or are already a member) you'll be able to get insurance cheaper through them usually. Ask your LBS - they'll know the ins and outs.

Pob lwc!

u/AWildMichigander · 1 pointr/mildlyinteresting

Not the cheap ones. This would be my go to. The only way through is with an angle grinder, if you're using that to get a bike I'm sure it'll raise some questions with any passersby.

u/rocketwidget · 1 pointr/bikeboston

It depends on the u-lock. This one would be trouble for bolt cutters:

https://www.amazon.com/Kryptonite-997986-Fahgettaboudit-U-Lock-Black/dp/B000OZ9VLU

That said, no lock will stop an angle grinder ☹

Here's a great article:

http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-bike-lock/

u/hyperphoenix19 · 1 pointr/NYCbike

Try twisting my New York Fahgettaboudit mini-U you'll destroy the bike in the attempt.

u/ryan924 · 1 pointr/bicycling

I'm going to assume Philadelphia is a lot like NYC ( where I live) when it comes to bike theft, so I will give you the same advice I give people that move here. Get a Kryptonite u lock. This one is the absolute cheapest that you can go with, but you'd be mush safer going with this. Lock thought the front wheel and frame. I would suggest getting at least a cable lock for the back wheel. Anything quick release will be stolen unless locked down. Best to replace anything that is quick release. No locking method is 100%. Whatever lock you have, there is a tool that can break it. The only thing you can do is not make it worth the effort. So don't go locking up a super nice bike. Lock it whenever you're out of arms length. If someone jumps on it and goes, you'll never catch it.

u/SpeedyLou · 1 pointr/flashlight

The Nu25 would make a great headlamp for night hikes! Thanks for doing this and congrats!

u/mystogan2901 · 1 pointr/bicycling

How about this one? But the brakes will still be on the straight handlebar.

u/NaanExpert · 1 pointr/bicycling

If you find an older road bike (like 80s or 70s) bar, the diameter will work with your shifters/brakes.

These may be helpful, but are not an equivalent for drops.

I'd ride it as is though.

u/aprofessional · 1 pointr/bicycling

Yeah bar diameter kinda sucks I think you can probably fit some extensions to it though? You'll at least be able to get into them for sprints and stuff I suppose but I'd miss riding on the hoods...

u/PedalinGardener · 1 pointr/bikewrench

I have risers, love rapid fire shifters, but like the feel of drops at times and thought about these

u/qsceszxdwa · 1 pointr/bikewrench

So here's what I would do. Slide in your controls and grips to where you think they would be comfy. Ride it without touching the part of the bars you think you won't use. Cut the bars there if you're satisfied. If you really want drop bars for some reason, stick these on there after you chop the bars. https://www.amazon.com/Origin8-33617-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8:

u/texastoasty · 1 pointr/bicycling

ive asked this question before, basicly best answer was bar end drops. like these: https://smile.amazon.com/Origin8-33617-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8?sa-no-redirect=1

as far as fit, if your legs are long enough that you can pedal a size larger fine then you may be able to get away with just changing the stem, which isn't too expensive or difficult.

a shorter steeper stem will get the bars closer to you and higher which will focus less of your weight on your hands.

u/johntmeche3 · 1 pointr/bicycling

I had a Giant Escape. You can either sell the bike and buy a road bike on Craigslist (what I did), or buy these:

http://www.amazon.com/Origin-Bicycle-Drop-Ends-Black/dp/B0013G6PB8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1409073242&sr=8-1&keywords=drop+bar+ends

Putting proper drops on is just too expensive.

u/AimForTheAce · 1 pointr/whichbike

See what I wrote above. It's just impractical to convert. If you want to have the hand positions, buy a bar ends and be done with it.

One example -

https://www.amazon.com/Origin8-33617-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8/

u/Clerui · 1 pointr/FixedGearBicycle

They’re drop bar attachments I added to my flat bar

Edit: https://www.amazon.com/Origin8-33617-Drop-Ends/dp/B0013G6PB8

u/doebedoe · 1 pointr/bikewrench

What is it about drops that you want? If it's a more aggressive riding position then yes go with a road bike. But do know those slimmer tires will not be as forgiving over bumps as something with a bit more volume.

If its just that you want more hand positions for the ride there are a whole variety of bar ends that you can add for little expense. Some of these will stretch you out more, some will just reorient your hands, and these mimic drop bars.

