Reddit Reddit reviews Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Carbon Steel Blade, 4.1-Inch, Military Green

We found 99 Reddit comments about Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Carbon Steel Blade, 4.1-Inch, Military Green. Here are the top ones, ranked by their Reddit score.

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Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Carbon Steel Blade, 4.1-Inch, Military Green
Fixed blade outdoor knife with 4.1-inch high carbon steel bladeLimited lifetime manufacturer’s warranty; Made in SwedenPatterned, high-friction grip makes the knife comfortable to hold and easy to handleBlade length: 4.1 inches (104 mm);Blade thickness: 0.08 inch (2.0 mm); Overall length: 8.6 inch (218 mm); Weight w/ sheath: 3.9 oz. (110 g)
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99 Reddit comments about Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Carbon Steel Blade, 4.1-Inch, Military Green:

u/Nastyboots · 70 pointsr/Bushcraft

The classic Companion is a sore dick deal - you just can't beat it!!

u/rockydbull · 23 pointsr/MechanicalKeyboards

I have had a shitty week so I treated myself to a grab bag. Probably won't get anything super great, but I hear it is fun to sort it all out. Thanks Op.

Edit: Thanks for whoever gave me gold! Long story short, this knife will cut the nerve in your finger with the slightest slip up and will require surgical repair.

u/Elethor · 19 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Anything else I need to know to care for them? I just ordered one of these and an Opinel aside from keeping them dry anything else they need?

u/Raltie · 14 pointsr/Bushcraft

As noted, this might be worth a look OP. Personally I think you'll be able to use that knife you bought, but you'll find it will wear down or break. Not because it can't cut, but because it isn't designed for heavy use. Just keep that in mind. Anyway here's the Mora people are talking about.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004TNWD40/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1484813998&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=mora+blades&dpPl=1&dpID=31hduVz10IL&ref=plSrch


Edit: and everyone in this sub has bought a knife just like yours (we aren't trying to be assholes, we just are naturally occurring assholes). There's a reason we're recommending something else.

u/RedStag00 · 13 pointsr/CampingGear

Everyone loves a Morakniv

u/BillyNature · 11 pointsr/Bushcraft

This kind of folding saw is great for camp-scale stuff. And a nice 4" fixed blade knife that you can baton with is all you need to split it. I've heard this is a good starter knife for bushcrafting but I haven't got to use mine yet.

u/ph0en1x778 · 9 pointsr/preppers

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40


I have this knife and it is well made and reliable and great starter knife.

u/ElBomberoLoco · 9 pointsr/Bushcraft

I know this answer gets teased for being ubiquitous...but a great first knife in this arena is a Morakniv Companion. It's very hard to beat in terms of quality-to-price ratio.

Don't worry about a sawback knife....especially since you said you already have a good handsaw. I haven't seen one that saws worth a damn anyway.

u/rusty075 · 8 pointsr/Bushcraft

For the money, it's hard to wrong with a Mora. Amazing value in a darn tough and well-made knife.

u/desertUsuf · 8 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Mora Companion. The value on these knives is pretty nuts, I keep thinking that prices will eventually go up because you get so much blade for the money. Great carver and slicer due to the scandi edge, and the carbon steel blade it tough and can take light batoning without issue.

Watch a few reviews online, pretty much all raving, and for good reason.

u/mvmntsofthemind · 8 pointsr/CampingandHiking

Can't beat a $14 Mora Companion, comes in stainless or high carbon. Comes shaving sharp. http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/

u/Kilo353511 · 8 pointsr/bugout

Here is what would use for $100 USD. All prices are via Amazon/Wal-mart

Pack: OutLander Lightweight Day Pack - Cheap, Lightweight and would get the job done for a GHB ($18)

Cutting: Morakniv Companion - Cheap and Mora makes some of the best knives ($12)

Combustion: Storm Matches ($6), All-weather matches($0.75), 2 Bic Lighters($2), and some Wetfire($6)

Cover: 3 Emergency Blankets($2)

Container: Back pack listed above, 6 bottles of water ($3), Single layer stainless steel bottle($7)

Cordage: 100 Feet of 550 ($6), Duct tape ($3)

Candlelight: 2 LED Lights ($4-12)

Consumables: 6 Cliff bars ($6), 3 %-Hour Energy ($6), Bag of trail Mix ($6)

Clothing: 2 Extra Pair of socks ($2), 2 pair Gloves ($7), 2 Hats ($10)

Communication: 3 Road Flares ($6) Signaling Mirror ($3)

Cash: $40-100 is recommended but this is optional.




Everything I have there (Cash excluded) should cost around $120. You can save money by making your own Wetfire with cotton balls and petroleum jelly. And the food can probably be replaced with cheaper items. I just put stuff I am comfortable with. Same is true with the flashlights, you could grab 4 of the $1
Wal-mart lights they are great for short term use and would cut out another $8.

Buy stuff in bulk when it is available too this will cut down cost.

Something every car should already have, but it worth the extra $10-20 is a small first aid kit or 2.

u/jepyang · 8 pointsr/Ultralight

The wilderness is probably where you need self-defense tools the least of anywhere in your life, but if that aspect is important to you, I won’t argue it any further.

That said, it’s a bad knife. Just cheap tacticool crap, not meant for any serious use. It’s liable to fall apart mid-use (one of the reviews even mentioned the locking mechanism failed resulting in injury). Can’t imagine much worse than trying to defend yourself and cutting your hand on your own faulty knife.

Something like a Morakniv is cheap but sturdy and well-made. Would work well for both camping uses and self defense (keep it on your belt and you don’t even have to flip the blade open to use it). Saves an ounce or so and is a massive upgrade to practical capability.

Alternately, a SAK Classic and a small thing of pepper spray is similarly cheap, saves 2-3 ounces, and is probably more effective for self-defense than a cheap flippy knife.

u/canadian_camping_guy · 8 pointsr/Bushcraft

mora companion is an inexpensive and extremely reliable bush knife. You can get it in high carbon steel or stainless depending on your preference. Its really hard to beat for the price. I have take used and abused mine and its still holding up very well.

https://www.amazon.ca/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40

u/hybaric · 7 pointsr/VEDC

You should add a few basic tools, screw driver, wrench, and fixed blade knife if this is for a VEDC. I also always keep duct tape and a few zipties in my car. Zipties are super handy for quick fixes and repairs like engine hoses coming lose etc.

