Top products from r/hockey

We found 120 product mentions on r/hockey. We ranked the 575 resulting products by number of redditors who mentioned them. Here are the top 20.

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Top comments that mention products on r/hockey:

u/JakeCameraAction · 29 pointsr/hockey

Here you go:

Movies


| |
:---|:---
SlapShot|A failing ice hockey team finds success using constant fighting and violence during games
Goon|Labeled an outcast by his brainy family, a bouncer overcomes long odds to lead a team of under performing misfits to semi-pro hockey glory, beating the crap out of everything that stands in his way.
Youngblood|A skilled young hockey prospect hoping to attract the attention of professional scouts is pressured to show that he can fight if challenged during his stay in a Canadian minor hockey town.
The Mighty Ducks Trilogy|A self-centered lawyer is sentenced to community service coaching a rag tag youth hockey team. In the second movie, leads them to the World Junior Goodwill Games. And in the third movie, the gang heads to a cake-eater private school and a different, tougher coach.
Mystery, Alaska|This comedy is about the residents of a small town who get over-excited when their hockey team gets chosen to host a televised event
Miracle|Miracle tells the true story of Herb Brooks (Russell), the player-turned-coach who led the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team to victory over the seemingly invincible Russian squad.
Breakaway|An Indian-Canadian hockey player struggles against traditional family values and discrimination from mainstream hockey players.


TV & Documentaries


| |
:---|:---
24/7| The road to the Winter Classic details the trials and tribulations of 2 teams each season as they head into the Winter Classic. First Season: Caps/Pens. Second Season: Flyers/Rangers
Pond Hockey|Pond Hockey examines the changing culture of sports through insightful interviews with hockey stars, experts, journalists and local rink rats alike. More than just a celebration of a beloved game, Pond Hockey searches the open ice for the true meaning of sport.
The Last Gladiators|In ice hockey, no one is tougher than the "goon". Those players have one mission: to protect the star players at any price.
Hockey: A People's History|The history of the sport of ice hockey and its impact on the founding country of Canada.
30 fo 30: A King's Ransom|Story of the Gretzky trade from Oilers to the Kings.

Books

| | |
:---|:---|:---
The Game|Ken Dryden|Ken Dryden, a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, is recognized as one of the greatest goalies ever to play the game. More than that, he is one of hockey's most intelligent and insightful commentators. In The Game, Dryden captures the essence of the sport and what it means to all hockey fans.
The Boys of Winter|Wayne Coffey|They were the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team, a blue-collar bunch led by an unconventional coach, and they engineered what Sports Illustrated called the greatest sports moment of the twentieth century. Their “Miracle on Ice” has become a national fairy tale, but the real Cinderella story is even more remarkable.
J.R.|Jeremy Roenick|Jeremy Roenick, one of the premier hockey players of his generation and one of the greatest American stars the NHL has ever known, shares his life story in this frank and unflinching autobiography.
Crossing the Line|Derek Sanderson|The autobiography of one of hockey’s first rebels and a beloved member of the “Big Bad Bruins,” this book shares how Derek Sanderson’s ferocious style helped lead the team to two Stanley Cup victories in the early 1970s.
Playing With Fire|Theo Fleury|Theo Fleury takes us behind the bench during his glorious days as an NHL player, and talks about growing up devastatingly poor and in chaos at home.
Jonesy: Put Your Head Down and Skate|Kieth Jones|Jonsey is the story of Keith s career in the league as well as all of the interesting stories he accumulated over the course of his career, playing with some of the leagues best players in the last 15 years, including Peter Forsberg, Joe Sakic, Mark Recchi and Eric Lindros. Forward by Ray Bourque.
Blood Feud|Adrian Dater|Blood Feud is a rollicking story of a fierce, and often violent, rivalry between the Detroit Red Wings and Colorado Avalanche.
Tough Guy|Bob Probert|Documenting his notorious career with the Detroit Red Wings and the Chicago Blackhawks, Bob Probert details in this autobiography how he racked up points, penalty minutes, and bar bills, establishing himself as one of the most feared enforcers in the history of the NHL.
Journeyman|Sean Pronger|The many triumphs (and even more numerous defeats) of a guy who's seen just about everything in the game of hockey while playing for 11 teams in 16 years.
Ballad of the Whiskey Robber|Julian Rubenstein|The true story of a bank robbing backup goalie in Hungary who becomes a folk hero right after the fall of communism.
Breakaway|Tal Pinchevsky|The stories of the first players to defect and/or get work visas to play in the NHL from Czechoslovakia and the USSR.
Breakaway|Andrew Conte|A detailed, fascinating account of Penguins rise from bankruptcy to Stanley Cup champion that takes you inside the board rooms as well as the players dressing rooms.
Artificial Ice|David Whitson, Richard Gruneau|Artificial Ice explores how hockey has moved from popular pastime to commercial entertainment product, and one struggling to maintain its stature in the North American entertainment market.
Orr: My Story|Bobby Orr|Bobby Orr is often referred to as the greatest ever to play the game of hockey. From 1966 through the mid-seventies, he could change a game just by stepping on the ice. No defenseman had ever played the way he did, or received so many trophies, or set so many records, several of which still stand today. Now he tells of his inspirations, his motivations, and what drove him to become one of the greats. Avalable October 15