Plus v-brakes are probably the best rim brakes for a commuter (powerful, easy to run fenders, etc etc.)

u/flyfishinjax · 1 pointr/flashlight

Hard to believe we've had 1k join in that short of a time!

https://www.amazon.com/Nitecore-NU25/dp/B077Z3LNX9/?tag=parametrek-20

u/siege_tank · 1 pointr/flashlight
u/_BALL-DONT-LIE_ · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Backpacking is what I love above all else, happy to help.

Finding a local Facebook Group or forum is definitely great advice, they're usually the best resources for learning about places to go/conditions to expect/anything specific to your area, plus find some people to tag along with. Starting out with day hikes is also totally the right thing to do, it will help give you a feel for moving through the woods. You could also combine this with car camping to familiarize yourself with your gear and with cooking/sleeping/etc. outside with a little less commitment than a backpacking trip.

I'd recommend /r/Ultralight over BackpackingLight, which is not particularly active and of much poorer quality than it was a few years ago, IMO. /r/Ultralight is quite welcoming/helpful and pretty active these days. I don't always agree with him, but Andrew Skurka is a well known hiker/adventurer who is also a great resource (both his website and his book). I think he is more approachable for beginners than a lot of others.

I disagree with /u/ImAtleastTwelve, at least to a certain degree, on cost. It certainly is not a cheap hobby by any means (especially considering even in great outdoors cities you're still almost certainly going to need to drive decent distances), but having a fairly light setup with solid gear doesn't have to be exorbitantly expensive—at least relative to say, fashion or photography. I could write endlessly about all kinds of gear, but just taking the example of stoves. You can get a little stove that screws onto a gas cansiter and weighs about an ounce for under 20 bucks. Startup costs can be high because there is quite a bit of gear you need, but it doesn't have to be too crazy. Also, it's a popular activity—lots of used gear (I rarely buy anything new) and people to borrow from out there.

And like he said, it's totally possible to do any number of amazing trips with whatever gear you can scrape together. The gear is a means to an end with backpacking, and all you need is enough to survive somewhat comfortably before you're ready to go outside and enjoy yourself. Everything after that is either making it more comfortable or extending your limits.

u/Cortez_thekiller · 1 pointr/Watches

Orient Mako perhaps?

u/klew3 · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

There are lots of watches linked to there but they all seem pretty good. And I'll throw in that I got this Orient black Mako on watchyouseek for about $70 used and in perfect condition though it took about a month for the right watch to pop up.

u/hurricanefalcon · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Seiko SKX007

Deep Blue Pro Diver 1k

Orient Mako

Bernhardt Binnacle Anchor

All of these are sub 300, and only one is more than 200. They're highly praised on Watchuseek in the Affordable Forum. It has tons of advice on mechanicals that won't break the bank

u/CopyrightedThought · 1 pointr/Watches

So do you want a diver or a business casual dress watch? The two watches you posted are VERY different in terms of where they work. Regardless, I would shy away from the Invicta. Here
is a higher quality diver, the Orient Mako, that is virtually the same. Same dimensions and everything.

It's hard to tell by your post but it seems you want this for the purpose of being able to dress it up more than dress it down. If you are willing to save another hundred dollars I think you could do well with the Hamilton Khaki Field. Can be either dressed up or down quite easily and goes well on a NATO.

Otherwise, dress watches like a Rodina or Orient Bambino might be more up your alley. Good luck!

u/kappuru · 1 pointr/malefashionadvice

Get this instead. 100 bucks, great quality, nice movement, and you won't cry when you scrape it against a rock. (you are going diving with this thing, right?)

u/Sharkbite0592 · 1 pointr/Watches

The 7K2 would be better in my opinion, it is 3mm bigger than your Invicta so it should fit fine, and the reviews on the 7K2 are better than the reviews on the 9K2 as well.
Also, for $10 more you can get an Orient Black Mako diver watch which has better reviews than both of them, just throwing it out there for you in case you're interested! http://www.amazon.com/Orient-CEM65001B-Black-Automatic-Watch/dp/B001EWEQ3A/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1416272316&sr=8-1&keywords=Orient+Mako

u/4br4c4d4br4 · 1 pointr/sanantonio

You could have posted the NON-SPAM direct link instead; https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC

Though it's academic since it's NLA at the link.

u/patrickeg · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

I'll remember that for next time. I've already packed it all away, but I might drag it out and take some pics. My foot is pretty banged up so it'll be a minute. But Ill give you a short list :)

Pack: Osprey Exos 58

Sleeping Bag: Teton Sports Tracker

Tent: ALPS Mountaineering Lynx 1

Tarp: Ultimate Survival Hex tarp

Mess kit: Mess kit and Mug

Water Filtration: Sawyer Mini

Tools/Defense: Note: Normally I would only take one knife, but I wasn't sure which I would prefer as they're two quite different blades. Ka-Bar Becker BK2, Condor Bushlore, and Bear Spray