A sturdy inexpensive knife to add would be something like a morakniv http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40

u/Arimil · 7 pointsr/CampingGear
  1. Tent: Eagles Peak II Two person tent - http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?productId=50802926
    -This was generous gift from my SO's mom. It may not be the best tent out there, but at free it can't be beat.

  2. Sleeping Bag: Marmot Aspen Minimalist 40 - http://www.trailspace.com/gear/marmot/aspen-40-ultralight/
    -Got this for its small size and light weight. Future winter camping trips are a possibility, in which case I plan on snagging a wool blanket of sleeping bag liner.

  3. Sleeping Pad: RidgeRest Classic - http://www.amazon.com/Therm-A-Rest-6433-Parent-RidgeRest-Classic-Mattress/dp/B00HZ13OYG
    -Simple basic sleeping pad, I've been using these since scouts and have wanted for nothing more, especially because of its light weight.
    -In the event of winter camping, is this enough to insulate from the ground? If not, what could be added to my sleep system to keep me insulated from the ground?

  4. Cookware: Pot Pan stackable combo - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FQZEYWE?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00
    -Lightweight and simple, these were cheap and seemed straight forward.
    -They stack with the majority of either piece's empty space facing each other, allowing for decently dry storage for matches etc. inside.
    -Comes with a tight fitting mesh ditty bag

  5. Small Camp Grill - Coghlan's Camp Grill - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001OPHA0S?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
    -Another straight forward and cheap piece,
    -This is really an optional piece, I plan on bringing it along on trips with big groups or when cooking meat is in the cards.

  6. Plates x2: Coleman Enamel plates - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009PUSPI?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
    -These are the camping gold standard in my book, been using them since scouts.

  7. Stuff Sacks x3: REI pack of 3 Ditty Sacks 2, 3, and 7 liter. -http://www.rei.com/product/795047/rei-ditty-sack-package-of-3
    -Came in a decently affordable combo pack, plan on using them for food/toiletries storage and bear bags.

  8. Knife: Morakniv Companion Straight Knife - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004TNWD40?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
    -Love this little knife, cheap but durable and was a shaver straight out of the box.
    -Came with a super thick plastic sheath

    9)Hatchet: Estwing Hatchet - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004TNWD40?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
    -Heard this was a classic, people say they've still got the one's their grandfather's used. It's heavy, but I'm happy with the tradeoff.
    -Got it sharpened well enough to cleanly slice through paper at the moment

  9. Axe Sharpener: Lansky Dual Grit Sharpener - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000B8FW0Y?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    -Great sharpener, pretty much the go to field sharpener from what I've gathered.
    -Only took a couple minutes to learn how to use, the only hard part is consistently following the bevel through each stroke, but it gets easier.

  10. Camp Towels x2: Microfiber quick-drying towels - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000B8FW0Y?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    -Very great, medium size towels with their own tote

  11. Collapsible Water Jug: REI 2.5 gallon collapsible water jug - http://www.rei.com/product/402099/reliance-fold-a-carrier-water-carrier-25-gal
    -Seems great, picked it up at REI physical store then read reviews and got spooked, we'll see though, a minority of the reviewers swear by it.
    -Just in case it sucks, any suggestions for a collapsible water container of equal size/price?

  12. Water Bags x2: 33 oz Bag style canteens - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B010OLZ3E2?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00
    -These came free with my water filter, and they have many good reviews. If they do well, I may buy some extras.

  13. Wine Skin: 2L - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CN4RN42?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00
    -More showing of my primitivist ass, and I thought I could take some weight off of my SO by carrying enough water for the two of us.

  14. Pillows x2: Field and Stream - http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?productId=33581126
    -Got these a long time ago when I knew less, they are pretty bulky and my first item I want to replace

  15. Pack: Kelty Redwing 50L Black
    -SO's mom gifted this this Christmas, so amazing and thoughtful, one of the best gifts I've ever gotten and I love the color

  16. Shoes: Skechers Trail Runners - I found these at the thrift store for a stunning 12 bucks and they fit perfectly

  17. Lighting: Outlite Lantern -http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01178FLM0?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00
    -Pack of flashlights (might not bring all four) - http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00V639BNC?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s01

  18. Extras: Tarp as groundcloth, some extra stakes.

    Items not shown:
    -Always a tin or bag of Drum Tobacco and papers
    -Kindle, old generation one
    -Collapsible trowel
    -Paracord
    -Burlap shoulder bag for gathering kindling etc

    Items still wanted (suggestions greatly appreciated):
    -Knife for SO
    -Work gloves
    -Plastic flasks for booze
    -Belt pouch
    -Higher quality tarp
    -Knife Sharpener
    -Sleeping bag liner or wool blanket
    -Any food suggestions!
    -Rain cover for pack
    -Smell proof food bags

    I don't have much experience outside of scouts, so I'm very open to critique of my setup. I will warn that I am very much into primitivism, and camping for me is a gateway to a backcountry, esthetic lifestyle I one day I hope to live, so some of my gear choices may not always be the most efficient. Any advice from a primitivist or purist standpoint is doubly appreciated.

u/Tyler9400 · 7 pointsr/Bushcraft

Edit: Just realized your looking for an EDC Knife. To split kindling? My post revolves around your first knife to go out into the bush. An EDC knife should just a small folder for when you open those fancy amazon boxes. Don't need a fixed blade knife for EDC purposes, but if your gonna be out in the woods messing around I'd follow what I said.

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IMO a Mora companion should be your first knife. They are 10 bucks. The one linked is a carbon steel version, if you are gonna be around water a lot get the stainless steel version. The stainless steel version will rust dull quicker. Edit: Was a typo, it definitely wont rust quicker lol. Get it if you are around water because it WONT rust, but the edge will dull quicker, this is why knowing how to sharpen in the field is important. I mean you can get through a day with a dull knife, but it's never fun.

This won't be the best knife in the world, but it's the best beginners knife, it can do all the basic tasks and work well for $10, so if you smack a rock, chip it somehow or end up messing it up when sharpening you can buy another one. Practice sharpening! This is a big one, you don't want to get a $100 knife and mess up sharpening it - anything is fixable but you don't want to do that with an expensive knife and start taking off too much steel and what not.