u/MalkaMania · 4 pointsr/hockey

Books

| | |
:---|:---|:---
The Game|Ken Dryden|Ken Dryden, a member of the Hockey Hall of Fame and the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, is recognized as one of the greatest goalies ever to play the game. More than that, he is one of hockey's most intelligent and insightful commentators. In The Game, Dryden captures the essence of the sport and what it means to all hockey fans.
The Boys of Winter|Wayne Coffey|They were the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team, a blue-collar bunch led by an unconventional coach, and they engineered what Sports Illustrated called the greatest sports moment of the twentieth century. Their “Miracle on Ice” has become a national fairy tale, but the real Cinderella story is even more remarkable.
J.R.|Jeremy Roenick|Jeremy Roenick, one of the premier hockey players of his generation and one of the greatest American stars the NHL has ever known, shares his life story in this frank and unflinching autobiography.
Crossing the Line|Derek Sanderson|The autobiography of one of hockey’s first rebels and a beloved member of the “Big Bad Bruins,” this book shares how Derek Sanderson’s ferocious style helped lead the team to two Stanley Cup victories in the early 1970s.
Playing With Fire|Theo Fleury|Theo Fleury takes us behind the bench during his glorious days as an NHL player, and talks about growing up devastatingly poor and in chaos at home.
Jonesy: Put Your Head Down and Skate|Kieth Jones|Jonsey is the story of Keith s career in the league as well as all of the interesting stories he accumulated over the course of his career, playing with some of the leagues best players in the last 15 years, including Peter Forsberg, Joe Sakic, Mark Recchi and Eric Lindros. Forward by Ray Bourque.
Blood Feud|Adrian Dater|Blood Feud is a rollicking story of a fierce, and often violent, rivalry between the Detroit Red Wings and Colorado Avalanche.
Tough Guy|Bob Probert|Documenting his notorious career with the Detroit Red Wings and the Chicago Blackhawks, Bob Probert details in this autobiography how he racked up points, penalty minutes, and bar bills, establishing himself as one of the most feared enforcers in the history of the NHL.
Journeyman|Sean Pronger|The many triumphs (and even more numerous defeats) of a guy who's seen just about everything in the game of hockey while playing for 11 teams in 16 years.
Ballad of the Whiskey Robber|Julian Rubenstein|The true story of a bank robbing backup goalie in Hungary who becomes a folk hero right after the fall of communism.
Breakaway|Tal Pinchevsky|The stories of the first players to defect and/or get work visas to play in the NHL from Czechoslovakia and the USSR.
Breakaway|Andrew Conte|A detailed, fascinating account of Penguins rise from bankruptcy to Stanley Cup champion that takes you inside the board rooms as well as the players dressing rooms.
Artificial Ice|David Whitson, Richard Gruneau|Artificial Ice explores how hockey has moved from popular pastime to commercial entertainment product, and one struggling to maintain its stature in the North American entertainment market.
Orr: My Story|Bobby Orr|Bobby Orr is often referred to as the greatest ever to play the game of hockey. From 1966 through the mid-seventies, he could change a game just by stepping on the ice. No defenseman had ever played the way he did, or received so many trophies, or set so many records, several of which still stand today. Now he tells of his inspirations, his motivations, and what drove him to become one of the greats. Avalable October 15

u/tasteofflames · 10 pointsr/hockey

So here's my thing with Bobby Hull. The guy was a remarkable piece of shit in his personal life, and yet, he's also one of the game's most important and best players.