Stove: MSR PocketRocket

First Aid: I had the Adventure Medical Kits Day Tripper, and then added to that with Celox and an Israeli Bandage

Trekking Poles: Cascade Mountain Tech CF with Cork Grips

In addition I had a few little things in a small kit; Ferro rod, duct tape, trail blazes, chemical water purifiers in case my Sawyer failed, bug spray, a small thing of sunscreen (which I didn't end up needing as it was overcast), deodorant, TP, etc.

u/Killcraft69 · 1 pointr/ElectricScooters

I seem to be very unlucky with my electric vehicles. I truley do ride them carefully, when I go over bigger bumps i kinda pull up so the tires dont take a big hit and I take smooth roads and stay on bike paths, I never ride it in the rain even though technically I could. I have had an es2 break on me, an acton blink quatro( A $1700 BOARD) break so consistently that it spent more time in SF getting fixed than in my possession. Luckily I am kind of a pain in the ass about getting refunds so I haven't taken a financial hit from these I do take a mental hit when I have to spend hours on the line with tech support and customer service. I just want something that won't break under very normal operating procedures. the m365 seems to be the right one cause there are so many people that own them. I did already purchase the X7 now just cause I need it for transport and the initial answer I got was meh. I'm taking a chance on this one mainly cause the specs are more what I am looking for. Also I would but the xaomi pro if it was on amazon. my es2 refund just came through and it was given as amazon credit which I requested cause it would mean zero processing time and I did need a new one asap. If you're curious I can let you know how it is in a few months or if this one breaks on me too. In that case I would just buy a xaomi once and for all. The current listing on amazon is very odd though It is sold by xaomi but the different buying options weirds me out

u/Meowmeowmeouch · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Ubens BRS Ultralight Camping Gas Stove Outdoor Burner Cooking Stove 25g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_other_apa_43EPybPPWPHMC

I bought this and it's fine. Used a handful of times.

u/desktop_monster · 1 pointr/Frugal_Jerk
u/TimeToRock · 1 pointr/Frugal_Jerk

I got curious what the listing looked like before, and I found this snapshot. I couldn't find the exact price that gives $58000 savings, but this is an even better deal from 2014, when you could save $66124.91!

u/I_teach_logic · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

DIRTY THIRTY


This watch has pretty entertaining reviews!

u/maxillo · 1 pointr/trailmeals

And remember you can just bring the bits you need. I like mine better for the weight actually, and have 2 different kits:


https://www.reddit.com/r/CampingGear/comments/2h32ru/picked_these_up_at_the_store_for_1495_and_1995/

I reeally like them and when i go by myself i just take the small one, and when 3 people I take them all and 2 stoves. I have an older pocket Rocket clone but got this little baby a few months ago for $10 or 11 bucks:

https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Ultralight-Camping-Outdoor-Cooking/dp/B00NNMF70U

I just try to be cheap thrifty so I do tend to look for sales and "clones". My buddy just bought the whole kit he needed for JMT and is in over 3 grand. My kit is pretty good and I am in for maybe $500-600.

I can always go back and buy the super expensive gram saving thing if I find I want to loose more weight from my pack down the road. But i figure at this point a diet will do more for trail weight than fancy gear.

u/roy649 · 1 pointr/bicycletouring

Yup. I've got the Shimano A530 but there's a few others that are variations on that theme.

Sometimes, even if I'm wearing my cycling shoes, I'll use the platform side. If I'm navigating some tight urban space, for example, and know I'll be going slow and stopping often. Or, even on the road, sometimes I'll unclip and flip them over just to give my feet a change.

I find being clipped in most useful climbing long hills. Pulling up on the backstroke gets other leg muscles into the game. Sometimes that's the difference between cresting the hill and having to take a break.

I used to wear toe clips with straps. This sort of thing. I find the SPDs to be easier to get out of quickly. What I haven't tried is the new style strapless toe-clips. I should probably give those a try.

u/OneLegAtATime · 1 pointr/bicycling

these pedals or these pedals have clips on one side, platforms on the other. I ride 20 miles a day on them commuting, and have done it both with and without clips. I can't think of anything better for my current commuting scenario.

u/danny31292 · 1 pointr/bicycling

He never once mentioned racing. He talked about rides to lunch etc. I think this would be a good choice.