I'd recommend a Mora companion, and whatever sharpening method you want. A decent, cheap stone is the Fallkniven DC3. There are better stones - but they require oils (or water) and you have to go through two or three types of stones and all these other things. Not to mention they are heavy and bulky. DC3 is small and you can take it with you.

If someone else wants to go more indepth on other sharpening methods and stones, please do so, I've had the same ones for a few decades and am not up-to-date on the tech.

Also strops, I had a local leatherworking shop make one for me, I've never found good ones online, or good leather to make your own. If you are familiar with good ones, feel free to link them.

u/beefstew809 · 6 pointsr/camping

Some people are very particular about their knives and what they use them for but I think that everyone should own a Mora. It is a very sharp knife that can be used for food prep all the way to just carving or whittling. The plus side is that they are light weight and they are cheap! Do yourself a favor and pick one up (it doesn't necessarily have to be the one that I linked).

u/ErroneousBosch · 6 pointsr/Bushcraft

Even cheaper in Carbon Steel

Edit: or carbon with a thicker blade

u/muddypaws · 5 pointsr/Ultralight

It's not exactly Ultralight but at 3.8 oz / 110 gr. You get a good quality fixed blade thats inexpensive. Morakniv Companion

u/Broke_Beedle · 5 pointsr/knives

Definitely don't get that.

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-4-1-Inch-Military/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=sr_1_3?dchild=1&keywords=mora&psc=1&qid=1572336720&sr=8-3

Mora is the best budget knife you can get. It will take a beating and it's affordable.

Not sure about folder brands if that's what you're looking for.

u/M4d_Martigan · 5 pointsr/france

Ben perso j'ai beaucoup appris de youtubeurs comme Survival Lilly, TA Outdoors et MCQ Bushcraft, il y aussi des français comme Chartreuse Nature ou Blackwolf Chris (plus brut de décoffrage, mais que je recommande pour les gueuletons qu'il se bricole dans la forêt), et on trouve de nombreux sites et ouvrages sur le sujet.

Question matos si tu randonne sérieux tu devrais avoir le plus important, mais il faut surtout un bon couteau (ce qui ne veut pas forcement dire cher, le MoraKniv Companion est un classique très robuste qui coute environ 15 boules), voire une hachette si tu veux beaucoup construire, et les essentiels de la rando (trousse de secours, popotte, tente ou hamac, tapis de sol, etc...). Perso je m'équipe beaucoup en surplus militaire, c'est bien moins cher, souvent plus robuste et plus pratique que du Décathlon de luxe. Après tout dépend de ce que tu veux faire, si t'a des questions n'hésites pas!

u/Lurkndog · 5 pointsr/Survival

Especially when you can get an actually good knife for not that much more.

A Mora Companion is 14 bucks, and pretty solid.

If you want a cheap folder that doesn't suck, there's the 3.95 Tan Flipper from Wal-mart.

u/gizram84 · 5 pointsr/Survival

Honestly, just get this Mora for a fraction of the price. It's an incredible knife.

u/Simsense · 5 pointsr/BuyItForLife

You can find super reviews on just about any Mora knife at Amazon, but here's one example:

https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40

u/BeerGeekAlpha · 4 pointsr/Ultralight
u/mozetti · 4 pointsr/camping

I bought a Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Carbon Steel Blade, Military Green, 4.1-Inch a few years ago. I use it for meal prep because it's fixed blade and about the size of a kitchen prep knife. The Amazon site shows its use for camping tasks, too.

EDIT - just saw this has been recommended a few times already. Must be good!

u/alc6379 · 4 pointsr/knives

I'm pretty happy with my choices, and they come in right under $200:

EDC:

u/[deleted] · 4 pointsr/Survival

Here. Carbon steel is easy to sharpen and holds an edge well. It does rust though so you need to keep it oiled, and it's not a bad idea to force a patina.

If you're worried about rust, you could get a stainless steel one, but they don't hold an edge as well. They also don't strike a spark off a ferro rod nearly as well as carbon steel, and IIRC they won't strike a spark off flint at all.

u/greath · 4 pointsr/knifeclub

Lol, alright for example:

  • Spyderco Delica 4 FFG: For your price range this is going to be the "best" steel you can get in a near 3" folding knife (VG-10). By best I mean the best edge retention in a stainless steel. However, being over 2.5" in some places (Chacago for example) the knife will be illegal. Also, many people do not like the look of the spyderhole as it can be seen as aggressive in office environments. Also the FRN handles, while very strong, have a cheap/plastic feel to them.

  • Spyderco Tenacious: Compared to the Delica, 8CR13MOV is a "worse" stainless steel (not as good edge retention, more prone to chipping during heavy impacts). However, the extra blade length is better for many outdoor tasks (breaking down tree branches). The handle is also G10, which is slightly tougher and has a much better feeling in hand than FRN.

  • Spyderco Centofante 3: A more "gentlemanly" and "office friendly" version of the Delica with a slightly longer blade. Again, VG-10 and FRN.

  • Kershaw Cryo II: Same steel as the tenacious. Metal handles slightly tougher than G10. Flipper action has "cool" factor. The blade grind makes the tip a touch stronger than on the tenacious.

  • Kershaw Skyline: One of the most iconic of Kershaw's knives. Hollow ground blade makes it great at slicing tasks.

  • Esee Izula: Skeletonized fixed blade. 1095 Steel is significantly better than the other steels listed at "chopping" tasks as it is not prone to chipping at all. It is NOT stainless and so the blade has a protective coating over most of it. The steel will require mineral oil/cleaning to prevent rusting.

  • Becker BK 24: Similar to the Esee Izula but D2 steel which has better edge retention and more corrosion resistance than 1095. It is also much harder to sharpen. Many think the BK24's handle is also less comfortable, the sheath is worse, and there are less available after market modifications.

  • Ontario Rat Series (linked the RAT I. RAT 2 similar but smaller): Ontario's version of the tenacious. Bladeshape generally more people friendly. Another very popular beater option.