His case ended the league's reserve clause, giving rise to free agency in the NHL. He ended up in court because he was lured to the WHA by professional sport's first million dollar check (paid out $100,000 over 10 years), boosting not only hockey salaries, but every professional athlete's. They dropped that load of cash on him because Jet's owner Benny Hatskin (bitchin' hockey name) thought his signing would give the league credibility. Ya see Hull was probably the most popular player in the NHL and his signing meant fans knew someone worth watching would be playing. Tack on the Swedish trio (Hedberg, Nilsson, and Sjoberg back on D) and you've a group that helped legitimize European style hockey in North America. With Hull, the WHA accomplished its goal and survived to the merger,* but I won't really go into all the implications of the league outside of Hull (of which there are many, the WHA challenged everything). Admittedly, outside of the first two, Hull was only a piece of the puzzle in these situations, a big damn piece in the case of the WHA. Even then, I'd really only put a couple of guys on the same level as him when it comes to impacting hockey as a business: Ted Lindsay and Doug Harvey (founders of the first NHL union).

As for his on ice achievements - 3x Art Ross, 2x Hart Trophy, 10x 1st team all-star, 2x 2nd team all-star. Dude's arguably the Blackhawks greatest player (...but Mikita) and one of hockey's absolute best. HF's history boards have him ranked as the #2 winger (behind Howe, in front of Richard) and #5 overall player (behind the big 4, above Harvey).*

I really don't have an opinion on what Chicago should do about this. I'm not a Chicago fan and I don't live anywhere near it. I can completely understand why the team would want a statue of player like Hull in front of the arena where the team plays. On the other hand, given the piece of shit human being he is (detailed elsewhere in this thread, makes Ike Turner look like a teddy bear), the people that find something celebrating his image offensive are completely justified. Ambivalent is as strong as an opinion as I'm going to have on this topic, I just wanted to show why the they put Hull there. I'm obviously a fan of Hull the hockey player, but seriously what the fuck dude? Who tries to throw their wife off a balcony?


No, seriously, that was the business plan masterminded by Hatskin after he got snubbed during the 67 expansion. Determined to get an NHL team no matter the fashion, he figured the NHL would simply absorb any competition, like the NFL had just done with the AFL, so he joined up. He underestimated the constant dicking they would take at the hands of Harold Ballard and the Molson brothers. The trio blocked multiple mergers, entirely out of spite for challenging the NHL. I highly recommend reading Rebel League; the WHA story is crazy. As a fun aside, a failed WHA presents some crazy what-ifs without even leaving Edmonton. What happens to the Oilers dynasty? The team no longer exists. Who ends up with Gretzky? Coffee? Messier?Does Kurri even come to North America? Do the Islanders win a fifth straight cup?

**Take these rankings as you will. I'm presenting them to give a general sense of how Hull is viewed by hockey history buffs and I like their methodology. I don't even agree with them. Hull over Harvey? Bullshit!

u/thisismyusernameOK · 3 pointsr/hockey

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

I'm saying this apolitically. I don't even live in Canada anymore, but he's the perfect fit. He absolutely loves hockey - he's a 'leader', he's been in office for almost 10 years (meaning he'll be done soon), and he is a diplomat.

Oh yeah, and he's a hockey historian: http://www.amazon.com/Great-Game-Forgotten-Professional-Hockey/dp/1476716536

I have a feeling this would be a perfect job for him, and I actually think he'd do a great job running the NHL.

He supports bringing more teams to Canada too - and if anyone can do it, the former PM of Canada is the man.

Remember Condi Rice said her dream job is the Comish of the NFL?

u/blueline37 · 1 pointr/hockey

Alright well Bobby Orr's book is a given but I devoured it over the course of a single flight because it's just so well-written. I'm still working on Derek Sanderson's book.

BUT that being said, I've also read Ken Dryden's book and found it awesome as well!

Other good hockey books I've read:
Kerry Fraser--really provides insight into the life of a guy in stripes.
This book about the Miracle on Ice team because murrica.

I know they may not be players you've watched in your lifetime--they're certainly not in my case, I'm just too young--but they are all just really good and I recommend them anyway!

u/Air-tun-91 · 1 pointr/hockey

Because hockey has so many random things happening quickly, I find it's useful to first start to try and understand the very general "game situation" of any individual point in time during the course of a game.