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO

u/edgebaristax · 1 pointr/FixedGearBicycle

I am thinking about getting the same SPD Pedals that I have on my other Masi. There are amazing because they offer a few riding options.

u/the_gnarts · 1 pointr/bikecommuting

> Uhh, those are definitely meant for cleats to be installed. The 2 screws are standard SPD compatible.

Yes I know, but they work good even without.

> How tiny are your platforms that they can fit into that space?

On the commuter I have these: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001MZ2AGO/

u/gnarmonica · 1 pointr/bicycling

I'm a little late on your post, but as someone who only recently got serious about cycling and even more recently went clipless, I'll share some thoughts:

> more speed/acceleration

As others have said, there isn't a substantial speed increase. However, in my opinion, it does become easier to get up to speed if you pop out of the saddle and floor it. It also makes climbing feel far easier to me. The biggest advantage is the added stability in your feet. After 5-10 miles, I don't even feel the pedals so much anymore and it becomes a fluid process.

> But does this tire you out faster?

Not really, but if I'm being honest, "pulling" uses a set of muscles you may not be used to using, so your legs may get unexpectedly sore for the first couple of rides if you do that. Once you're past that (which was quick for me) there are no real downsides.

> Are they hard to get out of in a pinch?

This depends. There are different types of cleats/clips, and you can vary the tension on each, making them easier or harder to get out of. I've been using mine for about 6 months and have always been able to clip out in time, even once when a car cut me off and I had to get out in a split second.

> Are good/light ones terribly expensive?

Prices vary widely, but you can easily get a solid set of pedals for $50 or so. I have these pedals here, since I ride recreationally and also use my bike to commute in to work. Notice there are clips on one side and a flat platform on the other. They aren't the lightest, but they aren't super heavy, and the versatility is great.

u/brit527 · 1 pointr/ladycyclists

GPS or the pedals?

I use these for pedals on both my road bike and hybrid. Shimano PD-A530 SPD Dual Platform Bike Pedal https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001MZ2AGO?ref=yo_pop_ma_swf I found shoes at a local bike shop for $100. I definitely say to try them on before buying.

As for the GPS— I bought a used Garmin Edge 500 for $50 from someone in my bike club. Prior, I used Strava on my phone but it was a real battery killer.

u/gabbagoo · 1 pointr/bicycling

Oh man, besides the pedals I'm not sure these are upgrades as much as they are 'add-ons' but hey I'm done working so I'll pretend by being on Reddit:

Got this light from my LBS with my bike, love that it was bright as shit and rechargeable...I emailed the company about some the band and different sizes since we have the interrupter lever, they were awesome and sent me some to try out

This tail Light because it was also rechargeable and crazy bright...people behind me have rolled up and asked what kind of light it is...me likey

These panniers because the good reviews, minimal looks, and the waterproof aspect..I use these guys along with a random rack from REI everyday....love it..I also got this backpack thingymajig that makes the pannier a backpack

Got these pedals because they allowed me to rock normal shoes when I'm not wearing these, I like that I can tool around with just normal shoes on without worrying about foot placement.

And riding through town with the oblivious drivers/tourists around downtown I'm picking this horn, we'll see how it goes..and maybe a gopro......

u/Mindflux · 1 pointr/bicycling

I was eyeing some Shimano Dual Platform pedals myself. One side is for riding with your 'normal' shoes and the other side supports SPD cleats.

http://www.amazon.com/Shimano-PD-A530-Dual-Platform-Pedal/dp/B001MZ2AGO/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331911376&sr=8-1


Then instead of some insane moonboots I was going to do something like:

http://www.zappos.com/keen-commuter-ii-black-keen-yellow~1
or
http://www.keenfootwear.com/us/en/product/ss12/shoes/men/pedal/springwater%20ii
or
http://www.zappos.com/chrome-kursk-pro-black

I figure this way if I want a leisurely ride with the family.. I can do that. Or if I want to clip in I can do that too.

u/mochabear1231 · 1 pointr/bicycling

Yeah, any other non-road bike pedal will be more than enough. I have these on my Felt, and they're not true road or mountain bike pedals, more like commuter-esque/urban riding pedals. A lot of people like the Shimano SPD pedals because they are really great value for the price point. These ones are the most common and are very versatile.

Unless you're pro-cyclist level, there really isn't a huge gain (at least imo, ymmv) between the two. Comes down to preference really. I have noticed in a few bike shops that road shoes/cleats tend to run a little bit more as well, but I also wasn't really looking into those, so obviously there's going to be variation.

Yup, I wear those to bike and 4-5/7 days of the week at work. Really not complaints at all - very sturdy shoe, good design, and the vibram soles work great in any wet/non-ideal conditions.