  • Morakniv Knives (there are MANY, this is just one): Highly regarded in the "bushcraft" community. High carbon steel (similar to 1095) with a scandi-grind which is great for field sharpening and woodworking. Only partial tangs so not advised to use for battoning tasks or chopping.

  • Kershaw OD-2: Gentlemanly knife with great flipping action.

    There are a LOT more suggestions I could add...
u/kylechan245 · 3 pointsr/knifeclub
u/NarrWallace · 3 pointsr/knifeclub

I recommend this one. It has I nice grip and it is still one of the cheapest mora knives.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004TNWD40?pc_redir=1395426251&robot_redir=1

u/Ravenor95 · 3 pointsr/Survival

For general survival/bushcraft purposes (though not for breaking a car window):
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004TNWD40/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1485034514&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=morakniv&dpPl=1&dpID=31hduVz10IL&ref=plSrch
(Great quality/price ratio from Sweden)

For EDC/general cutting purposes(and gorgeous old-school looks), a small high-quality folding knife from France:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004AMY6GS/ref=mp_s_a_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1485034837&sr=8-2&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65&keywords=opinel+carbon&dpPl=1&dpID=51baQV0eVVL&ref=plSrch

If you want a more "modern" pocket knife that is still affordable, I recommend something from the American masters of Cold Steel like:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00U1I875Q/ref=cm_cr_arp_mb_bdcrb_top?ie=UTF8
(Gotta give some lovin' to that Aus8A japanese steel and the Scandinavian grind)

I can recommend all three, though I own only the first 2. Have fun and stay sharp!

u/__helix__ · 3 pointsr/CampingGear

I'll second the Mora blades. I have a couple like http://www.amazon.com/New-Swedish-Mil-Mora-Knife/dp/B004TNWD40 this one. If you poke around, you should find different colors in the $12-15 range. Very good steel on that blade - used it to field dress a couple deer and was still sharp.

Since space may be at a premium - many butcher shops in grocery stores will sharpen non-serrated blades for free.

I'd skip the flashlight and get a headlamp. The simpler ones without the battery pack on the back side of the head work nicely and double as a hand held light if you need it too.

u/10nix · 3 pointsr/knives

I've found that the Companion makes a very good general purpose knife. I used mine last November to skin and butcher a deer, and it was well up to the task.

Edit: This is the one I use.

u/benpetersen · 3 pointsr/BuyItForLife

Here's a great buck/camp knife, carbon fixed blade, 3/4 tang (full tangs are $50-$75), 4-6 in long (longer and it gets in the way) Mora Companion HDK

u/Odysimus · 3 pointsr/searchandrescue

Traditional SAR, the teams you will find around the country operate in a whole different world than the military. For the most part you can sort of look to volunteer firefighters as an analogy, even then they tend to be more regimented than SAR. There are some SAR teams out there that have more of a military structure to them, but most of what you will find will feel more like SAR clubs (think chess clubs, hiking clubs, etc). My unit meets once a month, we have a business meeting with the whole review last month's minutes, reports on events since the last meeting, old business, new business, etc. After that we conduct a classroom training session on topics like Lost Person Behavior, Medical Techniques, Navigation, etc. We also conduct regular field trainings to bring it all together. We don't have ranks, we have a list of skillsets and we are each typed according to our ability in each skill. Our unit and all the units I know don't work with weapons, sure we carry knives, but the biggest blade most of us work with is one of these, not some giant thing that rambo would carry, no machetes, no hatchets. If there is a situation where SAR skills are needed for say a fugitive, we stay home. We have done evidence searches for things criminals have tossed into the woods, but they were already in jail.

SAR in the military is their own thing and while we can and do work together on missions they are a unit that stays a unit. When we ask for military assets we indicate what needs to be done and they tell us what they are sending and what it will do. If I show up on a mission with 5 other people from my unit we might be on a team together or I might get put in with members of a different unit.

When it comes to the actual searching it is simply a lot of covering ground. We walk, and we walk, and we walk. 99% of the time we get nothing, there are only so many clues out there. There is one really awesome clue (the person or thing you were out to look for) and tons of acreage to cover. We often start from a last known point and try to move that further along in time. An example we were out looking for a mushroom hunter, when I showed up they new where he started into the woods, we then found a clearly picked mushroom and a couple of boot prints. That advanced the last known point a few hundred feet and gave us a second breadcrumb to work with. It takes a certain type of person to do that effectively. I have seen plenty of people bow out because they had been on maybe a dozen searches over several years and never found a thing. One of our radio operators has been on 8 missions, each ended in a recovery. My hope when I got in was to find a clue at some point, and Oh Boy my first time out I got the find, I found the 24yro woman who had hanged herself. We don't have an obligation to respond to one call or another, but you also don't get to decide who gets lost and when. You also have to get along real well with the others on your team. I've been on all sorts of teams and there are people that I know I don't want to go out with, and certain combinations of people that I won't go out with.

With every one of your responses I feel more and more that SAR wouldn't be a good fit for you now. Most units welcome visitors, I would say that you might consider finding one of the local unit's meetings and checking it out. Attend a few meetings before even considering applying, and talk to the people there and be honest about what you are looking for. Once you get started into it there is a substantial investment in time, energy, gear, and training on the part of you and your team. It isn't worth it to go through a bunch of training and getting geared up to not be a productive member of a team (remember finding nothing is something). I'm not sure what exactly you are looking for, but I don't think SAR is it. There is always a "who knows?" aspect and if you spend some time around a unit you may find that it is a good fit, or that your outlook might change. Our mountain rescue unit has people "hang out" around them for several months before offering them an application, in their world they have to trust their lives to their team. While the regular old SAR doesn't require the same standard it is very easy for someone (as good at it as they may be) to be more of a distraction than a help.

TL;DR
I don't think SAR is going to get you what you want. If you do feel like continuing down this path talk to the people in the unit(s) in your area, be honest, and don't take it personally if they tell you "no".

u/codewolf · 3 pointsr/bugout

My two cents, I'm sure others will pick on these opinions...