It's about pattern recognition. "Okay, the defending team recovered the puck and the defenseman has it behind his net, the attacking team is changing lines. This is a breakout play". Then you go research breakout strategies and will begin to recognize the different types.

"Okay, the attacking team has made the breakout to centre ice and now they are trying to cross the blueline. This is a zone entry play."

"The attacking team is on the powerplay. Looks like they only have one player at the top of the zone, the only powerplay setup I know that has one guy up there is the Umbrella."

Also keep in mind that modern hockey relies less on position (F, LW, RW, LD, RD) and much more on relative things. A lot of it comes down to where players are in relation to the puck.

"Okay, the team recovered the puck and is setting up to break out of their zone on attack. The defending team is sending one guy to chase the puck carrier, this is F1 (closest to the puck). Looks like the second closest player on the defending team, F2, is doing such and such."

This is a great book and a must-buy. Recommended by broadcaster and student of the game, Jeff Marek: https://www.amazon.com/Hockey-Plays-Strategies-Ryan-Walter/dp/0736076344

Also find things that Jeff Marek talks in (podcasts) and subscribe to them all. I also recommend Hockey Central at Noon podcast for keeping up with general hockey discussion. Very homerish Canadians, enjoyable banter.

Hockey is a lot like futbol, actually, but faster. You have to recognize the game situation at a very low-level of detail, and that then can be built on with more detailed knowledge you acquire about each game situation.

Let me know if I can describe this a bit better.

There are a lot of comments here advising you to learn about the current league players and such, and that's okay. However, you'll acquire more knowledge if you focus more on watching games for the sake of watching them and reading about different situations and plays. When I was getting into football, it was nice that I knew who Diego Costa was and where he was at all times on the pitch, but it was MORE useful to know that he was a striker, how a well-placed through ball might reach him for a chance, what formation Chelsea played and why, etc.

u/v4vendetta77 · 2 pointsr/hockey

Like many others, I recommend watching Buffalo. I live in NC and always love when they come to play the Hurricanes. I also love watching Chicago, Pittsburgh and Nashville. If you want to learn more about the game, I suggest the book Take Your Eye off the Puck. I'm reading it now and it's entertaining and informative. https://www.amazon.com/Take-Your-Eye-Off-Puck/dp/1629371203

u/ashesinpompeii · 2 pointsr/hockey

It's not exactly what you are looking for but I've enjoyed what I've read of Greg Wyshinski's Book. It's a guide to the game, it breaks down the game and some of the things you wouldn't think of - the little moves to get an open shooting lane for another player, etc.

Greg is a good writer, and a funny guy. Check it out!

u/DrRumdumcabbage · 1 pointr/hockey

There's a great book about the Stanley Cup's Adventures. "Why is the Stanley Cup in Mario Lenieux's Pool" Lots of great stories. One of my favorites involves one player opening up the bottom and carving his name on the inside.

u/infidelappel · 2 pointsr/hockey

http://www.amazon.com/Jonesy-Skate-Improbable-Career-Keith/dp/0975441981

Not exactly written about one of the game's greats, but Jonesy is highly entertaining, and offers a look in on a lot of interesting things that happened during his career. I highly recommend this one.

u/leafspackersfan · 1 pointr/hockey

Picking a team, I would just watch games and see who you like. Maybe pick up one of the NHL video games and do the same. I know it's not the best advice but nobody else can really tell you who to root for. I agree to pick a team in your time zone so you can watch the games. A good book is Take your Eye off the Puck, although it might be better once you know the basics already

u/chairmanmauer · 3 pointsr/hockey

i haven't read [this] (https://www.amazon.com/Take-Your-Eye-Off-Puck/dp/1629371203) because I'm a cheap bastard but the author is a pretty respected guy I think and it looks like its not too expensive.

u/ftpguy · 2 pointsr/hockey

Probert was my favorite player growing up. I never had the opportunity to meet him but I've got a signed stick from him. One of my prized possessions.

EDIT: Also his autobiography is an interesting read if you're into that sort of thing.

u/bxgurl · 2 pointsr/hockey

Journeyman by Sean Pronger Very amusing, even to my non-hockey fan mother. Interesting due not only who his little brother is, but rarely do the guys who bounce in and out of the minor leagues get a platform to tell the story.

Ballad of the Whiskey Robber by Julian Rubenstein The true story of a bank robbing backup goalie in Hungary who becomes a folk hero right after the fall of communism.