It sucks to say, but you are definitely going to eat shit at least once while getting used to clipless pedals. Just a part of the initiation into biking culture!

u/franks28 · 1 pointr/WildernessBackpacking

My personal recommendation, especially if you are in only OKAY shape, take them (two of them) even if you were going with 0 pounds of gear. They are worth it on your knees alone, and can help your pace. You dont have to spend much. But if i had to recommend one set it would be these.https://www.amazon.com/Cascade-Mountain-Tech-Carbon-Trekking/dp/B00XM0YGW8/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1485792994&sr=1-1&keywords=mountain+tech+trekking+poles+cork

u/nosacredcows · 1 pointr/Survival
u/SlotCarSteve · 1 pointr/secretsanta

I was all set to send him a tactical knife and a Totoro hat. Maybe next year.

u/thehonorablereese · 1 pointr/knives

I'm a fixed blade fan, though what's "EDC" for me (large knife in a belt sheath) isn't for most people. However, a full tang, fixed blade knife will always be more "indestructible" than a folder, so I stand by my opinions.

The KA-BAR BK series are extremely tough knives. My favorite is the BK-2: https://www.amazon.com/KA-BAR-Becker-Campanion-Fixed-Blade/dp/B001N1DPDE/. This is about as close to "impossible to break" as you can get. It's a big, thick chunk of steel and I've used it for everything from cutting rope, splitting wood, removing tile and grout, and as a pry bar.

At about half the price is the Ontario 499: https://www.amazon.com/Ontario-Force-Survival-Knife-Black/dp/B001CZDQPI/ It's smaller than the BKs and has a rough finish, but it's extremely tough. It has been indestructible as far as I can tell: I TRIED to break it by banging it into hard logs and carelessly batoning with it and it barely lost an edge. Great knife for the price.

I could give you some strong examples of folders, but I know other commenters on here will do way better than me on that.

u/clicker4721 · 1 pointr/knives

I would recommend a Ka-Bar Becker BK-2 Campanion (of course) and a Kershaw Skyline, if you're interested in a folder. Total for less than $100.
(BK-2 Abuse links.) Those two sets of tests should be more than enough evidence for the Campanion's awesomeness. It's $62 on Amazon.
The Kershaw Skyline gets great reviews. Amazon has them for $34.

EDIT: Added all the links, and decided to provide an actually comprehensive and helpful comment.

u/K_17 · 1 pointr/ElectricScooters

Xiaomi Mi Electric Scooter, 18.6 Miles Long-range Battery, Up to 15.5 MPH, Easy Fold-n-Carry Design, Ultra-Lightweight Adult Electric Scooter (US Version with Warranty) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_x30oDbCSH1QDM

This is what I purchased not sure

u/BigShibby · 1 pointr/ElectricScooters

M365 on Amazon Canada for $579.99 Cad

Xiaomi Mi Electric Scooter, 18.6 Miles Long-Range Battery, Up to 15.5 MPH, Easy Fold-n-Carry Design, Ultra-Lightweight Adult Electric Scooter (US Version with Warranty) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B076KKX4BC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_LSulDbJDGA4ZT

u/jkaos92 · 1 pointr/MechanicalKeyboards

Hi. Italian here!

  • Recently i bought Finish Line Extreme Fluoro for stabs after a long research, is the fastest that you can get and is not bad.

  • CandyKeys has SuperLube! Is also cheap for europe, i did a test, if you get 10 superlubes is 7 euro + 4 euro DHL shipping, 11 euro for Italy is pretty good imho

  • Also SwitchTop has SuperLube, shipping is something like 8$ to Italy but if you need something other from the shop, may be worth it, otherwise CandyKeys is better!

  • Krytox/Teflon formula from Pexon

    From what i saw, Krytox is usually better, not sure what is Pexon formula but the original Krytox is used to be better but is also pretty expensive, especially to Italy, I would say just go for that Finish Line on Amazon or SuperLube from CandyKeys and you will be fine :)

    Ciao!
u/TrollerBlade · 1 pointr/keyboards

It is a good idea to apply some form of grease after removing and cleaning the key caps. I prefer a simple teflon grease, something like this.

u/kamspy · 1 pointr/knifeclub

You could use gun oil for that part. If you don't have anything like that around, use motor oil and see if it starts to cure your problem. If the motor oil works, order something like this https://www.amazon.com/Finish-Line-Extreme-Fluoro-Syringe/dp/B002L5UL92 and change it out when it arrives.

u/meh-guy · 1 pointr/MechanicalKeyboards

I just found that this lube is cheaper than the super lube, and pretty widely used. As for the stabilizers, this stuff seems pretty good.

u/BookishCipher · 1 pointr/MechanicalKeyboards

Permatex 22058 Dielectric Tune-Up Grease Tube was a suggestion I got from a YouTuber and it works really well so far. A bit expensive but you don't use a lot so lasts forever.