  • Get rid of the car escape tool you'll never use it and it'll just add weight to your key chain - buy a cheap knife with a belt cutter and window breaker if you want that functionality
  • Instead of that knife you have on the list, buy a Mora knife for something you'll just keep in the bag and not use that often (and it's a great knife even if you use it often)
  • A Bic lighter will float as well as the one on your list and is a lot cheaper
  • Get rid of the rechargeable batteries since nothing on your list uses them and nothing on your list will charge them
  • No need to spend $100 on a flashlight that will sit in a pack. Look for a reliable one that costs much, much less - you even have a crank light on the list, that will do in a pinch
  • Get rid of the fire sticks and put some cotton balls soaked in Vaseline in a film canister in the pack
  • Cyalume sticks are great, keep those
  • Get a titanium spork instead of the plastic one
  • Remove the Datrex ration bars, you'll never use them, or just keep them in a vehicle outside of the pack
  • The Mountain House eggs (or any dehydrated eggs) are the worst (tasting) of the meals, get some other protein meal
  • Everything else on that list - look for less expensive options - for example, you should be able to find a cheap tarp for less
  • You can put a better first aid kit together by buying the contents and spreading them over multiple first aid kits for home, work, vehicle, etc. but a prepared one isn't too bad, just supplement it
  • The matches are too expensive for something you can make with light anywhere matches and wax
  • Where's your pack? what will you carry this in?




u/Gonzoguard · 3 pointsr/EDC

On the cheaper side, Gerber MP 600.
Gerber MP600 Multi-Plier, Needle Nose, Black [47550] https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000VORS1E/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_ylfCDbQQFGQJM

I also recently purchased a Leatherman Wave as a bday present for me it's nice, though I found a new in box on Ebay so a little savings.

I do agree with others your gonna want a fix blade as well, Check out the Mora line affordable reliabable.

Morakniv Companion Fixed Blade Outdoor Knife with Carbon Steel Blade, 4.1-Inch, Military Green https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_bBfCDbZHX4RA0

u/Daoism · 3 pointsr/knives

Personally I wouldn't head into the woods without a fixed blade knife. That's just my personal preference.

The obvious answer that a lot of people will give you is a Mora. These people are correct. It's a crazy sharp knife, well made and for $14 you could use it for one hiking trip and it'd be worth it.

If you're looking for a folder to carry all the time. Any of those you listed would be good. There are like a million choices for folders in the $20-40 range. Just stick to a good brand and find one you like the looks of.

u/StandingByToStandBy · 3 pointsr/castiron

Well, I have an idea for now. I travel for a living, and spend a lot of time in hotels. I'm going to be building a cooking kit for my car that just sits in the truck for times like this.

Currently I have (1) 12" cast iron pan, 1 coffee maker, 1 Morakniv, a cutting board, and a pair of tongs.

I'm missing about 99% of the shit I need, but hey, gotta start somewhere.

u/camobit · 3 pointsr/Pennsylvania

first and foremost, find a hunter safety class and take it. there is an online option now but I really recommend going to an in-person class. I did this when I was 11 or 12 and remember some very experienced old timey hunters explaining everything. we even got hands-on experience with some old 22's and got to shoot them at a range.

they will cover most of your questions, and will go over gun safety and how to hunt safely (identifying your target, whats behind your target, etc). They should also cover the basics of field dressing (removing the organs out in the field).

If you want to hunt deer you're going to want a rifle of at very minimum .243 caliber (preferably higher, i hunt with .30-06). Hunting rifles as of this moment cannot be semi-automatic although there is a real possibility this will be changed by next hunting season. (Even so the most common AR-15 which is .223 caliber is too small for hunting deer.) A .270 is a common whitetail caliber, big enough to take down a deer but not going to kick as hard as .30-06 or .308.

When you buy your hunting license, it comes with one tag to harvest an antlered deer. The rules of what makes a deer count as "antlered" vary from region to region but for most of PA it requires at least 3 points on one side. The paperwork you receive will also have a form you must mail in to your county treasurer to apply for a doe tag. The doe permits are limited and the earlier you apply the better your chances are. A doe tag is only good for the zone you applied in.

If you want to hunt rabbits and birds such as pheasants or turkey you'll want a shotgun. Most people would hunt with a 12 gauge but if you've got a smaller frame you might want a smaller gun (16 or 20 gauge). Turkey requires a tag similar to a buck, which are included in your regular hunting license.

Ducks require a special stamp you can buy when you purchase your license, and there are rules about the metal in the shot shells when you hunt waterfowl (it can't contain lead).

if you're interested in squirrel hunting you can use a shotgun, but the more challenging way to do it is with a 22 rifle. This is a very small and inexpensive bullet.

If you've never handled a gun you're going to be nervous carrying it around with a shell in the chamber. The best thing you can do is take it a range (such as these) and go through a few boxes of shells practicing. A State Game Lands range is free to use as long as you have a hunting license. The one by me usually has a game commission officer there who would be happy to answer questions. Just practice, learn where your safety is, be aware of where the muzzle is pointed, and keep your finger out of the trigger guard. Also protect your hearing! You will need hearing and eye protection at the range!

you need to wear orange on your head and chest/back for most seasons in PA, the exception being some archery/muzzleloader and turkey hunting. Just get a hat and vest and you'll be fine.

Other gear: knife (I prefer a small fixed blade knife to a folder for cleaning deer; less places to get hair and gunk stuck), lighter, maps, emergency whistle, emergency blanket, drag rope (to get the deer out of the woods), rubber gloves (so you aren't a mess after cleaning a deer), and I bring a spare phone battery.

Like any other adventure in the wild make sure people know where you're going and when you should be home.

u/billyandtheclonasaur · 2 pointsr/camping

I have a Gerber and a Mora that I like, though I would not baton(?) wood with either if that is a requirement.

u/amishjim · 2 pointsr/CampingandHiking

I generally carry a pocketknife, as I have since the 4th grade. A knife is a great tool, in the woods or not. I couldn't imagine going into the woods without one, tho. I always smh when someone gets snarky about carrying knives in the woods. You will only regret not having one when you need it. Lately I have been carrying a Mora on my pack. Super light weight and sharp. Oh, and cheap

u/spaztheannoyingkitty · 2 pointsr/preppers

If this is for a BOB and you're willing to consider a fixed blade utility knife, you might want to consider the Morakniv Companion:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B004TNWD40/ref=ox_sc_saved_image_9?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

I have one in my vehicle bag. I haven't used it extensively but it's quality construction, inexpensive, and has a ton of great reviews.

u/MiataTrySlide92 · 2 pointsr/knives
u/Tisdale53 · 2 pointsr/army

Get a mora! Fixed blade super cheap super sharp. Easy to sharpen and if you lose it your out 11 dollars

MORA

u/trekkie00 · 2 pointsr/Survival

This Mora knife? Can't argue with a $15 knife, looks fairly nice.

u/kds1398 · 2 pointsr/Survival

Thank you for your service.