Breakaway by Tal Pinchevsky The stories of the first players to defect and/or get work visas to play in the NHL from Czechoslovakia and the USSR.

u/toothpuppeteer · 6 pointsr/hockey

Identifying break-outs is probably one of the easier places to start. Here's a short article on some.

The idea of dumping the puck in, is getting through all the defenders that clog up the neutral zone. Just skating the puck in is pretty hard to do at times, so toss it in and use the built up speed to get past defenders, then setup down low.

I think this book, Hockey Plays and Strategies is pretty awesome. There used to be an EA NHL site that had many excerpts but I can't find it. It has 'look inside' on amazon so you can check some of it out that way.

u/[deleted] · 8 pointsr/hockey

If you havent read his book, I highly recommend it. It was a great read. He had some kinda life, and puts it all out there - both good and (lots of) bad.

Theo Fleury - Playing with fire

u/threepadstack · 5 pointsr/hockey

they have someone dedicated to keeping it constantly buffed and polished

https://www.amazon.ca/Stanley-Mario-Lemieuxs-Swimming-Pool/dp/1572434406

an amazing read of some of those stories

u/OmarTheTerror · 1 pointr/hockey

I really enjoyed Jonesy's book, Buccicross co-wrote/ghostwrote it.

Really entertaining.

u/crazy_canucklehead · 5 pointsr/hockey

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miracle_on_Ice#References

Use the references from wikipedia, other people did the hard work for you.

Also consider picking up The Boys of Winter - its relatively cheap and is a great read about that.

Another good resource

I would also consider watching the movie Miracle

And watching the game itself cant hurt

u/Brutally-Honest- · 3 pointsr/hockey

Gretzky wasn't traded to make the team better, he was sold because the owner needed money. He even wrote a book on it. I'd Trade Him Again: On Gretzky, Politics And The Pursuit Of The Perfect Deal

u/fateislosthope · 2 pointsr/hockey

Keith Jones book Put your head down and skate was a great read. The inside look at a non allstar grinding guy just trying to play hockey and drink beer.

u/crowbar_benson · 14 pointsr/hockey

I read a pretty good book on the subject (I know- A Book!), from the perspective of the players involved. http://www.amazon.com/dp/1118095006

u/GoSioux14 · 13 pointsr/hockey

I can't recommend enough Bob Probert's book. What a fascinating dude - crazy, but fascinating.

u/JackLambertsBalls · 2 pointsr/hockey

Sorry for the late reply. It is very hard to work, watch hockey and reddit.

Here is a great book if you can get your hands on it:

https://www.amazon.com.au/Code-Unwritten-Rules-Fighting-Retaliation/dp/1572437561

If you cannot be bothered reading, CBC did a documentary on it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwe6LgsPn-A

Basically, fighting is an important part of hockey. There is an unwritten code that surrounds it. Although it is complex, it is a vital part of the sport.

u/TheConeOfShame805 · 5 pointsr/hockey

I picked up some finer points watching the game live, pretty close to the benches. Finally the whole When Do They Do Line Changes and Why made sense (especially as a soccer player, it's weird to watch a game that they don't blow the whistle to make changes)

This book was helpful.

u/firevice · 2 pointsr/hockey

Another book to add would be Adrian Dater's Blood Feud. Great information about the Avs-Wings rivalry.

u/rotaderp · 1 pointr/hockey

I personally haven't read either of these books but they each have a few good reviews and might be what you're looking for.

1 2

u/DRUNK_ON_SYRUP · 13 pointsr/hockey

Got to play minor hockey my whole life but if you don't have that luxury, play the NHL series on xbox. Also, reading this book helped my Dutch fiend

u/Mister_Kurtz · 3 pointsr/hockey

Our past Prime Minister, Stephen Harper, is a huge hockey fan and wrote a book about hockey.

https://www.amazon.ca/Great-Game-Forgotten-Professional-Hockey/dp/1476716536

I didn't hear a lot of hockey analogies out of him.

u/keostyriaru · 2 pointsr/hockey

I have not, but I would recommend the Mark Messier biography, and the Peter Pocklington biography

Both were very good reads.

u/TermlessRain57 · 7 pointsr/hockey

I guess the big two rules to know would be icing and offsides

Icing is when an offensive player sends the puck into the offensive zone from the far side of the center ice line. If the puck then crosses the red line in the offensive zone (the goal line, but not in the net) and a defensive player gets to one of the face off dots in that end, it is icing. Sort hard to explain so I hope that makes sense.