Canada: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B000AL8VD2/?coliid=I1N71VWMGGSOXK&colid=J58MB1DVXYQQ&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

US: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000AL8VD2?pf_rd_p=2d1ab404-3b11-4c97-b3db-48081e145e35&pf_rd_r=EVNQKENT60XP5CXEPJJ7

​

Also for plastic on plastic lube (the stems of the stabilizers, do not use inside of switches) this: https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B002L5UL92/?coliid=I3VPHHQD2B8350&colid=J58MB1DVXYQQ&psc=1&ref_=lv_ov_lig_dp_it

u/nachoaddict · 1 pointr/MechanicalKeyboards

Is there anything to be careful of besides non-conductivity when looking for a grease? I saw this on a Ripster guide and I think I'm gonna order it: https://www.amazon.com/Finish-Line-Extreme-Fluoro-Syringe/dp/B002L5UL92/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1466142797&sr=8-1&keywords=Extreme+Fluoro+Grease

u/davey94 · 1 pointr/MechanicalKeyboards

would this lube be fine for lubing cherry stabs? or finish line?

u/ADCBot · 1 pointr/MechanicalKeyboards

Would this work for lubing PCB mounted Cherry style stabs?

u/Convex11 · 1 pointr/MechanicalKeyboards

(English isn't my first language so i'm sorry if there are some errors)
I just bough a poker 3 and the spacebar is squeaky as hell, so I was about to buy this, but I've read that it will crumble in a month or so and my only other option is this one, but I don't know if it can be used on stabilizers,so which one should i buy?

u/crj3012 · 1 pointr/MechanicalKeyboards
u/format120 · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Looks like 70$ on Amazon. Are they still the most budget friendly at that price?

u/jarmus · 1 pointr/Watches

I know you said automatic - but here's a quartz that might have the look you're going for @ well below $500:

Casio Men's EF503D-1AV "Edifice" Stainless Steel Watch https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003URWNOG/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_H6VCybPYVB021

u/KinkyKankles · 1 pointr/Watches

Opinions on [this Crown and Buckle Strap] (http://www.crownandbuckle.com/harbor-20mm-brown-calf.html) vs [this Etsy Horween strap] (https://www.etsy.com/listing/249657622/leather-watch-band-the-hudson-strap). It'd sit on a [Casio EF503D-1AV "Edifice"] (https://www.amazon.com/Casio-EF503D-1AV-Edifice-Stainless-Steel/dp/B003URWNOG?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=od_aui_detailpages00). I can't figure out which would match the watch better, and I concerns on the longevity of the lined C&B strap.

u/jKK- · 1 pointr/Watches

It's not the initial style you were thinking about, but just for some variety, the Casio edifice series is pretty well received around here, and they have a good quality chronograph on sale currently for $39.99. If you like how it looks, you can't go wrong. With a leather band this thing is very pleasing to the eye.

http://www.amazon.com/Casio-EF503D-1AV-Edifice-Stainless-Steel/dp/B003URWNOG

u/new_to_this_cscareer · 1 pointr/frugalmalefashion

I am not sure which one i should go for, Mahogany or the Horsebutt Watch Strap for the Casio Edifice

//edit: ordered the Horsebutt strap.

u/JobboBobbo · 1 pointr/frugalmalefashion
u/Seeker80 · 1 pointr/Watches

You've got a pretty diverse set of options. There's stuff like this Tissot. It fits the bill technically, but would also wear through your whole budget. You'd have to decide if you really want to pay that much for an automatic Tissot, when you really want an Omega. Quartz models are also far cheaper, so that's another consideration.

You can come in far under budget with a quartz Casio Edifice. This can reasonably scratch the itch, and you can spend the rest of the budget on other watches you want, or whatever.

You can also just spend a little more for a secondhand Speedmaster automatic in the first place.

u/Hobbits_armpit · 1 pointr/cycling

> if motorists, cyclists, & scooter people knew & obeyed the laws of their own conveyance & respected those of the others', we'd be safe & content.

Can I have some of what you're on? Belgium might be run by sane people, but Australia certainly isn't, and I won't mention the current US administration, as transport is a state issue.

Obedience to laws only makes sense when the laws do.