Hard to beat a Mora for the price though, right?

Could you provide your favorites at different prices? I don't know much about what real world experienced people would use.

I use a Fallkniven but I'm a total keyboard commando and I just like knives so I don't know much. I hear esee5 is nice too.

u/Serow · 2 pointsr/IAmA

I really like Mora. They make the Companion which is a really great fixed blade knife for only $15. Hands down the best knife for camping for the price. https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1505417935&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=morakniv

u/frenzyboard · 2 pointsr/knives

The delica is a pretty great option for whittling. It's a high carbon blade, so it holds up to wood fibers and hard use pretty well. It's got a solid lockup and zero blade play, so control and safety are taken care of. But honestly, it's a better EDC tool than a carving knife.

Another good option I'd throw out for you are high carbon mora blades.

You might also dig this. It's specially made for wood work.

u/warriorscall · 2 pointsr/scienceofdeduction

The knife in the green sheath is a Mora, a very well known outdoor knife. https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40

It could be used as a weapon, but that's not what they're known for.

Not sure what the thing that says bang is.

u/zapatodefuego · 2 pointsr/knives

I recently picked up a Mora for some "light" canoeing. I honestly didn't use it for much, but it seems like a solid knife.

u/theoutrider5485 · 2 pointsr/BuyItForLife

The man that sharpens my knives locally, explained to me that all dish washing detergents have abrasives in them to clean your dishes better. Abrasives are bed for a keen edge. Personally I have been using
Morakniv Companions as steak knives. I chose these knives because my buddy who is a survival instructor and search and rescue personnel swears by them for anything, outdoors or indoors. The blade lasts forever and the edge on the carbon steel lasts longer than stainless because carbon steel is harder. I bought three and they are pretty amazing. They are carbon steel, so they will acquire their own amazing colors as you use them.

EDIT: Find them here: http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1408767946&sr=1-1

u/cwcoleman · 2 pointsr/CampingGear

Day Packs are abundant. There are dozens that fit the 'hydro port' requirement. It really depends on what other features you need. Most specifically - size. You say 'day pack' slash 'one night pack'. In my experience those are 2 very different bags. A day pack is generally 15-30 liters, depending on how much technical gear you plan to carry (or how cold / snowy it gets). An overnight pack is generally 50-65 liters. I warn against picking an overnight pack based on the number of nights you'll be out. 1 night requires the exact same gear as 10 nights, other than food (which is generally 1 liter per person per day). So if you want a day pack, focus on that. If you want a overnight pack, focus on that. Trying to get 1 that does both jobs well will end up awkward both ways.

u/AuRelativity · 2 pointsr/knifeclub

I really really like a $13 Mora. Rugged, sharp as heck, solid...so cheap you don't feel bad really really using it and beating the piss out of it. A real been-there-done-that guy I know recommended them to me and after using one (and having lots of other fixed blades, I truly love it)
https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40
They make a serrated also:
https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Bushcraft-Serrated-4-3-Inch-Stainless/dp/B00K70MLK0/ref=sr_1_10?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1509940703&sr=1-10&keywords=mora+black


If I was going to pick anything maybe one of these:
http://www.jayfisher.com/USAF_Pararescue_Knives.htm

This with an aftermarket sheath:
https://www.amazon.com/Ka-Bar-Snody-Handle-Included-Purple/dp/B00ILFNAYY


Actually what am I smoking. This: 100x this. If you've held it in your hand you know that it is the most comfortable knife I've ever held.

http://www.benchmade.com/bushcrafter-family.html

Although the Busse I'm evaluating now is pretty dope.... I still want a Benchmade Bushcrafter.

If it was for overall survival/utility I'd want a Himalayan Imports Khukuri.

For Search/Rescue specifically... give me a tanto-point, combo-edge...honking chunk of steel.
https://www.topsknives.com/knives/tactical/tops-pry-knife-ppp-tool
https://www.topsknives.com/knives/survival/smoke-jumper

Could be persuaded to try these
http://www.benchmade.com/fixed-blade-knives.html?blade_style_shape=861

something stupid and overbuilt (in the best way)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Axt6pJERJ38


u/alucard_3501 · 2 pointsr/knifeclub
u/cigr · 2 pointsr/knives

Not a great knife.

I'd recommend one of the following:

Morakniv $16

Buck 119 $48

The knife you've chosen isn't going to hold a good edge as long and will be harder to sharpen well. I'm not one to spend stupid amounts of money on high end knives, but a decent knife makes a big difference.

u/Jmint12 · 2 pointsr/guns
u/FastAktionJakson · 2 pointsr/Bushcraft

Congrats on starting the journey that is bushcraft and woodsmanship. It's such a rewarding pastime. Since you seem to be loading up on gear I have on huge piece of advise for you. I beg you BEG YOU to invest a little bit of money on a good belt knife. Nothing to fancy. Some thing like an Old Hickory butcher knife or a good quality Mora . Both are relatively inexpensive and quality products. When I started out I bought a cheap "survival knife" which wasn't worth the cardboard packaging it came in and then eventually upgraded to the Bear Grylls ultimate survival knife which promptly broke after about 3 overnights of use. Budget bushcraft is fine for most things however spending 15 dollars on a mora you will have to replace MAYBE every 3 or 4 years if you take care of it certainly beats spending 10 dollars 3 or 4 times a year on junk. Good luck and remember... in the famous words of Ray Mears "If you're in the woods and you're 'roughing it' you're doing something wrong"

u/chrono13 · 2 pointsr/Survival

I love guns, but if it takes a slot in an imaginary 5-item limited survival kit, it may get left out.

Good knife for $14: http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40

Fire: 2 bic lighters. $4.

Shelter: Bivvy, tarp, or hikers tent. Tarp being cheapest.