Offsides is when a member of the offensive team crosses the blue line into the offensive zone before the puck does. So basically the puck has to be in the offensive zone before any other offensive players can cross the blue line.

Now for fights... There pretty much an unwritten code about that. If you're really interested in the topic, I highly recommend the book The Code. Essentially fighting is a way for players to police the game themselves if necessary. Say if a player takes a cheap shot, you might have a fight to send a message to the other team. Also might be used to try to swing the momentum in a game if a team gets down a few early. Every now and then, theres a cheap shot one game, but it will be a few games later between the teams that everything boils over into a huge fight or sometimes even a line brawl.

Tonight was a great game. Hope you liked what you saw . NBCSN has games on pretty much every night if you want to watch more!

u/bakanino · 3 pointsr/hockey

I really enjoyed The Game by Ken Dryden

u/DC2600 · 8 pointsr/hockey

The Oilers had to smuggle fugitive forward Frankie “Seldom” Beaton out of their dressing room in an equipment bag, the Jersey Knights played on a rink that actually had a slope to it, the NHL owners messing with the WHA teams (the leafs owner had the toronto WHA team's arena's lights dim for their first game, got rid of the pads on the home team bench).

WHA also had their draft age at 18 while the NHL's was 20 at the time, allowing the WHA to poach young kids with more money then the NHL would offer at a younger age. (The NHL would lower their draft age to compete with the WHA there). WHA also went after European players at a time when the NHL was primarily North-American.

Book i read was The Rebel League. Highly recommend it, really entertaining.

u/Nick_1138 · 3 pointsr/hockey

I'm not a newbie to the sport or anything, but just for the Hell of it I picked up the following book: Take Your Eye Off the Puck by Greg Wyshynski

It's just a fun read and it'll give you some insight into things you might not pick up just by watching the surface. The author is a blogger for Yahoo! and he does a pretty decent job.

u/Beuford87 · 13 pointsr/hockey

Greg Wyshynski's new book "Take Your Eye Off the Puck: How to Watch Hockey By Knowing Where to Look") will probably be helpful. I can't say for sure because I just started reading it last night and am only a handful of pages in.

u/JohnMarstonRockstar · 1 pointr/hockey

PM Harper is actually a big hockey fan, wrote a book on it too.

u/EatSleepJeep · 3 pointsr/hockey

For Orr: Establish physical dominance over the rink, gain momentum for your team, send a message to the other team, avenge his last defeat.

recommended reading

u/megagnome5000 · 3 pointsr/hockey

Those interested in reading more on the intersection of hockey, economics, business, and culture may want to take a look at Artificial Ice: Hockey, Culture, and Commerce, edited by David Whitson and Richard Gruneau. The book was published seven years ago, but it still provides relevant discussions on league expansion/contraction, marketing, rule changes, etc. This book review from the Canadian Journal of Sociology gives a more detailed summary.

u/dswartze · 5 pointsr/hockey

For what it's worth the Stephen Harper that wrote this book is the Stephen Harper that was prime minister when the book was published.

That never made me like him though.

u/pluc61 · 2 pointsr/hockey

He was replace by Jacques Plante who missed practices so he could go cross-country skiing.

Plante later return to playing because the WHA's caliber was so low ho could earn some easy cash. He became the first player in history to miss a game because he got sunburned laying on the side of a pool in Phoenix.

The WHA ladies and gentlemen.

Source: Rebel league https://www.amazon.ca/Rebel-League-Unruly-Hockey-Association/dp/077108949X

u/crazye97 · 8 pointsr/hockey

The Final Call, for anyone else who may be wondering.

u/marshalofthemark · 2 pointsr/hockey

Actually, two of his teammates later ended up defecting themselves - Frantisek Musil went to the North Stars, and Petr Klima (yep, the guy who scored in triple-OT in 1990 for the Oilers) to the Red Wings. This is a great book with lots of stories about Czechoslovakian and Russian hockey defectors.

u/dmcnelly · 5 pointsr/hockey

I was a bit too young at the time, but this book documents it pretty darn well.

http://www.amazon.com/Blood-Feud-Colorado-Avalanche-Nastiest/dp/1589793196

If I had my copy with me, I'd give you the exact page/paragraph, but it's covered in there in excruciating detail.