The rules are frequently written by people who are only interested in pandering to the whims of large voting groups. And if that happens to result in the deaths of an "out" group, those large voting groups are perfectly OK with that. The laws in Australia, for example, with its shitty the bicycle infrastructure, will kill you if you follow the rules. This is why they are broken all the time. The infrastructure and to a smaller degree good social norms, are vastly more important.

Personally, I'm not a fan of electric scooters and I really loathe these sorry excuses for transport. I have come to the conclusion that I hate them not because they are particularly dangerous, but because they are just so amazingly uncool. Like someone wearing a a bright pink jacket and green velvet pants. It's not harming me, but, oh god, please, just... stop....

u/Peoples_Bropublic · 1 pointr/knives

A fixed blade would be perfect. Mora knives are excellent inexpensive knives that are quite commonly used for camping. They make some with wooden handles, composite handles, stainless blades, and carbon blades. My understanding is that their stainless blades don't hold an edge quite as well as their carbon blades, but carbon blades have the disadvantage of being susceptible to rust. So for an outdoor camping application where you're likely to be running around in dirt and mud and rain and lakes and streams and not likely to have a supply of rubbing alcohol, clean cloths, metal polish, and mineral oil, a stainless blade with composite handle would probably serve you best.

On the other hand, Cody London, that hippy dude from Dual Survival pretty much exclusively uses classic Moras with wooden handles and carbon blades. On the other other hand, he also doesn't wear pants or shoes.

Here are a few to look at.

u/Magneticitist · 1 pointr/knives

In that case I was also thinking for a budget of $200 you could get him a nice fixed blade and a nice folding pocket knife. Without more details you may have to just go with your gut feeling on a couple of the more popular brands mentioned since they rarely fail to please. Fallkniven, Benchmade, Bark River, Buck..

The Buck 110 is always a well received pocket knife and I would happily receive any of their fixed hunting knives.

I've also read that Morakniv makes a great all around blade even for working with game. I love all the Mora's I own and the best thing about them is the price. You could add one of those in for only an extra 15 bucks and it may end up being a really well used knife he likes and can beat up using it for things he may not want to do with his nice pretty knife his wife got him. Just a possible thought there if you can't land that perfect single knife for him. A nice little folder, solid fixed blade that will last and he can admire, and an all around utility knife covering all 3 bases.

u/discretion · 1 pointr/XTerra

Lordy, you can run a sawzall off your inverter?

I just got one of these, one of these and a cheap true temper axe and have been served well so far.

u/rambotoad · 1 pointr/CampingGear

This used to be my go-to stove until I discovered the BRS3000T. Weighs less than an ounce and functions quite well for an ultralight $17 stove.

BRS Outdoor Camping Gas Cooking Stove Portable Ultralight Burner 25g https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NNMF70U/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_E-FJAbMW831GN

u/saxmanpi · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

Hey there! I wish you the best of luck in your training and thanks for the contest!

My item is a bike lock. I'm going to be needing a one come Fall when I start school.

u/mania4conquest · 1 pointr/FixedGearBicycle
u/centurionotsoprotour · 1 pointr/whichbike

If you're not averse to heading across to Kirkland, this one is a solid option for $50: https://seattle.craigslist.org/est/bik/6172493923.html - 17" should be right for 5'6" and at that price you can add $20 fenders, a $20 rack, $20 in lights (front and rear!) and $40 on a u lock with auxiliary cable - bike theft is pretty rampant in Seattle and campuses are often hit. If everyone around you has sad cable locks and you've got the bother of a u-lock and a cable, your chances of the bike making it through the year in your possession increase greatly. (Hot tips on how to actually lock up once you have said lock - http://www.sfbike.org/resources/theft-locking/ )

Alternate options: https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/bik/6164879482.html - up in shoreline and $155 but this Specialized Hardrock should be a good fit at 16" and still has a bit in the budget for a rack/fenders/lock/lights. Plus it looks to be in good shape.

u/Richard_bender · 1 pointr/flashlight

This one please!

Thanks for the giveaway! Been putting my copper mini baton clipped to my hat for working under my house, could use a head lamp.

u/nessie7 · 1 pointr/flashlight

https://www.amazon.com/Nitecore-NU25/dp/B077Z3LNX9/?tag=parametrek-20

I do need a headlight, so that would work, I suppose.

u/oreocereus · 1 pointr/Ultralight

Way too heavy. My cooker is something like this (it might even be the same thing) https://www.amazon.com/BRS-Outdoor-Camping-Portable-Ultralight/dp/B00NNMF70U

It weights 45g. You don't need a case for it either, I just put it inside my pot and make sure there are some socks or a buff around it so it doesn't stab a hole in my pack/other stuff.

u/ANAL_CLOWN_SHOES · 1 pointr/MTB

Just search "Bike work stand".