Cord: 100ft of 750 cord, pre-cut in to 4ft, 6ft and 12ft lengths.

Sawyer water filer, or pot to boil water in.

u/Recycle0rdie · 1 pointr/Random_Acts_Of_Amazon

First of all this is the item i think you will purchase with this order - http://amzn.com/B00006IE7L

Now for my list.... prepare to get wood ;)

  1. http://amzn.com/B003373NCO - Marble Wood, occasionally known as Cake Wood.

  2. http://amzn.com/B00C3UQZVS - Osage Orange wood, orange like simon's hair.

  3. http://amzn.com/0670759074 - Book, what wood is that?

  4. http://amzn.com/B004TNWD40 - Swedish made Mora knife. would cut through a steak as if it were water

  5. http://amzn.com/B008X2ZFG6 - Camelthorn wood, named after an animal.

  6. http://amzn.com/B0032YUTP2 - Cocobolo wood, has streaks of purple when freshly sanded.

  7. http://amzn.com/B005H59GN0 - Pocoyo Racing, a game I've wanted to buy my son for a long time.

  8. http://amzn.com/B008GUSPB2 - Masturbating to my most favorite wood species should be considered a guilty pleasure.

  9. http://amzn.com/B005G2G4D4 - A tool, this was easy

  10. http://amzn.com/B009FBJ7WM - From my childhood, Nike high tops.

  11. http://amzn.com/B009ZD6D1I - Carving set with organized display case.

  12. http://amzn.com/B00123YCQC - Carving knife set, for my hobby

  13. http://amzn.com/B00DXNYWLO - Kiridashi Kogatana blade, nerdy.... because ninjas.

  14. http://amzn.com/B007AS3PPW - Ancient Bog Oak wood, naturally black from being in a swamp for 1000+ years

  15. http://amzn.com/B004JTTWWK - Spalted Tamarind wood, sometimes known to contain streaks of pale green.

  16. http://amzn.com/B00465DUVG - Nike skate shoes, something you wear.

  17. http://amzn.com/B006HFU6HY - Macassar Ebony wood, funny because it smells like B.O when you cut it.

  18. http://amzn.com/B004JTQDM2 - Hackberry wood, comes from a flowering tree. Without bees it could not reproduce.

  19. http://amzn.com/1551052741 - Book about trees and shrubs, could potentially be used to select ornamental species for a garden.

  20. http://amzn.com/B009ZD6D1I - Deluxe woodcarving and palm tool set by Flexcut, My most favorite Item.

    Thank you so much for the contest, I had alot of fun putting this together. Happy Happy cake day /u/ask_seek_knock! and good luck to everyone!



u/cr0wmium · 1 pointr/knives

I have a Kellam, Helle is going to be my next puuko addition.

Pretty knife! I've found myself admiring my Kellam more often than using it.

Just as a tip, this knife has lasted me amazingly in the outdoors (I mainly do a lot of fishing and camping) and complements my wood-handled Kellam rather nicely for wet environments! Anyways, great gift.

u/JayL1F3 · 1 pointr/knives

The Morakniv Companion seems like a good starting point. Pretty cheap where I'm at ordering from Amazon.

Granted, I have a couple Gerbers. Mostly paraframe folders, and for the price, you're better off with a Chinese Kershaw, like the Oso Sweet

u/Ipats · 1 pointr/CampingGear

So I am going to get a Mora blade, it is between these three, that are all close to each other!

http://www.amazon.com/New-Swedish-Mil-Mora-Knife/dp/B004TNWD40

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-Companion-Heavy-Duty-Knife/dp/B009NZVZ3E/ref=pd_sbs_sg_2

http://www.amazon.com/Mora-HighQ-Robust-Knife-Carbon/dp/B00816PZ8W/ref=pd_sim_sg_1

At this point the $5 differences aren't an issue, what would be my best bet of those three?

u/supertofu · 1 pointr/knives

A Mora Companion MG Carbon Steel has everything you want except for the rubber handle.

u/tylerthehun · 1 pointr/everymanshouldknow

If you're looking for a plain and simple, fixed-blade knife, get a Mora. They're cheap as shit, razor sharp, and hold up damn well. Just keep them clean and oiled or they tend to rust.

If you're looking for a multi-tool type knife, go with Leatherman. They're more expensive, and the model I have is discontinued so I can't give you a recommendation, but they've got a version for everyone.

And listen to everyone telling you not to use a knife for self defense. The best tools for self defense are open eyes and fast feet. If you feel like you need something else, there are much better options than a knife.

u/ColonelBunkyMustard · 1 pointr/knifeclub

Get a pair of Mora Companions for $14 each and if you find out that you want something more then you can look for something more focused for your type of outdoors use. Most "survival" knives are lumped together in one category that makes it difficult to distinguish what their type design is for. KaBar Becker BK2 is basically a sharpened pry-bar. The thing is practically bomb-proof but its thick blade and obtuse grind means that it won't be very easy to cut with. Esee knives are also tough, and feature more functional grinds and and a great warranty, but 1095 steel they use is still going to be inferior in edge retention and edge stability to premium CPM-3v or Vanadis 4-Extra that you see on stuff like a GSO-4.7 or the ZT-0180. Then you have knives like Falknivens that use high-end stainless laminated steels which are price because the process for laminating is expensive and complicated and provides a stainless blade with some of the impact absorption that normally is attributed to carbon blades while still maintaining a harder edge. The reason I suggest a Mora is that for someone new to the fixed blade game, it's an option that won't break the bank and is also probably the highest value for the price of any fixed blade available. It's the Timex of knives. Not fancy but it works and is easy to replace if you lose or break(which is still pretty unlikely) it.

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=pd_sim_468_1?ie=UTF8&dpID=31RSOV7Bn4L&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR160%2C160_&refRID=0QT33JYXQS3ZD772EAFD

u/movdev · 1 pointr/preppers

well im not an expert in any of those categories. but ive been doing a lot of heavy research into bushcrafting (ie watching all the top dogs on youtube and studyign their gear) and ill tell you knives are ultra important. the one you have listed is seen as a joke though it is a good one but without the serrated edge. you should add the mora $10 knife thats on amazon right now. https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1480303187&sr=8-1&keywords=mora+knife

u/tjreicks · 1 pointr/CampingGear

morakniv is the way to go

Edit: they have other variations, but all of their knives are excellent for price points

u/thelastboyscout007 · 1 pointr/Survival

like u/kimste2 said for the money you really can't go wrong with a Mora. If you insist on a full tang I also have a couple of the Survivor HK-106 knives and have been very impressed considering the price, they also come with a fire starter.