u/Brobeens · 1 pointr/hockey

Not entirely about hockey, but Theo Fleury's Playing With Fire was a fantastic/sad read

u/_bobbykelso · 7 pointsr/hockey

This book helped me immensely when I first wanted to know what was actually happening on the ice.

u/Ace676 · 2 pointsr/hockey

Blood Feud: Detroit Red Wings v. Colorado Avalanche by Adrian Dater tells the story of the one of the biggest rivalries in the NHL.

u/Think-Think-Think · 1 pointr/hockey

The Code: The Unwritten Rules of Fighting and Retaliation in the NHL
Ross Bernstein

http://www.amazon.com/The-Code-Unwritten-Fighting-Retaliation/dp/1572437561

u/gabe_ · 2 pointsr/hockey

Totally... what a little bitch. If you get called out.. you square off, drop the gloves and go for it.

This isn't 'Nam.. there are RULES:

http://www.amazon.com/Code-Unwritten-Rules-Fighting-Retaliation/dp/1572437561

u/xaeonic · 2 pointsr/hockey

From the playing with fire prologue:

> What took me down was rage. Rage fuelled by drugs, alcohol and relationships. I had two exes and three great kids back home in Canada, yet I wanted to die. I went on a three-monthbender. Just me and mounds of cocaine. I would run out into the desert at night and scream at the trees. At the end of the three months, I was just fuckin' crazy. Could not stop doing drugs, could not stop drinkin', could not stop partyin'.

http://amzn.com/1600786375

u/expi_ala_doshus · 1 pointr/hockey

The Ballad of the Whiskey Robber. By Julian Rubinstein

DESCRIPTION: Elmore Leonard meets Franz Kafka in the wild, improbably true story of the legendary outlaw of Budapest. Attila Ambrus was a gentleman thief, a sort of Cary Grant--if only Grant came from Transylvania, was a terrible professional hockey goalkeeper, and preferred women in leopard-skin hot pants. During the 1990s, while playing for the biggest hockey team in Budapest, Ambrus took up bank robbery to make ends meet. Arrayed against him was perhaps the most incompetent team of crime investigators the Eastern Bloc had ever seen: a robbery chief who had learned how to be a detective by watching dubbed Columbo episodes; a forensics man who wore top hat and tails on the job; and a driver so inept he was known only by a Hungarian word that translates to Mound of Ass-Head. BALLAD OF THE WHISKEY ROBBER is the completely bizarre and hysterical story of the crime spree that made a nobody into a somebody, and told a forlorn nation that sometimes the brightest stars come from the blackest holes. Like The Professor and the Madman and The Orchid Thief, Julian Rubinsteins bizarre crime story is so odd and so wicked that it is completely irresistible.

u/Siven87 · 1 pointr/hockey

You're right, using examples of when "The Code," is ridiculous isn't intelligent to do because it makes "The Code," look bad. We can go on with other examples? Ray Emery? Chris Simon? Trevor Gillies? Marty McSorley?

It's not "boiling down," "The Code," is the definition (ridiculous and murky as it may be,) of how fighting works in the NHL. Read Ross Bernstein's book about the many different ways fighting attempts to define itself within the realms of the game. "The Code," is exactly what this is about. And, "The Code," is garbage.

The funniest thing about all of this? Brooks Orpik has fought to "answer to his hits," before. Including "answering," to his arguably dirtiest hit when he injured Erik Cole. As Orpik has gotten older he has fought less because he doesn't and shouldn't have to. You know who else delivered huge body checks, fought a lot early in his career, but then did it less as he got older? Scott Stevens. This is all ridiculous though, as "getting punched in the face," hasn't been a deterrent to anything since the modern rules were put into place. But, hey, if you think the way fighting worked in the 70s with bench clearing brawls not having any extra consequence, go for it. Fighting is dying, just like stick fighting died before it. I just hope a player doesn't have to die fighting before it stops. Though, with the deaths of men like Wade Belak, Rick Rypien, and Derek Boogaard, perhaps people already have died because of fighting. Don Sanderson dying because his head smashed off the ice during a fight in the OHL is "just part of the game," too I guess.


The ridiculous logic of Sanderson's death is, instead of banning fighting, we'll just make sure players keep their helmets on when they bare knuckle box. It'd be hilarious if this rule didn't exist because someone DIED.

And, for the record, if you're going to give a snide, looking down your nose, remark about someone not understanding, at least use proper grammar while trying to act above someone.