Plenty of options. I'm looking at getting this one:
http://www.amazon.com/BIKEHAND-Cycle-Mechanic-Bicycle-Repair/dp/B00D9B7OKQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=cycling&ie=UTF8&qid=1408986564&sr=1-1&keywords=bike+stand

$90. The cheaper ones I saw went for $55. I'm not sure what that converts to in Europe money.

u/dr_pelipper · 1 pointr/cycling

I have one of these, though it's always difficult to say how much of a difference +/- ~$50 makes. Reviews on the lower end one seems to mention issues with the clamp often, but the clamp on this one definitely feels extremely solid. Few of the reviews on this one mention issues with collar at the telescopic bit; I'm about 6 months in and moderate use, and haven't noticed signs of it thus far.

u/bkrassn · 1 pointr/bicycling

I like these shorts they are not that expensive and have lasted well over a year and going strong. My floor pump looks something like this but I can't remember the brand name. As far as tools you likely just need a screw driver and an allen key for the adjustments. There are some youtube videos that explain the process. You will want a work stand. <-- is the one I got. It is a little bouncy but it works and it was under $100 so I'm happy with it. You may want to throw in a pedal wrench while your at it.

u/SillyCubensis · 1 pointr/ebikes

Bikehand pro. I borrowed it from my friend and it's doing a great job holding up Project ChEBorow. I'm ordering my own right now.

u/blackhathedgehog · 1 pointr/ebikes

Well, if it makes you feel better, me and my partner have had very little bike fixing experience, we've had to learn it all ourselves.

The bike comes 95% assembled:

  • need to use a hex wrench to fasten the handlebars
  • you need a wrench to install the pedals

    We ended up getting a bike repair stand which does a great job of holding the bike if you take the battery off first. My partner and i swapped out our tires to some semi-slicks and have since learned how to replace flats on our own. We are still pretty slow -- it takes us 30-45 minutes to take off and reinstall a tire but we're getting faster! This is coming from someone who is not very mechanically inclined either.

    They also include a variety of tools (tire levels, etc) that you can use for maintenance, so you don't have to worry too much about going out and buying it yourself -- we had to go to our local hardware store because their toolkits were out of stock at the time.
u/ldt003 · 1 pointr/assholedesign

DUDE! These caps are the best! Get yourself a sawyer mini like this. They fit those caps perfectly! I think it’s the reason smartwater is dominating the premium water market. Because backpackers keep buying them up.

u/matthewrozon · 1 pointr/backpacking

You do not have to spend a lot. Here are some suggestions that I choose to use even though I could spend the money on more expensive gear.

Pack: Rent until you decide you want to do this a lot and have already bought the rest of your gear

Tent: rent it for this trip if you don't already have one. If you do, it's best to split it up, poles and fly for you and tent for him or vice versa

Sleeping bags, bring them if you have them or rent

Stove: http://www.amazon.com/Ultralight-Backpacking-Canister-Ignition-silvery/dp/B00ENDRORM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396264963&sr=8-1&keywords=backpacking+stove Works just as well as the 50$ one.

Water filter: http://www.amazon.com/Sawyer-Products-SP128-Filtration-System/dp/B00FA2RLX2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396265006&sr=8-1&keywords=sawyer+mini+water+filter cheap, durable, no moving parts to worry about and it's super light

Pot: A lot of people use this, but it might be a bit small for you depending on what kind of food you're going to cook but this works well for freezer bag meals http://www.amazon.com/Stanco-Non-Stick-Grease-Strainer-Black/dp/B000MVTIOQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1396265044&sr=8-1&keywords=grease+can

Long Johns and other clothing: Walmart usually has decent options. Make sure that they are synthetic. You may find that you already have a few things if you look through your clothes at home. Depending how thick they are your snowboarding socks might make good hiking socks or if you have long underwear for snowboarding they would be useful camping.

What are you doing for shoes? Do not waste money on boots if you don't already have them. 90% of trails can be done in good running shoes and 95% of trails can be done in light hiking shoes.

Misc hints: For water bottles just re-use old gatorade bottles, those nalgenes are super heavy. Think about getting two hiking poles instead of just walking stick but this is a preference thing. Avoid cotton at all costs and have fun!

u/keepsharp · 1 pointr/CampingandHiking

Try the Sawyer Mini! Its half the weight, and $21 on amazon.

u/VGooseV · 1 pointr/backpacking

+1 on the sawyer mini. It works like a champ.