Mora

Mora - Light My Fire

Survivor HK-106

u/kimste2 · 1 pointr/Survival

Not full tang but what I recommend: here

Full tang recommendation: here

u/jlbraun · 1 pointr/Survival

Mora. The end.

Survival knives are meant to be used, not babied.

u/psophis · 1 pointr/Bushcraft

With that one you are paying a large premium for the sheath. This has a thinner blade 2.5mm vs 3.2mm, but is arguably not as tough.

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40

u/Dont_Call_it_Dirt · 1 pointr/knifeclub
u/SlickSlims · 1 pointr/tea
u/lectures · 1 pointr/CampingGear

http://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40/

I like carbon steel blades, but I also like sharpening knives....

u/gandothesly · 1 pointr/Bushcraft

I own each of these. The Mora Bushcraft Triflex is what I carry in the field. The others are still fantastic.

Morakniv Companion

Morakniv Craftline HighQ

Mora Bushcraft Triflex (seems out of stock at Amazon)

u/TRTBrandonSchaub · 1 pointr/Bowyer

It's really important that you get a tool that's right for you. As you notice, I don't recommend planes, the other guy did.

I have reasons but they are mostly my own. For eexample I wouldn't recommend planes because they will only work when working on straight grain. The moment you encounter a knot, you'll be struggling. And on top of it, planes are expensive and only the expensive ones are worth getting. A cheap drawknife or rasp works fine but a cheap plane is gonna make you cry.

Now, you were saying you don't wanna file for 10 hours. I think you're a little bit mistaken about rasps. You will probably be surprised how quick a good, coarse rasp is. They can devour wood. The reason why you need a rasp is because there will be spots in wood where the grain is running off. A cutting tool will struggle to cut when grain runs off but a rasp will still work.

Alright, I recommend the following. Get yourself a rasp. I have no particular recommendation. Check out ebay and see if you can get one there. If not, get one from harbor freight. Look for a big one. Possibly these 4-in-1s.

Then, get a Morakniv knife. The company is famous for making high quality bushcrafting knives. These knives are absolutely amazing for working on wood.

And a knife is better than a plane or drawknife if you don't have a workbench. Just place the wood against the ground and your foot and use the knife.

On Amazon for $14, the companion. https://www.amazon.com/Morakniv-Companion-Outdoor-Military-4-1-Inch/dp/B004TNWD40

It's one of their cheapest and great. They come with a scandi grind. It's the best grind for woodworking and easiest to resharpen.

u/Kromulent · 1 pointr/knives

That sort of durability is a matter of blade thickness. The trade-off is that the thicker the blade, the less effectively they cut.

Thick heavy knives can be OK choppers and pry bars and even digging tools, and there's nothing wrong with that. Get a smaller knife, too, for cutting tasks, and you're all set.

A good argument can be made that a folding saw/small knife combination will get you further than a big knife/small knife combination, but that's a matter of personal style.

$25 or so will get you a Cold Steel kukri, which is essentially indestructable and which will chop pretty well. Another $15 for a Mora and you're golden.

u/brazilliandanny · 1 pointr/knives

It's a great knife for under $30. Strong blade, amazing grip on the handle.

Honestly Im not crazy about the fire starter as I keep plenty in my camping kit, so this will be redundant. But they didn't any Mora's available without it so I bought one anyway.

If you are looking for the fire starter/knife combo than it's great. other wise just get the basic Mora for half the price.

u/Peoples_Bropublic · 1 pointr/knives

A fixed blade would be perfect. Mora knives are excellent inexpensive knives that are quite commonly used for camping. They make some with wooden handles, composite handles, stainless blades, and carbon blades. My understanding is that their stainless blades don't hold an edge quite as well as their carbon blades, but carbon blades have the disadvantage of being susceptible to rust. So for an outdoor camping application where you're likely to be running around in dirt and mud and rain and lakes and streams and not likely to have a supply of rubbing alcohol, clean cloths, metal polish, and mineral oil, a stainless blade with composite handle would probably serve you best.

On the other hand, Cody London, that hippy dude from Dual Survival pretty much exclusively uses classic Moras with wooden handles and carbon blades. On the other other hand, he also doesn't wear pants or shoes.

Here are a few to look at.

u/Coffeeshopman · 1 pointr/Hamilton

The best knives and best prices for knives is on the internet. http://www.amazon.com/New-Swedish-Mil-Mora-Knife/dp/B004TNWD40

u/fromkentucky · 1 pointr/Bushcraft

I felt the same way before buying a Classic Mora. I have a number of other knives, including an Ontario RAT-5 and I use the Mora more than anything else (except for batoning, that's where the RAT-5 shines). The handle is far more comfortable than you would imagine, in a variety of holds. The Scandinavian grind makes for smooth, easy cutting and slicing and is simple to hone.

I'd really like to get an ESEE 4 (or a TOPS B.O.B. Hunter) because the RAT-5 is just more knife than I need and ESEE knives come with a lifetime warranty, but I'd still carry the Mora as a supplement. It's easily the best $15 I've ever spent.

u/BadHumanGoodGnome · 1 pointr/Survival

Here's the knife plus a couple of bucks, buy a few gallons of water and hope for good weather.

u/ScriptThat · 1 pointr/Survival

The cheapest one you can find on Amazon. Actually, just buy two.

Throw one in your trunk and forget about it until you need a knife one day.
Throw the other in your toolbox and use it for random jobs.

After a few months of using it you'll realize it's a great little thing and get another to take camping.

Edit:
I like this one because it's ~$8.50 and your fingers won't slip onto the blade under any circumstances. It's a little on the small side if you have big hands though.

For camping I like this one.

u/justsomeguy75 · 1 pointr/knifeclub

The Companion is probably their best seller. They have a Heavy Duty version with a heavier blade, and they have many different knives if you want something different. They are all very similar though, with the only real difference being carbon steel or stainless. They're all well made and worth your money.